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  • 1.
    Adawi, Rahim
    University of Skövde, School of Engineering Science.
    Preventing fatal effects of overworking: Product design solution2018Independent thesis Basic level (university diploma), 20 credits / 30 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [en]

    “Overworking to death” is a phenomenon that has been noticeable in developing countries. The cause of death is mainly through ischemic strokes. While the victims’ occupations differed, they all shared a common characteristic, being positioned in a sedentary work, ranging from IT workers to doctors. This project’s aim was to develop a product that prevented or decreased the strokes that derived from sedentary overwork. This was mainly tackled by preventing one of the three causes of developing blood props, slowed blood flow. In order to gather rich data of the phenomenon, a qualitative study was conducted in China, during two months. By doing an extensive structured sampling, information rich data could be gathered during a short period of time. Data were derived from observations, questionnaires and an interview, which then was interpreted to customer needs and the final product specification. The final product became a trouser with an in built dynamic compression mechanic, that can compress the veins mostly during sitting activities, in order to prevent blood stasis. The compression mechanic works like the Chinese finger trap; compressing the calves while sitting and stretching the legs forward. It is made only out of polysaccharides fibres; cotton and corn.

  • 2.
    Islam, Khairul
    et al.
    Rajshahi Univ, Dept Biochem & Mol Biol, Rajshahi 6205, Bangladesh .
    Haque, Abedul
    Rajshahi Univ, Dept Biochem & Mol Biol, Rajshahi 6205, Bangladesh .
    Karim, Rezaul
    Rajshahi Univ, Dept Biochem & Mol Biol, Rajshahi 6205, Bangladesh / Islamic Univ, Dept Appl Nutr & Food Technol, Kushtia 7003, Bangladesh / UMP, FIST, Gambang 26300, Pahang, Malaysia .
    Fajol, Abul
    Rajshahi Univ, Dept Biochem & Mol Biol, Rajshahi 6205, Bangladesh .
    Hossain, Ekhtear
    Rajshahi Univ, Dept Biochem & Mol Biol, Rajshahi 6205, Bangladesh .
    Salam, Kazi Abdus
    Rajshahi Univ, Dept Biochem & Mol Biol, Rajshahi 6205, Bangladesh .
    Ali, Nurshad
    Rajshahi Univ, Dept Biochem & Mol Biol, Rajshahi 6205, Bangladesh .
    Saud, Zahangir Alam
    Rajshahi Univ, Dept Biochem & Mol Biol, Rajshahi 6205, Bangladesh .
    Rahman, Matiar
    Rajshahi Univ, Dept Biochem & Mol Biol, Rajshahi 6205, Bangladesh .
    Rahman, Mashiur
    Rajshahi Univ, Dept Biochem & Mol Biol, Rajshahi 6205, Bangladesh .
    Sultana, Papia
    Rajshahi Univ, Dept Stat, Rajshahi 6205, Bangladesh .
    Hossain, Mostaque
    Bangladesh Inst Res & Rehabil Diabet Endocrine &, Dept Med, Dhaka, Bangladesh .
    Akhand, Anwarul Azim
    Univ Dhaka, Dept Genet Engn & Biotechnol, Dhaka 1000, Bangladesh .
    Mandal, Abul
    University of Skövde, School of Life Sciences. University of Skövde, The Systems Biology Research Centre.
    Miyataka, Hideki
    Tokushima Bunri Univ, Lab Mol Nutr & Toxicol, Fac Pharmaceut Sci, Tokushima 7708514, Japan.
    Himeno, Seiichiro
    Tokushima Bunri Univ, Lab Mol Nutr & Toxicol, Fac Pharmaceut Sci, Tokushima 7708514, Japan.
    Hossain, Khaled
    Rajshahi Univ, Dept Biochem & Mol Biol, Rajshahi 6205, Bangladesh .
    Dose-response relationship between arsenic exposure and the serum enzymes for liver function tests in the individuals exposed to arsenic: a cross sectional study in Bangladesh2011In: Environmental health, ISSN 1476-069X, E-ISSN 1476-069X, Vol. 10, p. 64-Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: Chronic arsenic exposure has been shown to cause liver damage. However, serum hepatic enzyme activity as recognized on liver function tests (LFTs) showing a dose-response relationship with arsenic exposure has not yet been clearly documented. The aim of our study was to investigate the dose-response relationship between arsenic exposure and major serum enzyme marker activity associated with LFTs in the population living in arsenic-endemic areas in Bangladesh. Methods: A total of 200 residents living in arsenic-endemic areas in Bangladesh were selected as study subjects. Arsenic concentrations in the drinking water, hair and nails were measured by Inductively Coupled Plasma Mass Spectroscopy (ICP-MS). The study subjects were stratified into quartile groups as follows, based on concentrations of arsenic in the drinking water, as well as in subjects' hair and nails: lowest, low, medium and high. The serum hepatic enzyme activities of alkaline phosphatase (ALP), aspartate transaminase (AST) and alanine transaminase (ALT) were then assayed. Results: Arsenic concentrations in the subjects' hair and nails were positively correlated with arsenic levels in the drinking water. As regards the exposure-response relationship with arsenic in the drinking water, the respective activities of ALP, AST and ALT were found to be significantly increased in the high-exposure groups compared to the lowest-exposure groups before and after adjustments were made for different covariates. With internal exposure markers (arsenic in hair and nails), the ALP, AST and ALT activity profiles assumed a similar shape of dose-response relationship, with very few differences seen in the higher groups compared to the lowest group, most likely due to the temporalities of exposure metrics. Conclusions: The present study demonstrated that arsenic concentrations in the drinking water were strongly correlated with arsenic concentrations in the subjects' hair and nails. Further, this study revealed a novel exposure- and dose- response relationship between arsenic exposure metrics and serum hepatic enzyme activity. Elevated serum hepatic enzyme activities in the higher exposure gradients provided new insights into arsenic-induced liver toxicity that might be helpful for the early prognosis of arsenic-induced liver diseases.

  • 3.
    Liu, Yu
    et al.
    University of Skövde, School of Engineering Science. University of Skövde, The Virtual Systems Research Centre.
    Syberfeldt, Anna
    University of Skövde, School of Engineering Science. University of Skövde, The Virtual Systems Research Centre.
    Strand, Mattias
    University of Skövde, School of Engineering Science. University of Skövde, The Virtual Systems Research Centre.
    Review of simulation-based life cycle assessment in manufacturing industry2019In: Production & Manufacturing Research, ISSN 2169-3277, Vol. 7, no 1, p. 490-502Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The manufacturing industry has a duty to minimize its environmental impact, and an increasing body of legislation mandates environmental impact evaluations from a life cycle perspective to prevent burden shift. The manufacturing industry is increasing its use of computer-based simulations to optimize production processes. In recent years, several published studies have combined simulations with life cycle assessments (LCAs) to evaluate and minimize the environmental impact of production activities. Still, current knowledge of simulations conducted for LCAs is rather disjointed. This paper accordingly reviews the literature covering simulation-based LCAs of production processes. The results of the review and cross-comparison of papers are structured in terms of seven elements in line with the ISO standard definition of LCA and report the strengths and limitations of the reviewed studies. © 2019, © 2019 The Author(s). Published by Informa UK Limited, trading as Taylor & Francis Group.

  • 4.
    Nawani, Neelu
    et al.
    Microbial Diversity Research Centre, Dr D Y Patil Biotechnology and Bioinformatics Institute, Dr D Y Patil Vidyapeeth, Pune, India.
    Rahman, Aminur
    University of Skövde, School of Bioscience. University of Skövde, The Systems Biology Research Centre.
    Nahar, Noor
    University of Skövde, School of Bioscience. University of Skövde, The Systems Biology Research Centre.
    Saha, Anandakumar
    Department of Zoology, University of Rajshahi, Bangladesh.
    Kapadnis, Balasaheb
    Department of Microbiology, Savitribai Phule University of Pune, Pune, India.
    Mandal, Abul
    University of Skövde, School of Bioscience. University of Skövde, The Systems Biology Research Centre.
    Status of metal pollution in rivers flowing through urban settlements at Pune and its effect on resident microflora2016In: Biologia (Bratislava), ISSN 0006-3088, E-ISSN 1336-9563, Vol. 71, no 5, p. 494-507Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This study illustrates the sporadic distribution of metals in fluvial systems flowing from catchments to urban settlements. This is a detailed study prognosticating the deteriorating quality of rivers at specific locations due to metal pollution. Heavy metals like cadmium, lead, nickel and mercury are prominent in industrial sector. Contour plots derived using spatial and temporal data could determine the focal point of metal pollution and its gradation. Metal values recorded were cadmium 157 mg/L, lead 47 mg/L, nickel 61 mg/L and mercury 0.56 mg/L. Prokaryote diversity was less in polluted water and it harboured metal tolerant bacteria, which were isolated from these polluted sites. Actinomycetes like Streptomyces and several other bacteria like Stenotrophomonas and Pseudomonas isolated from the polluted river sites exhibited changes in morphology in presence of heavy metals. This stress response offered remedial measures as Streptomyces were effective in biosorption of cadmium, nickel and lead and Stenotrophomonas and Pseudomonas were effective in the bioaccumulation of lead and cadmium. The amount of 89 mg of lead and 106 mg of nickel could be adsorbed on one gram of Streptomyces biomass-based biosorbent. Such biological remedies can be further explored to remove metals from polluted sites and from metal contaminated industrial or waste waters.

  • 5.
    Paul, Sudip Kumar
    et al.
    Department of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, University of Rajshahi, Bangladesh / Department of Applied Nutrition and Food Technology, Islamic University, Kushtia, Bangladesh.
    Islam, Md Shofikul
    Department of Applied Nutrition and Food Technology, Islamic University, Kushtia, Bangladesh.
    Hasibuzzaman, M. M.
    Department of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, University of Rajshahi, Bangladesh.
    Hossain, Faruk
    Department of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, University of Rajshahi, Bangladesh.
    Anjum, Adiba
    Department of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, University of Rajshahi, Bangladesh.
    Saud, Zahangir Alam
    Department of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, University of Rajshahi, Bangladesh.
    Haque, Md Mominul
    Department of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, University of Rajshahi, Bangladesh.
    Sultana, Papia
    Department of Statistics, University of Rajshahi, Bangladesh.
    Haque, Azizul
    Department of Microbiology and Immunology, Medical University of South Carolina, Charleston, United States.
    Andric, Klara Biljana
    University of Skövde, School of Bioscience.
    Rahman, Aminur
    The Life Science Center, School of Science and Technology, Örebro University, Örebro, SE 701 82, Sweden.
    Karim, M. Rezaul
    Department of Applied Nutrition and Food Technology, Islamic University, Bangladesh.
    Siddique, Abu Eabrahim
    Department of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, University of Rajshahi, Bangladesh.
    Karim, Yeasir
    Department of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, University of Rajshahi, Bangladesh.
    Rahman, Mizanur
    Department of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, University of Rajshahi, Bangladesh.
    Miyataka, Hideki
    Laboratory of Molecular Nutrition and Toxicology, Faculty of Pharmaceutical Sciences, Tokushima Bunri University, Tokushima, Japan.
    Xin, Lian
    Laboratory of Molecular Nutrition and Toxicology, Faculty of Pharmaceutical Sciences, Tokushima Bunri University, Japan.
    Himeno, Seiichiro
    Laboratory of Molecular Nutrition and Toxicology, Faculty of Pharmaceutical Sciences, Tokushima Bunri University, Japan.
    Hossain, Khaled
    Department of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, University of Rajshahi, Bangladesh.
    Higher risk of hyperglycemia with greater susceptibility in females in chronic arsenic-exposed individuals in Bangladesh2019In: Science of the Total Environment, ISSN 0048-9697, E-ISSN 1879-1026, Vol. 668, p. 1004-1012Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Arsenic (As) toxicity and diabetes mellitus (DM) are emerging public health concerns worldwide. Although exposure to high levels of As has been associated with DM, whether there is also an association between low and moderate As exposure and DM remains unclear. We explored the dose-dependent association between As exposure levels and hyperglycemia, with special consideration of the impact of demographic variables, in 641 subjects from rural Bangladesh. The total study participants were divided into three groups depending on their levels of exposure to As in drinking water (low, moderate and high exposure groups). Prevalence of hyperglycemia, including impaired glucose tolerance (IGT) and DM was significantly associated with the subjects’ drinking water arsenic levels. Almost all exposure metrics (As levels in the subjects’ drinking water, hair and nails) showed dose-dependent associations with the risk of hyperglycemia, IGT and DM. Among the variables considered, sex, age, and BMI were found to be associated with higher risk of hyperglycemia, IGT and DM. In sex-stratified analyses, As exposure showed a clearer pattern of dose-dependent risk for hyperglycemia in females than males. Finally, drinking water containing low-to-moderate levels of As (50.01–150 μg/L) was found to confer a greater risk of hyperglycemia than safe drinking water (As ≤10 μg/L). Thus the results suggested that As exposure was dose-dependently associated with hyperglycemia, especially in females. © 2019 Elsevier B.V.

  • 6.
    Salgaonkar, Neeta A.
    et al.
    Microbial Diversity Research Centre, Dr D Y Patil Biotechnology and Bioinformatics Institute, Dr D Y Patil Vidyapeeth, Pune, India.
    Thakare, Prasad M.
    Microbial Diversity Research Centre, Dr D Y Patil Biotechnology and Bioinformatics Institute, Dr D Y Patil Vidyapeeth, Pune, India.
    Junnarkar, Manisha V.
    Microbial Diversity Research Centre, Dr D Y Patil Biotechnology and Bioinformatics Institute, Dr D Y Patil Vidyapeeth, Pune, India.
    Kapadnis, Balasaheb P.
    Department of Microbiology, Savitribai Phule University of Pune, Pune, India.
    Mandal, Abul
    University of Skövde, School of Bioscience. University of Skövde, The Systems Biology Research Centre.
    Eriksson, Cecilia
    University of Skövde, School of Health and Education. University of Skövde, Health and Education.
    Neelu, Nawani N.
    Microbial Diversity Research Centre, Dr D Y Patil Biotechnology and Bioinformatics Institute, Dr D Y Patil Vidyapeeth, Pune, India.
    Use of N,N-diacetylchitobiose in decreasing toxic effects of indoor air pollution by preventing oxidative DNA damage2016In: Biologia (Bratislava), ISSN 0006-3088, E-ISSN 1336-9563, Vol. 71, no 5, p. 505-515Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Indoor air pollution occurs due to hazardous pollutants, such as tobacco smoke, pesticides and carbon oxides, sulphur oxides and nitrogen oxides arising from combustion of biomass fuels. Exposure to these pollutants results in respiratory conditions like asthma, chronic obstructive pulmonary disease, lung cancer, pneumonia and other lower respiratory infections. Several of these infections are a result of inflammation and oxidative stress. Here we demonstrate the ability of N,N-diacetylchitobiose in preventing oxidative DNA damage in peripheral blood mononuclear cells exposed to biomass smoke extracts and cigarette smoke extract. The cytotoxic effect of these pollutants was determined by trypan blue exclusion assay in peripheral blood mononuclear cells, where cytotoxicity in decreasing order was  garette > wood > sawdust > cowdung. Cytotoxicity could be due to single- and double-strand breaks in the DNA as a result of oxidative stress. Comet assay measures the extent of DNA damage in the cells exposed to toxic agents. When mononuclear cells were treated with N,N-diacetylchitobiose and later exposed to smoke extracts, the extent of DNA damage decreased by 44.5% and 57.5% as compared to untreated cells. The protection offered by N,N-diacetylchitobiose towards oxidative DNA damage was at par with quercetin, a popular herbal medicine. Glutathione-S-transferase activity was determined in mononuclear cells exposed to smoke extracts, where oxidative stress in cells exposed to cigarette smoke extract was maximum. The present study demonstrates for the first time the ability of N,N -diacetylchitobiose to alleviate the harmful effects of indoor air pollutants.

  • 7.
    Vrasdonk, Emke
    et al.
    Chalmers University of Technology.
    Palme, Ulrika
    Chalmers University of Technology.
    Lennartsson, Tommy
    Swedish University of Agricultural Sciences, Uppsala.
    Antonelli, Alexandre
    University of Gothenburg.
    Berg, Sofia
    University of Skövde, School of Bioscience. University of Skövde, The Systems Biology Research Centre.
    Jonsson, Annie
    University of Skövde, School of Bioscience. University of Skövde, The Systems Biology Research Centre.
    Cederberg, Christel
    Chalmers University of Technology.
    Defining the reference situation for biodiversity in Life Cycle Assessments: Review and recommendations2016Conference paper (Refereed)
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