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  • 51.
    Andersson, Thomas
    University of Skövde, School of Business. University of Skövde, Enterprises for the Future.
    Att leda genom medarbetarskap2016In: Organisation & Samhälle, ISSN 2001-9114, no 2, p. 44-47Article in journal (Other academic)
    Abstract [sv]

    Genom att ge medarbetarna förtroende och uppmuntra ansvars- och initiativtagande är det möjligt att bryta den passivitet som detaljerade regler och standardisering ofta medför.

  • 52.
    Andersson, Thomas
    University of Skövde, School of Business. University of Skövde, Enterprises for the Future.
    Att leda genom medarbetarskap i vården2018In: Cancervården, ISSN 1401-6583, no 1, p. 16-17Article in journal (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
  • 53.
    Andersson, Thomas
    University of Skövde, School of Business. University of Skövde, Enterprises for the Future.
    Followership: An important social resource for organizational resilience2018In: The Resilience Framework: Organizing for sustained viability / [ed] Stefan Tengblad, Margareta Oudhuis, Singapore: Springer, 2018, p. 147-162Chapter in book (Refereed)
  • 54.
    Andersson, Thomas
    University of Skövde, School of Technology and Society.
    Förutsättningar för förbättringsarbete i vården2013In: Att utveckla vården: Erfarenheter av kvalitet, verksamhetsutveckling och förbättringsarbete / [ed] Nomie Eriksson, Kajsa-Mia Holgers, Tomas Müllern, Lund: Studentlitteratur, 2013, 1, p. 121-142Chapter in book (Refereed)
  • 55.
    Andersson, Thomas
    University of Skövde, School of Technology and Society.
    Personal growth and sensitivity training as fashions in management and management research2008In: International Studies of Management and Organization, ISSN 0020-8825, E-ISSN 1558-0911, Vol. 38, no 2, p. 71-96Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Purpose – to compare the introduction of, and associated contemporary research into, two management fashions. Design/methodology/approach – names the two fashions as “personal growth” and “sensitivity training”, states that sensitivity training was popular in the 1960s-1970s, and that personal growth, incorporating aspects of sensitivity training, was widely used in 1990s-2000s, focuses on the relationship between management fashions and management research fashions, suggests that fashions follow wave patterns, and discusses the role of consultants in the development, diffusion and translation of a fashion. Draws on the author’s own doctoral thesis to illustrate how individuals can be influenced by a fashion, identifies similarities between sensitivity training and personal development, sees the former as a first-wave fashion and the latter as a second-wave, and profiles the techniques, methods and goals of the two fashions, pinpointing self-knowledge, and the belief that in order to understand others one must understand one’s self, as key concepts in both fashions. Analyses two doctoral theses, the first published in 1979 studying sensitivity training, the second published by the author in 2005 studying personal development, reports the author’s interviews with the first paper’s author, likens managers’ identity work in managing to researchers’ identity work in a dissertation, and concludes that both managers and researchers surf on the same or parallel, fashion waves. Originality/value – highlights the cyclic pattern of fashions, and shows how both researchers and practitioners are subject to fashions

  • 56.
    Andersson, Thomas
    University of Skövde, School of Business. University of Skövde, Enterprises for the Future.
    Sociala resurser avgörande för organisatorisk resiliens - även i teknikorienterade organisationer!2014In: Organisatorisk resiliens: Vad är det som gör företag och organisationer livskraftiga? / [ed] Stefan Tengblad & Margareta Oudhuis, Lund: Studentlitteratur AB, 2014, 1, p. 93-112Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 57.
    Andersson, Thomas
    University of Skövde, School of Business. University of Skövde, Enterprises for the Future.
    The medical leadership challenge in healthcare is an identity challenge2015In: Leadership in Health Services, ISSN 1751-1879, E-ISSN 1751-1887, Vol. 28, no 2, p. 83-99Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Purpose– The purpose of this article is to describe and analyse the identity challenges that physicians with medical leadership positions face.

    Design/methodology/approach– Four qualitative case studies were performed to address the fact that identity is processual, relational and situational. Physicians with managerial roles were interviewed, as well as their peers, supervisors and subordinates. Furthermore, observations were made to understand how different identities are displayed in action.

    Findings– This study illustrates that medical leadership implies identity struggles when physicians have manager positions, because of the different characteristics of the social identities of managers and physicians. Major differences are related between physicians as autonomous individuals in a system and managers as subordinates to the organizational system. There are psychological mechanisms that evoke the physician identity more often than the managerial identity among physicians who are managers, which explains why physicians who are managers tend to remain foremost physicians.

    Research limitations/implications– The implications of the findings, that there are major identity challenges by being both a physician and manager, suggest that managerial physicians might not be the best prerequisite for medical leadership, but instead, cooperative relationships between physicians and non-physician managers might be a less difficult way to support medical leadership.

    Practical implications– Acknowledging and addressing identity challenges can be important both in creating structures in organizations and designing the training for managers in healthcare (both physicians and non-physicians) to support medical leadership.

    Originality/value– Medical leadership is most often related to organizational structure and/or leadership skills, but this paper discusses identity requirements and challenges related to medical leadership.

  • 58.
    Andersson, Thomas
    et al.
    University of Skövde, School of Business. University of Skövde, Enterprises for the Future.
    Cäker, Mikael
    University of Gothenburg, Sweden / University of Trondheim, Norway.
    Tengblad, Stefan
    University of Skövde, School of Business. University of Skövde, Enterprises for the Future.
    Wickelgren, Mikael
    University of Skövde, School of Business. University of Skövde, Enterprises for the Future.
    Building traits for organizational resilience through balancing organizational structures2019In: Scandinavian Journal of Management, ISSN 0956-5221, E-ISSN 1873-3387, Vol. 35, no 1, p. 36-45Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This paper describes and explains how balancing organizational structures can build traits for organizational resilience. Organizational resilience is a holistic and complex concept. In this paper, we move beyond focusing on sudden and disruptive events in favour of anticipating the unexpected in daily organizing. Organizational resilience is understood here as building traits of risk awareness, preference for cooperation, agility and improvisation and is analysed by means of a longitudinal qualitative case study. The paper contributes to the field by showing how balancing organizational structures can foster organizational resilience traits. We show that power distribution and normative control can create preparedness for unexpected events and foster action orientation at the same time as supporting organizational alignment. 

  • 59.
    Andersson, Thomas
    et al.
    University of Skövde, School of Technology and Society.
    Eriksson, Nomie
    University of Skövde, School of Technology and Society.
    Ujvari, Sandor
    University of Skövde, School of Technology and Society.
    Easier to trust managers than management?: The case of improvement work in healthcare2011Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Previously, improvement work in healthcare has mainly been medically related and driven by medical research, but NPM implies that management-initiated improvement work targeting organizing, productivity, efficiency, work flow etc. has become more and more common. Management-initiated improvement work has a high failure rate, and in general it seems difficult to motivate co-workers to actively participate. In all processes of organizational change, trust in the initiator of a change project is an important prerequisite to enable change take place. In this article, our purpose is to investigate how trust in management influences management-initiated improvement work. In a qualitative study we investigate improvement work at three Swedish hospitals. Our theoretical framework is based on a view of management as being both the people who manage and the system of management. This distinction is important since we can trust people and we can have confidence in a system, but these processes are different. Consequently, it is possible to trust individual managers, but as long as we do not trust management as a system, management-initiated improvement work will face considerable problems.  To analyze trust we use a model that identifies three important antecedents for one person (the trustor) to consider another person (the trustee) as trustworthy: ability, benevolence and integrity. Using social system theory, we extend this model to on the one hand describe trust in specific persons (specific managers), and on the other hand describe confidence in a system (management in general, which the system-specific managers are parts of). The results indicate that there in general is a lack of trust between healthcare personnel and healthcare management.

     

    We were able to find certain managers who were found trustworthy by the personnel, but despite these trust-relations the personnel did still not have confidence in management as a system. To the contrary, these managers were perceived as exceptions, and did not change the perception of management in general. The consequences for management-initiated improvement work were that most personnel at best were ignorant to it, and at worst resisted it openly. However, there were examples when trusted enthusiastic managers succeeded in initiating improvement work, but then the continuation and success was directly connected to this person, and if s/he left, the improvement work stopped. Furthermore, some work groups seemed to very clearly separate “real” improvement work, which they initiated themselves, from “phony” improvement work initiated by management, which only stole time from more important tasks.

  • 60.
    Andersson, Thomas
    et al.
    University of Skövde, School of Technology and Society.
    Eriksson, Nomie
    University of Skövde, School of Technology and Society.
    Ujvari, Sandor
    University of Skövde, School of Technology and Society.
    Industriellt baserade modeller för kvalitetsutveckling2013In: Att utveckla vården: Erfarenheter av kvalitet, verksamhetsutveckling och förbättringsarbete / [ed] Nomie Eriksson, Kajsa-Mia Holgers, Tomas Müllern, Lund: Studentlitteratur, 2013, 1, p. 73-84Chapter in book (Refereed)
  • 61.
    Andersson, Thomas
    et al.
    University of Skövde, School of Technology and Society.
    Eriksson, Nomie
    University of Skövde, School of Technology and Society.
    Ujvari, Sandor
    University of Skövde, School of Technology and Society.
    Organisering av förbättringsarbete inom vården med inspiration från industrin2011Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [sv]

    I denna artikel fokuserar vi på användandet av industriellt baserade produktionssynsätt (IBP) inom vården i avsikt att arbeta systematiskt med förbättringsarbete. Tidigare forskning har visat att det är svårt att få nya arbetsmetoder att få genomslag i den dagliga praktiken. I denna artikel fokuserar vi på om det går att se indirekta effekter såsom hur förbättringsarbetet organiseras beroende på vilka IBP olika sjukhus väljer att arbeta med. Undersökning är genomförd genom fallstudier på tre sjukhus som har valt att arbeta med tre olika metoder: six sigma, processorientering och mikrosystem.

    Studien visar att de olika logikerna bakom de olika metoderna ger fundamentalt olika sätt att organisera förbättringsarbetet vid de tre sjukhusen. Six sigma-sjukhuset valde ett centraliserat förbättringsarbete i hög grad drivet av experter på förbättringsmetoder, processsjukhuset

    hade en expertavdelning som var mer av bollplank och utbildare för verksamhetens förbättringsarbete och mikrosystem-sjukhuset valde ett decentraliserat förbättringsarbete där förbättringsarbetet var både lokalt initierat och drivet.

  • 62.
    Andersson, Thomas
    et al.
    University of Skövde, School of Business. University of Skövde, Enterprises for the Future.
    Gadolin, Christian
    University of Skövde, School of Business. University of Skövde, Enterprises for the Future.
    Distributed Leadership in Healthcare: Post-NPM in Action2014Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 63.
    Andersson, Thomas
    et al.
    University of Skövde, School of Business. University of Skövde, Enterprises for the Future.
    Gadolin, Christian
    University of Skövde, School of Business. University of Skövde, Enterprises for the Future.
    Followership and Distributed Leadership in Healthcare2015Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 64.
    Andersson, Thomas
    et al.
    University of Skövde, School of Business. University of Skövde, Enterprises for the Future.
    Gadolin, Christian
    University of Skövde, School of Business. University of Skövde, Enterprises for the Future.
    Medarbetarskap är viktigt men fallgroparna är många2018In: Skaraborgs Allehanda, ISSN 1403-3739Article in journal (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
  • 65.
    Andersson, Thomas
    et al.
    University of Skövde, School of Business. University of Skövde, Enterprises for the Future.
    Gadolin, Christian
    University of Skövde, School of Business. University of Skövde, Enterprises for the Future.
    Relational Leadership: An Enabler of Institutional Work in Healthcare2016Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 66.
    Andersson, Thomas
    et al.
    University of Skövde, School of Business. University of Skövde, Enterprises for the Future.
    Gadolin, Christian
    University of Skövde, School of Business. University of Skövde, Enterprises for the Future.
    Relational Leadership and Institutional Work in Healthcare2016Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 67.
    Andersson, Thomas
    et al.
    University of Skövde, School of Technology and Society.
    Gadolin, Christian
    University of Skövde, School of Technology and Society.
    The Call for Leadership in Healthcare - What Is It We Are Calling for?2013Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 68.
    Andersson, Thomas
    et al.
    University of Skövde, School of Business. University of Skövde, Enterprises for the Future. Chalmers University.
    Gadolin, Christian
    University of Skövde, School of Business. University of Skövde, Enterprises for the Future.
    Hellström, Anders
    Chalmers University.
    Eriksson, Erik
    Chalmers University.
    Unintended Consequences of Management Concepts in Healthcare: The Mix of Value Configurations in Diabetes Care2018Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 69.
    Andersson, Thomas
    et al.
    University of Skövde, School of Business. University of Skövde, Enterprises for the Future Research Environment.
    Gadolin, Christian
    University of Skövde, School of Business. University of Skövde, Enterprises for the Future Research Environment.
    Stockhult, Helén
    University of Skövde, School of Business. University of Skövde, Enterprises for the Future Research Environment.
    Samverkan i komplexitet: Resultat från utvärdering av samverkansmodell social hållbarhet/folkhälsa2019Report (Other academic)
  • 70.
    Andersson, Thomas
    et al.
    University of Skövde, School of Business. University of Skövde, Enterprises for the Future.
    Kazemi, Ali
    University of Skövde, School of Health and Education. University of Skövde, Health and Education.
    Wickelgren, Mikael
    University of Skövde, School of Business. University of Skövde, Enterprises for the Future.
    Career in Swedish Retail2016Report (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    A career in retailing is to a large extent a boundaryless career. A career in retail does not limit the individual to a single organisation, to a single role/position, or to a hierarchical rung on the organisational ladder. Both co-workers and managers move quite easily among organisations within the same retail area, between different retail areas, and in and out of the retail sector.

    • In the past, the description of retailing as a transitory employment sector has had a negative connotation. Yet this description can also have quite a positive connotation. For example, experience acquired in the retail sector can be very useful in other work sectors. Moreover, people working in retail are generally motivated by job security, a job that is possible to combine to leisure/family, and a job close to home. They are typically much less motivated by traditional career advancement opportunities, the exercise of power over others, and by the desire to make decisions.

    • People working in retail have a rather limited interest in becoming managers in part because their major work motivators are not the motivators one usually associates with management career paths.

    • Gender is a relatively weak distinguishing variable in terms of retail careers, but there are some statistically significant – yet small – differences in the work characteristics of men and women in retail. For example, women in retail prioritize work-life balance, the proximity of workplace to home, and outside interests more than men in retail. These priorities have a limiting effect on their opportunities to accept managerial positions and to follow traditional, upward career paths.

    • There are more women than men working in the retail sector today, but a larger percentage of men in management positions. However, this cannot be explained by differences between the motivations of men and women to become managers or in their attitudes towards their own managerial capabilities. The explanation lies in other, more indirect factors such as the expectations of today’s managers.

    • Women generally earn less than men in the retail sector. This inequality is especially evident when differences in work responsibilities exist (e.g., specialized areas, subbranches, management tasks).

    • There is some general scepticism among employees in the retail sector as far as the extent to which their employers are willing to commit to their well-being and development. This finding has important practical implications when employees sense a lack of employer commitment to them.

    • People outside retail sector generally have a more negative picture of the retail sector than the people within the sector. People in the retail sector are relatively satisfied and think their work is varied and interesting.

    • The number of women at the lower management levels (at the store-level) is increasing. Because of this trend, which is expected to continue, in the relatively near future there may be as many female managers as male managers at this level. However, at the upper management levels in retail, there are more than ten men for every woman and no indications of change.

    • Job security is the most important career anchor for retail employees in Sweden. This finding has very important practical implications because job security is typically not associated with employment in the retail sector. It is a factor that can be an important consideration for retailers.

  • 71.
    Andersson, Thomas
    et al.
    University of Skövde, School of Business. University of Skövde, Enterprises for the Future.
    Kazemi, Ali
    University of Skövde, School of Health and Education. University of Skövde, Health and Education.
    Wickelgren, Mikael
    University of Skövde, School of Business. University of Skövde, Enterprises for the Future.
    Karriärvägar i detaljhandeln2016Report (Refereed)
  • 72.
    Andersson, Thomas
    et al.
    University of Skövde, School of Business. University of Skövde, Enterprises for the Future.
    Liff, Roy
    Borås University, Borås, Sweden.
    Co-optation as a response to competing institutional logics: Professionals and managers in healthcare2018In: Journal of Professions and Organization, ISSN 2051-8803, E-ISSN 2051-8811, Vol. 5, no 2, p. 71-87Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Researchers working under the institutional logics perspective find the struggle between managerial logic and various professional logics one of the most intriguing issues in healthcare organizations. Previous research provided several explanations at both the organizational level (mediation, hybridization, and selective coupling) and the individual actor level (hierarchization, sense making, reinterpretation, and hijacking) for the coexistence of professional and managerial logics in healthcare. However, all of these explanations are based on the underlying institutional logics not changing. In this article, we show that co-optation can explain the coexistence of institutional logics, but that it also causes the underlying institutional logics to change. Co-optation means that an actor adopts a strategic element from another logic that retains the most important elements of its own logic. Empirically, this article illustrates co-optation processes through a qualitative study of outpatient units in child and adolescent psychiatric care in Sweden. Using an institutional logics framework, we describe and explain how managers co-opted elements of professional logics and professionals co-opted elements of managerial logic in their attempts to support their own interests. Even if co-optation is performed to protect the home logic, the co-opted elements ultimately change it. This study contributes to the institutional logics framework by describing and explaining how co-optation can be a dynamic response to competing logics at the individual actor level.

  • 73.
    Andersson, Thomas
    et al.
    University of Skövde, School of Technology and Society.
    Liff, Roy
    GRI vid Handelshögskolan i Göteborg / Högskolan i Borås.
    Tengblad, Stefan
    University of Skövde, School of Technology and Society.
    Multiprofessionella team – mellan ideal och verklighet2013In: Att utveckla vården: Erfarenheter av kvalitet, verksamhetsutveckling och förbättringsarbete / [ed] Nomie Eriksson, Kajsa-Mia Holgers, Tomas Müllern, Lund: Studentlitteratur, 2013, 1, p. 205-224Chapter in book (Refereed)
  • 74.
    Andersson, Thomas
    et al.
    University of Skövde, School of Business. University of Skövde, Enterprises for the Future.
    Liff, Roy
    Borås University and Gothenburg Research Institute.
    Tengblad, Stefan
    University of Skövde, School of Business. University of Skövde, Enterprises for the Future.
    The cooptation of managerialism: Professionals' responses on accountability pressures2014In: International Labour Process Conference, 2014Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 75.
    Andersson, Thomas
    et al.
    University of Skövde, Enterprises for the Future. University of Skövde, School of Business.
    Tengblad, Stefan
    University of Skövde, School of Business. University of Skövde, Enterprises for the Future.
    An experience based view on leader development: leadership as an emergent and complex accomplishment2016In: Development and Learning in Organizations: An International Journal, ISSN 1477-7282, E-ISSN 1758-6097, Vol. 30, no 6, p. 30-32Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Purpose

    The paper aims to identify and address matching problems in leader development and to propose how these problems can be dealt with.

    Design/methodology/approach

    Based on previous research, traditional leadership development (LD) is criticized and alternative approaches are suggested.

    Findings

    This research identifies two major matching problems in traditional LD – between participant and development effort and between development effort and realities of managerial work. A context-sensitive and emergent view of LD is suggested to address these matching problems.

    Practical implications

    The paper illustrates the need of leader development that is addressing the complex nature of managerial work in a more holistic way and to help participants to understand how such complexities can be dealt with.

    Originality/value

    An alternative view of leader development is identified. It matches managers’ diversities and the realities of managerial work better than traditional leader development does.

  • 76.
    Andersson, Thomas
    et al.
    University of Skövde, School of Business. University of Skövde, Enterprises for the Future.
    Tengblad, Stefan
    University of Skövde, School of Business. University of Skövde, Enterprises for the Future.
    Medledarskap: Ledarskap som kollektiv initiativförmåga2015In: Ledarskapsboken / [ed] Sten Jönsson, Lars Strannegård, Stockholm: Liber, 2015, 2, p. 248-272Chapter in book (Refereed)
  • 77.
    Andersson, William
    et al.
    University of Skövde, School of Business.
    Gustafsson, Andreas
    University of Skövde, School of Business.
    Styrningens påverkan på butikschefers motivation2014Independent thesis Basic level (degree of Bachelor), 10 credits / 15 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [en]

    Background: Since the 1990s, the major clothing companies have taken an increasingly large market share. This has led to that the clothing industry has become more centralized. Because of this, the store manager who has primary responsibility for the store is more guided in their work. The store manager has goals to relate to while he or she is guided in their actions to achieve their goals.

    Purpose: The aim is that through interviews provide an understanding of how the store managers' motivation is influenced by the designed control system and explain what motivators store managers find most motivating in their work.

    Implementation: The study was conducted by six semi-structured interviews with store managers and is thus a qualitative approach. This methodology allows for the study of store managers in more depth. The interviews have transcribed and then analyzed using the theoretical framework of the study. The four clothing companies in the study all have a turnover of over 1 billion annually and uses a centralized control.

    Outcome: Store managers in the study pronounce that their goals must be perceived as fair to be motivating. It is also important to the long-term budgetary objective, combined with short-term goals, as several goals at work are perceived as positive and the long term goal does not feel as distant. Responsibility is an important part of the work, however more responsibility does not always lead to higher motivation and therefore store managers' cases should be at a reasonable level. Feedback is something that store managers need regularly. It is important that feedback not only contains information about the results, but they also want to get a directive on how they can change the work for the better.

  • 78.
    Andersén, Jim
    Swedish Business School at Örebro University, Örebro, Sweden.
    A critical examination of the EO-performance relationship2010In: International Journal of Entrepreneurial Behaviour & Research, ISSN 1355-2554, E-ISSN 1758-6534, Vol. 16, no 4, p. 309-328Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Purpose The purpose of this study is to critically analyze the assertion that there is a statistical significant relationship between EO and performance. Design In several publications it has been stated that there is a positive relationship between entrepreneurial orientation (EO) and the performance of a firm. These studies have generally used the same core references, and these seminal contributions are examined critically in this article. The EO-performance relationship is also analyzed in an empirical study, consisting of 172 Swedish SMEs in the manufacturing sector. Findings The result of the literature review is that the notion of a positive EO-performance relationship can be questioned. Earlier studies have neglected some important issues, mainly regarding the use of perceptual performance data, common method biases and survival biases. Some of the conclusions presented are supported by the empirical study. Originality/value The main point of this paper is to show that the relationship between EO and performance is more complicated than previous studies have implied. More care should be taken when generalizing the results of core references and scholars ought to have a more cautious approach when stating that there is a general correlation between EO and performance.

  • 79.
    Andersén, Jim
    Örebro universitet, Handelshögskolan vid Örebro universitet.
    A resource-based taxonomy of manufacturing MSMEs2012In: International Journal of Entrepreneurial Behaviour & Research, ISSN 1355-2554, E-ISSN 1758-6534, Vol. 18, no 1, p. 98-122Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Purpose – The purpose of this paper is to develop a contemporary resource-based taxonomy of manufacturing micro, small, and medium-sized enterprises (MSMEs) and to relate the findings to other small to medium-sized enterprise (SME) taxonomies and to resource-based theory.

    Design/methodology/approach – Cluster analysis of 186 Swedish manufacturing MSMEs. The cluster analysis is based on resources and capabilities. The cluster variables were identified through case studies and a literature review of contemporary studies in resource-based theory.

    Findings – The cluster analysis resulted in identification of six different clusters: Ikeas, conservatives, technocrats, marketeers, craftsmen, and nomads. The results are related to other SME taxonomies and the usefulness of going beyond the one-dimensional scale of entrepreneurs and non-entrepreneurs is discussed.

    Originality/value – Classifications of firms, for example the Miles and Snow typology, have been used successfully in numerous studies. Also, the resource-based view of the firm has had a great impact on business research and there has been increasing interest in MSMEs. However, there are very few contemporary resource-based taxonomies of MSMEs.

  • 80.
    Andersén, Jim
    Örebro universitet, Handelshögskolan vid Örebro universitet.
    Aggregated social representations, sensemaking and entrepreneurial strategies2010Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 81.
    Andersén, Jim
    University of Skövde, School of Business. University of Skövde, Enterprises for the Future.
    Resource orchestration of firm-specific human capital and firm performance: the role of collaborative human resource management and entrepreneurial orientation2019In: International Journal of Human Resource Management, ISSN 0958-5192, E-ISSN 1466-4399Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Firm-specific human capital (HC) is widely recognised as the most important resource for superior firm performance. Contemporary literature on the resource-based view (RBV) and resource orchestration has stressed the importance of organising resources, such as firmspecific HC, in order to fully exploit them. However, companies with idiosyncratic resources cannot rely on established resource exploitation practices, making the exploitation of firmspecific HC a complex issue. Nevertheless, few studies have empirically examined how to orchestrate firm-specific HC. Therefore, the aim of this study is to examine how resource orchestration – operationalised as collaborative human resource management (CHRM) and entrepreneurial orientation (EO) both individually and combined – moderates the relationship between firm-specific HC and firm performance. Based on a sample of 151 Swedish manufacturing firms, the findings demonstrate that CHRM and EO do not independently influence the relationship between firm-specific HC and performance. However, firms with firm-specific HC benefit from either being highly entrepreneurial and relying on CHRM or being non-entrepreneurial and not focusing on CHRM; they perform worst if they are entrepreneurial without using CHRM. Whereas previous RBV-studies on resource exploitation have mainly stressed that HC has to be exploited, this study contributes to the RBV by examining how firm-specific HC should be exploited.

  • 82.
    Andersén, Jim
    Örebro universitet, Handelshögskolan vid Örebro universitet.
    Resource-based competitiveness: managerial implications of the resource-based view2010In: Strategic Direction, ISSN 0258-0543, E-ISSN 1758-8588, Vol. 26, no 5, p. 3-5Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Purpose:                           

    The purpose of this article is to identify and discuss the practical implications of the resource based-view of the firm.

    Methodology:                   

    Review of relevant literature.

    Findings:                           

    A number of recommendations are put forward and the practical implications constitute the main findings of this study.

    Practical implications:     

    The implications can be summarized by these recommendations: Diversify based on capabilities and not on the markets you are currently serving, focus on creating value together with your customers based on your resources instead of offering a set of products, integrate HRM practices with strategic management processes. The complexity of imitating resources is also discussed.

    Originality:                      

    Few publications have set out to develop implications of the resource-based view from a CEO’s point of view. This paper provides an easy-to-access review and summary of some of the main implications of the resource-based view.

  • 83.
    Andersén, Jim
    University of Skövde, School of Business.
    SHRM, employee wellbeing and firm performance: Some initial propositions on the relationships and identification of moderating variables2013In: Proceedings of the 23rd International Business Research Conference, 2013Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 84.
    Andersén, Jim
    Swedish Business School, Örebro University, Örebro, Sweden.
    Strategic resources and firm performance2011In: Management Decision, ISSN 0025-1747, E-ISSN 1758-6070, Vol. 49, no 1, p. 87-98Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Purpose – Numerous studies have set out to examine the relationship between strategic resources and firm performance. The traditional VRIO attributes have been the point of departure in most resource-based studies. This paper sets out to argue that the relationship between resources and performance is more complex. Thus, the purpose of this paper is to illustrate the complex relationship between a strategic resource and firm performance by providing an overview of different factors that can influence this relationship.

    Design/methodology/approach – Relevant literature is reviewed and discussed.

    Findings – It was found that five criteria must be fulfilled for resources to generate superior performance. These are identified and discussed. These criteria fit with existing resources, management capability, marketing capability, firm appropriation of rent, and non-competitive disadvantages.

    Research limitations/implications – By using the criteria identified, resource-based theory can become less tautological. Also, the criteria highlight the importance of resource utilization and appropriation of resource-based rents.

    Practical implications – The paper could contribute to an increased awareness among practitioners of the importance of focusing on factors which are additional to the VRIO-attributes when analyzing potential strategic resources. The criteria provide an easy-to-access framework for strategic analysis.

    Originality/value – Whereas some specific aspects of the relationship between the possession of resources and firm performance have been reviewed in some RBT contributions, few studies have addressed the issue using a more holistic approach. Thus, this paper affords a broader approach on the relationship between strategic resources and firm performance.

  • 85.
    Andersén, Jim
    University of Skövde, School of Business. University of Skövde, Enterprises for the Future.
    The absorptive capacity of family firms - how familiness affects potential and realized absorptive capacity2015In: Journal of Family Business Management, ISSN 2043-6238, E-ISSN 2043-6246, Vol. 5, no 1, p. 73-89Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Purpose

    Absorptive capacity is a key competitive advantage and is defined as the capacity to absorb knowledge from the environment. Although some studies have examined how various antecedents to absorptive capacity differ between family firms and non-family firms, no studies have set out to specifically analyze absorptive capacity in the context of family firms. This paper discusses the ability of family firms to absorb external knowledge by analyzing the relationship between “familiness” and “absorptive capacity”.

    Design/methodology/approach

    By reviewing and combining studies on absorptive capacity and knowledge-management practices of family firms, new insights into the absorptive capacity of family firms are developed.

    Findings

    It is argued that due to higher levels of social capital, familiness is positively related to the ability to transform and use external knowledge (i.e. realized absorptive capacity). However, firms with high levels of familiness are likely to be inferior in acquiring and assimilating external knowledge (i.e. potential absorptive capacity).

    Originality/value

    Although previous studies have analyzed various knowledge-management practices of family firms, no studies have set out to specifically explore how familiness affects various dimensions of absorptive capacity.

  • 86.
    Andersén, Jim
    Örebro universitet, Handelshögskolan vid Örebro universitet.
    The Competitiveness of Chinese SMEs2010In: Business, Finance and Economics of China / [ed] Lian Guo, Fai Zong, New York: Nova Science Publishers, Inc., 2010, p. 129-141Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 87.
    Andersén, Jim
    University of Skövde, School of Business. University of Skövde, Enterprises for the Future.
    What about the employees in entrepreneurial firms?: A multi-level analysis of the relationship between entrepreneurial orientation, role ambiguity, and social support2017In: International Small Business Journal, ISSN 0266-2426, E-ISSN 1741-2870, Vol. 35, no 8, p. 969-990Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Research on entrepreneurial orientation (EO) has mainly addressed outcomes of EO at the level of the firm. However, few studies have examined how EO affects employees. Using a multi-level analysis of 343 employees nested in 25 SMEs, revealed that EO will increase the degree of role ambiguity among employees. Social support from management was not found to have any effect on the relationship between EO and role ambiguity. However, social support from co-workers weakens the EO-ambiguity relationship and can counteract the negative effects of EO to some degree. The study contributes to the EO literature by being one of very few that have considered possible negative consequences of EO, and it also highlights how to reduce role ambiguity in entrepreneurial SMEs.

  • 88.
    Andersén, Jim
    et al.
    University of Skövde, School of Business. University of Skövde, Enterprises for the Future.
    Andersén, Annelie
    Karlstad University.
    Are high-performance work systems (HPWS) appreciated by everyone?: The role of management position and gender on the relationship between HPWS and affective commitment2019In: Employee relations, ISSN 0142-5455, E-ISSN 1758-7069, Vol. 41, no 5, p. 1046-1064Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Purpose:  Although most studies on HPWS focus on various firm-level outcomes, there has been an increasing interest in how employees are affected by HPWS. However, most of these studies use social exchange theory and, based on an idea of reciprocal exchange, implicitly assume that all employees become more affectively committed to organizations using HPWS.  Based on social identity theory, we argue that management position and gender likely influence how individuals respond to HPWS. Thus, the aim of this study is to examine how HPWS affects affective commitment among managers, subordinates, men, and women.

    Design/methodology/approach: Hierarchical linear model analysis of 356 employees in 26 Swedish small and medium-sized manufacturing companies.

    Findings: In the sample examined, managers and women show increased affective commitment in organizations using HPWS. For men with non-managerial positions, the results indicate a reversed relationship, i.e. HPWS could actually reduce affective commitment.

    Originality/value: The findings indicate the need to consider individual differences when examining the effect of HPWS, and highlight the usefulness of relational-oriented theories when studying the employee outcomes of HRM systems.

  • 89.
    Andersén, Jim
    et al.
    University of Skövde, School of Business. University of Skövde, Enterprises for the Future.
    Andersén, Annelie
    University of Skövde, School of Health and Education. University of Skövde, Health and Education.
    Deconstructing resistance to organizational change – A social representation theory approach2014In: International Journal of Organizational Analysis, ISSN 1934-8835, E-ISSN 1758-8561, Vol. 22, no 3, p. 342-355Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Purpose - Social representation theory (SRT) is a growing theory in social psychology research. SRT is about how individuals co-construct representations of various objects in different social settings. These social representations govern the attitudes and actions of individuals and groups. In spite of the growing interest in SRT in various fields, no studies have used SRT to understand resistance to organizational change. Thus, the purpose of this work is to illustrate how SRT can be used to understand the concept of resistance to change.

    Design/methodology/approach - Review of the relevant literature on resistance to change and SRT in order to develop a conceptual framework for understanding resistance from the standpoint of SRT.

    Findings - We develop a model that illustrates how three interrelated objects, i.e. the organizational process and the pre- and post-change situation, are co-constructed in social contexts. Also, we discuss how representations of these objects can co-exist (cognitive polyphasia). Our study illustrates the complexity of resistance to change by deconstructing the concept.

    Originality/value - Application of SRT in order to analyze resistance to organizational change is a novel approach that provides several new insights. For example, whereas most publications regard advocates of change as sense-givers in the change recipient’s sense-making process, we argue for a more constructionist approach. Thus, all actors involved in the change process will affect each other and together co-construct the social representations. These social representations govern attitudes to change.

  • 90.
    Andersén, Jim
    et al.
    University of Skövde, School of Business. University of Skövde, Enterprises for the Future.
    Jansson, Christian
    University of Skövde, School of Business. University of Skövde, Enterprises for the Future.
    Ljungkvist, Torbjörn
    University of Skövde, School of Business. University of Skövde, Enterprises for the Future.
    A Dynamic Approach to Causal Ambiguity - How Organizational Learning Affects Causal Ambiguity2015In: Proceedings of ICICKM 2015 The 12th International Conference on Intellectual Capital Knowledge Management and Organisational Learning / [ed] Vincent Ribière & Lugkana Worasinchai, Academic Conferences and Publishing International Limited , 2015Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 91.
    Andersén, Jim
    et al.
    University of Skövde, School of Business. University of Skövde, Enterprises for the Future.
    Jansson, Christian
    University of Skövde, School of Business. University of Skövde, Enterprises for the Future.
    Ljungkvist, Torbjörn
    University of Skövde, School of Business. University of Skövde, Enterprises for the Future.
    A model for measuring resource immobility2014Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 92.
    Andersén, Jim
    et al.
    University of Skövde, School of Business. University of Skövde, Enterprises for the Future.
    Jansson, Christian
    University of Skövde, School of Business. University of Skövde, Enterprises for the Future.
    Ljungkvist, Torbjörn
    University of Skövde, School of Business. University of Skövde, Enterprises for the Future.
    Can environmentally oriented CEOs and environmentally friendly suppliers boost the growth of small firms?2019In: Business Strategy and the Environment, ISSN 0964-4733, E-ISSN 1099-0836Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The core question addressed in the natural resource‐based view (NRBV) of the firm is how to develop and exploit resources beneficial for both the natural environment and firm performance. Due to the resource constraints and increased competition facing small manufacturing firms, achieving this is a challenge for such companies. Building on the NRBV and resource orchestration literatures, we examine the relationship between green purchasing capabilities (GPCs), CEO's environmental orientation(EO), and firm growth. Results from 304 Swedish small manufacturing firms indicate a significant relationship between GPC and growth, and this relationship is positively moderated by the EO of the CEO.

  • 93.
    Andersén, Jim
    et al.
    University of Skövde, School of Business. University of Skövde, Enterprises for the Future.
    Jansson, Christian
    University of Skövde, School of Business. University of Skövde, Enterprises for the Future.
    Ljungkvist, Torbjörn
    University of Skövde, Enterprises for the Future. University of Skövde, School of Business.
    Rent appropriation management of strategic human capital in practice2017Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 94.
    Andersén, Jim
    et al.
    University of Skövde, School of Business. University of Skövde, Enterprises for the Future.
    Jansson, Christian
    University of Skövde, School of Business. University of Skövde, Enterprises for the Future.
    Ljungkvist, Torbjörn
    University of Skövde, School of Business. University of Skövde, Enterprises for the Future.
    Resource immobility and sustained performance: A systematic assessment of how immobility has been considered in empirical resource-based studies2016In: International journal of management reviews (Print), ISSN 1460-8545, E-ISSN 1468-2370, Vol. 18, no 4, p. 371-396Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The core notion of the resource-based view (RBV) is that the possession of certain resources can result in superior performance and, in order for this performance to be sustained, these resources cannot be perfectly mobile. Whereas previous reviews have mainly focused on the relationship between resources and temporary performance, no studies have systematically analyzed the extent to which empirical RBV studies have specifically considered immobility of resources. By analyzing a sample of 218 empirical RBV studies, the authors found that 17% of the studies directly measured some dimension of immobility (by, for example, actually measuring the level of social complexity, unique history, tacitness or tradability). Fewer than 2% of the studies measured the outcome of resource immobility, i.e. sustained performance differences. Based on these results, this paper discusses the consequences of overlooking this key dimension of the RBV (i.e. immobility) and suggests that, and discusses how, future research should consider resource immobility to a greater extent.

  • 95.
    Andersén, Jim
    et al.
    Örebro universitet, Handelshögskolan vid Örebro universitet.
    Kask, Johan
    Örebro universitet, Handelshögskolan vid Örebro universitet.
    Asymmetrically realized absorptive capacity and relationship durability2012In: Management Decision, ISSN 0025-1747, E-ISSN 1758-6070, Vol. 50, no 1, p. 43-57Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Purpose – Absorbing knowledge from partner firms is a key feature of marketing relationships. Recent publications have called for more dynamic and cognitive approaches in marketing relationship research. Also, established definitions of absorptive capacities have been questioned. This article aims to address propositions that take these overlooked and questioned elements into consideration, which can help explain conducts and dependencies, and affect relationship durability.

    Design/methodology/approach – The authors put forward four propositions by combining literature on interfirm relationships and managerial cognition with evolutionary ideas from marketing and management literature.

    Findings – The authors embrace a redefinition of potential absorptive capacity (the disposed capacity to absorb knowledge) and realized absorptive capacity (the absorption of knowledge actually performed). This distinction can, to some extent, be explained by the degree of cognitive attention given to the marketing relationship. Moreover, asymmetrically realized absorptive capacityvis-à-vis a partner substantially influences the dynamics of partners' conduct and dependency, which may vary the risk that the relationship will end.

    Practical implications – The propositions illustrate how a motivated partner that gives more attention to the relationship is more likely to absorb more knowledge than its counterpart, which can threaten the durability of a relationship. Thus, managers need to be able to understand possible long-term consequences of the partner's conduct in order to avoid losses of joint strategic resources and relational benefits.

    Originality/value – By advocating an evolutionary approach, an impetus for more dynamism in marketing relationship research is presented. This study also shows the importance of including the longitudinal dimension in analysis if one wants to understand change in – and durability of – marketing relationships.

  • 96.
    Andersén, Jim
    et al.
    University of Skövde, School of Business. University of Skövde, Enterprises for the Future.
    Ljungkvist, Torbjörn
    University of Skövde, School of Business. University of Skövde, Enterprises for the Future.
    Entrepreneurial orientation and employee well-being2015Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 97.
    Andersén, Jim
    et al.
    University of Skövde, School of Business. University of Skövde, Enterprises for the Future.
    Ljungkvist, Torbjörn
    University of Skövde, School of Business. University of Skövde, Enterprises for the Future.
    Jansson, Christian
    University of Skövde, School of Business. University of Skövde, Enterprises for the Future.
    An integrated approach to rent appropriation and rent generation2016Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 98.
    Andersén, Jim
    et al.
    University of Skövde, School of Business. University of Skövde, Enterprises for the Future.
    Ljungkvist, Torbjörn
    University of Skövde, School of Business. University of Skövde, Enterprises for the Future.
    Svensson, Lotten
    University of Skövde, School of Business. University of Skövde, Enterprises for the Future.
    Entrepreneurially oriented in what? A business model approach to entrepreneurship2015In: Journal of Small Business and Enterprise Development, ISSN 1462-6004, E-ISSN 1758-7840, Vol. 22, no 3, p. 433-449Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Purpose – The purpose of this paper is to illustrate and argue for the necessity of deconstructing the entrepreneurship concept by analyzing entrepreneurial orientation (EO) at various levels of the business model.

    Design/methodology/approach – Literature review supplemented with five illustrative cases.

    Findings – A business model approach to entrepreneurship enables identification of the component of the business model in which entrepreneurship was started. This has several implications for analysis of the EO-performance relationship and for the identification of antecedents to EO.

    Originality/value – The EO of firms has generally been analyzed at a generic level, i.e. the concept has been used to measure and analyze the overall entrepreneurship of firms. In this paper, the authors argue that EO can be present in various dimensions of a business and that firms can be entrepreneurial in certain areas and conservative in other areas.

  • 99.
    Andersén, Jim
    et al.
    University of Skövde, School of Business. University of Skövde, Enterprises for the Future.
    Samuelsson, Joachim
    University of Skövde, School of Business. University of Skövde, Enterprises for the Future.
    Resource organization and firm performance: How entrepreneurial orientation and management accounting influence the profitability of growing and non-growing SMEs2016In: International Journal of Entrepreneurial Behaviour & Research, ISSN 1355-2554, E-ISSN 1758-6534, Vol. 22, no 4, p. 466-484Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Purpose

    The aim of this study is to examine how entrepreneurial orientation (EO) and the use of management accounting practices (MAPs) in decision making affects the profitability of SMEs, and also to analyze the extent to which EO and the use of MAPs affects profitability differently in growing and non-growing SMEs.

    Design/methodology/approach

    The paper employs an empirical investigation which is based on a sample of 153 Swedish manufacturing SMEs. The data is analyzed by two- and three way interaction regressions.

    Findings

    EO and MAPs have a positive effect on profitability in non-growing SMEs, but the combined effect of EO and MAPs has no additional effect. However, for growing SMEs, high usage of MAPs in decision making is a prerequisite for EO to influence profitability.

    Originality/value

    This study is the first to use the resource-based view to examine the relationship between two dimensions of resource organization and SME profitability. Entrepreneurial orientation (EO) is used as a proxy for how resources are organized in order to identify opportunities, and management accounting practices (MAPs) are used as a proxy for how efficiently resources are organized.

  • 100.
    Arslanovic, Senad
    et al.
    University of Skövde, School of Business.
    Kämpe Nilsson, Christoffer
    University of Skövde, School of Business.
    Employer branding för att attrahera och rekrytera talangfull personal: En studie om hur organisationer kan använda Employer branding för att attrahera och rekrytera talangfull personal2019Independent thesis Basic level (degree of Bachelor), 10 credits / 15 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [en]

    Background: The struggle for talents is a problem that can exist in a labour market. Organizations must differentiate themselves to compete for talent. To attracting and recruiting has become a more important dilemma for organizations. The organization wants to attract and recruit the talents to its organization, since this means market benefits and that the organization can be more attractive. Therefore, it is important to highlight why and to understand how organizations can use Employer branding to attract and recruit talented staff.

    Purpose: The purpose is to investigate how organizations use Employer branding to recruit talented staff and thereby explain the connection between studies and business.

    Method: In order to be able to answer the purpose of the report, a qualitative study with six interviews was conducted with managers at each organization. The interviews were conducted to gain a deeper understanding of how Employer branding can be used by organizations. In addition to interviews, observations were performed on the organisation's social media to investigate how this corresponds to what has been said in the interviews. The respondents were selected based on their relevant professional role in each organization, which is considered to have knowledge and experience within Employer branding and recruitment.

    Result/Conclusion: The study has concluded that the organizations find it difficult to define talent. The organizations that has been interviewed to the study agreed that talent was important with talented staff. Organizations can use Employer branding as a marketing strategy to attract and recruit talented workers to their organization. To use Employer branding organizations can work with four components: organizational attributes, promotion & communication channels, formation of employer image and employer attractiveness. The study organizations are positive towards the components and use them to a large extent. The organizations use marketing and communication channels to showcase their brand, which candidates they are looking for and what is important with the service. All organizations also think it is important to have a good image because it shows that organizations can be attractive in the future. The organizations members try to perform well in the organizations interests outside the workplace. Employer branding can thus be used as a strategy to reach out to talents in a labour market.

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