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  • 51.
    Andersén, Jim
    et al.
    University of Skövde, School of Business. University of Skövde, Enterprises for the Future.
    Jansson, Christian
    University of Skövde, School of Business. University of Skövde, Enterprises for the Future.
    Ljungkvist, Torbjörn
    University of Skövde, School of Business. University of Skövde, Enterprises for the Future.
    A Dynamic Approach to Causal Ambiguity - How Organizational Learning Affects Causal Ambiguity2015In: Proceedings of ICICKM 2015 The 12th International Conference on Intellectual Capital Knowledge Management and Organisational Learning / [ed] Vincent Ribière & Lugkana Worasinchai, Academic Conferences and Publishing International Limited , 2015Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 52.
    Andersén, Jim
    et al.
    University of Skövde, School of Business. University of Skövde, Enterprises for the Future.
    Jansson, Christian
    University of Skövde, School of Business. University of Skövde, Enterprises for the Future.
    Ljungkvist, Torbjörn
    University of Skövde, School of Business. University of Skövde, Enterprises for the Future.
    A model for measuring resource immobility2014Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 53.
    Andersén, Jim
    et al.
    University of Skövde, School of Business. University of Skövde, Enterprises for the Future.
    Jansson, Christian
    University of Skövde, School of Business. University of Skövde, Enterprises for the Future.
    Ljungkvist, Torbjörn
    University of Skövde, School of Business. University of Skövde, Enterprises for the Future.
    Can environmentally oriented CEOs and environmentally friendly suppliers boost the growth of small firms?2019In: Business Strategy and the Environment, ISSN 0964-4733, E-ISSN 1099-0836Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The core question addressed in the natural resource‐based view (NRBV) of the firm is how to develop and exploit resources beneficial for both the natural environment and firm performance. Due to the resource constraints and increased competition facing small manufacturing firms, achieving this is a challenge for such companies. Building on the NRBV and resource orchestration literatures, we examine the relationship between green purchasing capabilities (GPCs), CEO's environmental orientation(EO), and firm growth. Results from 304 Swedish small manufacturing firms indicate a significant relationship between GPC and growth, and this relationship is positively moderated by the EO of the CEO.

  • 54.
    Andersén, Jim
    et al.
    University of Skövde, School of Business. University of Skövde, Enterprises for the Future.
    Jansson, Christian
    University of Skövde, School of Business. University of Skövde, Enterprises for the Future.
    Ljungkvist, Torbjörn
    University of Skövde, Enterprises for the Future. University of Skövde, School of Business.
    Rent appropriation management of strategic human capital in practice2017Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 55.
    Andersén, Jim
    et al.
    University of Skövde, School of Business. University of Skövde, Enterprises for the Future.
    Jansson, Christian
    University of Skövde, School of Business. University of Skövde, Enterprises for the Future.
    Ljungkvist, Torbjörn
    University of Skövde, School of Business. University of Skövde, Enterprises for the Future.
    Resource immobility and sustained performance: A systematic assessment of how immobility has been considered in empirical resource-based studies2016In: International journal of management reviews (Print), ISSN 1460-8545, E-ISSN 1468-2370, Vol. 18, no 4, p. 371-396Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The core notion of the resource-based view (RBV) is that the possession of certain resources can result in superior performance and, in order for this performance to be sustained, these resources cannot be perfectly mobile. Whereas previous reviews have mainly focused on the relationship between resources and temporary performance, no studies have systematically analyzed the extent to which empirical RBV studies have specifically considered immobility of resources. By analyzing a sample of 218 empirical RBV studies, the authors found that 17% of the studies directly measured some dimension of immobility (by, for example, actually measuring the level of social complexity, unique history, tacitness or tradability). Fewer than 2% of the studies measured the outcome of resource immobility, i.e. sustained performance differences. Based on these results, this paper discusses the consequences of overlooking this key dimension of the RBV (i.e. immobility) and suggests that, and discusses how, future research should consider resource immobility to a greater extent.

  • 56.
    Andersén, Jim
    et al.
    University of Skövde, School of Business. University of Skövde, Enterprises for the Future.
    Ljungkvist, Torbjörn
    University of Skövde, School of Business. University of Skövde, Enterprises for the Future.
    Entrepreneurial orientation and employee well-being2015Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 57.
    Andersén, Jim
    et al.
    University of Skövde, School of Business. University of Skövde, Enterprises for the Future.
    Ljungkvist, Torbjörn
    University of Skövde, School of Business. University of Skövde, Enterprises for the Future.
    Jansson, Christian
    University of Skövde, School of Business. University of Skövde, Enterprises for the Future.
    An integrated approach to rent appropriation and rent generation2016Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 58.
    Andersén, Jim
    et al.
    University of Skövde, School of Business. University of Skövde, Enterprises for the Future.
    Ljungkvist, Torbjörn
    University of Skövde, School of Business. University of Skövde, Enterprises for the Future.
    Svensson, Lotten
    University of Skövde, School of Business. University of Skövde, Enterprises for the Future.
    Entrepreneurially oriented in what? A business model approach to entrepreneurship2015In: Journal of Small Business and Enterprise Development, ISSN 1462-6004, E-ISSN 1758-7840, Vol. 22, no 3, p. 433-449Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Purpose – The purpose of this paper is to illustrate and argue for the necessity of deconstructing the entrepreneurship concept by analyzing entrepreneurial orientation (EO) at various levels of the business model.

    Design/methodology/approach – Literature review supplemented with five illustrative cases.

    Findings – A business model approach to entrepreneurship enables identification of the component of the business model in which entrepreneurship was started. This has several implications for analysis of the EO-performance relationship and for the identification of antecedents to EO.

    Originality/value – The EO of firms has generally been analyzed at a generic level, i.e. the concept has been used to measure and analyze the overall entrepreneurship of firms. In this paper, the authors argue that EO can be present in various dimensions of a business and that firms can be entrepreneurial in certain areas and conservative in other areas.

  • 59.
    Andersén, Jim
    et al.
    University of Skövde, School of Business. University of Skövde, Enterprises for the Future.
    Samuelsson, Joachim
    University of Skövde, School of Business. University of Skövde, Enterprises for the Future.
    Resource organization and firm performance: How entrepreneurial orientation and management accounting influence the profitability of growing and non-growing SMEs2016In: International Journal of Entrepreneurial Behaviour & Research, ISSN 1355-2554, E-ISSN 1758-6534, Vol. 22, no 4, p. 466-484Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Purpose

    The aim of this study is to examine how entrepreneurial orientation (EO) and the use of management accounting practices (MAPs) in decision making affects the profitability of SMEs, and also to analyze the extent to which EO and the use of MAPs affects profitability differently in growing and non-growing SMEs.

    Design/methodology/approach

    The paper employs an empirical investigation which is based on a sample of 153 Swedish manufacturing SMEs. The data is analyzed by two- and three way interaction regressions.

    Findings

    EO and MAPs have a positive effect on profitability in non-growing SMEs, but the combined effect of EO and MAPs has no additional effect. However, for growing SMEs, high usage of MAPs in decision making is a prerequisite for EO to influence profitability.

    Originality/value

    This study is the first to use the resource-based view to examine the relationship between two dimensions of resource organization and SME profitability. Entrepreneurial orientation (EO) is used as a proxy for how resources are organized in order to identify opportunities, and management accounting practices (MAPs) are used as a proxy for how efficiently resources are organized.

  • 60.
    Auruskeviciene, Vilte
    et al.
    Kaunas University of Technology, Lithuania.
    Radon, Anita
    University of Borås, Sweden.
    Abraha, Desalegn
    University of Skövde, School of Business. University of Skövde, Enterprises for the Future.
    Reardon, James
    University of Northern Colorado, USA.
    Vida, Irena
    University of Ljubljana, Slovenia.
    Consumer Decision Model of Intellectual Property Theft in Eurasia Markets2015In: 15th EBES conference, Jan 8-10, Lisbon, Portugal, 2015Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 61.
    Boers, Börje
    University of Skövde, School of Business. University of Skövde, Enterprises for the Future.
    100 years and older: responsible ownership in long-lived family firms2019Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The purpose of this paper is to explore the implications of responsible ownership in long-lived family firms. Theoretically, the paper draws on responsible ownership. Responsible ownership is suggested as an alternative conceptualization of social responsible behavior in family firms. Empirically, the study draws on in depth case studies from Germany and Sweden. The study focuses on responsible ownership behavior towards two key stakeholders, i.e. employees and the home community. Thereby the study contributes to further the understanding of responsible ownership of family firms.

  • 62.
    Boers, Börje
    University of Skövde, School of Business. University of Skövde, Enterprises for the Future.
    Go East! How family businesses choose markets and entry modes when internationalising2016In: International Journal of Globalisation and Small Business, ISSN 1479-3059, E-ISSN 1479-3067, Vol. 8, no 4, p. 333-354Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This paper investigates the choices of foreign markets, international market selection (IMS), and the respective entry modes, entry mode selection (EMS), for family firms internationalisation by using in-depth case studies of two family-owned newspaper companies. These decisions are studied from the Uppsala-stage model perspective. The purpose is to understand how and why family firms choose IMS and EMS when internationalising from a risk perspective. This study shows that IMS and EMS can at times be the consequence of one decision which may be the result of opportunistic behaviour. The decision reflects the risk preferences of owning families when selecting markets and entry modes. The explored family firms use contrasting approaches as they choose IMS and EMS according to different logics. Psychic distance leads to certain international market selection, but there is not a given preference for low distance. Instead, the entry mode selection reflects the dominant risk perception of the owning families. A preference for direct entry modes corresponds to the owning families risk perception and need for control. Accordingly, IMS and EMS are two steps, but the order of these is not given, i.e. after an entry mode is chosen this may be applied irrespective of the market to be entered. Business model and acquisition are highlighted as alternative entry modes, giving control to family firms. Thereby, this study expands those prior and increases the understanding of the peculiarities of family firm internationalisation.

  • 63.
    Boers, Börje
    University of Skövde, School of Business. University of Skövde, Enterprises for the Future.
    Heteronormativity and the family firm: Will we ever see a queer family business?2017In: Gender and Family Entrepreneurship / [ed] João J. Ferreira, Vanessa Ratten, Veland Ramadani, Robert D. Hisrich, Leo-Paul Dana, London and New York: Routledge, 2017, 1, p. 171-182Chapter in book (Refereed)
  • 64.
    Boers, Börje
    University of Skövde, School of Business. University of Skövde, Enterprises for the Future.
    Internationalization of regional newspaper companies: two examples2015Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Newspaper companies and other media companies are under pressure as their traditional business model is challenged. Some companies try to compensate by entering new markets, i.e. to internationalize. This strategy increases their presence in old and new media markets and segments. This paper problematizes how two family owned newspaper companies internationalize from two perspectives, i.e. an ownership perspective and an industry perspective. Empirically, the paper draws on two examples of family owned newspaper companies. Semi-structured interviews with owners, managers and editors have been conducted domestically and in the respective foreign market. Archival data has been used to complement the interviews. Both companies started as regional newspaper companies and have reached leading positions in their distribution area. Whereas one company entered the Eastern European market in the 1990s the other company focused on domestic expansion and small scale, international joint ventures in the later 2000s. From an ownership perspective it becomes visible that the family owners are initiating and supporting the internationalization process. In one company, an owner manager was in charge for the internationalization process which can be seen as a success factor. In the other company, the owners were not actively involved which is reflected in the relatively poorer results. From a newspaper industry perspective the study shows that synergies are possible by syndication of content across languages within the same industry as well as business models (printing).These perspectives contribute to the developing body of literature in the field of media management on internationalization and ownership.

  • 65.
    Boers, Börje
    University of Skövde, School of Business. University of Skövde, Enterprises for the Future.
    Learning to professionalize: handling tensions in a family owned newspaper business2015Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This paper aims at understanding the professionalization process of a Swedish family owned newspaper from a generational perspective. Professionalization is a much debated topic within the family business field. Family ownership is still common in the Nordic countries.  But the consequences and implications are not well understood and despite its presence the issue of family ownership is rarely discussed in the academic field. Media studies discuss professionalization but mostly focusing on the journalistic profession. Ownership and ownership transition have only recently been discussed.

     Empirically, the paper draws on an in depth case study of a family owned newspaper company. Semi-structured interviews with owners, managers, board members, and editors have been conducted. The interviews were complemented with secondary material, e.g. annual reports and biographies. Four generations are discussed with regards to professionalization processes.  The study shows that competence and learning are factors influencing the professionalization process across generations.  Competence is divided into cultural and formal competence. Learning is categorized as experiential learning which increases over generations. Formal competence and structures become important, increasing the risk for alienation between the owners and the business.  Professionalization of ownership structures and roles has consequences for family, ownership and business. The paper contributes to the limited research on family ownership in media management research.

  • 66.
    Boers, Börje
    University of Skövde, School of Business. University of Skövde, Enterprises for the Future.
    The codetermined family business: a paradox?: Comparing cases from Sweden and Germany2019Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The purpose of this comparative case study is to understand codetermination in two family firms. Empirically, this study draws on an interpretive case study of two family businesses. Its findings extends earlier research, by exploring and introducing the phenomenon of codetermination in the family business literature. Theoretically, the study draws on the control-collaboration paradox which helps understanding the phenomenon of codetermination. Findings highlight the need for professional governance structures in order to facilitate cooperation between family owners, the management, and employee representatives.

  • 67.
    Boers, Börje
    et al.
    University of Skövde, School of Business. University of Skövde, Enterprises for the Future.
    Brozovic, Danilo
    University of Skövde, School of Business. University of Skövde, Enterprises for the Future.
    Work-family interface: coping strategies in growing family SMEs2019Conference paper (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    SMEs may be more vulnerable because of their limited resources (Falkner & Hiebl, 2015). SMEs’ success is often dependent on their owner managers, e.g. their attitude towards growth may differ substantively (Achtenhagen, Naldi, & Melin, 2010; Jaouen & Lasch, 2015). For instance, Davidsson argued that not all small firm owners are willing to grow because they, e.g., fear that growth will endanger employee well-being and the owners will lose control (Davidsson, 1989, 1991). The ability of owner managers to follow a growth strategy may in part also be dependent on how the owner manager is able to handle its life outside the business (Jennings & McDougald, 2007), e.g. the family embeddedness (Aldrich & Cliff, 2003).

    More recent research has called for studies investigating, e.g. the work–family (WF) interactions in businesses run by male and female entrepreneurs (Adkins, Samaras, Gilfillan, & McWee, 2013; Ahl, 2006). Extant research has started looking at motives and constrains of female entrepreneurs in regards to the work family interface (Adkins, et al., 2013; Ahl, 2006).

    Research on work family interface is, in line with other areas, dominated by studies investigating the US-context, disregarding other contexts (Shaffer, Joplin, & Hsu, 2011). More and more researchers have called for further research on the interface between family and work life (Jaskiewicz, Combs, Shanine, & Kacmar, 2017; Nguyen & Sawang, 2016; Powell & Eddleston, 2017; Powell, Greenhaus, Allen, & Johnson, 2018). Therefore, we offer a new angle by investigating male entrepreneurs who can be considered successful in a Swedish context. Success in this context refers to a sustainable growth strategy in regards to growing the business considerably in both turnover and number of employees over a period of five years.

     Purpose/topic of research

    The purpose of this study is to understand the work-family interface in small, growing family firms by answering the following research questions:

    Which coping strategies are used to address conflicts in the work family interface?How do these strategies support work/life –balance and how to do they influence firm growth?

    Research method

    The authors of this study conducted a research project on SMEs which, after a period of stable performance in terms of turnover and number of employees, grew with 50% in bother turnover and number of employees over a consecutive period of five years. The study was conducted in the southwest of Sweden.

    For this paper and purpose we selected three companies where the respondents had expressed that work-life-conflicts played a role for being able to focus on and execute a growth strategy.

    The figures concerning turnover and number of employees were taken from the publicly available annual reports. The collection of this data was executed in 2017 and included annual reports from 2000 to 2016.

    As part of the general study, the selected companies were interviewed. Before the interviews were conducted, the interviewees were contacted by email and afterwards by telephone. In this first telephone conversation, the general purpose of the study was explained. In the following face-to-face interviews the respondents, usually owner-managers, were interviewed, using a structured interview guideline. The guideline entailed open questions and scaled questions concerning reasons for growth, performance, change in ownership and management, entrepreneurial orientation, employee concerns, justice and equality.

     Theories used Coping strategies

    The literature has come up with plenty of coping strategies that deal with how individual deal with issues that bothers them. In this study we draw on research with a connection to entrepreneurship and growth (Jennings & McDougald, 2007).

     Coping has been defined in psychological terms by Lazarus and Folkman (1984) as “constantly changing cognitive and behavioral efforts to manage specific external and/or internal demands that are appraised as taxing”. Coping is expending conscious effort to solve personal and interpersonal problems, and seeking to master and minimize stress (Weiten & Lloyd, 2008). Psychological coping mechanisms are usually termed coping strategies or coping skills. Unconscious strategies are commonly excluded. The term coping generally refers to adaptive or constructive coping strategies. However, some coping strategies can also be considered maladaptive. Maladaptive coping can be described as non-coping. Furthermore, the term coping commonly refers to reactive coping. This contrasts with proactive coping, in which a coping response aims to head off a future stressor. Coping responses are partly controlled by personality, but also by the social context, particularly the stressful environment (Carver & Connor-Smith, 2010).

    On growth

    “Most firms start small, live small and die small” (Davidsson 2010, p. 23[BB1] ). Growth is not the norm, and the main reason that most firms do not grow is that they operate in mature industries and serves local markets (Davidsson 2010). For those firms that do grow the entrepreneur often plays an important role. Factors such as motivation, education, management experience, number of founders have been proven to influence growth in a positive direction. However, there is a lack of research regarding how different factors related to work-life balance affects firm growth.

    Growth is usually defined as an increase in the amount of some measurable outcome, e.g. sales or employment (Cyron & Zoellick, 2018)(Cyron & Zoellick 2018, Davidsson 2010).

     Contribution of research

    The research contributes insights on which and how male entrepreneurs use coping strategies to address conflicts in the work family interface.

    Findings reveal the complex role of family which can both be an origin but also a solution to these conflicts.

    The study further contributes to the ongoing debate concerning growth intension and growth ambition in the entrepreneurship literature. Especially in small family firms, growth is not only hindered by limited resources. At the same time, resources and obstacles for growth are complex.

  • 68.
    Boers, Börje
    et al.
    University of Skövde, School of Business. University of Skövde, Enterprises for the Future.
    Henschel, Thomas
    Hochschule für Technik und Wirtschaft Berlin.
    Being Entrepreneurial in a Crisis?: The Role of Entrepreneurial Orientation in Crisis Management of Family Firms2019In: Embracing uncertainty: Entrepreneurship as a key capability for the 21st century / [ed] René Maurer, Sophia Braun, 2019Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 69.
    Boers, Börje
    et al.
    University of Skövde, School of Business. University of Skövde, Enterprises for the Future.
    Ljungkvist, Torbjörn
    University of Skövde, School of Business. University of Skövde, Enterprises for the Future.
    A founder's heritage: the development of organizational identity2019In: Journal of Small Business and Entrepreneurship, ISSN 0827-6331, E-ISSN 2169-2610, Vol. 31, no 1, p. 73-95Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The purpose of this paper is to understand how a former family firm strategically makes use of the founder's legacy to preserve its organizational identity. Following a single case study approach, it draws on rich empirical material from semi-structured interviews and extensive archival data. We show how central organizational activities are affected by a founder's heritage long after the formal exit has taken place, illustrating the central, enduring, and distinctive elements of organizational identity a founder has. Regardless of ownership forms, the family company founder's legacy is used to legitimize new owners and maintain the organization's identity. However, centripetal moves complicate the preservation of the organizational identity, whereas a high focus on value leveraging in another ownership form opens up for centrifugal approaches which strengthen the entrepreneurial dimension of organizational identity.

  • 70.
    Boers, Börje
    et al.
    University of Skövde, School of Business. University of Skövde, Enterprises for the Future.
    Ljungkvist, Torbjörn
    University of Skövde, School of Business. University of Skövde, Enterprises for the Future.
    A founder’s heritage: the development of psychological ownership2017Conference paper (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    ObjectivesIs a founder “leaving” an organization by selling it, or are there aspects of the founder left even though, the founder does not have a formal occupation or ownership in the organization?Will there be a legacy of the founder and how will this affect the psychological ownership? What is the founder’s heritage from a psychological ownership perspective?The purpose is to understand the consequences of a business sale of the founder and from a psychological ownership perspective.

    Prior WorkDrawing on the work of psychological ownership and founder heritage, the work combines important literatures to shed light on an important empirical phenomenon, i.e. the exit of a founder/entrepreneur and its consequences for the organization.

    ApproachThis study follows a single case study approach and draws on rich empirical material from semi-structured interviews and extensive archival data.

    ResultsWe show how central activities are affected by a founder’s heritage over long time after the formal exit has taken place. We illustrate the development of a founder’s psychological ownership before and after he has formally sold the legal ownership.

    Implications and ValueThe paper aims at contributing to the entrepreneurial and founder exit-literature by adding a process perspective. Unlike it is sometimes assumed in the entrepreneurship literature is an exit not necessarily a clear-cut and once and for all decision. The paper contributes also psychological ownership literature by highlighting its continuity after the formal sale of the legal ownership and its consequences for the organization.

  • 71.
    Boers, Börje
    et al.
    University of Skövde, School of Business. University of Skövde, Enterprises for the Future. CeFEO@JIBS.
    Ljungkvist, Torbjörn
    University of Skövde, School of Business. University of Skövde, Enterprises for the Future.
    Family business, resilience and regional culture: Examples from Sweden2014Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The present study examines two regions in the south west of Sweden. A number of factors which are of significant importance in creating resilient family businesses as well as regions are identified. The study is based on a literature investigation and on 60 interviews of leaders in business and communities. Thereby, the study contributes to the scarce literature on resilience in family businesses and the interdependence with regional culture. Resilience in this paper refers to a particular type of economic and structural crisis which has not been considered before. We highlight similarities and differences of two regions in Sweden which have distinct regional cultures. These cultures support the development of resiliency. However, owning families as facilitators for organizational resilience play the central role. Their closeness and involvement in the business allows them to act fast and take decisions quickly which makes them more resilient.

  • 72.
    Boers, Börje
    et al.
    University of Skövde, School of Business. University of Skövde, Enterprises for the Future.
    Ljungkvist, Torbjörn
    University of Skövde, School of Business. University of Skövde, Enterprises for the Future.
    Family businesses as venture capitalists: the exception that proves the rules?2016Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 73.
    Boers, Börje
    et al.
    University of Skövde, School of Business. University of Skövde, Enterprises for the Future.
    Ljungkvist, Torbjörn
    University of Skövde, School of Business. University of Skövde, Enterprises for the Future.
    Remembering the Founder in Times of Ownership and Leadership Changes2016In: RENT Proceedings 2016, Antwerp, 2016Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Objectives

    Is a founder “leaving” an organization by selling it, or are there aspects of the founder left even though, the founder does not have a formal occupation or ownership in the organization?

    What are the motives of a founder to sell his organization? Will there be a legacy of the founder and how will this affect the organization’s identity? By questioning ‘who were we?’ or ‘who have we been?’ the relevance of organizational history becomes apparent. But how does this work in practice when a founder is not any longer part of the dominant coalition of the organization?

    The purpose is to understand the heritage of a founder, and the consequences for the organizational identity when the founder exits.

    Prior Work

    Drawing on the work of entrepreneurial exit and organizational identity, including imprinting, the work combines important literatures to shed light on an important empirical phenomenon, i.e. the exit of a founder/entrepreneur.

     

    Approach

    This study follows a single case study approach and draws on rich empirical material from semi-structured interviews and extensive archival data.

     

    Results

    We show how central activities are affected by a founder’s heritage over long time after the formal exit has taken place. We illustrate this by analyzing the consequences of changes in ownership and leadership after the founder’s exit. The founder becomes an artefact which allows to signal continuity and discontinuity depending on the different owners’ perspectives.

     

    Implications and Value

    The paper aims at contributing to the entrepreneurial and founder exit-literature by adding a process perspective. Unlike it is sometimes assumed in the entrepreneurship literature is an exit not necessarily a clear-cut and once and for all decision. The paper contributes also to the organizational identity literature by highlighting the central role a founder can have for an organization.

  • 74.
    Boers, Börje
    et al.
    University of Skövde, School of Business. University of Skövde, Enterprises for the Future.
    Ljungkvist, Torbjörn
    University of Skövde, School of Business. University of Skövde, Enterprises for the Future.
    Brunninge, Olof
    University of Jönköping.
    Giving Up The Family Name While Staying A Family Business: The Family Business As Acquirer2018Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 75.
    Boers, Börje
    et al.
    University of Skövde, School of Business. University of Skövde, Enterprises for the Future.
    Ljungkvist, Torbjörn
    University of Skövde, School of Business. University of Skövde, Enterprises for the Future.
    Brunninge, Olof
    Jönköping International Business School, Sweden.
    Nordqvist, Mattias
    Jönköping International Business School, Sweden.
    Going private: A socioemotional wealth perspective on why family controlled companies decide to leave the stock-exchange2017In: The Journal of Family Business Strategy, ISSN 1877-8585, E-ISSN 1877-8593, Vol. 8, no 2, p. 74-86Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Our purpose is to understand the process of ‘going private’ decisions in family firms by applying a socioemotional wealth (SEW) perspective, specified in the following research questions: how do socioemotional wealth considerations influence owning families’ decisions to delist their publicly-listed companies? How do socioemotional wealth considerations change after the delisting of a firm? Based on case studies of two family firms, we elaborate upon the balancing of socioemotional and financial wealth considerations by the family owners, the assessment of which changes over time. Ultimately, we propose that the experiences from being listed can lead to the reevaluation of financial, as well as socioemotional, wealth considerations. By delisting, the companies reclaim independence and control, and the identity as a private family-owned firm becomes once again pronounced. We develop the SEW-perspective by viewing the decision to delist as a mixed gamble, in that owning families have to weigh personal and financial losses against SEW gains, thereby indicating how SEW-considerations change over time. We find that owning families are willing to sacrifice current SEW, accepting current financial losses for prospective increased SEW. Additionally, in this study we extend the argument that decisions to leave the stock market are tradeoffs between competing factors.

  • 76.
    Boers, Börje
    et al.
    University of Skövde, School of Business. University of Skövde, Enterprises for the Future.
    Ljungkvist, Torbjörn
    University of Skövde, School of Business. University of Skövde, Enterprises for the Future.
    Brunninge, Olof
    Jönköping International Business School, Sweden.
    Nordqvist, Mattias
    Jönköping International Business School, Sweden.
    Going private: Why family controlled, publicly-listed companies decide to leave the stock-exchange2015Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 77.
    Boers, Börje
    et al.
    University of Skövde, School of Business. University of Skövde, Enterprises for the Future.
    Melin, Leif
    Jönköping International Business School.
    Family business: A duality perspective on organizational identity in family businesses2015In: Proceedings IFERA 2015, Hamburg: Hamburg Institute of Family Owned Business , 2015, p. 107-Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Organizational identity has become a popular topic in family business research. Yet, there is little research accounting for the peculiarities of family businesses. Organizational identity research is dominated by the view of Albert and Whetten (1985) and the question of what organizational identity is. Little attention has been devoted to understand how organizational identity is constructed in family businesses. We draw on case studies and use a dualities perspective. This perspective builds on three dualities which are common to family businesses, i.e. formality-informality, independence-dependence, and historical paths-new paths.

  • 78.
    Boers, Qiuhong
    et al.
    University of Skövde, School of Business.
    Boers, Börje
    University of Skövde, School of Business. University of Skövde, Enterprises for the Future.
    The Construction of a Professional Identity of a Female Entrepreneur2018In: Knowledge, Learning and Innovation: Research Insights on Cross-Sector Collaborations / [ed] Vanessa Ratten, Vitor Braga, Carla Susana Marques, Cham: Springer, 2018, p. 113-122Chapter in book (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    The construction of professional identity of an entrepreneur involves many factors. In this chapter, the case study of a Chinese female immigrant entrepreneur in Sweden illustrates the complexity of professional identity which intertwines with the gender identity and the cultural identity in all levels from personal, professional and socio-cultural. The methods of participant observation and discourse analysis are used. The results reflect the impacts of gender and culture factors in the construction and communication of professional identity, which can contribute to the integration process of Chinese immigrants in Sweden.

  • 79.
    Brorström, Björn
    et al.
    Högskolan i Borås.
    Eriksson, Nomie
    University of Skövde, School of Business. University of Skövde, Enterprises for the Future.
    Jensen, Christian
    Handelshögskolan Göteborg univeristet.
    Nilsson, Viveka
    Kfi - Kommunforskning i Västsverige, Göteborgs universitet.
    Hållbar kommun: Att balansera konkurrerande värden2015Report (Other academic)
    Abstract [sv]

    Frågan ”Vad är en hållbar kommun?” är utgångspunkt i den studie som presenteras. Studien syftar till att belysa vad en hållbar kommun kan vara och behandlar frågan både ur ett teoretiskt och empiriskt perspektiv. Begreppet hållbarhet används flitigt i samhällsdebatten om hur vi ska ta oss an allehanda utmaningar på såväl global som lokal nivå. Hållbarhetsbegreppet används inte bara som ett attraktivt värdeomdöme och en retorisk tankefigur i samhällsdebatten, utan även som en strukturerande idé som håller på att finna sina organisatoriska uttrycksformer på såväl nationell som lokal nivå. Hållbarhetsbegreppet adresserar både ett tillstånd och ideal (hållbarhet) och en process och dynamik (hållbar utveckling).

    Vad händer då i ett redan komplext system när nya ideal adderas? Blir det ”lager på lager” och allt ska göras samtidigt? Blir det särkoppling, transformeras kommunen eller förändrar man där det är möjligt och ger det nya namn, men gör man det man alltid gjort? Inom forskning finns alla alternativ dokumenterade det tenderar nämligen att ske flera saker samtidigt när nya struktureringsidéer anammas.

    I den teoretiska referensramen identifierades tre konfliktytor; de kring ägande, resurser och utveckling. En förutsättning för all konfliktlösning är institutionella arrangemang för att hantera makt, intressen och möjligheter. Makt i form av vem som ingår överenskommelser, intressen i form av vad man är beredd att gå med på och möjligheter kring vad som kan åstadkommas. Det är således inte ”antingen eller”, utan snarare ”både och”, där flera avvägningar och bedömningar måste göras. Det kommunala självstyret är en god grund att vidareutveckla detta institutionella arrangemang för en hållbar kommun.

     Forskningsprojektet fortsätter där föreliggande rapport ger en god grund för fördjupade studier med mer precisa frågeställningar och intervjuer av fler aktörer. Kommunerna behöver organiseras, styras och ledas för att få fokus på hållbarhet. Hur det sker är en viktig fråga för fortsatt forskning. 

  • 80.
    Brozovic, Danilo
    University of Skövde, School of Business. University of Skövde, Enterprises for the Future.
    Business model based on strong sustainability: Insights from an empirical study2019In: Business Strategy and the Environment, ISSN 0964-4733, E-ISSN 1099-0836Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The extant literature on traditional and sustainable business models lacks insights into how strong sustainability-that is, constraining economic and social activities within the limitations of natural resources-can shape business models. Thus, the purpose of this article is to propose a business model framework based on the principles of strong sustainability (SSBM). The proposed framework is developed combining available literature and empirical insights from a qualitative abductive study of 12 permaculture business ventures in Sweden. The results identify nature as the primary stakeholder and recommend strong local anchorage, the creation of diversified income sources, deliberate limitations on economic growth, the infusion of the business model with a systemic and ecosystem perspective, and the design of value flows beyond financial aspects. The discussion reflects on the most important results, provides practical implications and managerial guidelines, and suggests future research in the SSBM.

  • 81.
    Cregård, Anna
    et al.
    Högskolan i Halmstad.
    Berntson, ErikStockholms universitet.Tengblad, StefanUniversity of Skövde, School of Business. University of Skövde, Enterprises for the Future.
    Att leda i en komplex organisation: Utmaningar och nya perspektiv för chefer i offentlig verksamhet2018Collection (editor) (Other academic)
  • 82.
    Cregård, Anna
    et al.
    Högskolan i Halmstad.
    Berntson, Erik
    Stockholms universitet.
    Tengblad, Stefan
    University of Skövde, School of Business. University of Skövde, Enterprises for the Future.
    Andersson, Pia
    Göteborgs universitet.
    Lindgren, Hans
    Göteborgs universitet.
    En introduktion till ledarskap och organisatorisk komplexitet2018In: Att leda i en komplex organisation: Utmaningar och nya perspektiv för chefer i offentlig verksamhet / [ed] Anna Cregård, Erik Berntson, Stefan Tengblad, Stockholm: Natur och kultur, 2018, 1, p. 9-21Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 83.
    Cregård, Anna
    et al.
    Högskolan i Halmstad.
    Eriksson, Nomie
    University of Skövde, School of Business. University of Skövde, Enterprises for the Future.
    Chefskap i professionella organisationer: läkare som chefer2018In: Att leda i en komplex organisation: Utmaningar och nya perspektiv för chefer i offentlig verksamhet / [ed] Anna Cregård, Erik Berntson, Stefan Tengblad, Stockholm: Natur och kultur, 2018, 1, p. 71-82Chapter in book (Other academic)
    Abstract [sv]

    Komplexa organisationer är vanligen svåra att styra – och det gäller särskilt organisationer med starkt professionaliserade aktörer. Det beror på flera faktorer: att det är svårt att överblicka handlingars konsekvenser i sådana organisationer, att det inte är självklart att styrimpulser efterföljs eller att verksamhetens viktigaste procedurer ens går att följa upp. Dessutom kan det som sker på en hierarkisk nivå sakna koppling till det som händer på en annan – och det gäller särskilt for kärnverksamhet i relation till ledning.

  • 84.
    Cregård, Anna
    et al.
    Förvaltningshögskolan Göteborgs universitet, School of Public Administration, University of Gothenburg, Göteborg, Sweden.
    Eriksson, Nomie
    University of Skövde, School of Business. University of Skövde, Enterprises for the Future.
    Perceptions of trust in physician-managers2015In: Leadership in Health Services, ISSN 1751-1879, E-ISSN 1751-1887, Vol. 28, no 4, p. 281-297Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Purpose – The purpose of this paper is to explore the dual role of physician-managers through an examination of perceptions of trust and distrust in physician-managers. The healthcare sector needs physicians to lead. Physicians in part-time managerial positions who continue their medical practice are called part-time physician-managers. This paper explores this dual role through an examination of perceptions of trust and distrust in physician-managers. Design/methodology/approach – The study takes a qualitative research approach in which interviews and focus group discussions with physician-managers and nurse-managers provide the empirical data. An analytical model, with the three elements of ability, benevolence and integrity, was used in the analysis of trust and distrust in physician-managers. Findings – The respondents (physician-managers and nurse-managers) perceived both an increase and a decrease in physicians’ trust in the physician-managers. Because elements of distrust were more numerous and more severe than elements of trust, the physician-managers received negative perceptions of their role. Research limitations/implications – This paper’s findings are based on perceptions of perceptions. The physicians were not interviewed on their trust and distrust of physician-managers. Practical implications – The healthcare sector must pay attention to the diverse expectations of the physician-manager role that is based on both managerial and medical logics. Hospital management should provide proper support to physician-managers in their dual role to ensure their willingness to continue to assume managerial responsibilities. Originality/value – The paper takes an original approach in its research into the dual role of physician-managers who work under two conflicting logics: the medical logic and the managerial logic. The focus on perceived trust and distrust in physician-managers is a new perspective on this complicated role.

  • 85.
    Deraz, Hossam A.
    et al.
    Halmstad University.
    Awuah, Gabriel B.
    Halmstad University.
    Abraha Gebrekidan, Desalegn
    University of Skövde, School of Business. University of Skövde, Enterprises for the Future.
    The Effect of Culture on the Consumers’ Assessment of Advertisements on Social Networking Sites; Cross-cultural analysis2015Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Do consumers of the same brand from different culture have the same perceptions while assessing the advertisements on Social Networking Sites’ (SNSAs)? To answer this question, the data for this study were collected from brand communities’ consumers (BCCs) on SNSs. 278 respondents from three different cultural backgrounds (Egyptians, Dutch and British) answered the questionnaires. Five main variables to collect the consumers’ assessment of SNSAs were tested (information value, entertainment value, credibility value, interactivity value, and irritation value). Based on the empirical findings, the three groups perceived five of the six variables with significant difference F ratios. Consequently, their perception of the entertainment value of SNSAs has no significant differences between the three groups. Based on the cross-cultural theory, the findings of this study have some agreements and some contradictions, especially the influences of power distance and uncertainly avoidance. Moreover, the researchers used the One-way analysis of variance (ANOVA) with Post Hoc tests to compare between the assessments of the three groups.

  • 86.
    Deraz, Hossam
    et al.
    School of Business and Engineering, Halmstad University, Sweden.
    Baffour Awuah, Gabriel
    School of Business and Engineering, Halmstad University, Sweden.
    Abraha Gebrekidan, Desalegn
    University of Skövde, School of Business. University of Skövde, Enterprises for the Future.
    Assessing the Value of Social Network Sites' Advertisements2015In: Proceedings of the Third International Conference on E-Technologies and Business on the Web, Paris, France 2015, 2015, p. 89-101Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 87.
    Deraz, Hossam
    et al.
    School of Business and Engineering, Halmstad University, Sweden.
    Baffour Awuah, Gabriel
    School of Business and Engineering, Halmstad University, Sweden.
    Abraha Gebrekidan, Desalegn
    University of Skövde, School of Business. University of Skövde, Enterprises for the Future.
    Factors Predicting Consumers' Assessment of Advertisments on Social Networking Sites2015In: International Journal of Digital Information and Wireless Communications (IJDIWC), ISSN 2225-658X, E-ISSN 2225-658X, Vol. 5, no 2, p. 111-123Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Marketers act on social networking sites (SNSs) in order to be more efficient in merchandising their products and/or services. Even so, the scope of the published studies regarding the assessment of advertisements on social networking sites (SNAs) is limited. Consequently, the present study aimed to consider credibility and interactivity, in addition to information, entertainment and irritation values, as main factors for consumers’ assessment of SNAs, as perceived by SNSs’ users.An analysis of empirical data helped to identify four main factors for assessing SNAs. These were: information value, entertainment value, credibility value and interactivity value. Irritation value was the only factor that had no significant effect on the assessment of SNAs. Furthermore, based on the beta coefficients, the information and entertainment values of SNAs, in conjunction with credibility and interactivity values, had different outcomes from previous studies. Consequently, the interactivity value was the strongest among the four predictors for assessing SNAs.

  • 88.
    Durst, Susanne
    University of Skövde, Enterprises for the Future. University of Skövde, School of Business.
    How far have we come with the study of knowledge risks?2019In: Vine: The Journal of Information and Knowledge Management Systems, ISSN 0305-5728, E-ISSN 1474-1032, Vol. 49, no 1, p. 21-34Article, review/survey (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Purpose – This paper aims to review research on the topic of knowledge risks to establish the current body of knowledge and, on this basis, to suggest some promising avenues for future research.

    Design/methodology/approach – This study consists of a systematic review of 52 refereed articles on knowledge risks.

    Findings – The findings contribute to a more holistic view of the topic and related aspects and, thus, complement the study of knowledge management. Additionally, a number of research questions are proposed, aimed at guiding and informing future research activities.

    Research limitations/implications – This study may not have enabled a complete coverage of all articles in the field of knowledge risks. Yet, based on the chosen research methodology, it seems reasonable to assume that the review process covered a large share of studies available.

    Originality/value – To the best of the author’s knowledge, no systematic literature review on knowledge risks and related issues has previously been published in academic journals. Keywords Knowledge loss, Knowledge management, Systematic literature review, Knowledge risk management, Knowledge risks

    Paper type Literature review

  • 89.
    Durst, Susanne
    et al.
    University of Skövde, School of Business. University of Skövde, Enterprises for the Future.
    Aggestam, Lena
    University of Skövde, School of Business. University of Skövde, Enterprises for the Future.
    Using IT-Supported Knowledge Repositories for Succession Planning in SMEs: How to Deal with Knowledge Loss?2016In: Handbook of Research on Human Resources Strategies for the New Millennial Workforce / [ed] Patricia Ordoñez de Pablos and Robert D. Tennyson, IGI Global, 2016, p. 393-406Chapter in book (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In the context of succession planning a huge number of critical knowledge can be at risk. This challenges smaller firms in particular. Based upon this, the chapter intends to highlight the contribution of IT-supported repositories to small and medium-sized enterprises (SME) succession planning as a promising approach to better cope with the risk of knowledge loss. More precisely, the aim of this chapter is to analyze different types of knowledge loss in the capture process with SME succession planning to demonstrate the potentials and deficiencies with IT-supported knowledge repositories. The findings presented in this chapter will hopefully contribute to a better understanding of how to deal with knowledge loss in the capture process when using IT-supported knowledge repositories for SME succession planning.

  • 90.
    Durst, Susanne
    et al.
    University of Skövde, School of Business. University of Skövde, Enterprises for the Future.
    Aggestam, Lena
    University of Skövde, School of Business. University of Skövde, Enterprises for the Future.
    Aisenberg Ferenhof, Helio
    Department of Production Engineering and Systems, Federal University of Santa Catarina (UFSC), Florianópolis, Santa Catarina, Brazil.
    Understanding knowledge leakage: a review of previous studies2015In: Vine: The Journal of Information and Knowledge Management Systems, ISSN 0305-5728, E-ISSN 1474-1032, Vol. 45, no 4, p. 568-586Article, review/survey (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Purpose – This paper aims to review research on the topic of knowledge leakage to establish the current body of knowledge and, on this basis, to suggest some promising avenues for future research.

    Design/methodology/approach – The study consists of a systematic review of 57 refereed empirical articles on knowledge leakage.

    Findings – The findings contribute to a more holistic view of the topic and complement the study of knowledge management. Additionally, a conceptual framework is proposed that aims at guiding and informing future research activities.

    Research limitations/implications – This study may not have enabled a complete coverage of all empirical articles in the field of knowledge leakage. Yet, based on the chosen research methodology, it seems reasonable to assume that the review process covered a large share of studies available.

    Originality/value – To the best of the authors’ knowledge, no systematic literature review on knowledge leakage has previously been published in academic journals.

  • 91.
    Durst, Susanne
    et al.
    University of Skövde, School of Business. University of Skövde, Enterprises for the Future.
    Aisenberg Ferenhof, Helio
    Federal University of Santa Catarina (UFSC), Brazil.
    Knowledge Leakages and Ways to Reduce Them in Small and Medium-Sized Enterprises (SMEs)2014In: Information, ISSN 2078-2489, Vol. 5, no 3, p. 440-450Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In this paper, we look into knowledge leakages and ways to address them. It is conducted from the point of view of small and medium-sized enterprises (SMEs), as their specific attributes create unique challenges. Based on a discussion of the relevant fields, ways are presented in order to reduce the danger of knowledge leakages. In view of practitioners, the paper’s findings may enable an increased awareness towards the areas where existing knowledge is at the mercy of “leakage”. This can assist managers of SMEs to better cope with risks related to knowledge leakage and, therefore, better exploit the (limited) knowledge base available.

  • 92.
    Durst, Susanne
    et al.
    University of Skövde, School of Business. University of Skövde, Enterprises for the Future.
    Aisenberg Ferenhof, Helio
    Complexo de Ensino Superior de Santa Catarina, Florianópolis, Brazil / Universidade Federal de Santa Catarina, Florianópolis, Brazil.
    Knowledge Risk Management in Turbulent Times2016In: Competitive Strategies for Small and Medium Enterprises: Increasing Crisis Resilience, Agility and Innovation in Turbulent Times / [ed] Klaus North & Gregorio Varvakis, Springer, 2016, p. 195-209Chapter in book (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This chapter presents a knowledge risk management framework. In turbulent times organizations of all sizes are required to be even more prepared to make necessary changes in their business strategies. Access to knowledge that is relevant and up-to-date is critical in meeting this challenge. Knowledge however is not always positive, i.e. something of value, but has a negative side as well. This situation can be tackled with a knowledge risk management approach that addresses knowledge from a holistic point of view. Therefore this approach supports companies in better managing their critical knowledge to master present and future business challenges. The aim of this chapter is to introduce knowledge risk management and its contribution to meeting these challenges. Regarding Knowledge management tools refer to the following chapter.

  • 93.
    Durst, Susanne
    et al.
    University of Skövde, School of Business. University of Skövde, Enterprises for the Future.
    Aisenberg Ferenhof, Helio
    Department of Production Engineering and Systems, Federal University of Santa Catarina (UFSC), Campus Trindade Florianópolis/SC, Brazil.
    What do we know about knowledge reuse in organisations?2017In: Global Business and Economics Review (GBER), ISSN 1097-4954, E-ISSN 1745-1329, Vol. 19, no 4, p. 420-447Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This paper looks into knowledge that is ‘wasted’ in organisations, that is existing relevant knowledge that is not (re)used in business operations. Against the backdrop of today’s business environment, a lack of knowledge application is not only costly but also dangerous. Therefore, the purpose of this paper is to review research on knowledge reuse (waste) in organisations to identify our current body of knowledge and gaps in the field justifying further research activities. In order to do so, the study consists of a systematic review of 52 refereed empirical articles on knowledge reuse in organisations. The topic seems to be a promising field for intensive research and offers a variety of future research avenues. Some ideas for future research are proposed in this study.

  • 94.
    Durst, Susanne
    et al.
    University of Skövde, School of Business. University of Skövde, Enterprises for the Future.
    Aisenberg Ferenhof, Helio
    Universidade Federal de Santa Catarina, Brazil.
    Yousefi, Bahram Hooshyar
    Literature Review on Big Data: What Do We Know So Far?2018In: Big Data in the Arts and Humanities: Theory and Practice / [ed] Giovanni Schiuma, Daniela Carlucci, CRC Press, 2018, p. 3-14Chapter in book (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The term “big data” has been discussed often in recent years so it is high time for us to determine the current state of knowledge on big data and the benefits and challenges that its applications may bring to individuals, companies, or the society at large. We argue that such work will allow for greater dissemination of results across both academic research and practitioners. The determination of the body of knowledge will help to systematize research, whereas practitioners will get insights into the pros and cons of using big data, which in turn can provide the basis for the improved use of big data or its first-time application, respectively. Based on a systematic review consisting of 87 papers, this chapter proposes a number of future research avenues that can be used to organize the study of big data. The future avenues and the determination of the current body of knowledge about big data are considered the main contributions of this chapter. Next, we briefly discuss the term “big data.” Then the insights into the methodology are provided. After that, the results are presented. This is followed by a discussion about the possible future research opportunities. The chapter terminates with final remarks and conclusions.

  • 95.
    Durst, Susanne
    et al.
    University of Skövde, School of Business. University of Skövde, Enterprises for the Future.
    Brunold, Julia
    University of Skövde, School of Business.
    Corporate governance practices in smaller privately held businesses – insights from the Rhine Valley region2017In: Handbook of Research on Corporate Governance and Entrepreneurship / [ed] Jonas Gabrielsson, Edward Elgar Publishing, 2017, p. 201-223Chapter in book (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The study of corporate governance is dominated by quantitative research and tends to focus on large listed companies businesses. As a response to this situation, this chapter examines how corporate governance is practiced in smaller businesses. It reports findings based on semi-structured interviews conducted with executive staff of smaller privately held firms from the Rhine Valley region. More precisely parts of both Austria (Province of Vorarlberg) and the Principality of Liechtenstein were covered. In total, twenty-five individuals were involved. The findings particularly emphasize the concept of relational governance as a more appropriate governance approach in small firms. Thereby the chapter suggests that the relational governance approach needs to be extended by considering employees and their contribution to governance practices and company development as well. The chapter´s findings may help managing directors of smaller firms to better understand and exploit the benefits of different governance mechanisms in their efforts to cope with different business challenges ahead. The findings may also be used by policy makers helping them to develop improved corporate governance codes and best practice recommendations. To sum up, the chapter provides fresh insights into the practice of governance in smaller firms taken from a practitioner’s perspective. Additionally, it offers the opportunity of expanding our understanding of the topic in different parts of the world.

     

  • 96.
    Durst, Susanne
    et al.
    University of Skövde, School of Business. University of Skövde, Enterprises for the Future. Department of Business Administration, Universidad del Pacífico, Lima, Peru.
    Bruns, Guido
    Incipere, Lindau, Germany.
    Knowledge Management in Small and Medium-Sized Enterprises2018In: The Palgrave Handbook of Knowledge Management / [ed] Jawad Syed, Peter A. Murray, Donald Hislop, Yusra Mouzughi, Cham: Palgrave Macmillan, 2018, p. 495-514Chapter in book (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Against the background of knowledge as an ever more important strategic resource in the current environment, as well as demographic developments which will soon lead to a shortage of expert knowledge, the practice of knowledge management (KM) calls for an even stronger consideration. Knowledge is the critical asset that will help organizations master present and future organizational challenges. This applies to small and medium-sized enterprises (SMEs) in particular. Therefore, the aim of this chapter is to discuss KM in SMEs by first defining this category of firms in quantitative and qualitative terms. Once this understanding is established, we turn to the current body of knowledge regarding KM in SMEs and discuss both the benefits and challenges ahead. We then address how to apply knowledge management in SMEs. The chapter concludes with a number of promising research avenues intended to develop further the study of KM in SMEs.

  • 97.
    Durst, Susanne
    et al.
    University of Skövde, School of Business. University of Skövde, Enterprises for the Future.
    Bruns, Guido
    Incipere, Düsseldorf, Germany.
    Sustaining the Future of the Public Sector: Insights into a Swedish Municipality’s Dealing with Knowledge Management and Succession Planning2016In: Journal of Information & Knowledge Management, ISSN 0219-6492, E-ISSN 1793-6926, Vol. 15, no 2, article id 1650012Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The ageing workforce soon leads to a number of retirements in government organisations that will put the knowledge basis at risk. Addressing this point the present study provides an analysis and evaluation of a Swedish municipality’s dealing with the aspects of knowledge management and succession planning against the background of demographic developments and the increased relevance of knowledge. It reports findings based on semi-structured interviews conducted with executive staff of the municipality. Results of data analysed show that the municipality is far from being ready to master the challenges ahead. To date the municipality follows a sporadic approach rather than a strategic and planned one when addressing the issue of succession planning. Indeed, the findings suggest that a muddling through approach prevails. Based on the findings some suggestions were derived that may help both municipalities facing similar circumstances as well as policy makers drafting suitable policies.

  • 98.
    Durst, Susanne
    et al.
    University of Skövde, School of Business. University of Skövde, Enterprises for the Future. Department of Business Administration, Universidad del Pacífico, Lima, Peru.
    Bruns, Guido
    Incipere Consulting and Education, Lindau, Germany.
    Visualization of IC for Improving Green Innovations in SMEs2019In: Intellectual Capital Management as a Driver of Sustainability: Perspectives for Organizations and Society / [ed] Florinda Matos, Valter Vairinhos, Paulo Maurício Selig, Leif Edvinsson, Springer, 2019, p. 139-155Chapter in book (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Investments in sustainable practices, such as green innovations are expected to increase both an organization’s long-term survival and its operational performance. Sustainable development of organizations is driven by organizations’ ability to continuously exploit their base of or access to intellectual capital (IC)/knowledge. Thus, organizations of each kind need to integrate the management of IC/knowledge into their overall strategic efforts. Taking the relevance of IC management for organizations’ sustainability and growth intents, the visualization of IC should be a critical component of organizations’ IC management. Against this background, the purpose of this chapter is to explore and discuss the benefits of IC visualization for sustainable development of organizations. More precisely, the focus is on IC visualization for green innovation activities in smaller companies. Smaller firms have been chosen because the resource constraints create unique challenges for both sustainability and growth. Based on a theoretical discussion a set of guidelines for improving green innovations in SMEs taking into account their IC is proposed.

  • 99.
    Durst, Susanne
    et al.
    University of Skövde, Enterprises for the Future. University of Skövde, School of Business.
    Bruns, Guido
    Incipire Consulting, Lindau, Germany.
    Edvardsson, Ingi Runar
    Reykjavík, University of Iceland, Iceland.
    Retaining Knowledge in Smaller Building and Construction Firms2017In: International Journal of Knowledge and Systems Science, ISSN 1947-8208, Vol. 8, no 3, p. 1-12, article id 1Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The purpose of this study is to increase our understanding of how SMEs retain critical knowledge. Against the background of the underdeveloped body of knowledge regarding knowledge retention, the authors selected an explorative (qualitative) research approach. More precisely, they conducted semi-structured interviews with organization members (i.e. executive and regular staff) of five Austrian SMEs operating in the building and construction industry. This study provides fresh insights into knowledge retention in SMEs. The findings advance the limited understanding of knowledge retention in general and regarding SMEs. They also contribute to the further development of the study of knowledge management in the building and construction sector. Based on the study's findings the authors derive suitable measures to better manage the process of knowledge retention in SMEs. These measures may be useful for SMEs operating in other industries as well.

  • 100.
    Durst, Susanne
    et al.
    University of Skövde, School of Business. University of Skövde, Enterprises for the Future.
    Bruns, Guido
    Incipere, Germany.
    Edvardsson, Ingi-Runar
    University of Iceland, Iceland.
    Knowledge Retention in Smaller Firms2018In: Contemporary Knowledge and Systems Science / [ed] W. B. Lee, F. Sabetzadeh, IGI Global, 2018, p. 100-119Chapter in book (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In environments that are characterized by skill shortage, knowledge retention should be a key activity. Our understanding of this knowledge practice, however, is underdeveloped. The purpose of this chapter is to contribute to the further development of this field. The authors are interested in studying how smaller firms approach the retention of critical knowledge. Semi-structured interviews with organization members of five smaller Austrian firms operating in the building and construction industry were conducted. The findings presented in this chapter advance the limited understanding of knowledge retention in general and regarding smaller businesses. They also contribute to the further development of the study of knowledge management in the building and construction sector. Based on the study's findings, suitable measures to better manage the process of knowledge retention in smaller firms are derived. These measures may be useful for smaller firms operating in similar industries as well.

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