his.sePublications
Change search
Refine search result
1 - 17 of 17
CiteExportLink to result list
Permanent link
Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf
Rows per page
  • 5
  • 10
  • 20
  • 50
  • 100
  • 250
Sort
  • Standard (Relevance)
  • Author A-Ö
  • Author Ö-A
  • Title A-Ö
  • Title Ö-A
  • Publication type A-Ö
  • Publication type Ö-A
  • Issued (Oldest first)
  • Issued (Newest first)
  • Created (Oldest first)
  • Created (Newest first)
  • Last updated (Oldest first)
  • Last updated (Newest first)
  • Disputation date (earliest first)
  • Disputation date (latest first)
  • Standard (Relevance)
  • Author A-Ö
  • Author Ö-A
  • Title A-Ö
  • Title Ö-A
  • Publication type A-Ö
  • Publication type Ö-A
  • Issued (Oldest first)
  • Issued (Newest first)
  • Created (Oldest first)
  • Created (Newest first)
  • Last updated (Oldest first)
  • Last updated (Newest first)
  • Disputation date (earliest first)
  • Disputation date (latest first)
Select
The maximal number of hits you can export is 250. When you want to export more records please use the Create feeds function.
  • 1.
    Andersson, Thomas
    University of Skövde, School of Business. University of Skövde, Enterprises for the Future Research Environment.
    Att leda genom medarbetarskap i vården2018In: Cancervården, ISSN 1401-6583, no 1, p. 16-17Article in journal (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
    Download full text (pdf)
    fulltext
  • 2.
    Andersson, Thomas
    et al.
    University of Skövde, School of Business. University of Skövde, Enterprises for the Future Research Environment.
    Gadolin, Christian
    University of Skövde, School of Business. University of Skövde, Enterprises for the Future Research Environment.
    Stockhult, Helén
    University of Skövde, School of Business. University of Skövde, Enterprises for the Future Research Environment.
    Samverkan i komplexitet: Resultat från utvärdering av samverkansmodell social hållbarhet/folkhälsa2019Report (Other academic)
    Download full text (pdf)
    fulltext
  • 3.
    Andersén, Jim
    et al.
    University of Skövde, School of Business. University of Skövde, Enterprises for the Future. University of Skövde, Enterprises for the Future Research Environment.
    Jansson, Christian
    University of Skövde, School of Business. University of Skövde, Enterprises for the Future. University of Skövde, Enterprises for the Future Research Environment.
    Ljungkvist, Torbjörn
    University of Skövde, School of Business. University of Skövde, Enterprises for the Future. University of Skövde, Enterprises for the Future Research Environment.
    Can environmentally oriented CEOs and environmentally friendly suppliers boost the growth of small firms?2020In: Business Strategy and the Environment, ISSN 0964-4733, E-ISSN 1099-0836, Vol. 29, no 2, p. 325-334Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The core question addressed in the natural resource‐based view (NRBV) of the firm is how to develop and exploit resources beneficial for both the natural environment and firm performance. Due to the resource constraints and increased competition facing small manufacturing firms, achieving this is a challenge for such companies. Building on the NRBV and resource orchestration literatures, we examine the relationship between green purchasing capabilities (GPCs), CEO's environmental orientation(EO), and firm growth. Results from 304 Swedish small manufacturing firms indicate a significant relationship between GPC and growth, and this relationship is positively moderated by the EO of the CEO.

  • 4.
    Boers, Börje
    et al.
    University of Skövde, School of Business. University of Skövde, Enterprises for the Future Research Environment.
    Brozovic, Danilo
    University of Skövde, School of Business. University of Skövde, Enterprises for the Future Research Environment.
    Work-family interface: coping strategies in growing family SMEs2019Conference paper (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    SMEs may be more vulnerable because of their limited resources (Falkner & Hiebl, 2015). SMEs’ success is often dependent on their owner managers, e.g. their attitude towards growth may differ substantively (Achtenhagen, Naldi, & Melin, 2010; Jaouen & Lasch, 2015). For instance, Davidsson argued that not all small firm owners are willing to grow because they, e.g., fear that growth will endanger employee well-being and the owners will lose control (Davidsson, 1989, 1991). The ability of owner managers to follow a growth strategy may in part also be dependent on how the owner manager is able to handle its life outside the business (Jennings & McDougald, 2007), e.g. the family embeddedness (Aldrich & Cliff, 2003).

    More recent research has called for studies investigating, e.g. the work–family (WF) interactions in businesses run by male and female entrepreneurs (Adkins, Samaras, Gilfillan, & McWee, 2013; Ahl, 2006). Extant research has started looking at motives and constrains of female entrepreneurs in regards to the work family interface (Adkins, et al., 2013; Ahl, 2006).

    Research on work family interface is, in line with other areas, dominated by studies investigating the US-context, disregarding other contexts (Shaffer, Joplin, & Hsu, 2011). More and more researchers have called for further research on the interface between family and work life (Jaskiewicz, Combs, Shanine, & Kacmar, 2017; Nguyen & Sawang, 2016; Powell & Eddleston, 2017; Powell, Greenhaus, Allen, & Johnson, 2018). Therefore, we offer a new angle by investigating male entrepreneurs who can be considered successful in a Swedish context. Success in this context refers to a sustainable growth strategy in regards to growing the business considerably in both turnover and number of employees over a period of five years.

     Purpose/topic of research

    The purpose of this study is to understand the work-family interface in small, growing family firms by answering the following research questions:

    Which coping strategies are used to address conflicts in the work family interface?How do these strategies support work/life –balance and how to do they influence firm growth?

    Research method

    The authors of this study conducted a research project on SMEs which, after a period of stable performance in terms of turnover and number of employees, grew with 50% in bother turnover and number of employees over a consecutive period of five years. The study was conducted in the southwest of Sweden.

    For this paper and purpose we selected three companies where the respondents had expressed that work-life-conflicts played a role for being able to focus on and execute a growth strategy.

    The figures concerning turnover and number of employees were taken from the publicly available annual reports. The collection of this data was executed in 2017 and included annual reports from 2000 to 2016.

    As part of the general study, the selected companies were interviewed. Before the interviews were conducted, the interviewees were contacted by email and afterwards by telephone. In this first telephone conversation, the general purpose of the study was explained. In the following face-to-face interviews the respondents, usually owner-managers, were interviewed, using a structured interview guideline. The guideline entailed open questions and scaled questions concerning reasons for growth, performance, change in ownership and management, entrepreneurial orientation, employee concerns, justice and equality.

     Theories used Coping strategies

    The literature has come up with plenty of coping strategies that deal with how individual deal with issues that bothers them. In this study we draw on research with a connection to entrepreneurship and growth (Jennings & McDougald, 2007).

     Coping has been defined in psychological terms by Lazarus and Folkman (1984) as “constantly changing cognitive and behavioral efforts to manage specific external and/or internal demands that are appraised as taxing”. Coping is expending conscious effort to solve personal and interpersonal problems, and seeking to master and minimize stress (Weiten & Lloyd, 2008). Psychological coping mechanisms are usually termed coping strategies or coping skills. Unconscious strategies are commonly excluded. The term coping generally refers to adaptive or constructive coping strategies. However, some coping strategies can also be considered maladaptive. Maladaptive coping can be described as non-coping. Furthermore, the term coping commonly refers to reactive coping. This contrasts with proactive coping, in which a coping response aims to head off a future stressor. Coping responses are partly controlled by personality, but also by the social context, particularly the stressful environment (Carver & Connor-Smith, 2010).

    On growth

    “Most firms start small, live small and die small” (Davidsson 2010, p. 23[BB1] ). Growth is not the norm, and the main reason that most firms do not grow is that they operate in mature industries and serves local markets (Davidsson 2010). For those firms that do grow the entrepreneur often plays an important role. Factors such as motivation, education, management experience, number of founders have been proven to influence growth in a positive direction. However, there is a lack of research regarding how different factors related to work-life balance affects firm growth.

    Growth is usually defined as an increase in the amount of some measurable outcome, e.g. sales or employment (Cyron & Zoellick, 2018)(Cyron & Zoellick 2018, Davidsson 2010).

     Contribution of research

    The research contributes insights on which and how male entrepreneurs use coping strategies to address conflicts in the work family interface.

    Findings reveal the complex role of family which can both be an origin but also a solution to these conflicts.

    The study further contributes to the ongoing debate concerning growth intension and growth ambition in the entrepreneurship literature. Especially in small family firms, growth is not only hindered by limited resources. At the same time, resources and obstacles for growth are complex.

  • 5.
    Boers, Börje
    et al.
    University of Skövde, School of Business. University of Skövde, Enterprises for the Future Research Environment. Universität Witten, Herdecke, Germany.
    Nordqvist, Mattias
    Jönköping University, Sweden.
    Family businesses as hybrid organisations2020In: Handbook on Hybrid Organisations / [ed] David Billis, Colin Rochester, Cheltenham, UK: Edward Elgar Publishing, 2020, p. 507-521Chapter in book (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The objective of this chapter is to deepen our understanding of the nature of family businesses by analysing them as hybrid organisations. We define family businesses as businesses where one or several families own the controlling majority of the shares and are actively involved in the business (Chrisman et al., 2005; Chua et al., 1999). The focus of the chapter is on the theoretical notion of family businesses as hybrid organisations, and it draws on case research based on two publicly listed family firms. Publicly listed family firms are common around the world (La Porta et al., 1999) and they illustrate explicitly the hybrid character of family businesses by combining the logic of family ownership with the expectation of delivering shareholder value (Boers and Nordqvist, 2012). We argue that hybridity is especially apparent in publicly listed family businesses, where it arises from different underlying institutional logics related to the family and the market and the private and the public. The hybrid nature of this kind of business has an impact on their decision-making, their control and/or their governance more generally. To analyse the two cases, we draw on literature on hybrid organisations, governance and family firms. The study of hybrid organisations has gained momentum in recent years (see, e.g., Battilana and Dorado, 2010; Battilana and Lee, 2014; Billis, 2010; Pache and Santos, 2013; and also this Handbook). The current focus seems to be on social enterprises as typical examples of hybrid organisations (Battilana and Lee, 2014; Doherty et al., 2014). Yet this phenomenon is not exclusive to social enterprises or the third sector: it is equally relevant for some public sector and for-profit organisations. The most common type of business is the family business (Dyer, 2003), which also represents a hybrid organisation, with the two domains of family and business constituting the source of hybridity. Family businesses have been portrayed as hybrid organisations in previous literature (e.g., Arregle et al., 2007; Boers and Nordqvist, 2012; Ljungkvist and Boers, 2017), but the concept of hybridity has not gained as much research attention as it deserves. The purpose of this chapter is to address this limitation.

  • 6.
    Edvardsson, Ingi Runar
    et al.
    School of Business, University of Iceland, Reykjavik, Iceland.
    Durst, Susanne
    University of Skövde, School of Business. University of Skövde, Enterprises for the Future Research Environment.
    Oskarsson, Gudmundur Kristjan
    School of Business and Science, University of Akureyri, Akureyri, Iceland.
    Strategic outsourcing in SMEs2020In: Journal of Small Business and Enterprise Development, ISSN 1462-6004, E-ISSN 1758-7840, Vol. 27, no 1, p. 73-84Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Purpose So far, there are very few empirical research studies available on the outsourcing pattern among small- and medium-sized enterprises (SMEs). The purpose of this paper is to examine strategic outsourcing among Icelandic SME service firms, from 2009 to 2018. Design/methodology/approach The data presented in this paper cover responses from 802 small service firms, which were collected through telephone and online questionnaires. In order to have sufficient data on strategic outsourcing and to ensure a decent analysis, three surveys were combined. Findings The main finding of the present paper is that SMEs that have a developed strategy on outsourcing seem to perform better than those who do not have. The former are more likely to have achieved cost reduction, especially in housing and finance, and they use outsourcing to increase core businesses. They select vendor firms more on the bases of cost and services, rather than personal contacts. Also, these firms have improved service quality, by focusing on their core competences. Originality/value To the authors' knowledge, the present study is one of the few empirical studies that have examined outsourcing in SMEs from a strategic perspective. The findings are valuable for managerial practice and could be a base for outsourcing strategies in SMEs.

  • 7.
    Edvardsson, Ingi Runar
    et al.
    School of Business, University of Iceland, Reykjavik, Iceland.
    Óskarsson, Guðmundur Kristján
    School of Business and Science, University of Akureyri Iceland, Akureyri, Iceland.
    Durst, Susanne
    University of Skövde, School of Business. University of Skövde, Enterprises for the Future Research Environment.
    The outsourcing practice among small knowledge-intensive service firms2020In: VINE Journal of Information and Knowledge Management Systems, ISSN 2059-5891Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Purpose: This paper aims to present findings on outsourcing practices in small service firms in Iceland, where the prime focus is on knowledge-intensive service firms. Design/methodology/approach: To gain information on the scope and reason for outsourcing, telephone and online surveys were used. In total, 802 firms participated in the surveys, which were conducted in the period 2009-2018. Findings: The results show that knowledge-intensive firms outsource far more than other service firms and are also more likely to have an outsourcing strategy. The grounds for increased outsourcing are cost reduction and strategic reasons, such as a focus on core competency and the search for external knowledge. In comparison with other firms, knowledge-intensive firms are increasingly outsourcing cleaning, security services, canteen and transportation, IT processes, human resource management, training and consulting. Additionally, managers of these firms select suppliers more on the basis of cost and quality. They also realize more cost savings as a consequence of outsourcing. Outsourcing had a very limited effect on employment in the firms, while cost reduction was achieved in 48.3 per cent of the firms involved. Research limitations/implications: The findings are in line with the resource-based theory and, interestingly, this is not limited to knowledge-based firms, but to a large portion of service firms as well. Originality/value: This is the first in-depth study on outsourcing patterns in knowledge-intensive firms, which uses theoretical classification in empirical analysis. 

  • 8.
    Gadolin, Christian
    University of Skövde, School of Business. University of Skövde, Enterprises for the Future Research Environment.
    Låt inte ”komplexitet” bli en ursäkt för misslyckande2019In: Dagens Samhälle, ISSN 1652-6511Article in journal (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
  • 9.
    Gadolin, Christian
    et al.
    University West, Trollhättan, Sweden / Chalmers University of Technology, Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Andersson, Thomas
    University of Skövde, School of Business. University of Skövde, Enterprises for the Future Research Environment. Chalmers University of Technology, Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Eriksson, Erik
    Chalmers University of Technology, Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Hellström, Andreas
    Chalmers University of Technology, Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Providing healthcare through “value shops”: impact on professional fulfilment for physicians and nurses2020In: International Journal of Health Governance, ISSN 2059-4631Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Purpose: The purpose of this paper is to empirically explore and demonstrate the ability of healthcare professionals to attain professional fulfilment when providing healthcare inspired by “value shops”. Design/methodology/approach: A qualitative case study incorporating interviews and observations was conducted. Findings: The empirical data suggest that the professional fulfilment of both physicians and nurses is facilitated when care is organized through “value shops”. Both groups of professionals state that they are able to return to their “professional core”. Originality/value: The beneficial outcomes of organizing healthcare inspired by the “value shop” have previously been explored in terms of efficiency and quality. However, the professional fulfilment of healthcare professionals when providing such care has not been explicitly addressed. Professional fulfilment is vital in order to safeguard high-quality care, as well as healthcare professionals' involvement and engagement in implementing quality improvements. This paper highlights the fact that care provision inspired by the “value shop” may facilitate professional fulfilment, which further strengthens the potential positive outcomes of the “value shop” when utilized in a healthcare setting. 

    Download full text (pdf)
    fulltext
  • 10.
    Gadolin, Christian
    et al.
    University of Skövde, School of Business. University of Skövde, Enterprises for the Future Research Environment.
    Krohwinkel, Anna
    Leading Health Care.
    Mannerheim, Unni
    Leading Health Care.
    Kompetensmixen i framtidens vård måste säkras2020In: Dagens medicin, ISSN 1104-7488, no 5, p. 23-Article in journal (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
  • 11.
    Hooshyar Yousefi, Bahram
    et al.
    University of Skövde, School of Business. University of Skövde, Enterprises for the Future Research Environment.
    Mirkhezri, Hana
    Department of Architecture, Tabriz Branch, Islamic Azad University of Tabriz, Iran.
    Toward A Game-based Learning Platform: A Comparative Conceptual Framework For Serious Games2019Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The new education systems is currently living a paradigm shift in pedagogical approaches associated with the innovation in the fundamentals of teaching methods; we are facing an emerging necessity interconnected to learners’ attitudes, experiences and the general structure of digitalization and in our case, gamification. Taking gamification into consideration, it seems we still need to regenerate a sustainable codification of the new knowledge in the field of education; therefore, reconsideration of learning itself is essential which eventually reconstructs the educational programs and adapts new tools and technologies. Gamification and Serious Games draw a new perspective toward the processes and tools to achieve new objectives and methods in order to improve the quality of education. In this paper, we have developed a conceptual model of the mentioned adaptation which crystallizes the flow of the dominant gamification trends and its components in a comprehensive platform with a holistic approach in order to aggregate it into Serious Game definition; the concluded model would reflect an understanding of the role of mechanics and dynamics in the nature of the education. The result is a starting point for the integration of the developed conceptual framework to the establishment of a prospect model/platform of Serious Games in different educational branches.

  • 12.
    Liff, Roy
    et al.
    Gothenburg Research Institute, School of Business, Economics and Law, University of Gothenburg, Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Andersson, Thomas
    University of Skövde, School of Business. University of Skövde, Enterprises for the Future Research Environment.
    Experts’ contribution to strategy when strategy is absent: A case study of quality experts in hospitals2020In: Public Management Review, ISSN 1471-9037, E-ISSN 1471-9045Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This study investigates how new categories of experts can contribute to strategydevelopment in public organizations. Interplay between managers and experts wasanalysed using principal-agent theory, stewardship theory, and partnership theory,each assigning the experts different kinds of strategic contribution. Results show thatexperts may contribute to an iterative and emergent strategy process as stewardsthrough a consultative process method that lets the means guide the goals. Experts’knowledge of what other actors in the organization perceive as important guides theexperts’ application of the technical methods and processing.

    Download full text (pdf)
    fulltext
  • 13.
    Ljungkvist, Torbjörn
    et al.
    University of Skövde, School of Business. University of Skövde, Enterprises for the Future. University of Skövde, Enterprises for the Future Research Environment.
    Boers, Börje
    University of Skövde, School of Business. University of Skövde, Enterprises for the Future. University of Skövde, Enterprises for the Future Research Environment.
    Samuelsson, Joachim
    University of Skövde, School of Business. University of Skövde, Enterprises for the Future. University of Skövde, Enterprises for the Future Research Environment.
    Three stages of Entrepreneurial Orientation: The Founder’s role2019In: International Journal of Entrepreneurial Behaviour & Research, ISSN 1355-2554, E-ISSN 1758-6534, Vol. 26, no 2, p. 285-306Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Purpose – The purpose of this paper is to understand the development of the five dimensions ofentrepreneurial orientation (EO) over time by taking a founder’s perspective.Design/methodology/approach – The paper draws on an in-depth single-case study. It combinessemi-structured interviews in the company with archival data, such as annual reports, press clips andinterviews in business magazines.Findings – The results indicate that the EO dimensions change from being personalized and directlysolution-oriented to being intangible value-creation-oriented.Originality/value – By suggesting ownership-based EO configurations, this study contributes insights intohow different ownership forms propel EO. These configurations – that is, personal, administrative based andintangible focused – show the impact of the EO dimensions and provide a systematic and theoreticalunderstanding of EO change over time.

  • 14.
    Osarenkhoe, Aihie
    et al.
    University of Gävle, Faculty of Education and Business Studies, Department of Business and Economic Studies, Business administration.
    Fjellström, Daniella
    University of Gävle, Faculty of Education and Business Studies, Department of Business and Economic Studies, Business administration.
    Abraha, Desalegn
    University of Skövde, School of Business. University of Skövde, Enterprises for the Future Research Environment.
    Baffour Awuah, Gabriel
    University of Halmstad, Sweden.
    Networked establishment processes in transition economies2020In: Global Business and Economics Review (GBER), ISSN 1097-4954, E-ISSN 1745-1329, Vol. 22, no 1/2, p. 161-177Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The purpose of this article is to examine the establishment processes of Scania in Croatia and Statoil in Estonia applying a model developed from the network approach. The findings show that Statoil’s ability to leverage significant actors in its network to support its establishment made the process less cumbersome and less resource-consuming. Scania’s lack of home- and host country support resulted in an arduous and costly process, with Scania’s market position changing several times as different problems cropped up. We also found that relationship orientation requires adaptation by the firm and, more critically, by its managers. A lack of cross-cultural competence is also observed to be an impeding factor in the process.

  • 15.
    Shujahat, Muhammad
    et al.
    KM and EL Lab, Faculty of Education, University of Hong Kong.
    Razzaq, Shahid
    Department of Health, District Attock, Government of Punjab, Pakistan.
    Wang, Minhong
    KM and EL Lab, Faculty of Education, University of Hong Kong.
    Durst, Susanne
    University of Skövde, School of Business. University of Skövde, Enterprises for the Future Research Environment.
    Personal knowledge management and knowledge worker productivity in the healthcare sector2019In: Proceedings of the 20th European Conference on Knowledge Management / [ed] Eduardo Tomé, Francisco Cesário, Raquel Reis Soares, Academic Conferences Limited, 2019, Vol. 2, p. 933-940Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The implementation of Knowledge management (KM) in healthcare has primarily been carried out on the organizational level with a traditional centric approach, whereas, personal knowledge management (PKM), a bottom-up approach which focuses on the knowledge in the knowledge workers' (KWs') minds, is somewhat missing. This study advocates the implementation of PKM as a complementary approach to a centric approach to KM, if not an alternative approach, in the healthcare sector to foster knowledge-worker productivity (KWP). Therefore, the prime purpose of this study was to empirically test a proposed model which accounts for the impact of the four individual-level determinants - task definition, job autonomy, KW's lifelong learning and innovation as a job requirement - on the relationship between PKM and KWP. These four determinants are inspired by Drucker's KWP theory that advocated the role of PKM for enhanced KWP. The data were collected from 71 knowledge workers in the public healthcare department of the District Attock, Pakistan and were analysed using partial least squares modelling. The results support the varying roles of four individual-level determinants in fostering PKM, which in turn, increases KWP. The results make the case for additional focus of PKM as a complementary KM approach in the healthcare sector. 

  • 16.
    Sumbal, Muhammad Saleem
    et al.
    Department of Management and HR, NUST Business School, National University of Sciences and Technology (NUST), Islamabad, Pakistan.
    Tsui, Eric
    Department of Industrial and Systems Engineering, Hong Kong Polytechnic University, Kowloon, Hong Kong.
    Durst, Susanne
    University of Skövde, School of Business. University of Skövde, Enterprises for the Future Research Environment.
    Shujahat, Muhammad
    Knowledge Management and E-Learning Lab, Faculty of Education, The University of Hong Kong, Hong Kong.
    Irfan, Irfan
    Department of Management and HR, NUST Business School, National University of Sciences and Technology (NUST), Islamabad, Pakistan.
    Ali, Syed Muhammad
    Department of Engineering Management, National University of Sciences and Technology (NUST), Islamabad, Pakistan.
    A framework to retain the knowledge of departing knowledge workers in the manufacturing industry2020In: VINE Journal of Information and Knowledge Management Systems, ISSN 2059-5891Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Purpose: The purpose of this study is to develop a conceptual framework on knowledge loss in a manufacturing sector based on three aspects: likelihood of knowledge loss, critical areas of knowledge loss and relevance of each of these knowledge areas in terms of utilization and alignment with organizational goals and strategy. Such a conceptual framework can be helpful to the practicing managers in understanding the types of knowledge that is lost of a given departing employee and thus deciding on a measure to retain the critical employees or capture their knowledge before they leave. Design/methodology/approach: Using a case study approach, data has been collected from a multinational battery manufacturing company based in Hong Kong. Semi-structured interviews have been conducted and analyzed through CAQDAS ATLAS.ti to generate the themes which were then used to develop the conceptual framework. Findings: The findings revealed that the likelihood factors of knowledge loss in the manufacturing sector include layoffs, retirement, immigration and job change. The critical areas of knowledge loss comprise the knowledge of relationships and networks, especially with the customers and suppliers, the technical knowledge (battery and process technology) and knowledge of management, among others. The relevance of each of these knowledge areas needs to be determined through proper analysis whether these knowledge areas are needed in future projects, up to date and aligned with organizational goals and strategy along with other factors. Research limitations/implications: Using the developed conceptual framework, managers and executives can identify critical employees in the manufacturing sector and accordingly take some appropriate measures to retain their knowledge. Caution should be taken while applying the findings of this study in other industries and context. Originality/value: This paper is an attempt to reduce the dearth of empirical studies by exploring knowledge retention in the manufacturing sector, especially in the development of proper conceptual frameworks to assess the potential knowledge loss of employees.

  • 17.
    Öberg, Christina
    et al.
    Weaterhead Center for International Affairs, Harvard University, Cambridge, Massachusetts, USA / The Ratio Institute, Stockholm, Sweden / School of Business, Örebro University, Sweden.
    Klinton, Markus
    Örebro University, Sweden.
    Stockhult, Helen
    University of Skövde, School of Business. University of Skövde, Enterprises for the Future Research Environment.
    Inside the incubator - business relationship creations among incubated firms2020In: Journal of business & industrial marketing, ISSN 0885-8624, E-ISSN 2052-1189Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Purpose Incubators, as providers of advice and resources, suggest fostering the development of early-idea firms. Literature and practice seem to suggest an ever-increasing amount of incubator support. The creation of business relationships is at the heart of any business development, and this paper addresses whether a laissez-faire incubator fosters the creation of business relationships. The purpose of this paper is to explore the creation of business relationships among incubated firms during and after their time in the incubator along with the roles that these relationships play for the incubated firms. Design/methodology/approach Empirically, the paper is based on retrospective interviews with representatives of all incubated firms in a university incubator. A total of fifteen interviews were conducted with representatives of the incubated firms, the incubator and its owners, complemented by secondary data sources. Findings The paper points out three antecedents for business relationship creation: the lack of experience and connections; convenience; and trust based on the interactions with others in the incubator. These antecedents are connected to the roles of transforming businesses and of adaptation in the dyadic relationships. The laissez-faire incubator helped through the learning-by-doing among the incubated firms, which made them focus on business relationship creation from early on. Originality/value Most incubator research portrays the unilateral transfer of knowledge from the incubator to the incubated firm, with the latter being a service taker rather than a co-producer. The paper adds knowledge about business relationships among firms in incubators and the roles that these business relationships could play for the firms. The focus on an incubator providing limited support is of high practical relevance, given the trend of incubators facilitating more and more services.

1 - 17 of 17
CiteExportLink to result list
Permanent link
Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf