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  • 51.
    Vernon, David
    et al.
    University of Skövde, School of Informatics. University of Skövde, The Informatics Research Centre.
    Lowe, Robert
    University of Skövde, School of Informatics. University of Skövde, The Informatics Research Centre. Division of Cognition and Communication, University of Gothenburg, Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Thill, Serge
    University of Skövde, School of Informatics. University of Skövde, The Informatics Research Centre.
    Ziemke, Tom
    University of Skövde, School of Informatics. University of Skövde, The Informatics Research Centre. Department of Computer and Information Science, Linköping University, Sweden.
    Embodied cognition and circular causality: On the role of constitutive autonomy in the reciprocal coupling of perception and action2015In: Frontiers in Psychology, ISSN 1664-1078, E-ISSN 1664-1078, Vol. 6, article id 1660Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 52.
    Vernon, David
    et al.
    University of Skövde, School of Informatics. University of Skövde, The Informatics Research Centre.
    Thill, Serge
    University of Skövde, School of Informatics. University of Skövde, The Informatics Research Centre.
    Ziemke, Tom
    University of Skövde, School of Informatics. University of Skövde, The Informatics Research Centre.
    The Role of Intention in Cognitive Robotics2016In: Toward Robotic Socially Believable Behaving Systems: Volume I / [ed] Anna Esposito & Lakhmi C. Jain, Switzerland: Springer, 2016, p. 15-27Chapter in book (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    We argue that the development of robots that can interact effectively with people requires a special focus on building systems that can perceive and comprehend intentions in other agents. Such a capability is a prerequisite for all pro-social behaviour and in particular underpins the ability to engage in instrumental helping and mutual collaboration. We explore the prospective and intentional nature of action, highlighting the importance of joint action, shared goals, shared intentions, and joint attention in facilitating social interaction between two or more cognitive agents. We discuss the link between reading intentions and theory of mind, noting the role played by internal simulation, especially when inferring higher-level actionfocussed intentions. Finally, we highlight that pro-social behaviour in humans is the result of a developmental process and we note the implications of this for the challenge of creating cognitive robots that can read intentions.

  • 53.
    Veto, Peter
    et al.
    Department of Neurological, Neuropsychological, Morphological and Movement Sciences, Section of Physiology and Psychology, University of Verona, Strada Le Grazie, 8, 37143 Verona – Italy.
    Thill, Serge
    University of Skövde, School of Humanities and Informatics. University of Skövde, The Informatics Research Centre.
    Hemeren, Paul
    University of Skövde, School of Humanities and Informatics. University of Skövde, The Informatics Research Centre.
    Incidental and non-incidental processing of biological motion: Orientation, attention and life detection2013In: Cooperative Minds: Social Interaction and Group Dynamics: Proceedings of the 35th Annual Meeting of the Cognitive Science Society Berlin, Germany, July 31-August 3, 2013 / [ed] Markus Knauff, Michael Pauen, Natalie Sebanz & Ipke Wachsmuth, Cognitive Science Society, Inc., 2013, p. 1528-1533Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Based on the unique traits of biological motion perception, the existence of a “life detector”, a special sensitivity to perceiving motion patterns typical for animals, seems to be plausible (Johnson, 2006). Showing motion displays upside-down or with changes in global structure is known to disturb processing in different ways, but not much is known yet about how inversion affects attention and incidental processing. To examine the perception of upright and inverted point-light walkers regarding incidental processing, we used a flanker paradigm (Eriksen & Eriksen, 1974) adapted for biological motion (Thornton & Vuong, 2004), and extended it to include inverted and scrambled figures. Results show that inverted walkers do not evoke incidental processing and they allow high accuracy in performance only when attentional capacities are not diminished. An asymmetrical interaction between upright and inverted figures is found which alludes to qualitatively different pathways of processing.

  • 54.
    Windridge, David
    et al.
    Department of Computer Science, Middlesex University, UK / Centre for Vision, Speech and Signal Processing, University of Surrey, UK.
    Svensson, Henrik
    University of Skövde, School of Informatics. University of Skövde, The Informatics Research Centre. Univ Skovde, Interact Lab, Skovde, Sweden..
    Thill, Serge
    University of Skövde, School of Informatics. University of Skövde, The Informatics Research Centre. Donders Institute for Brain, Cognition, and Behaviour, Radboud University, Netherlands.
    On the utility of dreaming: A general model for how learning in artificial agents can benefit from data hallucination2020In: Adaptive Behavior, ISSN 1059-7123, E-ISSN 1741-2633, article id UNSP 1059712319896489Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    We consider the benefits of dream mechanisms - that is, the ability to simulate new experiences based on past ones - in a machine learning context. Specifically, we are interested in learning for artificial agents that act in the world, and operationalize "dreaming" as a mechanism by which such an agent can use its own model of the learning environment to generate new hypotheses and training data. We first show that it is not necessarily a given that such a data-hallucination process is useful, since it can easily lead to a training set dominated by spurious imagined data until an ill-defined convergence point is reached. We then analyse a notably successful implementation of a machine learning-based dreaming mechanism by Ha and Schmidhuber (Ha, D., & Schmidhuber, J. (2018). World models. arXiv e-prints, arXiv:1803.10122). On that basis, we then develop a general framework by which an agent can generate simulated data to learn from in a manner that is beneficial to the agent. This, we argue, then forms a general method for an operationalized dream-like mechanism. We finish by demonstrating the general conditions under which such mechanisms can be useful in machine learning, wherein the implicit simulator inference and extrapolation involved in dreaming act without reinforcing inference error even when inference is incomplete.

  • 55.
    Windridge, David
    et al.
    Middlesex University, London, UK / University of Surrey, Guildford, UK.
    Thill, Serge
    University of Skövde, School of Informatics. University of Skövde, The Informatics Research Centre. University of Plymouth, UK.
    Representational fluidity in embodied (artificial) cognition2018In: Biosystems (Amsterdam. Print), ISSN 0303-2647, E-ISSN 1872-8324, Vol. 172, p. 9-17Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Theories of embodied cognition agree that the body plays some role in human cognition, but disagree on the precise nature of this role. While it is (together with the environment) fundamentally engrained in the so-called 4E (or multi-E) cognition stance, there also exists interpretations wherein the body is merely an input/output interface for cognitive processes that are entirely computational.

    In the present paper, we show that even if one takes such a strong computationalist position, the role of the body must be more than an interface to the world. To achieve human cognition, the computational mechanisms of a cognitive agent must be capable not only of appropriate reasoning over a given set of symbolic representations; they must in addition be capable of updating the representational framework itself (leading to the titular representational fluidity). We demonstrate this by considering the necessary properties that an artificial agent with these abilities need to possess.

    The core of the argument is that these updates must be falsifiable in the Popperian sense while simultaneously directing representational shifts in a direction that benefits the agent. We show that this is achieved by the progressive, bottom-up symbolic abstraction of low-level sensorimotor connections followed by top-down instantiation of testable perception-action hypotheses.

    We then discuss the fundamental limits of this representational updating capacity, concluding that only fully embodied learners exhibiting such a priori perception-action linkages are able to sufficiently ground spontaneously-generated symbolic representations and exhibit the full range of human cognitive capabilities. The present paper therefore has consequences both for the theoretical understanding of human cognition, and for the design of autonomous artificial agents.

  • 56.
    Ziemke, Tom
    et al.
    University of Skövde, School of Informatics. University of Skövde, The Informatics Research Centre. Human-Centered Systems, Department of Computer and Information Science, Linköping University, Sweden.
    Thill, Serge
    University of Skövde, School of Informatics. University of Skövde, The Informatics Research Centre.
    Robots are not embodied!: Conceptions of embodiment and their implications for social human-robot interaction2014In: Sociable Robots and the Future of Social Relations: Proceedings of Robo-Philosophy 2014 / [ed] Johanna Seibt, Raul Hakli & Marco Nørskov, Amsterdam: IOS Press, 2014, p. 49-53Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 57.
    Ziemke, Tom
    et al.
    University of Skövde, School of Informatics. University of Skövde, The Informatics Research Centre.
    Thill, Serge
    University of Skövde, School of Informatics. University of Skövde, The Informatics Research Centre.
    Vernon, David
    University of Skövde, School of Informatics. University of Skövde, The Informatics Research Centre.
    Embodiment is a Double-Edged Sword in Human-Robot Interaction: Ascribed vs. Intrinsic Intentionality2015In: Proc. Workshop on Cognition: A Bridge between Robotics and Interaction, 2015, p. 9-10Conference paper (Refereed)
12 51 - 57 of 57
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