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  • 1.
    Frisk, Mikael
    et al.
    Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology (IFM), Linköping University, Linköping, Sweden.
    Jonsson, Annie
    University of Skövde, School of Bioscience. University of Skövde, The Systems Biology Research Centre.
    Sellman, Stefan
    Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology (IFM), Linköping University, Linköping, Sweden.
    Flisberg, Patrik
    The Forestry Research Institute of Sweden, Uppsala, Sweden.
    Rönnqvist, Mikael
    Département de génie mécanique, Université Laval, Québec, Canada.
    Wennergren, Uno
    Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology (IFM), Linköping University, Linköping, Sweden.
    Route optimization as an instrument to improve animal welfare and economics in pre-slaughter logistics2018In: PLoS ONE, ISSN 1932-6203, E-ISSN 1932-6203, Vol. 13, no 3, article id e0193223Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Each year, more than three million animals are transported from farms to abattoirs in Sweden. Animal transport is related to economic and environmental costs and a negative impact on animal welfare. Time and the number of pick-up stops between farms and abattoirs are two key parameters for animal welfare. Both are highly dependent on efficient and qualitative transportation planning, which may be difficult if done manually. We have examined the benefits of using route optimization in cattle transportation planning. To simulate the effects of various planning time windows and transportation time regulations and number of pick-up stops along each route, we have used data that represent one year of cattle transport. Our optimization model is a development of a model used in forestry transport that solves a general pick-up and delivery vehicle routing problem. The objective is to minimize transportation costs. We have shown that the length of the planning time window has a significant impact on the animal transport time, the total driving time and the total distance driven; these parameters that will not only affect animal welfare but also affect the economy and environment in the pre-slaughter logistic chain. In addition, we have shown that changes in animal transportation regulations, such as minimizing the number of allowed pick-up stops on each route or minimizing animal transportation time, will have positive effects on animal welfare measured in transportation hours and number of pick-up stops. However, this leads to an increase in working time and driven distances, leading to higher transportation costs for the transport and negative environmental impact.

  • 2.
    Russo, Marika D.
    et al.
    Institute of Food Sciences, CNR, Avellino, Italy.
    Ahrens, Wolfgang
    Leibniz Institute for Prevention Research and Epidemiology BIPS, Bremen, Germany / Institute of Statistics, University of Bremen, Germany.
    De Henauw, Stefaan
    Department of Public Health, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences, Ghent University, Belgium.
    Eiben, Gabriele
    University of Skövde, School of Health and Education. University of Skövde, Health and Education.
    Hebestreit, Antje
    Leibniz Institute for Prevention Research and Epidemiology BIPS, Bremen, Germany.
    Kourides, Yannis
    Research and Education Institute of Child Health, Cyprus.
    Lissner, Lauren
    Section for Epidemiology and Social Medicine, Sahlgrenska Academy, University of Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Molnar, Denes
    Department of Paediatrics, University of Pécs, Hungary.
    Moreno, Luis A.
    GENUD (Growth, Exercise, Nutrition and Development) Research Group, University of Zaragoza, Spain.
    Pala, Valeria
    Epidemiology and Prevention Unit, Fondazione IRCSS Istituto Nazionale dei Tumori, Milan, Italy.
    Veidebaum, Toomas
    National Institute for Health Development, Tallinn, Estonia.
    Siani, Alfonso
    Institute of Food Sciences, CNR, Avellino, Italy.
    Russo, Paula
    Institute of Food Sciences, CNR, Avellino, Italy.
    The impact of adding sugars to milk and fruit on adiposity and diet quality in children: A cross-sectional and longitudinal analysis of the identification and prevention of dietary-and lifestyle-induced health effects in children and infants (IDEFICS) study2018In: Nutrients, ISSN 2072-6643, E-ISSN 2072-6643, Vol. 10, no 10, article id 1350Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Sugar, particularly as free sugars or sugar-sweetened beverages, significantly contributes to total energy intake, and, possibly, to increased body weight. Excessive consumption may be considered as a proxy of poor diet quality. However, no previous studies evaluated the association between the habit of adding sugars to “healthy” foods, such as plain milk and fresh fruit, and indicators of adiposity and/or dietary quality in children. To answer to these research questions, we Panalysed the European cohort of children participating in the IDEFICS study. Anthropometric variables, frequency of consumption of sugars added to milk and fruit (SAMF), and scores of adherence to healthy dietary pattern (HDAS) were assessed at baseline in 9829 children stratified according to age and sex. From this cohort, 6929 children were investigated again after two years follow-up. At baseline, a direct association between SAMF categories and adiposity indexes was observed only in children aged 6–<10 years, while the lower frequency of SAMF consumption was significantly associated with a higher HDAS. At the two year follow-up, children with higher baseline SAMF consumption showed significantly higher increases in all the anthropometric variables measured, with the exception of girls 6–<10 years old. The inverse association between SAMF categories and HDAS was still present at the two years follow-up in all age and sex groups. Our results suggest that the habit to adding sugars to foods that are commonly perceived as healthy may impact the adherence to healthy dietary guidelines and increase in adiposity risk as well. 

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