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  • 51.
    Eriksson, Irene
    et al.
    University of Skövde, School of Health and Education. University of Skövde, Health and Education.
    Olofsson, Birgitta
    Department of Nursing Umeå University, Umeå, Sweden.
    Gustafson, Yngve
    Department of Community Medicine and Rehabilitation, Geriatric Medicine, Umeå University, Umeå, Sweden.
    Fagerström, Lisbeth
    Department of Health Sciences, University of Buskerud, Drammen, Norway.
    Older women's experiences of suffering from urinary tract infections2014In: Journal of Clinical Nursing, ISSN 0962-1067, E-ISSN 1365-2702, Vol. 23, no 9-10, p. 1385-1394Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Aims and objectives: To describe and explore older women's experiences of having had repeated urinary tract infections (UTIs). Background: UTIs are one of the most common bacterial infections among older women. Approximately one-third of very old women suffer from at least one UTI each year. Despite the high incidence of UTI, little is known about the impact of UTI on health and daily life in older women. Design: A qualitative descriptive design. Methods: A qualitative study using semi-structured interviews was conducted with 20 Swedish women aged 67-96 years who suffered from repeated UTIs the preceding year. The data were analysed using qualitative content analysis. Results: Two main themes were identified: being in a state of manageable suffering and depending on alleviation. Being in a state of manageable suffering was described in terms of experiencing physical and psychological health problems, struggling to deal with the illness and being restricted in daily life. Depending on alleviation was illustrated in terms of having access to relief but also receiving inadequate care. Conclusions: This study demonstrated that UTIs are a serious health problem among older women that not only affects both physical and mental health but also has serious social consequences. The women in this study described the physical and psychological health problems, struggling to deal with the illness, being restricted in daily life, depending on access to relief and receiving inadequate care. Relevance to clinical practice: It is important to improve the knowledge about how UTI affects the health of older women. This knowledge may help nurses develop strategies to support these women. One important part in the supportive strategies is that nurses can educate these women in self-care. © 2013 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  • 52.
    Fioretto, Paola
    et al.
    Department of Medicine, University of Padova, Padova, Italy.
    Del Prato, Stefano
    Department of Clinical & Experimental Medicine, University of Pisa, Pisa, Italy.
    Buse, John B.
    Department of Medicine, University of North Carolina School of Medicine, Chapel Hill, North Carolina, USA.
    Goldenberg, Ronald
    LMC Diabetes & Endocrinology, Thornhill, Canada.
    Giorgino, Francesco
    Department of Emergency and Organ Transplantation, University of Bari Aldo Moro, Bari, Italy.
    Reyner, Daniel
    AstraZeneca, Gaithersburg, Maryland, USA.
    Langkilde, Anna Maria
    AstraZeneca, Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Sjöstrom, C. David
    AstraZeneca, Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Sartipy, Peter
    University of Skövde, School of Bioscience. University of Skövde, The Systems Biology Research Centre. AstraZeneca, Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Efficacy and safety of dapagliflozin in patients with type 2 diabetes and moderate renal impairment (chronic kidney disease stage 3A): The DERIVE Study2018In: Diabetes, obesity and metabolism, ISSN 1462-8902, E-ISSN 1463-1326, Vol. 20, no 11, p. 2532-2540Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Aims: Dapagliflozin is a selective inhibitor of sodium glucose co-transporter 2 (SGLT2). This study assessed the efficacy and safety of dapagliflozin 10 mg vs placebo in patients with type 2 diabetes (T2D) and moderate renal impairment (estimated glomerular filtration rate [eGFR], 45-59 mL/min/1.73 m(2); chronic kidney disease [CKD] stage 3A). Materials and methods: In this double-blind, parallel group, Phase 3 study (NCT02413398, ) patients with inadequately controlled T2D (HbA1c 7.0%-11.0%) were randomized (1:1) to dapagliflozin 10 mg once daily (N = 160) or matching placebo (N = 161) for 24 weeks. Randomization was stratified by pre-enrolment glucose-lowering therapy. The primary endpoint was change from baseline in HbA1c at Week 24. Results: At Week 24, compared with placebo, dapagliflozin significantly decreased HbA1c (difference [95% CI], -0.34% [-0.53, -0.15]; P < 0.001), body weight (difference [95% CI], -1.25 kg [-1.90, -0.59]; P < 0.001), fasting plasma glucose (difference [95% CI], -0.9 mmol/L [-1.5, -0.4]; P = 0.001) and systolic blood pressure (difference [95% CI], -3.1 mmHg [-6.3, 0.0]; P < 0.05). Decreases from baseline in eGFR were greater with dapagliflozin than placebo at Week 24 (-2.49 mL/min/1.73 m(2) [-4.96, -0.02]), however, eGFR returned to baseline levels at Week 27 (3 weeks post-treatment) (0.61 mL/min/1.73 m(2) [-1.59, 2.81]). No increase in adverse events (AEs; 41.9% vs 47.8%) or serious AEs (5.6% vs 8.7%) were reported with dapagliflozin versus placebo. No AEs of bone fractures, amputations or DKA were reported. Conclusions: The findings of this study (NCT02413398, ) support the positive benefit/risk profile of dapagliflozin for the treatment of patients with T2D and CKD 3A.

  • 53.
    Franx, Bart A. A.
    et al.
    Department of Anatomy, Donders Institute for Brain, Cognition and Behaviour, Radboud University Medical Center, Nijmegen, The Netherlands.
    Arnoldussen, Ilse A. C.
    Department of Anatomy, Donders Institute for Brain, Cognition and Behaviour, Radboud University Medical Center, Nijmegen, The Netherlands.
    Kiliaan, Amanda J.
    Department of Anatomy, Donders Institute for Brain, Cognition and Behaviour, Radboud University Medical Center, Nijmegen, The Netherlands.
    Gustafson, Deborah R.
    University of Skövde, School of Health and Education. University of Skövde, Health and Education. Department of Neurology, Section for NeuroEpidemiology, State University of New York, Downstate Medical Center, USA / Neuropsychiatric Epidemiology Unit (EPINEP), Institute for Neuroscience and Physiology, Sahlgrenska Academy at the University of Gothenburg, Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Weight Loss in Patients with Dementia: Considering the Potential Impact of Pharmacotherapy2017In: Drugs & Aging, ISSN 1170-229X, E-ISSN 1179-1969, Vol. 34, no 6, p. 425-436Article, review/survey (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Unintentional body weight loss is common in patients with dementia and is linked to cognitive impairment and poorer disease outcomes. It is proposed that some dementia medications with market approval, while aiming to improve cognitive and functional outcomes of a patient with dementia, are associated with reported body weight or body mass index loss. This review presents evidence in the published literature on body weight loss in dementia, describes selected theories behind body weight loss, evaluates the potential impact of approved dementia pharmacotherapies on body weight, considers the potential role for medical foods, understands the potential influence of treatments for neuropsychiatric symptoms and signs, and finally, summarizes this important area.

  • 54.
    Frost, Morgan
    University of Skövde, School of Bioscience.
    Social perception in Autism: An eye tracking and pupillometric study2018Independent thesis Advanced level (degree of Master (One Year)), 20 credits / 30 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [en]

    Typically developing humans innately place subjective value on social information and orient attention to it. This can be shown through eye tracking and pupillometry, a method used to show attentional engagement. Social brain development and social preference is present from infancy, and is thought to rely on a carefully balanced network of neurotransmitters and neural connections. Autism Spectrum Disorder (ASD) presents altered neural systems which cause individuals to perceive and process social information differently, but the neurophysiology of this difference remains unclear. Previous research shows atypical gaze patterns, hyperarousal, and lack of orienting to social stimuli in ASD. Since autism is highly comorbid and shares traits with other neurodevelopmental disorders, it is difficult to distinguish aspects of these social processing differences. This study used a group of 35 neuropsychiatric patients to investigate how individuals with autism process social and non-social scenes. Eye tracking and pupillometry measures were collected while participants observed images of natural scenes with or without a person. Participants with autism did not show a pupillary response to social images and were slower to fixate on the face  region than the other participants. Additionally there were correlations between clinical measures of social functioning and the length of time it took to fixate to faces. The results highlight important distinctions of social processing in autism. This thesis proposes a new perspective of looking at the social deficits present in autism spectrum disorder. It suggests reframing the current discussion from two leading hypotheses to a unified approach and formally considering the limitations of differing types of stimuli.

  • 55.
    Gillsjö, Catharina
    et al.
    University of Skövde, School of Life Sciences.
    Schwartz-Barcott, Donna
    University of Rhode Island.
    von Post, Iréne
    Åbo Academy University, Vasa.
    Home: The place the older adult can not imagine living without2011In: BMC Geriatrics, ISSN 1471-2318, E-ISSN 1471-2318, Vol. 11, no 10Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: Rapidly aging populations with an increased desire to remain at home and changes in health policy that promote the transfer of health care from formal places, as hospitals and institutions, to the more informal setting of one's home support the need for   further research that is designed specifically to understand the experience of home among older adults. Yet, little is known among health care providers about the older adult's experience of home. The aim of this study was to understand the experience of home as experienced by older adults living in a rural community in Sweden.

    Methods: Hermeneutical interpretation, as developed by von Post and Eriksson and based on Gadamer's philosophical hermeneutics, was used to interpret interviews with six older adults. The interpretation included a self examination of the researcher's experiences and   prejudices and proceeded through several readings which integrated the text with the   reader, allowed new questions to emerge, fused the horizons, summarized main and sub-themes and allowed a new understanding to emerge.

    Results: Two main and six sub-themes emerged. Home was experienced as the place the older adult could not imagine living without but also as the place one might be forced to leave. The older adult's thoughts vacillated between the well known present and all its comforts and the unknown future with all its questions and fears, including the underlying   threat of loosing one's home.

    Conclusions: Home has become so integral to life itself and such an intimate part of the older adult's being that when older adults lose their home, they also loose the place closest   to their heart, the place where they are at home and can maintain their identity, integrity and way of living. Additional effort needs to be made to understand the older adult's experience of home within home health care in order to minimize intrusion and maximize care. There is a need to more fully explore the older adult's experience with health care providers in the home and its impact on the older adult's sense of "being at home" and their health and overall well-being.

  • 56.
    Gunterberg, V.
    et al.
    Department of Internal Medicine and Clinical Nutrition, Sahlgrenska Academy, University of Gothenburg, Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Simrén, M.
    Department of Internal Medicine and Clinical Nutrition, Sahlgrenska Academy, University of Gothenburg, Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Öhman, Lena
    Department of Internal Medicine and Clinical Nutrition, Sahlgrenska Academy, University of Gothenburg, Gothenburg, Sweden / Department of Microbiology and Immunology, Sahlgrenska Academy, University of Gothenburg, Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Friberg, P.
    Department of Clinical Physiology, Sahlgrenska Academy, University of Gothenburg, Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Jones, M. P.
    Psychology Faculty, Macquarie University, Sydney, NSW, Australia.
    Van Oudenhove, L.
    Translational Research Center for Gastrointestinal Disorders (TARGID), Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, University of Leuven, Leuven, Belgium.
    Strid, H.
    Department of Internal Medicine and Clinical Nutrition, Sahlgrenska Academy, University of Gothenburg, Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Autonomic nervous system function predicts the inflammatory response over three years in newly diagnosed ulcerative colitis patients2016In: Neurogastroenterology and Motility, ISSN 1350-1925, E-ISSN 1365-2982, Vol. 28, no 11, p. 1655-1662Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    BACKGROUND: The autonomic nervous system (ANS) modulates intestinal inflammation in animal models. Human evidence confirming such modulating influence is limited. We aimed to investigate whether ANS function is associated with inflammatory parameters at disease onset, and whether it predicts the evolution of inflammation in patients with ulcerative colitis (UC).

    METHODS: We prospectively monitored 51 patients from onset of UC for 3 years. Upon remission of the onset flare, ANS activity was assessed by heart rate variability analysis and compared with healthy controls. Inflammatory parameters in blood, stool, and colonic biopsies obtained at onset and during follow-up visits were analyzed. Generalized linear models were used to test cross-sectional associations between ANS activity and inflammatory parameters at onset; linear mixed models were used to test whether ANS function at onset predicted the evolution of inflammation over the following 3 years.

    KEY RESULTS: Sympathovagal balance was different in UC patients compared to healthy controls, and cross-sectional associated with higher levels of systemic (erythrocyte sedimentation rate [ESR], CRP, TNF-α, IFN-γ) and mucosal inflammation (interleukin-8, IFN-γ) at onset. Conversely, a negative cross-sectional association with parasympathetic activity was found for ESR & TNF-α. Longitudinally, parasympathetic activity at onset predicted systemic (ESR, WBC), but not mucosal inflammation during follow-up.

    CONCLUSIONS & INFERENCES: This study further strengthens the association between the ANS system and intestinal inflammation previously found in animal models and recently in patients with inflammatory bowel disease. These results may have important implications for the pathogenesis and treatment of UC.

  • 57.
    Gustafson, Deborah R.
    University of Skövde, School of Health and Education. University of Skövde, Health and Education. Department of Neurology, State University of New York Downstate Medical Center, New York, USA.
    Adipose Tissue Complexities in Dyslipidemias2019In: Dyslipidemia / [ed] Samy I. McFarlane, London: IntechOpen , 2019, p. 1-22Chapter in book (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Adipose tissue is the largest organ in the human body and, in excess, contributes to dyslipidemias and the dysregulation of other vascular and metabolic processes. Adipose tissue is heterogeneous, comprised of several cell types based on morphology, cellular age, and endocrine and paracrine function. Adipose tissue depots are also regional, primarily due to sex differences and genetic variation. Adipose tissue is also characterized as subcutaneous vs. visceral. In addition, fatty deposits exist outside of adipose tissue, such as those surrounding the heart, or as infiltration of skeletal muscle. This review focuses on adipose tissue and its contribution to dyslipidemias. Dyslipidemias are defined as circulating blood lipid levels that are too high or altered. Lipids include both traditional and nontraditional species. Leaving aside traditional definitions, adipose tissue contributes to dyslipidemias in a myriad of ways. To address a small portion of this topic, we reviewed (a) adipose tissue location and cell types, (b) body composition, (c) endocrine adipose, (d) the fat-brain axis, and (e) genetic susceptibility. The influence of these complex aspects of adipose tissue on dyslipidemias and human health, illustrating that, once again, that adipose tissue is a quintessential, multifunctional tissue of the human body, will be summarized.

  • 58.
    Gustafson, Deborah R.
    University of Skövde, School of Health and Education. University of Skövde, Health and Education. Department of Neurology, State University of New York, Downstate Medical Center, New York, USA.
    Epidemiology Informs Randomized Clinical Trials of Cognitive Impairments and Late-Onset, Sporadic Dementias2018In: Journal of Neurology & Neuromedicine, ISSN 2572-942X, Vol. 3, no 5, p. 13-18Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 59.
    Gustafson, Deborah R.
    et al.
    University of Skövde, School of Health and Education. University of Skövde, Health and Education.
    McFarlane, S. I.
    Obesity, cardiovascular disease risk and frailty in aging women with HIV infectionIn: Geriatrics, ISSN 2308-3417Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 60.
    Gustafson, Deborah R.
    et al.
    University of Skövde, School of Health and Education. University of Skövde, Health and Education. State University of New York, NY, United States / University of Gothenburg.
    McFarlane, Samy I
    State University of New York, NY, United States.
    Epidemiology of Type 2 Diabetes and Dementia2018In: Type 2 Diabetes and Dementia / [ed] Velandai Srikanth and Zoe Arvanitakis, Elsevier, 2018, p. 5-27Chapter in book (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Type 2 diabetes (T2D) has been associated with dementia in countless observational epidemiology studies. The expansion of epidemiologic research on T2D and dementia is due to scientific recognition of the roles of metabolic and vascular factors as etiologic players in dementia, as well as ominous global demographic shifts in aging, obesity, and dementia. This chapter addresses epidemiologic studies evaluating the association between T2D and late-onset dementias with foci on (1) T2D and dementia as syndromes; (2) T2D and mild cognitive impairment or cognition and cognitive decline; (3) vascular and metabolic risk factors and comorbidities; (4) genetic influences on the T2D-dementia association; (5) ethnoracial considerations; (6) T2D and brain outcomes and biological markers; and (7) clinical trials of T2D medications and cognition and dementia. © 2018 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  • 61.
    Hagberg, Malin
    et al.
    University of Skövde, School of Life Sciences.
    Holmén, Jonathan
    University of Skövde, School of Life Sciences.
    Olausson, Josefin
    University of Skövde, School of Life Sciences.
    Karlsson, Sandra
    University of Skövde, School of Life Sciences.
    Johansson, Viktoria
    University of Skövde, School of Life Sciences.
    Larsson, Dennis
    University of Skövde, School of Life Sciences.
    Rapid activation of JNK/SAPK in LNCaP prostate cancer cells by 1α,25-dihydroxyvitamin D3 is independent of PDIA3 (1,25-MARRS)2008In: Current Topics in Steroid Research, ISSN 0972-4788, Vol. 5, p. 17-24Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    1α,25-dihydroxyvitamin D3 (1,25D3 ) is a highly potential anti-cancerous agent for prevention and treatment of prostate cancer, the most commonly diagnosed cancer type of males in western countries. A recent study by our laboratory, demonstrates that LNCaP cancer cells treated with 1,25D3, evoked dose-dependent activation of the JNK/SAPK MAPK signaling pathway within 10 minutes after hormone treatment, indicative of membrane-initiated steroid signaling (MISS) by 1,25D3. This confirms previous reports on intestinal-, chondrocyte- and osteoblast cells, where 1,25D3 operates through pharmacologically distinct nuclear-initiated mechanisms (NISS) and plasma membrane-initiated mechanisms. NISS is mediated via the vitamin D receptor (nVDR) and MISS is mediated through 1,25D3-MARRS (PDIA3, 1,25D3-membraneassociated rapid response steroid binding protein) or nVDR. The aims of the present study were to investigate the mechanisms of MISS evoked effects on alkaline phosphatase (ALP) and activation of the JNK/SAPK by 1,25D3, and the involvement of PDIA3 in 1,25D3 initiated activation of the JNK/SAPK signaling pathway. Furthermore, 1,25D3-treated LNCaP cells were transfected with siRNA against PDIA3 and phosphorylated JNK/SAPK was estimated by western analysis. Western analysis and ALP-assays demonstrated rapid activation of both JNK/SAPK as well as ALP. Silencing of PDIA3 did not affect 1,25D3 mediated activation of JNK/SAPK, suggesting that PDIA3 is not involved in the 1,25D3-initiated activation of the JNK/SAPK signaling pathway.

  • 62.
    Hammad, Yasser
    et al.
    Department of Anesthesiology, ICU and Perioperative Medicine, Hamad General Hospital, Box 3050, Doha, Qatar / Department Clinical Anesthesiology, Weill Cornell Medicine, Doha, Qatar.
    Elmoghazy, Walid
    Department of Transplant Surgery, Hamad General Hospital, Doha, Qatar / Department of Surgery, Sohag University, Egypt.
    El Ansari, Walid
    University of Skövde, School of Health and Education. University of Skövde, Health and Education. Department of Surgery, Hamad General Hospital, Doha, Qatar / Department of Medical Education, College of Medicine, Qatar University, Doha, Qatar.
    Lance, Marcus
    Department of Anesthesiology, ICU and Perioperative Medicine, Hamad General Hospital, Doha, Qatar / Department Clinical Anesthesiology, Weill Cornell Medicine, Doha, Qatar.
    Zaghw, Ahmed
    Department of Anesthesiology, ICU and Perioperative Medicine, Hamad General Hospital, Doha, Qatar.
    Shallik, Nabil
    Department of Anesthesiology, ICU and Perioperative Medicine, Hamad General Hospital, Doha, Qatar / Department Clinical Anesthesiology, Weill Cornell Medicine, Doha, Qatar / Department of Anesthesia, SICU, Tanta University, Egypt.
    Experimental effect of different dilutions of blood with human plasma protein fraction and large dose factor one on blood coagulation and chemistry in vitro2019In: Indian Journal of Anaesthesia, ISSN 0019-5049, Vol. 63, no 12, p. 1015-1021Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background and Aims: Human plasma protein fraction 5% (PPF5%) is an albumin-based colloid used to expand the plasma volume during volume deficiency. The current basic medical experimental study assessed in vitro coagulation of PPF5% solution and its effects on blood coagulation and chemistry. Methods: The study involved 20 volunteers, and each volunteer donated 20-50 ml of fresh blood. Three dilutions of blood with PPF5% dilutions were prepared (30, 50, and 70%). The fibrinogen dose required to correct coagulation in the 50% diluted samples was assessed (two doses used). The thromboelastogram (TEG) measured the haemostatic parameters (fibrinogen level, initiation of coagulation [R time], kinetics [K], acceleration of coagulation [α angle], maximum amplitude [MA] and coagulation index [CI]), and the ABL gas analyser measured the blood chemistry changes. Results: All dilutions showed significant TEG and blood chemistry changes when compared to controls. The two doses of fibrinogen corrected the clot formation speed with no significant difference in speed between the two doses. Acidosis measured by the strong ion gap (SID) and pH were significant for all dilutions when compared with the baseline. The 30% dilution remained within the lower normal acceptable value while 50% dilution was beyond the critical normal values. Conclusion: In vitro PPF5% to replace blood loss up to 50% dilution did not have significant coagulation and blood chemistry effects while coagulopathy should be expected in extreme dilutions (70%). Fibrinogen in a dose equivalent to 4 gm/70 kg adult improved clot strength at 50% dilution. 

  • 63.
    Handlin, Linda
    et al.
    University of Skövde, School of Health and Education. University of Skövde, Health and Education.
    Muller, Jasmin
    University of Skövde, School of Health and Education. University of Skövde, Health and Education.
    Ekström, Anette
    University of Skövde, School of Health and Education. University of Skövde, Health and Education.
    Promoting health of Swedish workers by complementary methods: example of a study design of a longitudinal randomized controlled intervention study2017In: Medical Research Archives, ISSN 2375-1916, Vol. 5, no 8, p. 1-13Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: When designing, implementing, and evaluating a work site health promotion program, it is necessary to ensure that the program is evidence based. The present article aims to present in-depth information on the design of a longitudinal randomized controlled complementary intervention pilot study that follows the Consort recommendations to evaluate possible effects of a health promotive intervention in healthy workers.

    Methods: Employees from four different workplaces were randomly assigned to one of the following groups: i) Massage and mental training (sitting in the armchair and receiving mechanical massage while listening to mental training programs, n=19), ii) Massage (sitting in the armchair and receiving mechanical massage only, n=19), iii) Mental training (sitting in the armchair and listening to mental training programs only, n=19), iv) Pause (sitting in the armchair but not receiving mechanical massage or listening to mental training programs, n=19), v) Control (not sitting in the armchair at all, n=17). The study lasted for eight weeks. Immediately before the randomization, after four weeks and after eight weeks the participants responded to statements from the Swedish Scale of Personality and had their heart rate, blood pressure and fingertip temperature measured.

    Results: Receiving mechanical massage and listening to mental training programs, either separately or in combination, during working hours had some positive effects on the employees’ own evaluation of their health, as well as their heart rate, blood pressure and fingertip temperature. However, the intervention need to be evaluated further.

    Conclusion: The approach described makes it possible to design, implement and evaluate a work site health promotion program, also on pilot-study level and these results should be seen as a first step towards larger randomized studies. This types of studies need to focus on healthy participants and special care should be taken to guarantee adequately powered study groups and their homogeneity.

  • 64.
    Heerspink, Hiddo J. L.
    et al.
    Department of Clinical Pharmacy and Pharmacology, University of Groningen, University Medical Center, Groningen, Netherlands.
    Sjöström, C. David
    AstraZeneca, Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Inzucchi, Silvio E.
    Section of Endocrinology, Yale University School of Medicine, New Haven, CT, United States.
    Hallow, Melissa K.
    Department of Epidemiology and Biostatistics, University of Georgia School of Public Health, Athens, GA, United States.
    Cain, Valerie A.
    Bogier Clinical and IT Solutions, Inc., Raleigh, NC, United States.
    Rossing, Peter
    Steno Diabetes Center Copenhagen, Gentofte, Denmark / Department of Clinical Medicine, University of Copenhagen, Copenhagen, Denmark.
    Stefansson, Bergur V.
    AstraZeneca, Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Sartipy, Peter
    University of Skövde, School of Bioscience. University of Skövde, The Systems Biology Research Centre. AstraZeneca, Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Reduction in albuminuria with dapagliflozin cannot be predicted by baseline clinical characteristics or changes in most other risk markers2019In: Diabetes, obesity and metabolism, ISSN 1462-8902, E-ISSN 1463-1326, Vol. 21, no 3, p. 720-725Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The sodium glucose co-transporter-2 inhibitor dapagliflozin has been shown to decrease urinary albumin-to-creatinine ratio (UACR). This effect, however, varies among individual patients. In this study, we assessed the baseline characteristics and concurrent changes in other cardiovascular risk markers that might be associated with UACR response to dapagliflozin. A pooled analysis of 11 phase 3 randomized, controlled clinical trials was performed. UACR change from baseline after 24 weeks treatment with dapagliflozin 10 mg/d in 531 patients with type 2 diabetes and UACR ≥30 mg/g at baseline was determined. UACR response was defined as >30% reduction from baseline at 24 weeks, whereas UACR non-response was defined as ≤30% reduction at 24 weeks. A total of 288 (54%) patients were classified as responders and 243 (46%) as non-responders. At 24 weeks, the UACR-adjusted mean change from baseline was −71.2% and 25.9% in responders and non-responders, respectively. Baseline characteristics were similar between both groups. Changes in HbA1c and body weight were comparable across groups. Responders showed a numerically larger reduction in estimated glomerular filtration rate and systolic blood pressure versus non-responders. UACR reduction to dapagliflozin is an individual characteristic that cannot be predicted by baseline clinical features or changes in metabolic variables. Whether UACR response would improve long-term renal and cardiovascular outcomes remains to be determined. 

  • 65.
    Horning, Aaron M.
    et al.
    University of Texas Health Science Center, San Antonio, USA.
    Awe, Julius Adebayo
    University of Skövde, School of Bioscience. University of Skövde, The Systems Biology Research Centre. Manitoba Institute of Cell Biology, University of Manitoba, Winnipeg, Manitoba, Canada / Department of Clinical Genetics, Institute of Biomedicine, Sahlgrenska Academy, University of Gothenburg, Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Wang, Chiou-Miin
    University of Texas Health Science Center, San Antonio, USA.
    Liu, Joseph
    University of Texas Health Science Center, San Antonio, USA.
    Lai, Zhao
    University of Texas Health Science Center, San Antonio, USA.
    Wang, Vickie Yao
    University of Texas Health Science Center, San Antonio, USA.
    Jadhav, Rohit R.
    University of Texas Health Science Center, San Antonio, USA.
    Louie, Anna D.
    University of Texas Health Science Center, San Antonio, USA.
    Lin, Chun-Lin
    University of Texas Health Science Center, San Antonio, USA.
    Kroczak, Tad
    University of Manitoba, Winnipeg, Manitoba, Canada.
    Chen, Yidong
    University of Texas Health Science Center, San Antonio, USA.
    Jin, Victor X.
    University of Texas Health Science Center, San Antonio, USA.
    Abboud-Werner, Sherry L.
    University of Texas Health Science Center, San Antonio, USA.
    Leach, Robin J.
    University of Texas Health Science Center, San Antonio, USA.
    Hernandez, Javior
    University of Texas Health Science Center, San Antonio, USA.
    Thompson, Ian M.
    University of Texas Health Science Center, San Antonio, USA.
    Saranchuk, Jeff
    University of Manitoba, Winnipeg, Canada.
    Drachenberg, Darrel
    University of Manitoba, Winnipeg, Canada.
    Chen, Chun-Liang
    University of Texas Health Science Center, San Antonio, USA.
    Mai, Sabine
    University of Manitoba, Winnipeg, Canada.
    Huang, Tim Hui-Ming
    University of Texas Health Science Center, San Antonio, USA.
    DNA Methylation Screening of Primary Prostate Tumors Identifies SRD5A2 and CYP11A1 as Candidate Markers for Assessing Risk of Biochemical Recurrence2015In: The Prostate, ISSN 0270-4137, E-ISSN 1097-0045, Vol. 75, no 15, p. 1790-1801Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    BACKGROUND. Altered DNA methylation in CpG islands of gene promoters has been implicated in prostate cancer (PCa) progression and can be used to predict disease outcome. In this study, we determine whether methylation changes of androgen biosynthesis pathway (ABP)-related genes in patients' plasma cell-free DNA (cfDNA) can serve as prognostic markers for biochemical recurrence (BCR). METHODS. Methyl-binding domain capture sequencing (MBDCap-seq) was used to identify differentially methylated regions (DMRs) in primary tumors of patients who subsequently developed BCR or not, respectively. Methylation pyrosequencing of candidate loci was validated in cfDNA samples of 86 PCa patients taken at and/or post-radical prostatectomy (RP) using univariate and multivariate prediction analyses. RESULTS. Putative DMRs in 13 of 30 ABP-related genes were found between tumors of BCR (n = 12) versus no evidence of disease (NED) (n = 15). In silico analysis of The Cancer Genome Atlas data confirmed increased DNA methylation of two loci-SRD5A2 and CYP11A1, which also correlated with their decreased expression, in tumors with subsequent BCR development. Their aberrant cfDNA methylation was also associated with detectable levels of PSA taken after patients' post-RP. Multivariate analysis of the change in cfDNA methylation at all of CpG sites measured along with patient's treatment history predicted if a patient will develop BCR with 77.5% overall accuracy. CONCLUSIONS. Overall, increased DNA methylation of SRD5A2 and CYP11A1 related to androgen biosynthesis functions may play a role in BCR after patients' RP. The correlation between aberrant cfDNA methylation and detectable PSA in post-RP further suggests their utility as predictive markers for PCa recurrence. (C) 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  • 66.
    Hurme, Mikko
    et al.
    Department of Psychology, University of Turku, Finland / Centre for Cognitive Neuroscience, University of Turku, Finland / Turku Brain and Mind Centre, University of Turku, Finland.
    Koivisto, Mika
    Department of Psychology, University of Turku, Finland / Centre for Cognitive Neuroscience, University of Turku, Finland / Turku Brain and Mind Centre, University of Turku, Finland.
    Revonsuo, Antti
    University of Skövde, School of Bioscience. University of Skövde, The Systems Biology Research Centre. Department of Psychology, University of Turku, Finland / Centre for Cognitive Neuroscience, University of Turku, Finland / Turku Brain and Mind Centre, University of Turku, Finland.
    Railo, Henry
    Department of Psychology, University of Turku, Finland / Centre for Cognitive Neuroscience, University of Turku, Finland / Turku Brain and Mind Centre, University of Turku, Finland.
    Early processing in primary visual cortex is necessary for conscious and unconscious vision while late processing is necessary only for conscious vision in neurologically healthy humans2017In: NeuroImage, ISSN 1053-8119, E-ISSN 1095-9572, Vol. 150, p. 230-238Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The neural mechanisms underlying conscious and unconscious visual processes remain controversial. Blindsight patients may process visual stimuli unconsciously despite their VI lesion, promoting anatomical models, which suggest that pathways bypassing the VI support unconscious vision. On the other hand, physiological models argue that the major geniculostriate pathway via VI is involved in both unconscious and conscious vision, but in different time windows and in different types of neural activity. According to physiological models, feedforward activity via VI to higher areas mediates unconscious processes whereas feedback loops of recurrent activity from higher areas back to VI support conscious vision. With transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS) it is possible to study the causal role of a brain region during specific time points in neurologically healthy participants. In the present study, we measured unconscious processing with redundant target effect, a phenomenon where participants respond faster to two stimuli than one even when one of the stimuli is not consciously perceived. We tested the physiological feedforward-feedback model of vision by suppressing conscious vision by interfering selectively either with early or later VI activity with TMS. Our results show that early VI activity (60 ms) is necessary for both unconscious and conscious vision. During later processing stages (90 ms), VI contributes selectively to conscious vision. These findings support the feedforward-feedback-model of consciousness.

  • 67.
    Hussain, Showket
    et al.
    Institute of Cytology & Preventive Oncology (ICMR), Noida, Uttar Pradesh, India.
    M., Yuvaraj
    Institute of Cytology & Preventive Oncology (ICMR), Noida, Uttar Pradesh, India.
    Thakur, Nisha
    Institute of Cytology & Preventive Oncology (ICMR), Noida, Uttar Pradesh, India.
    Salam, Irfana
    Sher-I-Kashmir Institute of Medical Sciences, Soura, Srinagar, Jammu and Kashmir, India.
    Singh, Neha
    Panjab University, Chandigarh, India.
    Mir, Mohammad Muzaffar
    Sher-I-Kashmir Institute of Medical Sciences, Soura, Srinagar, Jammu and Kashmir, India.
    Bhat, Mohammad Akbar
    Sher-I-Kashmir Institute of Medical Sciences, Soura, Srinagar, Jammu and Kashmir, India.
    Siddiqi, Mushtaq A.
    Sher-I-Kashmir Institute of Medical Sciences, Soura, Srinagar, Jammu and Kashmir, India.
    Das, Bhudev C.
    Dr. B.R. Ambedkar Research Centre for Biomedical Research (ACBR), University of Delhi, India.
    Bharadwaj, Mausumi
    Institute of Cytology & Preventive Oncology (ICMR), Noida, Uttar Pradesh, India.
    Association of cyclin D1 gene polymorphisms with risk of esophageal squamous cell carcinoma in Kashmir Valley: a high risk area2011In: Molecular Carcinogenesis, ISSN 0899-1987, E-ISSN 1098-2744, Vol. 50, no 7, p. 487-98Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Investigation of potential association of SNPs (G870A, rs9344; G1722C, rs678653) of cyclin D1 gene (CCND1) with susceptibility to esophageal squamous cell carcinoma (ESCC) in Kashmir valley (India). The study included 302 subjects comprising 151 ESCC cases and 151 controls. PCR-RFLP and direct sequencing were employed for genotyping. The G870A polymorphism, the individuals carrying GA + AA genotype was having 2.80-fold increased risk for development of ESCC (OR 2.8, 95% CI = 1.77-4.4; P = 0.0001) compared to GG genotype. Further a significantly higher risk was observed in individuals who consume >3 cups per day of salted tea (OR = 5.1; 95% CI = 1.6-16.7; P = 0.0016) and had smoking habits (OR = 6.3; 95% CI = 2.9-13.9; P = 0.0005). We also demonstrate for the first time in CCND1 1722 locus, the CC genotype was strongly associated with increased risk of developing ESCC (OR = 2.58; 95% CI = 1.61-4.15; P = 0.0001). In addition, the frequency of polymorphic C allele was also found to be higher in cases (OR = 1.92; 95% CI = 1.37-2.69; P = 0.0002). There appears to be an influence of CCND1 G870A/G1772C genotypes on genetic susceptibility to ESCC.

  • 68.
    Hussain, Showket
    et al.
    Division of Molecular Genetics & Biochemistry, Institute of Cytology & Preventive Oncology (ICMR), Noida, India.
    Singh, Neha
    Department of Biotechnology, Panjab University, Chandigarh, India.
    Salam, Irfana
    Department of Clinical Biochemistry, Sher-I-Kashmir Institute of Medical Sciences, Soura, Srinagar, Jammu and Kashmir, India.
    Bandil, Kapil
    Division of Molecular Genetics & Biochemistry, Institute of Cytology & Preventive Oncology (ICMR), Noida, India.
    Yuvaraj, M
    Division of Molecular Genetics & Biochemistry, Institute of Cytology & Preventive Oncology (ICMR), Noida, India.
    Akbar Bhat, Mohammad
    Department of Cardiovascular Thoracic Surgery, Sher-I-Kashmir Institute of Medical Sciences, Soura, Srinagar, Jammu and Kashmir, India.
    Muzaffar Mir, Mohammad
    Department of Biotechnology, Panjab University, Chandigarh, India.
    Siddiqi, Mushtaq A.
    Department of Cardiovascular Thoracic Surgery, Sher-I-Kashmir Institute of Medical Sciences, Soura, Srinagar, Jammu and Kashmir, India.
    Sobti, Ranbir C.
    Department of Biotechnology, Panjab University, Chandigarh, India.
    Bharadwaj, Mausumi
    Division of Molecular Genetics & Biochemistry, Institute of Cytology & Preventive Oncology (ICMR), Noida, India.
    Das, Bhudev C.
    Dr. B.R. Ambedkar Centre for Biomedical Research (ACBR) University of Delhi (North Campus), Delhi, India.
    Methylation-mediated gene silencing of suppressor of cytokine signaling-1 (SOCS-1) gene in esophageal squamous cell carcinoma patients of Kashmir valley2011In: Journal of Receptor and Signal Transduction Research, ISSN 1079-9893, E-ISSN 1532-4281, Vol. 31, no 2, p. 147-56Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    CONTEXT: Esophageal squamous cell carcinoma (ESCC) is a leading cause of cancer-related deaths in Jammu and Kashmir. The negative regulation of tumor suppressor gene leading to change in signaling pathway is one of the major mechanisms responsible for tumorigenic transformation.

    OBJECTIVE: In the present study, the role of silencing of suppressor of cytokine signaling-1 (SOCS-1) gene, a negative regulator of JAK/STAT pathway, was analyzed in ESCC.

    METHODS: The expression pattern of SOCS-1 gene was analyzed in esophageal tumor biopsies although normal adjacent tissues that served as controls. Reverse transcriptase polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR), immunohistochemistry, methylation-specific PCR (MSP), and human papillomavirus (HPV) detection were performed to assess the expression pattern and promoter methylation of SOCS-1 gene including HPV status in a total of 75 surgically resected tissue specimens.

    RESULTS: Compared with the level of SOCS-1 expression in normal tissues, 53% (40/75) of the tumor tissues expressed either undetectable or reduced SOCS-1 expression (>50% loss of expression), which was significantly associated with advanced clinical stage or severe histopathological grade of the disease (P < 0.01). Aberrant promoter methylation of the SOCS-1 gene was found in 45% (34/75) of the esophageal tumor tissues, which was also found to be significantly associated with advanced stage of esophageal carcinoma (P < 0.01). The prevalence of HPV infection was found in 19% of tumor cases, whereas no HPV could be detected in any of the normal adjacent tissues.

    CONCLUSION: Transcriptional inactivation of SOCS-1 gene, primarily due to its promoter hypermethylation although HPV infection, may play an important role in esophageal carcinogenesis in Kashmir.

  • 69.
    Hussain, Showket
    et al.
    ICPO (ICMR), NOIDA, India.
    Singh, Neha
    Department of Biotechnology, Panjab University, Chandigarh, India.
    Salam, Irfana
    Department of Clinical Biochemistry, Sher-I-Kashmir Institute of Medical Sciences, Kashmir, India.
    Bhat, Mohammad A.
    Department of Cardiovascular Thoracic Surgery, Sher-I-Kashmir Institute of Medical Sciences, Srinagar, India.
    Kakkar, Nandita
    Department of Histopathology, PGIMER, Chandigarh, India.
    Mir, Mohammad M.
    Department of Clinical Biochemistry, Sher-I-Kashmir Institute of Medical Sciences, Srinagar, India.
    Siddiqi, Mushtaq A.
    Department of Immunology and Molecular Medicine Sher-I-Kashmir Institute of Medical Sciences, Srinagar, India.
    Basir, Seemi F.
    Department of Biosciences Jamia Millia Islamia, Delhi, India.
    Bharti, Alok C.
    ICPO (ICMR), NOIDA, India.
    Bharadwaj, Mausumi
    ICPO (ICMR), NOIDA, India.
    Das, Bhudev C.
    Dr. B.R. Ambedkar Research Centre for Biomedical Research (ACBR), University of Delhi (North Campus), Delhi, India.
    Abstract 2722: Transcription factor NF-kB in esophageal squamous cell carcinoma: Alterations in activity and expression during Human Papillomavirus infection2011In: Cancer Research, ISSN 0008-5472, E-ISSN 1538-7445, Vol. 71, no 8 Suppl, article id Abstract 2722Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 70.
    Hörnberg, Frida
    et al.
    University of Skövde, School of Health and Education.
    Nyblom, Frida
    University of Skövde, School of Health and Education.
    Sex- och samlevnadsundervisning till ungdomar: Barnmorskors erfarenheter2019Independent thesis Advanced level (degree of Master (One Year)), 10 credits / 15 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [sv]

    Bakgrund: Forskning har visat att ungdomarna är missnöjda med den sex- och

    samlevnadsundervisning som idag finns att tillgå. Det sexuella beteendet har förändrats

    genom tiderna och det har visat sig vara tidskrävande samt svårt att bedriva undervisningen på grund av bristen på barnmorskor.

    Syfte: Att belysa ungdomsmottagnings-barnmorskornas erfarenheter av sex- och samlevnadsundervisning till ungdomar.

    Metod: I studien genomfördes intervjuer med sex barnmorskor verksamma på olika ungdomsmottagningar i Västra Götaland. Datamaterialet analyserades med hjälp av kvalitativ innehållsanalys.

    Resultat: I resultatet framkom fyra teman och åtta subteman; Främja en positiv syn på

    sexualiteten bland ungdomarna; Ungdomarnas okunskap kan leda till ett riskbeteende;

    Grundskolans sex- och samlevnadsundervisning möter inte ungdomarnas behov; Betydelsen

    av utåtriktat arbete. Konklusion: Resultatet visar att den sex- och samlevnadsundervisning

    som idag erbjuds till ungdomarna är bristande. Barnmorskorna ger tydliga förslag på hur sex och samlevnadsundervisningen kan integreras i grundämnena. Genom att ungdomarna får

    tillgång till den undervisning de är i behov ökar deras kunskap vilket genererar i en positiv

    sexualitet.

  • 71.
    Jensen, Poul Erik H.
    et al.
    Danish Multiple Sclerosis Center, Department of Neurology, Rigshospitalet, University of Copenhagen, Denmar.
    Warnke, Clemens
    Department of Neurology, University Hospital Köln, Germany / University of Düsseldorf, Medical Faculty, Department of Neurology, Germany.
    Ingenhoven, Kathleen
    University of Düsseldorf, Medical Faculty, Department of Neurology, Germany.
    Piccoli, Luca
    Università della Svizzera italiana (USI), Faculty of Biomedical Sciences, Institute for Research in Biomedicine, Bellinzona, Switzerland.
    Gasis, Marcia
    University of Düsseldorf, Medical Faculty, Department of Neurology, Germany.
    Hermanrud, Christina
    Department of Clinical Neuroscience, Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Fernandez-Rodriguez, Blanca M.
    Università della Svizzera italiana (USI), Faculty of Biomedical Sciences, Institute for Research in Biomedicine, Bellinzona, Switzerland.
    Ryner, Malin
    Department of Clinical Neuroscience, Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Kramer, Daniel
    Sanofi-Aventis Germany, Frankfurt Am Main, Germany.
    Link, Jenny
    Department of Clinical Neuroscience, Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Ramanujam, Ryan
    Department of Clinical Neuroscience, Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden / KTH – Royal Institute of Technology, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Auer, Michael
    Innsbruck Medical University, Innsbruck, Austria.
    Buck, Dorothea
    Department of Neurology, Technische Universität München, Munich, Germany.
    Grummel, Verena
    Department of Neurology, Technische Universität München, Munich, Germany.
    Bertotti, Elisa
    Merck NBE Bioanalytics Ivrea, Colleretto Giacosa, Italy.
    Fissolo, Nicolas
    Hospital Universitari Vall d'Hebron, Centre d'Esclerosi Múltiple de Catalunya, Barcelona, Spain.
    Oliver-Martos, Begoña
    Hospital Regional Universitario de Málaga, Instituto de investigación Biomédica de Málaga (IBIMA), Universidad de Málaga, Spain.
    Nytrova, Petra
    MS Center, Department of Neurology and Center Clinical Neuroscience, Charles University in Prague, 1st Faculty of Medicine and General University Hospital, Prague, Czech Republic.
    Khalil, Michael
    Department of Neurology, Medical University of Graz, Austria.
    Guger, Michael
    Clinic for Neurology 2, Kepler University Clinic, Med Campus III, Linz, Austria.
    Rathmaier, Sandra
    Clinic for Neurology 2, Kepler University Clinic, Med Campus III, Linz, Austria.
    Sievers-Stober, Claudia
    Departments of Biomedicine and Neurology, University Hospital Basel and University of Basel, Switzerland.
    Lindberg, Raija L. P.
    Departments of Biomedicine and Neurology, University Hospital Basel and University of Basel, Switzerland.
    Hässler, Signe
    CESP, INSERM UMR 1018, Faculty of Medicine, Paris-Sud University, Paris-Saclay, University UVSQ, Villejuif, France.
    Bachelet, Delphine
    CESP, INSERM UMR 1018, Faculty of Medicine, Paris-Sud University, Paris-Saclay, University UVSQ, Villejuif, France.
    Aktas, Orhan
    University of Düsseldorf, Medical Faculty, Department of Neurology, Germany.
    Donnellan, Naoimh
    Ipsen Biopharm Ltd., Berkshire, United Kingdom.
    Lawton, Andy
    GlaxoSmithKline R&D, Uxbridge, Middlesex, United Kingdom.
    Hemmer, Bernhard
    Department of Neurology, Technische Universität München, Germany / Munich Cluster for systems Neurology (SyNergy), Germany.
    Havrdova, Eva Kubala
    MS Center, Department of Neurology and Center Clinical Neuroscience, Charles University in Prague, 1st Faculty of Medicine and General University Hospital, Prague, Czech Republic.
    Kieseier, Bernd
    University of Düsseldorf, Medical Faculty, Department of Neurology, Germany.
    Hartung, Hans-Peter
    University of Düsseldorf, Medical Faculty, Department of Neurology, Germany.
    Comabella, Manuel
    Hospital Universitari Vall d'Hebron, Centre d'Esclerosi Múltiple de Catalunya, Barcelona, Spain.
    Montalban, Xavier
    Hospital Universitari Vall d'Hebron, Centre d'Esclerosi Múltiple de Catalunya, Barcelona, Spain.
    Derfuss, Tobias
    Departments of Biomedicine and Neurology, University Hospital Basel and University of Basel, Switzerland.
    Sellebjerg, Finn
    Danish Multiple Sclerosis Center, Department of Neurology, Rigshospitalet, University of Copenhagen, Denmark.
    Dönnes, Pierre
    SciCross AB, Skövde, Sweden.
    Pallardy, Marc
    INSERM UMR 996, Univ. Paris-Sud, Faculty of Pharmacy, Université Paris-Saclay, Châtenay-Malabry, France.
    Spindeldreher, Sebastian
    Drug Metabolism Pharmacokinetics-Biologics, Novartis Institutes for Biomedical Research, Basel, Switzerland.
    Broët, Philippe
    CESP, INSERM UMR 1018, Faculty of Medicine, Paris-Sud University, Paris-Saclay, University UVSQ, Villejuif, France / Assistance Publique - Hôpitaux de Paris, Hôpital Paul Brousse, Villejuif, France.
    Deisenhammer, Florian
    Innsbruck Medical University, Austria.
    Fogdell-Hahn, Anna
    Department of Clinical Neuroscience, Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Sorensen, Per Soelberg
    Danish Multiple Sclerosis Center, Department of Neurology, Rigshospitalet, University of Copenhagen, Denmark.
    Detection and kinetics of persistent neutralizing anti-interferon-beta antibodies in patients with multiple sclerosis: Results from the ABIRISK prospective cohort study2019In: Journal of Neuroimmunology, ISSN 0165-5728, E-ISSN 1872-8421, Vol. 326, p. 19-27Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Two validated assays, a bridging ELISA and a luciferase-based bioassay, were compared for detection of anti-drug antibodies (ADA) against interferon-beta (IFN-β) in patients with multiple sclerosis. Serum samples were tested from patients enrolled in a prospective study of 18 months. In contrast to the ELISA, when IFN-β-specific rabbit polyclonal and human monoclonal antibodies were tested, the bioassay was the more sensitive to detect IFN-β ADA in patients' sera. For clinical samples, selection of method of ELISA should be evaluated prior to the use of a multi-tiered approach. A titer threshold value is reported that may be used as a predictor for persistently positive neutralizing ADA.

  • 72.
    Jonefjäll, Börje
    et al.
    Institute of Medicine, Sahlgrenska Academy, University of Gothenburg, Department of Internal Medicine and Clinical Nutrition, Gothenburg, Sweden / Department of Internal Medicine, Kungälv Hospital, Kungälv, Sweden.
    Simrén, Magnus
    Institute of Medicine, Sahlgrenska Academy, University of Gothenburg, Department of Internal Medicine and Clinical Nutrition, Gothenburg, Sweden / Center for Functional GI and Motility Disorders, University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill, NC, USA.
    Lasson, Anders
    Department of Internal Medicine, Södra Älvsborgs Hospital, Bora ̊ s, Sweden 5 Institute of Biomedicine, Sahlgrenska Academy, University of Gothenburg.
    Öhman, Lena
    University of Skövde, School of Health and Education. University of Skövde, Health and Education. Institute of Medicine, Sahlgrenska Academy, University of Gothenburg, Department of Internal Medicine and Clinical Nutrition, Gothenburg, Sweden / Institute of Biomedicine, Sahlgrenska Academy, University of Gothenburg, Department of Microbiology and Immunology, Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Strid, Hans
    Institute of Medicine, Sahlgrenska Academy, University of Gothenburg, Department of Internal Medicine and Clinical Nutrition, Gothenburg, Sweden / Department of Internal Medicine, Södra Älvsborgs Hospital, Bora ̊ s, Sweden 5 Institute of Biomedicine, Sahlgrenska Academy, University of Gothenburg.
    Psychological distress, iron deficiency, active disease and female gender are independent risk factors for fatigue in patients with ulcerative colitis2018In: United European Gastroenterology journal, ISSN 2050-6406, E-ISSN 2050-6414, Vol. 6, no 1, p. 148-158Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: Patients with ulcerative colitis often report fatigue. Objectives: To investigate prevalence of and risk factors for fatigue in patients with ulcerative colitis with active disease and during deep remission. Methods: In this cross-sectional study, disease activity was evaluated with endoscopy and calprotectin, and patients were classified as having active disease (n=133) or being in deep remission (n=155). Blood samples were analysed to assess anaemia, iron deficiency and systemic immune activity. Patients completed questionnaires to assess fatigue, psychological distress, gastrointestinal symptoms and quality of life. Results: The prevalence of high fatigue (general fatigue >= 13, Multidimensional Fatigue Inventory) was 40% in the full study population. Among patients with high fatigue, female gender and iron deficiency were more prevalent, and these patients had more severe disease activity and reported higher levels of anxiety, depression and decreased quality of life compared with patients with no/mild fatigue. A logistic regression analysis identified probable psychiatric disorder (odds ratio (OR) (confidence interval) 6.1 (3.1-12.2)), iron deficiency (OR 2.5 (1.2-5.1)), active disease (OR 2.2 (1.2-3.9)) and female gender (OR 2.1 (1.1-3.7)) as independent risk factors for high fatigue. Similar results were found concerning psychological distress, gender and quality of life, but immune markers did not differ in patients in deep remission with high vs. no/mild fatigue. Conclusions: Probable psychiatric disorder, iron deficiency, active disease and female gender are independent risk factors for high fatigue in patients with ulcerative colitis. Low-grade immune activity does not seem to be the cause of fatigue among patients in deep remission.

  • 73.
    Jonefjäll, Börje
    et al.
    Department of Internal Medicine and Clinical Nutrition, Institute of Medicine, Sahlgrenska Academy, University of Gothenburg, Gothenburg, Sweden / Department of Internal Medicine, Kungälv Hospital, Kungälv, Sweden.
    Öhman, Lena
    University of Skövde, School of Health and Education. Department of Internal Medicine and Clinical Nutrition, Institute of Medicine, Sahlgrenska Academy, University of Gothenburg, Gothenburg, Sweden / Department of Microbiology and Immunology, Institute of Biomedicine, Sahlgrenska Academy, University of Gothenburg, Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Simrén, Magnus
    Department of Internal Medicine and Clinical Nutrition, Institute of Medicine, Sahlgrenska Academy, University of Gothenburg, Gothenburg, Sweden / Center for Functional GI and Motility Disorders, University of North Carolina, USA.
    Strid, Hans
    Department of Internal Medicine and Clinical Nutrition, Institute of Medicine, Sahlgrenska Academy, University of Gothenburg, Gothenburg, Sweden / Department of Internal Medicine, Södra Älvsborg Hospital, Borås, Sweden.
    IBS-like Symptoms in Patients with Ulcerative Colitis in Deep Remission Are Associated with Increased Levels of Serum Cytokines and Poor Psychological Well-being2016In: Inflammatory Bowel Diseases, ISSN 1078-0998, E-ISSN 1536-4844, Vol. 22, no 11, p. 2630-2640Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    BACKGROUND: Gastrointestinal symptoms (GI) compatible with irritable bowel syndrome (IBS) are common in patients with ulcerative colitis (UC) in remission. The causes of these symptoms remain to be clarified. Our aim was to investigate prevalence and factors associated with IBS-like symptoms in patients with UC in deep remission.

    METHODS: We included 298 patients with UC and used Mayo score, sigmoidoscopy, and fecal calprotectin to define deep remission versus active disease. Presence of IBS-like symptoms according to the Rome III criteria, severity of GI, extraintestinal and psychological symptoms, stress levels, and quality of life were measured with validated questionnaires. Serum cytokines and high-sensitive C-reactive peptide were determined.

    RESULTS: The criteria for deep remission was fulfilled by 132 patients (44%) and 24 of these fulfilled the Rome III criteria for IBS (18%). Patients with UC in deep remission with IBS-like symptoms had comparable levels of GI symptoms, non-GI somatic symptoms, and quality of life as patients with active UC. The patients with UC in deep remission with IBS-like symptoms had similar levels of fecal calprotectin as patients in deep remission without IBS-like symptoms (18 versus 31 μg/g, P = 0.11), but higher levels of serum cytokines (interleukin [IL]-1β, IL-6, IL-13, IL-10 and IL-8, P < 0.05) and higher levels of anxiety (P < 0.001), depression (P = 0.02) and perceived stress (P = 0.03).

    CONCLUSIONS: IBS-like symptoms in patients with UC in deep remission are common, but not as prevalent as previously reported. Poor psychological well-being and increased serum cytokine levels, but not colonic low-grade inflammation, were associated with IBS-like symptoms.

  • 74.
    Jukkala, Tanya
    et al.
    University of Skövde, School of Health and Education. University of Skövde, Health and Education. Södertörn University, Stockholm Centre on Health of Societies in Transition (SCOHOST), Huddinge, Sweden.
    Makinen, Ilkka Henrik
    Södertörn University, Stockholm Centre on Health of Societies in Transition (SCOHOST), Huddinge, Sweden / Uppsala University, Department of Sociology, Sweden.
    Stickley, Andrew
    Södertörn University, Stockholm Centre on Health of Societies in Transition (SCOHOST), Huddinge, Sweden / University of Tokyo, The Department of Human Ecology, Graduate School of Medicine, Japan / London School of Hygiene and Tropical Medicine, European Centre on Health of Societies in Transition (ECOHOST), London, United Kingdom.
    The Historical Development of Suicide Mortality in Russia, 1870-20072015In: Archives of Suicide Research, ISSN 1381-1118, E-ISSN 1573-8159, Vol. 19, no 1, p. 117-130Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Russia has one of the highest suicide mortality rates in the world. This study investigates the development of Russian suicide mortality over a longer time period in order to provide a context within which the contemporary high level might be better understood. Annual sex- and age-specific suicide-mortality data for Russia for the period 1870-2007 were studied, where available. Russian suicide mortality increased 11-fold over the period. Trends in male and female suicide developed similarly, although male suicide rates were consistently much higher. From the 1990s suicide has increased in a relative sense among the young (15-34), while the high suicide mortality among middle-aged males has reduced. Changes in Russian suicide mortality over the study period may be attributable to modernization processes.

  • 75.
    Jurcevic, Sanja
    University of Skövde, School of Bioscience. University of Skövde, The Systems Biology Research Centre. Örebro universitet, Institutionen för hälsovetenskap och medicin.
    MicroRNA expression profiling in endometrial adenocarcinoma2015Doctoral thesis, comprehensive summary (Other academic)
  • 76.
    Jurcevic, Sanja
    et al.
    University of Skövde, School of Bioscience. University of Skövde, The Systems Biology Research Centre.
    Klinga-Levan, Karin
    University of Skövde, School of Bioscience. University of Skövde, The Systems Biology Research Centre.
    Olsson, Björn
    University of Skövde, School of Bioscience. University of Skövde, The Systems Biology Research Centre.
    Ejeskär, Katarina
    University of Skövde, School of Bioscience. University of Skövde, The Systems Biology Research Centre.
    Verification of microRNA expression in human endometrial adenocarcinoma2016In: BMC Cancer, ISSN 1471-2407, E-ISSN 1471-2407, Vol. 16, no 1, article id 261Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 77.
    Jurcevic, Sanja
    et al.
    University of Skövde, School of Bioscience. University of Skövde, The Systems Biology Research Centre.
    Olsson, Björn
    University of Skövde, The Systems Biology Research Centre. University of Skövde, School of Bioscience.
    Klinga-Levan, Karin
    University of Skövde, The Systems Biology Research Centre. University of Skövde, School of Bioscience.
    MicroRNA expression in human endometrial adenocarcinoma2014In: Cancer Cell International, ISSN 1475-2867, E-ISSN 1475-2867, Vol. 14, no 1, article id 88Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    BACKGROUND: MicroRNAs are small non-coding RNAs that play crucial roles in the pathogenesis of different cancer types. The aim of this study was to identify miRNAs that are differentially expressed in endometrial adenocarcinoma compared to healthy endometrium. These miRNAs can potentially be used to develop a panel for classification and prognosis in order to better predict the progression of the disease and facilitate the choice of treatment strategy.

    METHODS: Formalin fixed paraffin embedded endometrial tissue samples were collected from the Örebro university hospital. QPCR was used to quantify the expression levels of 742 miRNAs in 30 malignant and 20 normal endometrium samples. After normalization of the qPCR data, miRNAs differing significantly in expression between normal and cancer samples were identified, and hierarchical clustering analysis was used to identify groups of miRNAs with coordinated expression profiles.

    RESULTS: In comparisons between endometrial adenocarcinoma and normal endometrium samples 138 miRNAs were found to be significantly differentially expressed (p < 0.001) among which 112 miRNAs have not been previous reported for endometrial adenocarcinoma.

    CONCLUSION: Our study shows that several miRNAs are differentially expressed in endometrial adenocarcinoma. These identified miRNA hold great potential as target for classification and prognosis of this disease. Further analysis of the differentially expressed miRNA and their target genes will help to derive new biomarkers that can be used for classification and prognosis of endometrial adenocarcinoma.

  • 78.
    Kallioinen, Minna
    et al.
    Department of Perioperative Services, Intensive Care and Pain Medicine, Turku University Hospital, Finland.
    Scheinin, Annalotta
    Department of Perioperative Services, Intensive Care and Pain Medicine, Turku University Hospital, Finland / Turku PET Centre, University of Turku and Turku University Hospital, Finland.
    Maksimow, Mikael
    Medicity Research Laboratory, University of Turku, Finland.
    Långsjö, Jaakko
    Turku PET Centre, University of Turku and Turku University Hospital, Finland / Department of Intensive Care, Tampere University Hospital, Finland.
    Kaisti, Kaike
    Turku PET Centre, University of Turku and Turku University Hospital, Finland / Department of Anesthesiology and Intensive Care, Oulu University Hospital, Finland.
    Takala, Riikka
    Department of Perioperative Services, Intensive Care and Pain Medicine, Turku University Hospital, Finland.
    Vahlberg, Tero
    Department of Clinical Medicine, Biostatistics, University of Turku and Turku University Hospital, Finland.
    Valli, Katja
    University of Skövde, School of Bioscience. University of Skövde, Systems Biology Research Environment. Department of Psychology and Speech-Language Pathology, and Turku Brain and Mind Centre, University of Turku, Finland.
    Salmi, Marko
    Medicity Research Laboratory, University of Turku, Finland / Institute of Biomedicine, University of Turku, Finland.
    Scheinin, Harry
    Department of Perioperative Services, Intensive Care and Pain Medicine, Turku University Hospital, Finland / Turku PET Centre, University of Turku and Turku University Hospital, Finland / Integrative Physiology and Pharmacology, Institute of Biomedicine, University of Turku, Finland.
    Maksimow, Anu
    Department of Perioperative Services, Intensive Care and Pain Medicine, Turku University Hospital, Finland.
    The influence of dexmedetomidine and propofol on circulating cytokine levels in healthy subjects2019In: BMC Anesthesiology, ISSN 1471-2253, E-ISSN 1471-2253, Vol. 19, no 1, p. 1-8, article id 222Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: Surgery and diseases modify inflammatory responses and the immune system. Anesthetic agents also have effects on the human immune system but the responses they induce may be altered or masked by the surgical procedures or underlying illnesses. The aim of this study was to assess how single-drug dexmedetomidine and propofol anesthesia without any surgical intervention alter acute immunological biomarkers in healthy subjects. Methods: Thirty-five healthy, young male subjects were anesthetized using increasing concentrations of dexmedetomidine (n = 18) or propofol (n = 17) until loss of responsiveness (LOR) was detected. The treatment allocation was randomized. Multi-parametric immunoassays for the detection of 48 cytokines, chemokines and growth factors were used. Concentrations were determined at baseline and at the highest drug concentration for each subject. Results: The changes in the concentration of eotaxin (decrease after dexmedetomidine) and platelet-derived growth factor (PDGF, increase after propofol) were statistically significantly different between the groups. Significant changes were detected within both groups; the concentrations of monocyte chemotactic protein 1, chemokine ligand 27 and macrophage migration inhibitory factor were lower in both groups after the drug administration. Dexmedetomidine decreased the concentration of eotaxin, interleukin-18, interleukin-2Ra, stem cell factor, stem cell growth factor and vascular endothelial growth factor, and propofol decreased significantly the levels of hepatocyte growth factor, IFN-.-induced protein 10 and monokine induced by IFN-gamma, and increased the levels of interleukin-17, interleukin-5, interleukin-7 and PDGF. Conclusions: Dexmedetomidine seemed to have an immunosuppressive effect on the immune system whereas propofol seemed to induce mixed pro- and anti-inflammatory effects on the immune system. The choice of anesthetic agent could be relevant when treating patients with compromised immunological defense mechanisms. Trial registration: Before subject enrollment, the study was registered in the European Clinical Trials database (EudraCT number 2013-001496-21, The Neural Mechanisms of Anesthesia and Human Consciousness) and in ClinicalTrials.gov (Principal Investigator: Harry Scheinin, number NCT01889004, The Neural Mechanisms of Anesthesia and Human Consciousness, Part 2, on the 23rd of June 2013).

  • 79.
    Kariminejad, Ariana
    et al.
    Kariminejad-Najmabadi Pathology & Genetics Centre, Tehran, Iran.
    Almadani, Navid
    Kariminejad-Najmabadi Pathology & Genetics Centre, Tehran, Iran.
    Khoshaeen, Atefeh
    Mehrgan Genetics Centre, Sari, Iran.
    Olsson, Björn
    University of Skövde, School of Bioscience. University of Skövde, The Systems Biology Research Centre.
    Moslemi, Ali-Reza
    Department of Pathology, University of Gothenburg, Sahlgrenska University Hospital, Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Tajsharghi, Homa
    University of Skövde, School of Bioscience. University of Skövde, The Systems Biology Research Centre. Department of Pathology, University of Gothenburg, Sahlgrenska University Hospital, Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Truncating CHRNG mutations associated with interfamilial variability of the severity of the Escobar variant of multiple pterygium syndrome2016In: BMC Genetics, ISSN 1471-2156, E-ISSN 1471-2156, Vol. 17, no 1, article id 71Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    BACKGROUND:In humans, muscle-specific nicotinergic acetylcholine receptor (AChR) is a transmembrane protein with five different subunits, coded by CHRNA1, CHRNB, CHRND and CHRNG/CHRNE. The gamma subunit of AChR encoded by CHRNG is expressed during early foetal development, whereas in the adult, the γ subunit is replaced by a ε subunit. Mutations in the CHRNG encoding the embryonal acetylcholine receptor may cause the non-lethal Escobar variant (EVMPS) and lethal form (LMPS) of multiple pterygium syndrome. The MPS is a condition characterised by prenatal growth failure with pterygium and akinesia leading to muscle weakness and severe congenital contractures, as well as scoliosis.

    RESULTS:Our whole exome sequencing studies have identified one novel and two previously reported homozygous mutations in CHRNG in three families affected by non-lethal EVMPS. The mutations consist of deletion of two nucleotides, cause a frameshift predicted to result in premature termination of the foetally expressed gamma subunit of the AChR.

    CONCLUSIONS:Our data suggest that severity of the phenotype varies significantly both within and between families with MPS and that there is no apparent correlation between mutation position and clinical phenotype. Although individuals with CHRNG mutations can survive, there is an increased frequency of abortions and stillbirth in their families. Furthermore, genetic background and environmental modifiers might be of significance for decisiveness of the lethal spectrum, rather than the state of the mutation per se. Detailed clinical examination of our patients further indicates the changing phenotype from infancy to childhood.

  • 80.
    Kariminejad, Ariana
    et al.
    Kariminejad-Najmabadi Pathology and Genetics Center, Tehran, Iran.
    Dahl-Halvarsson, Martin
    Department of Pathology, University of Gothenburg, Sahlgrenska University Hospital, Sweden.
    Ravenscroft, Gianina
    Centre for Medical Research, The University of Western Australia and the Harry Perkins Institute for Medical Research, Nedlands, Western Australia, Australia.
    Afroozan, Fariba
    Kariminejad-Najmabadi Pathology and Genetics Center, Tehran, Iran.
    Keshavarz, Elham
    Department of Radiology, Mahdieh Hospital, Shahid Beheshti University of Medical Science, Tehran, Iran.
    Goullée, Hayley
    Centre for Medical Research, The University of Western Australia and the Harry Perkins Institute for Medical Research, Nedlands, Western Australia, Australia.
    Davis, Mark R.
    Department of Diagnostic Genomics, Pathwest, QEII Medical Centre, Nedlands, Western Australia, Australia.
    Faraji Zonooz, Mehrshid
    Kariminejad-Najmabadi Pathology and Genetics Center, Tehran, Iran.
    Najmabadi, Hossein
    Kariminejad-Najmabadi Pathology and Genetics Center, Tehran, Iran.
    Laing, Nigel G.
    Centre for Medical Research, The University of Western Australia and the Harry Perkins Institute for Medical Research, Nedlands, Western Australia, Australia.
    Tajsharghi, Homa
    University of Skövde, School of Health and Education. University of Skövde, Health and Education. Centre for Medical Research, The University of Western Australia and the Harry Perkins Institute for Medical Research, Nedlands, Western Australia, Australia.
    TOR1A variants cause a severe arthrogryposis with developmental delay, strabismus and tremor2017In: Brain, ISSN 0006-8950, E-ISSN 1460-2156, Vol. 140, no 11, p. 2851-2859Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Autosomal dominant torsion dystonia-1 is a disease with incomplete penetrance most often caused by an in-frame GAG deletion (p.Glu303del) in the endoplasmic reticulum luminal protein torsinA encoded by TOR1A.

    We report an association of the homozygous dominant disease-causing TOR1A p.Glu303del mutation, and a novel homozygous missense variant (p.Gly318Ser) with a severe arthrogryposis phenotype with developmental delay, strabismus and tremor in three unrelated Iranian families. All parents who were carriers of the TOR1A variant showed no evidence of neurological symptoms or signs, indicating decreased penetrance similar to families with autosomal dominant torsion dystonia-1. The results from cell assays demonstrate that the p.Gly318Ser substitution causes a redistribution of torsinA from the endoplasmic reticulum to the nuclear envelope, similar to the hallmark of the p.Glu303del mutation.

    Our study highlights that TOR1A mutations should be considered in patients with severe arthrogryposis and further expands the phenotypic spectrum associated with TOR1A mutations. 

  • 81.
    Kenne Sarenmalm, Elisabeth
    et al.
    Research and Development Centre, Skaraborg Hospital, Skövde, Sweden / Institute of Health and Caring Sciences, Sahlgrenska Academy at Gothenburg University, Gothenburg, Sweden / Palliative Research Centre, Ersta Sköndal University College and Ersta Hospital, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Mårtensson, Lena B.
    University of Skövde, School of Life Sciences.
    Holmberg, Stig B.
    Department of Surgery, SU/Sahlgrenska University Hospital, Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Andersson, Bengt A.
    Microbiology and Immunology, Göteborg University, Göteborg, Sweden.
    Odén, Anders
    Department of Mathematical Sciences, Chalmers University of Technology, Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Bergh, Ingrid
    University of Skövde, School of Life Sciences.
    Mindfulness based stress reduction study design of a longitudinal randomized controlled complementary intervention in women with breast cancer2013In: BMC Complementary and Alternative Medicine, ISSN 1472-6882, E-ISSN 1472-6882, Vol. 13, article id 248Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: The stress of a breast cancer diagnosis and its treatment can produce a variety of psychosocial sequelae including impaired immune responses. Mindfulness Based Stress Reduction (MBSR) is a structured complementary program that incorporates meditation, yoga and mind-body exercises. Despite promising empirical evidence for the efficacy of MBSR, there is a need for randomized controlled trials (RCT). There is also a need for RCTs investigating the efficacy of psychosocial interventions on mood disorder and immune response in women with breast cancer. Therefore, the overall aim is to determine the efficacy of a Mindfulness Based Stress Reduction (MBSR) intervention on well-being and immune response in women with breast cancer.Methods and design: In this RCT, patients diagnosed with breast cancer, will consecutively be recruited to participate. Participants will be randomized into one of three groups: MBSR Intervention I (weekly group sessions + self-instructing program), MBSR Intervention II (self-instructing program), and Controls (non-MBSR). Data will be collected before start of intervention, and 3, 6, and 12 months and thereafter yearly up to 5 years. This study may contribute to evidence-based knowledge concerning the efficacy of MBSR to support patient empowerment to regain health in breast cancer disease.Discussion: The present study may contribute to evidence-based knowledge concerning the efficacy of mindfulness training to support patient empowerment to regain health in a breast cancer disease. If MBSR is effective for symptom relief and quality of life, the method will have significant clinical relevance that may generate standard of care for patients with breast cancer.Trial registration: ClinicalTrials.gov: NCT01591915. © 2013 Kenne Sarenmalm et al.; licensee BioMed Central Ltd.

  • 82.
    Khidir, N.
    et al.
    Department of Metabolic & Bariatric Surgery, Hamad General Hospital, Doha, Qatar.
    Al Dhaheri, M.
    Department of Metabolic & Bariatric Surgery, Hamad General Hospital, Doha, Qatar.
    El Ansari, Walid
    University of Skövde, School of Health and Education. University of Skövde, Health and Education. Department of Surgery, Hamad General Hospital, Doha, Qatar / College of Medicine, Qatar University, Doha, Qatar.
    Al Kuwari, M.
    Department of Metabolic & Bariatric Surgery, Hamad General Hospital, Doha, Qatar.
    Sargsyan, D.
    Department of Metabolic & Bariatric Surgery, Hamad General Hospital, Doha, Qatar.
    Bashah, M.
    Department of Metabolic & Bariatric Surgery, Hamad General Hospital, Doha, Qatar / Weill Cornell Medicine-Qatar, Doha, Qatar / Qatar Metabolic Institute, Doha, Qatar.
    Outcomes of Laparoscopic Gastric Greater Curvature Plication in Morbidly Obese Patients2017In: Journal of Obesity, ISSN 2090-0708, E-ISSN 2090-0716, Vol. 2017, article id 7989714Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    BACKGROUND: Laparoscopic gastric greater curvature plication (LGGCP) is a restrictive bariatric procedure without gastrectomy. However, limited literature on effectiveness of gastric plication exists.

    OBJECTIVES: We assessed LGGCP's efficacy, effects on associated comorbidities, safety and the rate of complications, and patient satisfaction with LGGCP's outcomes among morbidly obese patients.

    METHOD: Analysis of retrospectively data collected from medical records of 26 patients who had undergone LGGCP at Hamad General Hospital, Qatar, during 2011-2012.

    RESULTS: Most patients (92%) were Qatari nationals. The sample's mean age was 35.1 years. Mean duration of hospital stay was 3.9 ± 1.2 days. Mean preoperative BMI was 40.7 kg/m(2) that decreased at 2 years to 34.6 kg/m(2). LGGCP's effects on comorbidities were such that 7.6% of patients experienced resolutions of their comorbidities. There were no mortality or postoperative complications that required reoperation. Six patients (23%) were satisfied with the LGGCP's outcomes while 10 patients (38.5%) underwent sleeve gastrectomy subsequently.

    CONCLUSION: LGGCP had acceptable short term weight loss results, exhibited almost no postoperative complications, and improved patients' comorbidities. Despite the durability of the gastric fold, some patients regained weight. Future research may assess the possibility of an increase in the gastric pouch size postplication associated with weight regain.

  • 83.
    Kimber, Eva
    et al.
    Department of Neuropediatrics, Uppsala University Children's Hospital, Uppsala, Sweden / .
    Tajsharghi, Homa
    Department of Pathology, Sahlgrenska University Hospital, Sweden.
    Kroksmark, A.-K.
    Queen Silvia Children's Hospital, Sahlgrenska Academy, University of Göteborg, Göteborg, Sweden.
    Oldfors, Anders
    Department of Pathology, Sahlgrenska University Hospital, Sweden.
    Tulinius, M.
    Queen Silvia Children's Hospital, Sahlgrenska Academy, University of Göteborg, Göteborg, Sweden.
    A mutation in the fast skeletal muscle troponin I gene causes myopathy and distal arthrogryposis.2006In: Neurology, ISSN 0028-3878, E-ISSN 1526-632X, Vol. 67, no 4, p. 597-601Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    OBJECTIVE: To describe a three-generation family with distal arthrogryposis associated with myopathy and caused by a mutation in the gene encoding for sarcomeric thin filament protein troponin I, TNNI2.

    METHODS: The authors performed clinical investigations and reviewed medical records. Muscle biopsy specimens were obtained for morphologic analysis. Genomic DNA was extracted from blood and analyzed for mutations in TNNI2.

    RESULTS: The five affected individuals had predominantly distal congenital joint contractures, mild facial involvement (mild micrognathia, narrow palpebral fissures), and no detectable muscle weakness. The four affected adults had slightly increased levels of creatine kinase in blood, and muscle biopsy specimens showed findings of myopathy with changes restricted to type 2 fibers. These included variability of muscle fiber size, internalized nuclei, and increased interstitial connective tissue. Analysis of TNNI2 encoding the troponin I isoform expressed in type 2 muscle fibers disclosed a heterozygous three-base in-frame deletion, 2,918-2,920del, skipping the highly conserved lysine at position 176. The mutation was present in all 5 affected individuals but was not identified in any of the 11 unaffected family members.

    CONCLUSION: Distal arthrogryposis type 1 is genetically heterogeneous, and myopathy due to sarcomeric protein dysfunction may be one underlying cause of the disease.

  • 84.
    Kimber, Eva
    et al.
    Department of Women’s and Children’s Health, Uppsala University Children’s Hospital, Uppsala, Sweden / Department of Paediatrics, Institute of Clinical Sciences, University of Gothenburg, The Queen Silvia Children’s Hospital, Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Tajsharghi, Homa
    Department of Pathology, Institute of Biomedicine, University of Gothenburg, Sahlgrenska University Hospital, Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Kroksmark, Anna-Karin
    Department of Paediatrics, Institute of Clinical Sciences, University of Gothenburg, The Queen Silvia Children’s Hospital, Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Oldfors, Anders
    Department of Pathology, Institute of Biomedicine, University of Gothenburg, Sahlgrenska University Hospital, Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Tulinius, Már
    Department of Paediatrics, Institute of Clinical Sciences, University of Gothenburg, The Queen Silvia Children’s Hospital, Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Distal arthrogryposis: clinical and genetic findings2012In: Acta Paediatrica, ISSN 0803-5253, E-ISSN 1651-2227, Vol. 101, no 8, p. 877-887Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    AIM: Distal arthrogryposis is characterized by congenital contractures predominantly in hands and feet. Mutations in sarcomeric protein genes are involved in several types of distal arthrogryposis. Our aim is to describe clinical and molecular genetic findings in individuals with distal arthrogryposis and evaluate the genotype-phenotype correlation.

    METHOD: We investigated 39 patients from 21 families. Clinical history, including neonatal findings, joint involvement and motor function, was documented. Clinical examination was performed including evaluation of muscle strength. Molecular genetic investigations were carried out in 19 index cases. Muscle biopsies from 17 patients were analysed.

    RESULTS: A pathogenic mutation was found in six families with 19 affected family members with autosomal dominant inheritance and in one child with sporadic occurrence. In three families and in one child with sporadic form, the identified mutation was de novo. Muscle weakness was found in 17 patients. Ambulation was affected in four patients and hand function in 28. Fourteen patients reported pain related to muscle and joint affection.

    CONCLUSION: The clinical findings were highly variable between families and also within families. Mutations in the same gene were found in different syndromes suggesting varying clinical penetrance and expression, and different gene mutations were found in the same clinical syndrome demonstrating genetic heterogeneity.

  • 85.
    Kivimäki, Mika
    et al.
    UCL, Dept Epidemiol & Publ Hlth, London, United Kingdom / Univ Helsinki, Fac Med, Clinicum, Helsinki, Finland / Finnish Inst Occupat Hlth, Helsinki, Finland.
    Nyberg, Solja T.
    Univ Helsinki, Fac Med, Clinicum, Helsinki, Finland.
    Batty, G. David
    UCL, Dept Epidemiol & Publ Hlth, London, United Kingdom / Univ Edinburgh, Ctr Cognit Ageing & Cognit Epidemiol, Edinburgh, Scotland, United Kingdom.
    Kawachi, Ichiro
    Harvard TH Chan Sch Publ Hlth, Dept Social & Behav Sci, Boston, USA.
    Jokela, Markus
    Univ Helsinki, Fac Med, Dept Psychol & Logoped, Helsinki, Finland.
    Alfredsson, Lars
    Stockholm Cty Council, Ctr Occupat & Environm Med, Stockholm, Sweden / Karolinska Inst, Inst Environm Med, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Bjorner, Jakob B.
    Natl Res Ctr Working Environm, Copenhagen, Denmark.
    Borritz, Marianne
    Bispebjerg Univ Hosp Copenhagen, Dept Occupat & Environm Med, Copenhagen, Denmark.
    Burr, Hermann
    Fed Inst Occupat Safety & Hlth BAuA, Berlin, Germany.
    Dragano, Nico
    Univ Düsseldorf, Inst Med Sociol, Fac Med, Düsseldorf, Germany.
    Fransson, Eleonor I.
    Jönköping Univ, Sch Hlth & Welf, Jönköping, Sweden / Stockholm Univ, Stress Res Inst, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Heikkilä, Katriina
    London Sch Hyg & Trop Med, Dept Hlth Serv Res & Policy, London, United Kingdom / Royal Coll Surgeons England, Clin Effectiveness Unit, London, United Kingdom.
    Knutsson, Anders
    Mid Sweden Univ, Dept Hlth Sci, Sundsvall, Sweden.
    Koskenvuo, Markku
    Univ Helsinki, Fac Med, Clinicum, Helsinki, Finland.
    Kumari, Meena
    Univ Essex, Inst Social & Econ Res, Wivenhoe Pk, Colchester, Essex, England, United Kingdom.
    Madsen, Ida E. H.
    Natl Res Ctr Working Environm, Copenhagen, Denmark.
    Nielsen, Martin L.
    AS3 Co, AS3 Employment, Viby, Denmark.
    Nordin, Maria
    Stockholm Univ, Stress Res Inst, Stockholm, Sweden / Umeå Univ, Dept Psychol, Umeå, Sweden.
    Oksanen, Tuula
    Finnish Inst Occupat Hlth, Helsinki, Finland.
    Pejtersen, Jan H.
    Danish Natl Ctr Social Res, Copenhagen, Denmark.
    Pentti, Jaana
    Univ Helsinki, Fac Med, Clinicum, Helsinki, Finland.
    Rugulies, Reiner
    Natl Res Ctr Working Environm, Copenhagen, Denmark / Univ Copenhagen, Dept Publ Hlth, Copenhagen, Denmark / Univ Copenhagen, Dept Psychol, Copenhagen, Denmark.
    Salo, Paula
    Finnish Inst Occupat Hlth, Helsinki, Finland / Univ Turku, Dept Psychol, Turku, Finland.
    Shipley, Martin J.
    UCL, Dept Epidemiol & Publ Hlth, London, England, United Kingdom.
    Suominen, Sakari
    University of Skövde, School of Health and Education. University of Skövde, Health and Education. Univ Turku, Dept Publ Hlth, Turku, Finland.
    Theorell, Töres
    Stockholm Univ, Stress Res Inst, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Vahtera, Jussi
    Univ Turku, Dept Publ Hlth, Turku, Finland / Turku Univ Hosp, Turku, Finland.
    Westerholm, Peter
    Uppsala Univ, Dept Med Sci, Akad Sjukhuset, Uppsala, Sweden.
    Westerlund, Hugo
    Stockholm Univ, Stress Res Inst, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Steptoe, Andrew
    UCL, Dept Epidemiol & Publ Hlth, London, England, United Kingdom.
    Singh-Manoux, Archana
    Hop Paul Brousse, INSERM, U1018, Ctr Res Epidemiol & Populat Hlth, Villejuif, France.
    Hamer, Mark
    Loughborough Univ Technol, Natl Ctr Sport & Exercise Med, Sch Sport Exercise & Hlth Sci, Loughborough, Leics, England, United Kingdom.
    Ferrie, Jane E.
    Univ Bristol, Sch Social & Community Med, Bristol, Avon, England, United Kingdom.
    Virtanen, Marianna
    Finnish Inst Occupat Hlth, Helsinki, Finland.
    Tabak, Adam G.
    UCL, Dept Epidemiol & Publ Hlth, London, England, United Kingdom / Semmelweis Univ, Fac Med, Dept Med 1, Budapest, Hungary.
    Long working hours as a risk factor for atrial fibrillation: a multi-cohort study2017In: European Heart Journal, ISSN 0195-668X, E-ISSN 1522-9645, Vol. 38, no 34, p. 2621-2628Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Aims Studies suggest that people who work long hours are at increased risk of stroke, but the association of long working hours with atrial fibrillation, the most common cardiac arrhythmia and a risk factor for stroke, is unknown. We examined the risk of atrial fibrillation in individuals working long hours (>= 55 per week) and those working standard 35-40 h/week. Methods and results In this prospective multi-cohort study from the Individual-Participant-Data Meta-analysis in Working Populations (IPD-Work) Consortium, the study population was 85 494 working men and women (mean age 43.4 years) with no recorded atrial fibrillation. Working hours were assessed at study baseline (1991-2004). Mean follow-up for incident atrial fibrillation was 10 years and cases were defined using data on electrocardiograms, hospital records, drug reimbursement registers, and death certificates. We identified 1061 new cases of atrial fibrillation (10-year cumulative incidence 12.4 per 1000). After adjustment for age, sex and socioeconomic status, individuals working long hours had a 1.4-fold increased risk of atrial fibrillation compared with those working standard hours (hazard ratio = 1.42, 95% CI= 1.13-1.80, P= 0.003). There was no significant heterogeneity between the cohort-specific effect estimates (I-2= 0%, P = 0.66) and the finding remained after excluding participants with coronary heart disease or stroke at baseline or during the follow-up (N= 2006, hazard ratio= 1.36, 95% CI= 1.05-1.76, P = 0.0180). Adjustment for potential confounding factors, such as obesity, risky alcohol use and high blood pressure, had little impact on this association. Conclusion Individuals who worked long hours were more likely to develop atrial fibrillation than those working standard hours.

  • 86.
    Klingberg, Eva
    et al.
    Department of Rheumatology and Inflammation Research, Sahlgrenska Academy at the University of Gothenburg, Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Strid, Hans
    Department of Internal Medicine, Södra Älvsborgs Sjukhus, Borås, Sweden / Department of Internal Medicine and Clinical Nutrition, Sahlgrenska Academy at the University of Gothenburg, Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Ståhl, Arne
    Department of Microbiology and Immunology, Sahlgrenska Academy at the University of Gothenburg, Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Deminger, Anna
    Department of Rheumatology and Inflammation Research, Sahlgrenska Academy at the University of Gothenburg, Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Carlsten, Hans
    Department of Rheumatology and Inflammation Research, Sahlgrenska Academy at the University of Gothenburg, Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Öhman, Lena
    University of Skövde, School of Health and Education. Department of Microbiology and Immunology, Sahlgrenska Academy at the University of Gothenburg, Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Forsblad-d'Elia, Helena
    Department of Rheumatology and Inflammation Research, Sahlgrenska Academy at the University of Gothenburg, Gothenburg, Sweden / Rheumatology Unit, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Umeå University, Umeå, Sweden.
    A longitudinal study of fecal calprotectin and the development of inflammatory bowel disease in ankylosing spondylitis2017In: Arthritis Research & Therapy, ISSN 1478-6354, E-ISSN 1478-6362, Vol. 19, article id 21Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: Patients with ankylosing spondylitis (AS) are at increased risk of developing inflammatory bowel disease (IBD). We aimed to determine the variation in fecal calprotectin in AS over 5 years in relation to disease activity and medication and also to study the incidence of and predictors for development of IBD. Methods: Fecal calprotectin was assessed at baseline (n = 204) and at 5-year follow-up (n = 164). The patients answered questionnaires and underwent clinical evaluations. At baseline and at 5-year follow-up, ileocolonoscopy was performed in patients with fecal calprotectin = 500 mg/kg and = 200 mg/kg, respectively. The medical records were checked for diagnoses of IBD during the follow-up period. Results: Fecal calprotectin > 50 mg/kg was found in two-thirds of the patients at both study visits. In 80% of the patients, fecal calprotectin changed by < 200 mg/kg between the two measuring points. Baseline fecal calprotectin was positively correlated with Ankylosing Spondylitis Disease Activity Score based on C-reactive protein, Bath Ankylosing Spondylitis Disease Activity Index, Bath Ankylosing Spondylitis Functional Index, C-reactive protein, erythrocyte sedimentation rate, and fecal calprotectin at 5-year follow-up. The use of nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) was associated with higher fecal calprotectin, and 3-week cessation of NSAIDs resulted in a drop of a median 116 mg/kg in fecal calprotectin. The use of tumor necrosis factor (TNF) blockers was associated with lower fecal calprotectin at both visits, but the users of TNF receptor fusion proteins had significantly higher fecal calprotectin than users of anti-TNF antibodies at 5-year follow-up. The 5-year incidence of Crohn's disease (CD) was 1.5% and was predicted by high fecal calprotectin. Conclusions: Fecal calprotectin was elevated in a majority of the patients and was associated with disease activity and medication at both visits. CD developed in 1.5% of the patients with AS, and a high fecal calprotectin was the main predictor thereof. The results support a link between inflammation in the gut and the musculoskeletal system in AS. We propose that fecal calprotectin may be a potential biomarker to identify patients with AS at risk of developing IBD.

  • 87.
    Knoop, Johanna
    et al.
    University of Skövde, School of Life Sciences.
    Kovacs, Veronica
    University of Skövde, School of Life Sciences.
    Sjuksköterskans sömnstöd till patienter med långvariga sömnproblem: En litteraturöversikt2010Independent thesis Basic level (degree of Bachelor), 10 credits / 15 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [en]

    BACKGROUND: Sleep is a periodic state which is essential for the body to recover in a proper manner. Insomnia and people with sleep apnea are two groups of patients out of long-term sleep problems. There are many causes of poor sleep, and that’s why there are so important for the nurse to be sensitive and support patients through their knowledge concerning the actions and processes that exist to use.

    AIM: The purpose of this literature review was to illustrate which measures nurse can apply to support patients with long-term sleep problems.

    METHOD: A literature overview, including 13 reviewed and analyzed articles. Fribergs (2006) model for literature overview were used in data collection and analysis procedure.

    RESULT: Four categories emerged from the analysis of the articles: self-care, acupuncture, cognitive behavioral therapy, and support program. These categories make it enable for the nurse to apply support to patients who suffer out of prolonged sleeping problem. Patients perceive that both their sleep and quality of life improves with the help of different treatments.

    CONCLUSION: Research into long-term sleep problems has increased in recent years. Despite this, there is a lack of knowledge about how nurse can provide treatment and support for patients with insomnia and sleep apnea.

  • 88.
    Krantz, Adam
    et al.
    University of Skövde, School of Health and Education.
    Kapetanovic, Senada
    University of Skövde, School of Health and Education.
    Distriktssköterskors erfarenheter av att vårda patienter med insulinbehandlad diabetes i hemmet2016Independent thesis Advanced level (degree of Master (One Year)), 10 credits / 15 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [en]

    Background: Patients with insulin-treated diabetes occur frequently in the home care setting. This care isn’t always easy which results in complex situations. Previous research describes patients with diabetes experiences of being cared for. There is a lack of knowledge regarding the district nurse’s experiences of caring for patients with insulin-treated diabetes in the home. Aim: The aim of this study was to describe the district nurse’s experiences of caring for patients with insulin-treated diabetes in the home. Method: A qualitative method with an inductive approach was used. As analysis method qualitative content analysis was used. Seven district nurses within the municipal home care was interviewed. Results: From the analysis two themes arose; Shared responsibility of caring is a balance between the patient and other professionals and The care in a home environment is a risky situation. Conclusion: There is insecurity and uncertainty among the district nurses regarding the care of these patients. District nurses are seldom alone in the care situation but rarely have the opportunity to be with the patient. This leads to requirements of confidence in other professions. The district nurses are forced to act in difficult situations in ways that are not always allowed

  • 89.
    Källvik, Anna
    et al.
    University of Skövde, School of Life Sciences.
    Nilsson, Madeleine
    University of Skövde, School of Life Sciences.
    Vårdandet av patienter med Anorexia Nervosa: Upplevelser ur ett patient- och sjuksköterskeperspektiv2009Independent thesis Basic level (degree of Bachelor), 10 credits / 15 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [en]

    Anorexia Nervosa is a complex disease that requires an individual treatment. Patients with Anorexia are known to be ambivalent when it comes to making a recovery and therefore need strong teamwork and a good relationship with the nurse. The aim of this study is to examine what good care means for the patient and the nurse when it comes to treating Anorexia Nervosa. The essay is a literature review based on ten scientific articles. In the result, which is divided in two parts, seven themes arise and these are: independence, social support, isolation, a challenge, the relationship, caring and respect and trust. In the result it was revealed that the patients prioritize support from the nurses, showing that they care and don’t judge the patients. The nurses describe compassion, trust, acceptance and mutual respect as important parts in the given care. The conclusion is that a good relationship between the nurse and patient means a great deal to achieve success when treating Anorexia Nervosa. Hopefully this study gives nurses an ability to learn from the presented material, and be able to improve the care of girls suffering from Anorexia Nervosa.

  • 90.
    Labbé, Daniel
    University of Skövde, School of Humanities and Informatics.
    The Feeling of Anxiety: Phenomenology and neural correlates2008Independent thesis Basic level (degree of Bachelor), 10 credits / 15 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [en]

    The feeling of anxiety, a conscious experience, is associated with uneasiness, painfulness, or disturbing suspense. The current paper presents the phenomenology of anxiety disorders based on diagnostic criteria and reviews neuroimaging studies on anxiety including dissociation studies. Activity in the anterior cingulate cortex, medial prefrontal cortex, insula, temporal poles and amygdala suggest neural correlates of anxiety. The relevance of the neural correlates, how the feeling of anxiety differs from fear and worry, and the construct validity of anxiety are addressed. Anxiety and pain correlate with activity in the anterior cingulate cortex, which warrants further studies on the painfulness–anxiety relationship.

  • 91.
    Landegren, Nils
    et al.
    Department of Medicine (Solna), Karolinska University Hospital, Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden / Department of Medical Sciences, Science for Life Laboratory, Uppsala University, Uppsala, Sweden.
    Sharon, Donald
    Department of Genetics, Stanford University, CA, USA / Department of Molecular, Cellular, and Developmental Biology, Yale University, New Haven, CT 06511, USA.
    Shum, Anthony K.
    Division of Pulmonary and Critical Care, Department of Medicine, University of California San Francisco, San Francisco, CA 94143, USA.
    Khan, Imran S.
    Diabetes Center, University of California San Francisco, San Francisco, CA 94143, USA.
    Fasano, Kayla J.
    Diabetes Center, University of California San Francisco, San Francisco, CA 94143, USA.
    Hallgren, Åsa
    Department of Medicine (Solna), Karolinska University Hospital, Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden / Department of Medical Sciences, Science for Life Laboratory, Uppsala University, Uppsala, Sweden.
    Kampf, Caroline
    Department of Immunology, Genetics, and Pathology, Uppsala University, Uppsala, Sweden.
    Freyhult, Eva
    Cancer Pharmacology and Computational Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences, Bioinformatics Infrastructure for Life Sciences, Science for Life Laboratory, Uppsala University, Uppsala, Sweden.
    Ardesjö-Lundgren, Brita
    Department of Animal Breeding and Genetics, Swedish University of Agricultural Sciences, Uppsala, Sweden.
    Alimohammadi, Mohammad
    Department of Medicine (Solna), Karolinska University Hospital, Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden / Department of Medical Sciences, Science for Life Laboratory, Uppsala University, Uppsala, Sweden / Department of Medical Sciences, Uppsala University, Uppsala, Sweden.
    Rathsman, Sandra
    Department of Laboratory Medicine/Microbiology, Örebro University Hospital, Örebro, Sweden.
    Ludvigsson, Jonas F.
    Department of Medical Epidemiology and Biostatistics, Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Lundh, Dan
    University of Skövde, School of Bioscience. University of Skövde, Health and Education.
    Motrich, Ruben
    Centro de Investigaciones en Bioquímica Clínica e Inmunología, Departamento de Bioquímica Clínica, Facultad de Ciencias Químicas, Universidad Nacional de Córdoba, Córdoba 5000, Argentina.
    Rivero, Virginia
    Centro de Investigaciones en Bioquímica Clínica e Inmunología, Departamento de Bioquímica Clínica, Facultad de Ciencias Químicas, Universidad Nacional de Córdoba, Córdoba 5000, Argentina.
    Fong, Lawrence
    University of California San Francisco Helen Diller Family Comprehensive Cancer Center, San Francisco, CA 94115, USA.
    Giwercman, Aleksander
    Molecular Reproduction Research, Department of Clinical Sciences Malmö, Lund University, Malmö, Sweden.
    Gustafsson, Jan
    Department of Women’s and Children’s Health, Uppsala University, Uppsala, Sweden.
    Perheentupa, Jaakko
    The Hospital for Children and Adolescents, University of Helsinki, Helsinki 00029, Finland.
    Husebye, Eystein S.
    Department of Clinical Science, University of Bergen, and Department of Medicine, Haukeland University Hospital, Bergen 5020, Norway.
    Anderson, Mark S.
    Diabetes Center, University of California San Francisco, San Francisco, CA 94143, USA.
    Snyder, Michael
    Department of Genetics, Stanford University, Stanford 94305, CA, USA.
    Kämpe, Olle
    Department of Medicine (Solna), Karolinska University Hospital, Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden / Department of Medical Sciences, Science for Life Laboratory, Uppsala University, Uppsala, Sweden.
    Transglutaminase 4 as a prostate autoantigen in male subfertility2015In: Science Translational Medicine, ISSN 1946-6234, E-ISSN 1946-6242, Vol. 7, no 292, article id 292ra101Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Autoimmune polyendocrine syndrome type 1 (APS1), a monogenic disorder caused by AIRE gene mutations, features multiple autoimmune disease components. Infertility is common in both males and females with APS1. Although female infertility can be explained by autoimmune ovarian failure, the mechanisms underlying male infertility have remained poorly understood. We performed a proteome-wide autoantibody screen in APS1 patient sera to assess the autoimmune response against the male reproductive organs. By screening human protein arrays with male and female patient sera and by selecting for gender-imbalanced autoantibody signals, we identified transglutaminase 4 (TGM4) as a male-specific autoantigen. Notably, TGM4 is a prostatic secretory molecule with critical role in male reproduction. TGM4 autoantibodies were detected in most of the adult male APS1 patients but were absent in all the young males. Consecutive serum samples further revealed that TGM4 autoantibodies first presented during pubertal age and subsequent to prostate maturation. We assessed the animal model for APS1, the Aire-deficient mouse, and found spontaneous development of TGM4 autoantibodies specifically in males. Aire-deficient mice failed to present TGM4 in the thymus, consistent with a defect in central tolerance for TGM4. In the mouse, we further link TGM4 immunity with a destructive prostatitis and compromised secretion of TGM4. Collectively, our findings in APS1 patients and Aire-deficient mice reveal prostate autoimmunity as a major manifestation of APS1 with potential role in male subfertility.

  • 92.
    Larsson, Annika
    University of Skövde, School of Health and Education. annika_bryntesson@hotmail.com.
    Att leva med bröstcancer: En litteraturbaserad studie2017Independent thesis Basic level (degree of Bachelor), 10 credits / 15 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [en]

    Background: In Sweden, more than 9000 people are diagnosed with breast cancer annually. A common experience are a loss of control and fear of the future. Furthermore, the cancer affect women's whole existence and side effects from treatment are common. With support, women are able to cope with anxiety, grief and fears that arise.

    Purpose: The aim of this litterature-based study was to examine how women with breast cancer experienced their daily life after diagnosis and treatment.

    Method: A litterature-based study with nine qualitative articles.

    Result: Three categories revealed; The uncertainty of the diagnosis; The meaning of relationships and When life gets a new meaning, and seven subcategories.

    Conclusion: Women with breast cancer were a group exposed to a greater risk of developing mental illness, where uncertainty and the need for information were unmet. The disease lead women to undergo a variety of crisis's and the need for support were important and necessary for some women in order to fight the disease. Support from healthcare and high patient-involvement facilitates and lead to a sense of control and reduced vulnerability. The disease could also cause women to experience a new meaning in life and that it became more valuable to them.

  • 93.
    Le Nevé, Boris
    et al.
    Danone Nutricia Research, Life Sciences Department, Palaiseau, France.
    Brazeilles, Rémi
    Danone Nutricia Research, Life Sciences Department, Palaiseau, France.
    Derrien, Muriel
    Danone Nutricia Research, Life Sciences Department, Palaiseau, France.
    Tap, Julien
    Danone Nutricia Research, Life Sciences Department, Palaiseau, France / INRA (Institut National de la Recherche Agronomique) MetaGenoPolis, Jouy en Josas, France.
    Guyonnet, Denis
    Danone Nutricia Research, Life Sciences Department, Palaiseau, France.
    Öhman, Lena
    Department of Internal Medicine and Clinical Nutrition, Institute of Medicine, Sahlgrenska Academy, University of Gothenburg, Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Törnblom, Hans
    Department of Internal Medicine and Clinical Nutrition, Institute of Medicine, Sahlgrenska Academy, University of Gothenburg, Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Simrén, Magnus
    Department of Internal Medicine and Clinical Nutrition, Institute of Medicine, Sahlgrenska Academy, University of Gothenburg, Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Lactulose Challenge Determines Visceral Sensitivity and Severity of Symptoms in Patients With Irritable Bowel Syndrome2016In: Clinical Gastroenterology and Hepatology, ISSN 1542-3565, E-ISSN 1542-7714, Vol. 14, no 2, p. 226.e1-233.e3Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    BACKGROUND & AIMS: Patients with irritable bowel syndrome (IBS) can be assigned to groups with different gastrointestinal (GI) symptoms based on results from a combined nutrient and lactulose challenge. We aimed to identify factors that predict outcomes to this challenge and to determine whether this can be used in noninvasive assessment of visceral sensitivity in patients with IBS.

    METHODS: We performed a prospective study of 100 patients with IBS diagnosed according to Rome III criteria (all subtypes) and seen at a secondary or tertiary care center. After an overnight fast, subjects were given a liquid breakfast (400 mL; Nutridrink) that contained 25 g lactulose. Before the challenge, we assessed visceral sensitivity (via rectal barostat), oro-anal transit time, and fecal microbiota composition (via 16S ribosomal RNA pyrosequencing); we determined IBS severity using questionnaires. The intensity of 8 GI symptoms, the level of digestive comfort, and the amount of exhaled H2 and CH4 in breath were measured before and during a 4-hour period after the liquid breakfast.

    RESULTS: Based on the intensity of 8 GI symptoms and level of digestive comfort during the challenge, patients were assigned to groups with high-intensity GI symptoms (HGS; n = 39) or low-intensity GI symptoms (LGS; n = 61); patients with HGS had more severe IBS (P < .0001), higher somatization (P < .01), and lower quality of life (P < .05-.01) than patients with LGS. Patients with HGS also had significantly higher rectal sensitivity to random phasic distensions (P < .05-.001, compared with patients with LGS). There were no significant differences between groups in fecal microbiota composition, exhaled gas in breath, or oro-anal transit time.

    CONCLUSIONS: We found, in a prospective study, that results from a lactulose challenge test could be used to determine visceral sensitivity and severity of IBS. The intensity of patient symptoms did not correlate with the composition of the fecal microbiota. The lactulose challenge test may help better characterize patients with IBS and evaluate the efficacy of new treatments. ClinicalTrial.gov no: NCT01252550.

  • 94.
    Lebrero-Fernandez, Cristina
    et al.
    Department of Microbiology and Immunology, Institute of Biomedicine, University of Gothenburg, Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Wenzel, Ulf Alexander
    Department of Microbiology and Immunology, Institute of Biomedicine, University of Gothenburg, Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Akeus, Paulina
    Department of Microbiology and Immunology, Institute of Biomedicine, University of Gothenburg, Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Wang, Ying
    Department of Microbiology and Immunology, Institute of Biomedicine, University of Gothenburg, Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Strid, Hans
    Department of Internal Medicine and Clinical Nutrition, Institute of Medicine, University of Gothenburg, Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Simrén, Magnus
    Department of Internal Medicine and Clinical Nutrition, Institute of Medicine, University of Gothenburg, Gothenburg, Sweden / Center for Functional GI and Motility Disorders, University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill, North Carolina, USA.
    Gustavsson, Bengt
    Department of Surgery, Institute of Clinical Sciences, University of Gothenburg, Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Börjesson, Lars G.
    Department of Surgery, Institute of Clinical Sciences, University of Gothenburg, Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Cardell, Susanna L.
    Department of Microbiology and Immunology, Institute of Biomedicine, University of Gothenburg, Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Öhman, Lena
    University of Skövde, School of Health and Education. Department of Microbiology and Immunology, Institute of Biomedicine, University of Gothenburg, Gothenburg, Sweden / Department of Internal Medicine and Clinical Nutrition, Institute of Medicine, University of Gothenburg, Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Quiding-Järbrink, Marianne
    Department of Microbiology and Immunology, Institute of Biomedicine, University of Gothenburg, Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Bas-Forsberg, Anna
    Department of Microbiology and Immunology, Institute of Biomedicine, University of Gothenburg, Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Altered expression of Butyrophilin (BTN) and BTN-like (BTNL) genes in intestinal inflammation and colon cancer2016In: Immunity, Inflammation and Disease, ISSN 2050-4527, Vol. 4, no 2, p. 191-200Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Several Butyrophilin (BTN) and Btn-like (BTNL) molecules control T lymphocyte responses, and are genetically associated with inflammatory disorders and cancer. In this study, we present a comprehensive expression analysis of human and murine BTN and BTNL genes in conditions associated with intestinal inflammation and cancer. Using real-time PCR, expression of human BTN and BTNL genes was analyzed in samples from patients with ulcerative colitis, irritable bowel syndrome, and colon tumors. Expression of murine Btn and Btnl genes was examined in mouse models of spontaneous colitis (Muc2(-/-)) and intestinal tumorigenesis (Apc(Min/+)). Our analysis indicates a strong association of several of the human genes with ulcerative colitis and colon cancer; while especially BTN1A1, BTN2A2, BTN3A3, and BTNL8 were significantly altered in inflammation, colonic tumors exhibited significantly decreased levels of BTNL2, BTNL3, BTNL8, and BTNL9 as compared to unaffected tissue. Colonic inflammation in Muc2(-/-) mice significantly down-regulated the expression of particularly Btnl1, Btnl4, and Btnl6 mRNA, and intestinal polyps derived from Apc(Min/+) mice displayed altered levels of Btn1a1, Btn2a2, and Btnl1 transcripts. Thus, our data present an association of BTN and BTNL genes with intestinal inflammation and cancer and represent a valuable resource for further studies of this gene family.

  • 95.
    Lee, Richard G.
    et al.
    Univ Western Australia, Ctr Med Res, Nedlands, WA, Australia / Harry Perkins Inst Med Res, Nedlands, WA, Australia.
    Sedghi, Maryam
    Univ Isfahan, Dept Genet, Esfahan, Iran.
    Salari, Mehri
    Shahid Beheshti Univ Med Sci, Shohada Tajrish Neurosurg Ctr Excellence, Funct Neurosurg Res Ctr, Tehran, Iran.
    Shearwood, Anne-Marie J.
    Univ Western Australia, Ctr Med Res, Nedlands, WA, Australia / Harry Perkins Inst Med Res, Nedlands, WA, Australia.
    Stentenbach, Maike
    Univ Western Australia, Ctr Med Res, Nedlands, WA, Australia / Harry Perkins Inst Med Res, Nedlands, WA, Australia.
    Kariminejad, Ariana
    Kariminejad Najmabadi Pathol & Genet Ctr, Tehran, Iran.
    Goullee, Hayley
    Univ Western Australia, Ctr Med Res, Nedlands, WA, Australia / Harry Perkins Inst Med Res, Nedlands, WA, Australia.
    Rackham, Oliver
    Univ Western Australia, Ctr Med Res, Nedlands, WA, Australia / Harry Perkins Inst Med Res, Nedlands, WA, Australia / Univ Western Australia, Sch Mol Sci, Crawley, Australia.
    Laing, Nigel G.
    Univ Western Australia, Ctr Med Res, Nedlands, WA, Australia / Harry Perkins Inst Med Res, Nedlands, WA, Australia / QEII Med Ctr, PathWest, Dept Diagnost Genom, Nedlands, WA, Australia.
    Tajsharghi, Homa
    University of Skövde, School of Health and Education. University of Skövde, Health and Education.
    Filipovska, Aleksandra
    Univ Western Australia, Ctr Med Res, Nedlands, WA, Australia / Harry Perkins Inst Med Res, Nedlands, WA, Australia / Univ Western Australia, Sch Mol Sci, Crawley, Australia.
    Early-onset Parkinson disease caused by a mutation in CHCHD2 and mitochondrial dysfunction2018In: Neurology Genetics, ISSN 2376-7839, Vol. 4, no 5, article id e276Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Objective Our goal was to identify the gene(s) associated with an early-onset form of Parkinson disease (PD) and the molecular defects associated with this mutation. Methods We combined whole-exome sequencing and functional genomics to identify the genes associated with early-onset PD. We used fluorescence microscopy, cell, and mitochondrial biology measurements to identify the molecular defects resulting from the identified mutation. Results Here, we report an association of a homozygous variant in CHCHD2, encoding coiled-coil-helix-coiled-coil-helix domain containing protein 2, a mitochondrial protein of unknown function, with an early-onset form of PD in a 26-year-old Caucasian woman. The CHCHD2 mutation in PD patient fibroblasts causes fragmentation of the mitochondrial reticular morphology and results in reduced oxidative phosphorylation at complex I and complex IV. Although patient cells could maintain a proton motive force, reactive oxygen species production was increased, which correlated with an increased metabolic rate. Conclusions Our findings implicate CHCHD2 in the pathogenesis of recessive early-onset PD, expanding the repertoire of mitochondrial proteins that play a direct role in this disease.

  • 96.
    Lewander, Andreas
    et al.
    Department of Oncology, Institute of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, University of Linköping, SE-581 85 Linköping, Sweden.
    Gao, Jinfang
    Department of Oncology, Institute of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, University of Linköping, SE-581 85 Linköping, Sweden.
    Adell, Gunnar
    Department of Oncology, Karolinska University Hospital, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Zhang, Hong
    University of Skövde, School of Life Sciences. University of Skövde, The Systems Biology Research Centre.
    Sun, Xiao-Feng
    Department of Oncology, Institute of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, University of Linköping, SE-581 85 Linköping, Sweden.
    Expression of NF-kappa B p65 phosphorylated at serine-536 in rectal cancer with or without preoperative radiotherapy2011In: Radiology and Oncology, ISSN 1318-2099, E-ISSN 1581-3207, Vol. 45, no 4, p. 279-284Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background. In the present study, we investigated NF-kappa B p65 phosphorylated at Serine-536 (phosphor-Ser536-p65) in rectal cancer and its relationship to preoperative radiotherapy (RT), clinicopathological variables and biological factors. Patients and methods. Expression of phosphor-Ser536-p65 was examined by using immunohistochemistry in 141 primary rectal cancers, 149 normal mucosa specimens and 48 metastases in the lymph nodes, from rectal cancer patients who participated in a Swedish clinical trial of preoperative RT. Results. The expression of phosphor-Ser536-p65 in the cytoplasm increased from normal mucosa to primary tumour (p<0.0001, for both the group that did and the group that did not received RT). The expression did not further increase from primary tumour to metastasis in either group (p>0.05). Expression of phosphor-Ser536-p65 was positively related to, or tended to be related to, the expression of tumour endothelium marker 1 (TEM1, p=0.02), FXYD-3 (p=0.001), phosphatase of regenerating liver (PRL, p=0.02), p73 (p=0.048) and meningioma associated protein (MAC30, p=0.05) in the group that received RT but there were no such relationships in the group that did not received RT (p>0.05). The expression of phosphor-Ser536-p65 was not related to clinicopathological factors including survival (p>0.05). Conclusions. The increased expression of phosphor-Ser536-p65 may be involved in rectal cancer development. After RT, phosphor-Ser536-p65 seems to be positively related to the biological factors, which associated with more malignant features of tumours. However, phosphor-Ser536-p65 was not directly related to the response of RT based on recurrence and survival.

  • 97.
    Li, M.
    et al.
    Department of Clinical Neurophysiology, Uppsala University, Uppsala, Sweden / Department of Neurology, Qilu Hospital, Shandong University, Jinan, China.
    Lionikas, A.
    Department of Clinical Neurophysiology, Uppsala University, Uppsala, Sweden / Center for Developmental and Health Genetics, The Pennsylvania State University, University Park, PA, USA.
    Yu, F.
    Center for Developmental and Health Genetics, The Pennsylvania State University, University Park, PA, USA.
    Tajsharghi, Homa
    Department of Pathology, Sahlgrenska University Hospital, Göteborg, Sweden.
    Oldfors, Anders
    Department of Pathology, Sahlgrenska University Hospital, Göteborg, Sweden.
    Larsson, L.
    Department of Clinical Neurophysiology, Uppsala University, Uppsala, Sweden / Center for Developmental and Health Genetics, The Pennsylvania State University, University Park, PA, USA.
    Muscle cell and motor protein function in patients with a IIa myosin missense mutation (Glu-706 to Lys)2006In: Neuromuscular Disorders, ISSN 0960-8966, E-ISSN 1873-2364, Vol. 16, no 11, p. 782-791Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The pathogenic events leading to the progressive muscle weakness in patients with a E706K mutation in the head of the myosin heavy chain (MyHC) IIa were analyzed at the muscle cell and motor protein levels. Contractile properties were measured in single muscle fiber segments using the skinned fiber preparation and a single muscle fiber in vitro motility assay. A dramatic impairment in the function of the IIa MyHC isoform was observed at the motor protein level. At the single muscle fiber level, on the other hand, a general decrease was observed in the number of preparations where the specific criteria for acceptance were fulfilled irrespective of MyHC isoform expression. Our results provide evidence that the pathogenesis of the MyHC IIa E706K myopathy involves defective function of the mutated myosin as well as alterations in the structural integrity of all muscle cells irrespective of MyHC isoform expression.

  • 98.
    Lietzén, Raija
    et al.
    Department of Public Health, University of Turku, Turku, Finland.
    Virtanen, Pekka
    School of Health Sciences, University of Tampere, Tampere, Finland.
    Kivimäki, Mika
    Department of Public Health, Clinicum, Faculty of Medicine, University of Helsinki, Helsinki, Finland / Department of Epidemiology and Public Health, University College London Medical School, London, United Kingdom.
    Korkeila, Jyrki
    Department of Psychiatry, University of Turku and Harjavalta Hospital, Satakunta Hospital District, Harjavalta, Finland.
    Suominen, Sakari
    University of Skövde, School of Health and Education. University of Skövde, Health and Education. Department of Public Health, University of Turku, Turku, Finland.
    Sillanmäki, Lauri
    Department of Public Health, Clinicum, Faculty of Medicine, University of Helsinki, Helsinki, Finland.
    Koskenvuo, Markku
    Department of Public Health, Clinicum, Faculty of Medicine, University of Helsinki, Helsinki, Finland.
    Vahtera, Jussi
    Department of Public Health, University of Turku and Turku University Hospital, Turku, Finland.
    Change in β2-agonist use after severe life events in adults with asthma: A population-based cohort study Life events and bronchodilator usage among adults with asthma2017In: Journal of Psychosomatic Research, ISSN 0022-3999, E-ISSN 1879-1360, Vol. 100, p. 46-52Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Objective: This prospective, population-based cohort study of 1102 Finnish adults with asthma, examined whether exposure to stressful life events is associated with the intensity of usage of inhaled short-acting β2- agonists. Methods: Survey data was collected by two postal questionnaires. Baseline characteristics were obtained in 1998 and data on 19 specific stressful events (e.g. death of a child or spouse or divorce) within the six preceding months in 2003. Exposure to life events was indicated by a sum score weighted by mean severity of the events. Participants were linked to records of filled prescriptions for inhaled short-acting β2-agonists from national registers from 2000 through 2006. The rates of purchases of short-acting β2-agonists before (2000−2001), during (2002−2003) and after (2004–2006) the event exposure were estimated using repeated-measures Poisson regression analyses with the generalized estimating equation. Results: Of the 1102 participants, 162 (15%) were exposed to highly stressful events, 205 (19%) to less stressful events. During the 7-year observation period, 5955 purchases of filled prescription for inhaled short-acting β2- agonists were recorded. After exposure to highly stressful events, the rate of purchases of β2-agonists was 1.50 times higher (95% confidence interval (CI): 1.05, 2.13) than before the stressful event occurred. Among those with low or no exposure to life events, the corresponding rate ratios were not elevated (rate ratio 0.81, 95% CI: 0.66, 0.99 and 0.95, 95% CI: 0.83, 1.09 respectively). Conclusion: An increase in β2-agonist usage after severe life events suggests that stressful experiences may worsen asthma symptoms

  • 99.
    Ljungström, Lars
    et al.
    Department of Infectious Diseases, Skaraborg Hospital, Skövde, Sweden.
    Enroth, Helena
    Department of Clinical Microbiology, Unilabs AB, Skövde, Sweden.
    Claesson, Berndt E. B.
    Department of Clinical Microbiology, Unilabs AB, Skövde, Sweden.
    Ovemyr, Ida
    University of Skövde, School of Bioscience. University of Skövde, The Systems Biology Research Centre.
    Karlsson, Jesper
    Department of Clinical Microbiology, Unilabs AB, Skövde, Sweden.
    Fröberg, Berit
    Department of Clinical Microbiology, Unilabs AB, Skövde, Sweden.
    Brodin, Anna-Karin
    Department of Clinical Microbiology, Unilabs AB, Skövde, Sweden.
    Pernestig, Anna-Karin
    University of Skövde, School of Bioscience. University of Skövde, The Systems Biology Research Centre.
    Jacobsson, Gunnar
    Department of Clinical Microbiology, Unilabs AB, Skövde, Sweden.
    Andersson, Rune
    Institute of Biomedicine, Sahlgrenska Academy, Gothenburg University, Gothenburg, Sweden..
    Karlsson, Diana
    University of Skövde, School of Bioscience. University of Skövde, The Systems Biology Research Centre.
    Clinical evaluation of commercial nucleic acid amplification tests in patients with suspected sepsis2015In: BMC Infectious Diseases, ISSN 1471-2334, E-ISSN 1471-2334, Vol. 15, no 1, article id 199Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    BACKGROUND: Sepsis is a serious medical condition requiring timely administered, appropriate antibiotic therapy. Blood culture is regarded as the gold standard for aetiological diagnosis of sepsis, but it suffers from low sensitivity and long turnaround time. Thus, nucleic acid amplification tests (NAATs) have emerged to shorten the time to identification of causative microbes. The aim of the present study was to evaluate the clinical utility in everyday practice in the emergency department of two commercial NAATs in patients suspected with sepsis.

    METHODS: During a six-week period, blood samples were collected consecutively from all adult patients admitted to the general emergency department for suspicion of a community-onset sepsis and treated with intravenous antibiotics. Along with conventional blood cultures, multiplex PCR (Magicplex™) was performed on whole blood specimens whereas portions from blood culture bottles were used for analysis by microarray-based assay (Prove-it™). The aetiological significance of identified organisms was determined by two infectious disease physicians based on clinical presentation and expected pathogenicity.

    RESULTS: Among 382 episodes of suspected sepsis, clinically relevant microbes were detected by blood culture in 42 episodes (11%), by multiplex PCR in 37 episodes (9.7%), and by microarray in 32 episodes (8.4%). Although moderate agreement with blood culture (kappa 0.50), the multiplex PCR added diagnostic value by timely detection of 15 clinically relevant findings in blood culture-negative specimens. Results of the microarray corresponded very well to those of blood culture (kappa 0.90), but were available just marginally prior to blood culture results.

    CONCLUSIONS: The use of NAATs on whole blood specimens in adjunct to current culture-based methods provides a clinical add-on value by allowing for detection of organisms missed by blood culture. However, the aetiological significance of findings detected by NAATs should be interpreted with caution as the high analytical sensitivity may add findings that do not necessarily corroborate with the clinical diagnosis.

  • 100.
    Ljungström, Lars
    et al.
    Department of Infectious Diseases, Skaraborg Hospital.
    Jacobsson, Gunnar
    Department of Infectious Diseases, Skaraborg Hospital / The swedish strategic program against antibiotic resistance.
    Pernestig, Anna-Karin
    University of Skövde, School of Bioscience. University of Skövde, The Systems Biology Research Centre.
    Tilevik, Diana
    University of Skövde, School of Bioscience. University of Skövde, The Systems Biology Research Centre.
    The diagnostic value of PCT as biomarker in patients suspected with community-onset bacterial sepsis2017Conference paper (Refereed)
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