his.sePublications
Change search
Refine search result
1 - 6 of 6
CiteExportLink to result list
Permanent link
Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf
Rows per page
  • 5
  • 10
  • 20
  • 50
  • 100
  • 250
Sort
  • Standard (Relevance)
  • Author A-Ö
  • Author Ö-A
  • Title A-Ö
  • Title Ö-A
  • Publication type A-Ö
  • Publication type Ö-A
  • Issued (Oldest first)
  • Issued (Newest first)
  • Created (Oldest first)
  • Created (Newest first)
  • Last updated (Oldest first)
  • Last updated (Newest first)
  • Disputation date (earliest first)
  • Disputation date (latest first)
  • Standard (Relevance)
  • Author A-Ö
  • Author Ö-A
  • Title A-Ö
  • Title Ö-A
  • Publication type A-Ö
  • Publication type Ö-A
  • Issued (Oldest first)
  • Issued (Newest first)
  • Created (Oldest first)
  • Created (Newest first)
  • Last updated (Oldest first)
  • Last updated (Newest first)
  • Disputation date (earliest first)
  • Disputation date (latest first)
Select
The maximal number of hits you can export is 250. When you want to export more records please use the Create feeds function.
  • 1.
    Ayukekbong, James A.
    et al.
    Department of Infectious Diseases/Section of Clinical Virology, Institute of Biomedicine, University of Gothenburg, Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Andersson, M. E.
    Department of Infectious Diseases/Section of Clinical Virology, Institute of Biomedicine, University of Gothenburg, Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Vansarla, Goutham
    University of Skövde, School of Bioscience. University of Skövde, The Systems Biology Research Centre.
    Tah, F.
    Camyaids Institute of Laboratory Diagnosis and Clinical Research, Douala, Cameroon.
    Nkuo-Akenji, T.
    Faculty of Science Diagnostic Laboratory, University of Buea, Buea, Cameroon.
    Lindh, M.
    Department of Infectious Diseases/Section of Clinical Virology, Institute of Biomedicine, University of Gothenburg, Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Bergström, T.
    Department of Infectious Diseases/Section of Clinical Virology, Institute of Biomedicine, University of Gothenburg, Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Monitoring of seasonality of norovirus and other enteric viruses in Cameroon by real-time PCR: an exploratory study2014In: Epidemiology and Infection, ISSN 0950-2688, E-ISSN 1469-4409, Vol. 142, no 7, p. 1393-1402Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    We studied the seasonal fluctuation of norovirus and other enteric viruses in Cameroon. Two hundred participants aged between 1 and 69 years were prospectively followed up. Each participant provided monthly faecal samples over a 12-month period. A total of 2484 samples were tested using multiplex real-time PCR assay for the detection of norovirus, rotavirus and enterovirus. The effect of weather variables and risk factors were analysed by Pearson correlation and bivariate analysis. Overall, enterovirus was the most commonly detected virus (216% of specimens), followed by norovirus (39%) and rotavirus (04%). Norovirus and enterovirus were detected throughout the year with a peak of norovirus detection at the beginning of the rainy season and a significant alternation of circulation of norovirus genogroups from one month to the next. Age <5 years and consumption of tap water were risk factors for norovirus infection. Better understanding of factors influencing transmission and seasonality may provide insights into the relationship between physical environment and risk of infection for these viruses.

  • 2.
    Behnsen, Pia
    et al.
    Department of Clinical, Neuro- and Developmental Psychology, Amsterdam Public Health Research Institute, Vrije Universiteit Amsterdam, Netherlands.
    Buil, Joanne M.
    Department of Clinical, Neuro- and Developmental Psychology, Amsterdam Public Health Research Institute, Vrije Universiteit Amsterdam, Netherlands.
    Koot, Susanne
    Department of Clinical, Neuro- and Developmental Psychology, Amsterdam Public Health Research Institute, Vrije Universiteit Amsterdam, Netherlands.
    Huizink, Anja
    University of Skövde, School of Health and Education. University of Skövde, Health and Education. Department of Clinical, Neuro- and Developmental Psychology, Amsterdam Public Health Research Institute, Vrije Universiteit Amsterdam, Netherlands.
    Van Lier, Poul
    Department of Clinical, Neuro- and Developmental Psychology, Amsterdam Public Health Research Institute, Vrije Universiteit Amsterdam, Netherlands.
    Heart rate (variability) and the association between relational peer victimization and internalizing symptoms in elementary school children2019In: Development and psychopathology (Print), ISSN 0954-5794, E-ISSN 1469-2198, p. 1-9, article id 29 aprilArticle in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Relational victimization typically emerges first during the elementary school period, and has been associated with increased levels of internalizing symptoms in children. Individual differences in autonomic nervous system functioning have been suggested as a potential factor linking social stressors and internalizing symptoms. The aim of this study was therefore to examine whether heart rate and heart rate variability mediated the association between relational victimization and internalizing symptoms in 373 mainstream elementary school children. Children were assessed in 2015 (T 0 ; Grades 3-5, M age = 9.78 years, 51% boys) and reassessed in 2016 (T 1 ). Heart rate and heart rate variability were assessed during a regular school day at T 1 . A multi-informant (teacher and peer report) cross-time measure of relational victimization, and a multi-informant (self- and teacher report) measure of internalizing problems at T 1 was used. Results showed that heart rate variability, but not heart rate, mediated the association between relational victimization and internalizing symptoms. This study provides tentative support that in children from a general population sample, a psychobiological factor may mediate the association of relational victimization with internalizing symptoms.

  • 3.
    Hammad, Yasser A.
    et al.
    Department of Anesthesia, ICU and Perioperative Medicine, Hamad Medical Corporation, Doha, Qatar / Weill Cornell Medicine Qatar, Doha, Qatar.
    El Ansari, Walid
    University of Skövde, School of Health and Education. University of Skövde, Health and Education. Department of Surgery, Hamad General Hospital, Doha, Qatar / College of Medicine, Qatar University, Doha, Qatar.
    Shallik, Nabil A.
    Department of Anesthesia, ICU and Perioperative Medicine, Hamad Medical Corporation, Doha, Qatar / Weill Cornell Medicine Qatar, Doha, Qatar / Department of Anesthesia and SICU, Tanta University, Egypt.
    Sadek, Monzer H.
    Sidra Medicine, Doha, Qatar.
    Feki, Abdellatif M.
    Department of Anesthesia, ICU and Perioperative Medicine, Hamad Medical Corporation, Doha, Qatar.
    Bedhiaf, Kaouther
    Department of Anesthesia, ICU and Perioperative Medicine, Hamad Medical Corporation, Doha, Qatar.
    Khecharem, Fekria
    Department of Anesthesia, ICU and Perioperative Medicine, Hamad Medical Corporation, Doha, Qatar.
    Shehata, Walid M.
    Department of Transplant Surgery, Hamad General Hospital, Doha, Qatar.
    Bali, Souad
    Department of Anesthesia, ICU and Perioperative Medicine, Hamad Medical Corporation, Doha, Qatar.
    Muhammed, Abdulkader
    Department of Anesthesia, ICU and Perioperative Medicine, Hamad Medical Corporation, Doha, Qatar.
    Quality improvement can decrease blood delivery turnaround time: Evidence from a single tertiary-care academic medical center2018In: Middle East Journal of Anesthesiology, ISSN 0544-0440, Vol. 25, no 3, p. 273-281Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Context: Blood transfusion services are critical to any hospitals’ functioning, and timely blood/ component therapy resuscitation is lifesaving. Yet, few blood delivery turnaround time (TAT) studies have been undertaken. Aims: We assessed blood delivery TAT at our institution before and after implementing an intervention. Settings and Design: This before-after study assessed blood delivery TAT at our institution at baseline (first audit, December 2015 - February 2016); analyzed the causes of any delays and implemented a multipronged organizational, educational and operational remedial actions for risk mitigation for 3 months, aiming to shorten the blood delivery TAT; and then 9 months later assessed the blood delivery TAT again (second audit, November 2017 - December 2017). Methods and Material: For each of the two audits, we assessed three indices that comprise TAT: Response time (time from doctor’s request until blood is ready for collection, T1); processing time (time from the arrival of technician to blood bank and start of paperwork processing at the blood bank’s front desk until actual collection of the blood, T2); and, Transport time (time from blood bank to arrival to operating theatre, T3). Statistical analysis used: The observed proportions for categorical variables were reported as percentage and compared using Chi square test. Results: After implementing the remedial actions, the second audit confirmed considerable improvements across all three components that comprise the blood TAT. The transport time significantly decreased from an initial majority of > 15 mins duration, to a majority of < 15 mins transport time after the second audit; there was a 50% improvement in 30 mins response time; and the percentage of requests processed in < 10 mins were significantly higher after the second audit. Conclusions: Our program and its findings in terms of much improved blood delivery TAT after implementing this quality improvement approach represent an appropriate and effective solution to the challenge of making blood available fast enough to meet true hemorrhagic emergencies.

  • 4.
    Kivimäki, Mika
    et al.
    UCL, Dept Epidemiol & Publ Hlth, London, United Kingdom / Univ Helsinki, Fac Med, Clinicum, Helsinki, Finland / Finnish Inst Occupat Hlth, Helsinki, Finland.
    Nyberg, Solja T.
    Univ Helsinki, Fac Med, Clinicum, Helsinki, Finland.
    Batty, G. David
    UCL, Dept Epidemiol & Publ Hlth, London, United Kingdom / Univ Edinburgh, Ctr Cognit Ageing & Cognit Epidemiol, Edinburgh, Scotland, United Kingdom.
    Kawachi, Ichiro
    Harvard TH Chan Sch Publ Hlth, Dept Social & Behav Sci, Boston, USA.
    Jokela, Markus
    Univ Helsinki, Fac Med, Dept Psychol & Logoped, Helsinki, Finland.
    Alfredsson, Lars
    Stockholm Cty Council, Ctr Occupat & Environm Med, Stockholm, Sweden / Karolinska Inst, Inst Environm Med, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Bjorner, Jakob B.
    Natl Res Ctr Working Environm, Copenhagen, Denmark.
    Borritz, Marianne
    Bispebjerg Univ Hosp Copenhagen, Dept Occupat & Environm Med, Copenhagen, Denmark.
    Burr, Hermann
    Fed Inst Occupat Safety & Hlth BAuA, Berlin, Germany.
    Dragano, Nico
    Univ Düsseldorf, Inst Med Sociol, Fac Med, Düsseldorf, Germany.
    Fransson, Eleonor I.
    Jönköping Univ, Sch Hlth & Welf, Jönköping, Sweden / Stockholm Univ, Stress Res Inst, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Heikkilä, Katriina
    London Sch Hyg & Trop Med, Dept Hlth Serv Res & Policy, London, United Kingdom / Royal Coll Surgeons England, Clin Effectiveness Unit, London, United Kingdom.
    Knutsson, Anders
    Mid Sweden Univ, Dept Hlth Sci, Sundsvall, Sweden.
    Koskenvuo, Markku
    Univ Helsinki, Fac Med, Clinicum, Helsinki, Finland.
    Kumari, Meena
    Univ Essex, Inst Social & Econ Res, Wivenhoe Pk, Colchester, Essex, England, United Kingdom.
    Madsen, Ida E. H.
    Natl Res Ctr Working Environm, Copenhagen, Denmark.
    Nielsen, Martin L.
    AS3 Co, AS3 Employment, Viby, Denmark.
    Nordin, Maria
    Stockholm Univ, Stress Res Inst, Stockholm, Sweden / Umeå Univ, Dept Psychol, Umeå, Sweden.
    Oksanen, Tuula
    Finnish Inst Occupat Hlth, Helsinki, Finland.
    Pejtersen, Jan H.
    Danish Natl Ctr Social Res, Copenhagen, Denmark.
    Pentti, Jaana
    Univ Helsinki, Fac Med, Clinicum, Helsinki, Finland.
    Rugulies, Reiner
    Natl Res Ctr Working Environm, Copenhagen, Denmark / Univ Copenhagen, Dept Publ Hlth, Copenhagen, Denmark / Univ Copenhagen, Dept Psychol, Copenhagen, Denmark.
    Salo, Paula
    Finnish Inst Occupat Hlth, Helsinki, Finland / Univ Turku, Dept Psychol, Turku, Finland.
    Shipley, Martin J.
    UCL, Dept Epidemiol & Publ Hlth, London, England, United Kingdom.
    Suominen, Sakari
    University of Skövde, School of Health and Education. University of Skövde, Health and Education. Univ Turku, Dept Publ Hlth, Turku, Finland.
    Theorell, Töres
    Stockholm Univ, Stress Res Inst, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Vahtera, Jussi
    Univ Turku, Dept Publ Hlth, Turku, Finland / Turku Univ Hosp, Turku, Finland.
    Westerholm, Peter
    Uppsala Univ, Dept Med Sci, Akad Sjukhuset, Uppsala, Sweden.
    Westerlund, Hugo
    Stockholm Univ, Stress Res Inst, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Steptoe, Andrew
    UCL, Dept Epidemiol & Publ Hlth, London, England, United Kingdom.
    Singh-Manoux, Archana
    Hop Paul Brousse, INSERM, U1018, Ctr Res Epidemiol & Populat Hlth, Villejuif, France.
    Hamer, Mark
    Loughborough Univ Technol, Natl Ctr Sport & Exercise Med, Sch Sport Exercise & Hlth Sci, Loughborough, Leics, England, United Kingdom.
    Ferrie, Jane E.
    Univ Bristol, Sch Social & Community Med, Bristol, Avon, England, United Kingdom.
    Virtanen, Marianna
    Finnish Inst Occupat Hlth, Helsinki, Finland.
    Tabak, Adam G.
    UCL, Dept Epidemiol & Publ Hlth, London, England, United Kingdom / Semmelweis Univ, Fac Med, Dept Med 1, Budapest, Hungary.
    Long working hours as a risk factor for atrial fibrillation: a multi-cohort study2017In: European Heart Journal, ISSN 0195-668X, E-ISSN 1522-9645, Vol. 38, no 34, p. 2621-2628Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Aims Studies suggest that people who work long hours are at increased risk of stroke, but the association of long working hours with atrial fibrillation, the most common cardiac arrhythmia and a risk factor for stroke, is unknown. We examined the risk of atrial fibrillation in individuals working long hours (>= 55 per week) and those working standard 35-40 h/week. Methods and results In this prospective multi-cohort study from the Individual-Participant-Data Meta-analysis in Working Populations (IPD-Work) Consortium, the study population was 85 494 working men and women (mean age 43.4 years) with no recorded atrial fibrillation. Working hours were assessed at study baseline (1991-2004). Mean follow-up for incident atrial fibrillation was 10 years and cases were defined using data on electrocardiograms, hospital records, drug reimbursement registers, and death certificates. We identified 1061 new cases of atrial fibrillation (10-year cumulative incidence 12.4 per 1000). After adjustment for age, sex and socioeconomic status, individuals working long hours had a 1.4-fold increased risk of atrial fibrillation compared with those working standard hours (hazard ratio = 1.42, 95% CI= 1.13-1.80, P= 0.003). There was no significant heterogeneity between the cohort-specific effect estimates (I-2= 0%, P = 0.66) and the finding remained after excluding participants with coronary heart disease or stroke at baseline or during the follow-up (N= 2006, hazard ratio= 1.36, 95% CI= 1.05-1.76, P = 0.0180). Adjustment for potential confounding factors, such as obesity, risky alcohol use and high blood pressure, had little impact on this association. Conclusion Individuals who worked long hours were more likely to develop atrial fibrillation than those working standard hours.

  • 5.
    Magnusson Hanson, Linda L.
    et al.
    Stress Research Institute, Stockholm University, Sweden.
    Rod, Naja Hulvej
    Section of Epidemiology, Department of Public Health, University of Copenhagen, Social Medicine Section, Copenhagen, Denmark / National Research Centre for the Working Environment, Copenhagen, Denmark.
    Vahtera, Jussi
    Department of Public Health, University of Turku, Finland / Turku University Hospital, Finland.
    Peristera, Paraskevi
    Stress Research Institute, Stockholm University, Sweden.
    Pentti, Jaana
    Department of Public Health, University of Turku, Finland.
    Rugulies, Reiner
    Section of Epidemiology, Department of Public Health, University of Copenhagen, Social Medicine Section, Copenhagen, Denmark / National Research Centre for the Working Environment, Copenhagen, Denmark / Department of Psychology, University of Copenhagen, Denmark.
    Madsen, Ida Elisabeth Huitfeldt
    National Research Centre for the Working Environment, Copenhagen, Denmark.
    Lamontagne, Anthony D.
    McCaughey Centre, Centre for Health Equity, Melbourne School of Population and Global Health, University of Melbourne, Melbourne, Victoria, Australia / Population Health Strategic Research Centre, School of Health and Social Development, Deakin University, Burwood, Victoria, Australia.
    Milner, Allison
    Disability and Health Unit, Centre for Health Equity, Melbourne School of Population and Global Health, University of Melbourne, Victoria, Australia.
    Lange, Theis
    Section of Biostatistics, Department of Public Health, University of Copenhagen, Denmark.
    Suominen, Sakari
    University of Skövde, School of Health and Education. University of Skövde, Health and Education. Department of Public Health, University of Turku, Finland.
    Stenholm, Sari
    Department of Public Health, University of Turku, Finland.
    Xu, Tianwei
    Section of Epidemiology, Department of Public Health, University of Copenhagen, Social Medicine Section, Copenhagen, Denmark / National Research Centre for the Working Environment, Copenhagen, Denmark.
    Kivimäki, Mika
    Clinicum, Faculty of Medicine, University of Helsinki, Finland / Department of Epidemiology and Public Health, University College London, UK.
    Westerlund, Hugo
    Stress Research Institute, Stockholm University, Sweden.
    Multicohort study of change in job strain, poor mental health and incident cardiometabolic disease2019In: Occupational and Environmental Medicine, ISSN 1351-0711, E-ISSN 1470-7926, Vol. 76, p. 785-792Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Objectives: Several recent large-scale studies have indicated a prospective association between job strain and coronary heart disease, stroke and diabetes. Job strain is also associated with poorer mental health, a risk factor for cardiometabolic disease. This study investigates the prospective relationships between change in job strain, poor mental health and cardiometabolic disease, and whether poor mental health is a potential mediator of the relationship between job strain and cardiometabolic disease. Methods: We used data from five cohort studies from Australia, Finland, Sweden and UK, including 47 757 men and women. Data on job strain across two measurements 1-5 years apart (time 1 (T1)-time 2 (T2)) were used to define increase or decrease in job strain. Poor mental health (symptoms in the top 25% of the distribution of the scales) at T2 was considered a potential mediator in relation to incident cardiometabolic disease, including cardiovascular disease and diabetes, following T2 for a mean of 5-18 years. Results: An increase in job strain was associated with poor mental health (HR 1.56, 95% CI 1.38 to 1.76), and a decrease in job strain was associated with lower risk in women (HR 0.70, 95% CI 0.60-0.84). However, no clear association was observed between poor mental health and incident cardiometabolic disease (HR 1.08, 95% CI 0.96-1.23), nor between increase (HR 1.01, 95% CI 0.90-1.14) and decrease (HR 1.08, 95% CI 0.96-1.22) in job strain and cardiometabolic disease. Conclusions: The results did not support that change in job strain is a risk factor for cardiometabolic disease and yielded no support for poor mental health as a mediator.

  • 6.
    Paul, Sudip Kumar
    et al.
    Department of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, University of Rajshahi, Bangladesh / Department of Applied Nutrition and Food Technology, Islamic University, Kushtia, Bangladesh.
    Islam, Md Shofikul
    Department of Applied Nutrition and Food Technology, Islamic University, Kushtia, Bangladesh.
    Hasibuzzaman, M. M.
    Department of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, University of Rajshahi, Bangladesh.
    Hossain, Faruk
    Department of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, University of Rajshahi, Bangladesh.
    Anjum, Adiba
    Department of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, University of Rajshahi, Bangladesh.
    Saud, Zahangir Alam
    Department of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, University of Rajshahi, Bangladesh.
    Haque, Md Mominul
    Department of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, University of Rajshahi, Bangladesh.
    Sultana, Papia
    Department of Statistics, University of Rajshahi, Bangladesh.
    Haque, Azizul
    Department of Microbiology and Immunology, Medical University of South Carolina, Charleston, United States.
    Andric, Klara Biljana
    University of Skövde, School of Bioscience.
    Rahman, Aminur
    The Life Science Center, School of Science and Technology, Örebro University, Örebro, SE 701 82, Sweden.
    Karim, M. Rezaul
    Department of Applied Nutrition and Food Technology, Islamic University, Bangladesh.
    Siddique, Abu Eabrahim
    Department of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, University of Rajshahi, Bangladesh.
    Karim, Yeasir
    Department of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, University of Rajshahi, Bangladesh.
    Rahman, Mizanur
    Department of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, University of Rajshahi, Bangladesh.
    Miyataka, Hideki
    Laboratory of Molecular Nutrition and Toxicology, Faculty of Pharmaceutical Sciences, Tokushima Bunri University, Tokushima, Japan.
    Xin, Lian
    Laboratory of Molecular Nutrition and Toxicology, Faculty of Pharmaceutical Sciences, Tokushima Bunri University, Japan.
    Himeno, Seiichiro
    Laboratory of Molecular Nutrition and Toxicology, Faculty of Pharmaceutical Sciences, Tokushima Bunri University, Japan.
    Hossain, Khaled
    Department of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, University of Rajshahi, Bangladesh.
    Higher risk of hyperglycemia with greater susceptibility in females in chronic arsenic-exposed individuals in Bangladesh2019In: Science of the Total Environment, ISSN 0048-9697, E-ISSN 1879-1026, Vol. 668, p. 1004-1012Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Arsenic (As) toxicity and diabetes mellitus (DM) are emerging public health concerns worldwide. Although exposure to high levels of As has been associated with DM, whether there is also an association between low and moderate As exposure and DM remains unclear. We explored the dose-dependent association between As exposure levels and hyperglycemia, with special consideration of the impact of demographic variables, in 641 subjects from rural Bangladesh. The total study participants were divided into three groups depending on their levels of exposure to As in drinking water (low, moderate and high exposure groups). Prevalence of hyperglycemia, including impaired glucose tolerance (IGT) and DM was significantly associated with the subjects’ drinking water arsenic levels. Almost all exposure metrics (As levels in the subjects’ drinking water, hair and nails) showed dose-dependent associations with the risk of hyperglycemia, IGT and DM. Among the variables considered, sex, age, and BMI were found to be associated with higher risk of hyperglycemia, IGT and DM. In sex-stratified analyses, As exposure showed a clearer pattern of dose-dependent risk for hyperglycemia in females than males. Finally, drinking water containing low-to-moderate levels of As (50.01–150 μg/L) was found to confer a greater risk of hyperglycemia than safe drinking water (As ≤10 μg/L). Thus the results suggested that As exposure was dose-dependently associated with hyperglycemia, especially in females. © 2019 Elsevier B.V.

1 - 6 of 6
CiteExportLink to result list
Permanent link
Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf