his.sePublications
Change search
Refine search result
456789 301 - 350 of 444
CiteExportLink to result list
Permanent link
Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf
Rows per page
  • 5
  • 10
  • 20
  • 50
  • 100
  • 250
Sort
  • Standard (Relevance)
  • Author A-Ö
  • Author Ö-A
  • Title A-Ö
  • Title Ö-A
  • Publication type A-Ö
  • Publication type Ö-A
  • Issued (Oldest first)
  • Issued (Newest first)
  • Created (Oldest first)
  • Created (Newest first)
  • Last updated (Oldest first)
  • Last updated (Newest first)
  • Disputation date (earliest first)
  • Disputation date (latest first)
  • Standard (Relevance)
  • Author A-Ö
  • Author Ö-A
  • Title A-Ö
  • Title Ö-A
  • Publication type A-Ö
  • Publication type Ö-A
  • Issued (Oldest first)
  • Issued (Newest first)
  • Created (Oldest first)
  • Created (Newest first)
  • Last updated (Oldest first)
  • Last updated (Newest first)
  • Disputation date (earliest first)
  • Disputation date (latest first)
Select
The maximal number of hits you can export is 250. When you want to export more records please use the Create feeds function.
  • 301.
    Nilsson, Håkan
    et al.
    University of Skövde, School of Health and Education. University of Skövde, Health and Education.
    Andersson, Gerhard
    Linköpings universitet / Karolinska Institutet.
    Mindfulness – terapier och paradoxer2016In: Socialmedicinsk Tidskrift, ISSN 0037-833X, Vol. 93, no 1, p. 106-112Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 302.
    Nilsson, Håkan
    et al.
    University of Skövde, School of Health and Education. University of Skövde, Health and Education. Jönköping University.
    Bülow, Pia H.
    Jönköping University / University of the Free State, Bloemfontein, South Africa.
    Kazemi, Ali
    University of Skövde, School of Health and Education. University of Skövde, Health and Education.
    Mindful sustainable aging: Advancing a comprehensive approach to the challenges and opportunities of old age2015In: Europe's Journal of Psychology, ISSN 1841-0413, E-ISSN 1841-0413, Vol. 11, no 3, p. 494-508Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The primary aim of this article is to present a new concept called mindful sustainable aging (MSA), which is informed by mindfulness practices that support the physical, the mental, and especially, the social and the existential dimensions of old life. The concept of MSA is discussed and compared with four influential psychosocial theories in the field of gerontology, i.e., activity theory, disengagement theory, successful aging theory and gerotranscendence theory. The article ends with reviewing research on how mindfulness practice can help to manage, diminish and/or improve a number of serious physical conditions that are common among older people. The potential of mindfulness when it comes to facilitating for older adults in their quest for spiritual and existential meaning is discussed extensively throughout the article.

  • 303.
    Nilsson, Håkan
    et al.
    University of Skövde, School of Health and Education. University of Skövde, Health and Education. School of Health Sciences, Jönköping University, Jönköping, Sweden.
    Kazemi, Ali
    University of Skövde, School of Health and Education. University of Skövde, Health and Education.
    From Buddhist sati to Western mindfulness practice: A contextual analysis2016In: Journal of Religion & Spirituality in Social Work, ISSN 1542-6432, Vol. 35, no 1-2, p. 7-23Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Over the last three decades the practice of mindfulness has grown to become one of the most widespread health promoting applications in the West—so much that terms like yoga and meditation have now become standard household words. The purpose of this paper is to discuss the meaning of mindfulness within both its Buddhist and its Western context. In the former case, the aim will be to shed light on mindfulness as a concept and practice that is rooted in Buddhist understandings (i.e., the Buddhist perspective); and in the latter case, the meaning of mindfulness will be more broadly explored in terms of its relevance to society, social work and everyday life (i.e., the social (work) perspective).

  • 304.
    Nilsson, Håkan
    et al.
    University of Skövde, School of Health and Education. University of Skövde, Health and Education.
    Kazemi, Ali
    University of Skövde, School of Health and Education. University of Skövde, Health and Education.
    Mindfulness Therapies and Assessment Scales: A Brief Review2016In: International Journal of Psychological Studies, ISSN 1918-7211, E-ISSN 1918-722X, Vol. 8, no 1, p. 11-19Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 305.
    Nilsson, Håkan
    et al.
    University of Skövde, School of Health and Education. Högskolan i Jönköping, Hälsohögskolan.
    Kazemi, Ali
    University of Skövde, School of Health and Education. University of Skövde, Health and Education.
    Reconciling and thematizing definitions of mindfulness2015Manuscript (preprint) (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Mindfulness (or sati in Buddhism) can connote many plausible meanings; thus the concept is not easily defined and the definitions provided in the literature easily confuse the reader. Some mindfulness researchers offer definitions while others do not and take the definition of mindfulness for granted. Beyond the problem of defining mindfulness, the fact that the phenomenon is of great interest to a variety of disciplines, each of which has its own theoretical and methodological approaches, different authors employ different terms in describing this phenomenon. In the present article 30 definitions of mindfulness are reviewed and categorized in terms of four key themes, i.e., mindfulness conceived in terms of an activity, internal mind state, external stimuli, and cultivation. It is argued that until a more thorough, precise and comprehensive definition of mindfulness is formulated, it will be difficult to create protocols, scales and instruments that properly and precisely measure its effectiveness.

  • 306.
    Nilsson, Håkan
    et al.
    University of Skövde, School of Health and Education. University of Skövde, Health and Education.
    Kazemi, Ali
    University of Skövde, School of Health and Education. University of Skövde, Health and Education.
    Reconciling and Thematizing Definitions of Mindfulness: The Big Five of Mindfulness2016In: Review of General Psychology, ISSN 1089-2680, E-ISSN 1939-1552, Vol. 20, no 2, p. 183-193Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    [Correction Notice: An Erratum for this article was reported online in Review of General Psychology on Jul 11 2016 (see record 2016-33699-001). In the original article, there was an error in the abstract. The second core element of the concept of mindfulness yielded by the analysis was incorrectly listed as “nonjudgmental attitude.” It should be “present-centeredness.” The online version of this article has been corrected.] Mindfulness is an emerging concept in many professions and spheres of social life. However, mindfulness (or sati in Buddhism) can connote many plausible meanings. Thus, the concept is not easily defined and the definitions provided in the literature easily confuse the reader. Some mindfulness researchers offer definitions whereas others do not and take the definition of mindfulness for granted. Beyond the problem of defining mindfulness, the fact that the phenomenon is of great interest to various disciplines, each of which has its own theoretical and methodological approaches, different authors use different terms in describing this phenomenon. In the present article 33 definitions of mindfulness were extracted from a pool of 308 peer-reviewed full-length theoretical or empirical articles written in English, published between 1993 and March 2016, after systematic searches in Google Scholar, PsycARTICLES, and SocINDEX. The definitions were analyzed with a particular focus on the defining attributes or core elements of the concept of mindfulness. The analysis yielded 4 core elements of awareness and attention, present-centeredness, external events, and cultivation. Furthermore, an additional core element emerged from this analysis as being absent in Western definitions of mindfulness. This formed the basis for formulation of a new definition of mindfulness with an emphasis on ethical-mindedness. We argue that this core element is instrumental in filling in the gap that exists in current Western definitions, and with highlighting this element we hope to bridge the Western and Buddhist notions of mindfulness. (PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2016 APA, all rights reserved)

  • 307.
    Nilsson, Stefan
    et al.
    CHILD, School of Health Sciences, Borås University, Sweden.
    Björkman, Berit
    CHILD, School of Health Sciences, Jönköping University, Sweden.
    Almqvist, Anna-Lena
    CHILD, School of Health, Care and Social Welfare, Mälardalen University, Sweden.
    Almqvist, Lena
    CHILD, School of Health, Care and Social Welfare, Mälardalen University, Sweden.
    Björk-Willén, Polly
    CHILD, Department of Social and Welfare Studies, Linköping University, Sweden.
    Donohue, Dana
    Centre for AAC, University of Pretoria, South Africa.
    Enskär, Karin
    University of Skövde, School of Health and Education. University of Skövde, Health and Education. CHILD, School of Health Sciences, Jönköping University, Sweden.
    Granlund, Mats
    CHILD, School of Health Sciences, Jönköping University, Sweden.
    Huus, Karina
    CHILD, School of Health Sciences, Jönköping University, Sweden.
    Hvit, Sara
    CHILD, School of Education and Communication, Jönköping University, Sweden.
    Children's voices: Differentiating a child perspective from a child's perspective2015In: Developmental Neurorehabilitation, ISSN 1751-8423, E-ISSN 1751-8431, Vol. 18, no 3, p. 162-168Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    OBJECTIVE:

    The aim of this paper was to discuss differences between having a child perspective and taking the child's perspective based on the problem being investigated.

    METHODS:

    Conceptual paper based on narrative review.

    RESULTS:

    The child's perspective in research concerning children that need additional support are important. The difference between having a child perspective and taking the child's perspective in conjunction with the need to know children's opinions has been discussed in the literature. From an ideological perspective the difference between the two perspectives seems self-evident, but the perspectives might be better seen as different ends on a continuum solely from an adult's view of children to solely the perspective of children themselves. Depending on the research question, the design of the study may benefit from taking either perspective. In this article, we discuss the difference between the perspectives based on the problem being investigated, children's capacity to express opinions, environmental adaptations and the degree of interpretation needed to understand children's opinions.

    CONCLUSION:

    The examples provided indicate that children's opinions can be regarded in most research, although to different degrees.

  • 308.
    Nordström, Susanna
    University of Skövde, School of Health and Education. University of Skövde, Health and Education.
    Contextualizing extreme metal music: the case of the Swedish metal nursery2017In: Made in Sweden / [ed] Alf Björnberg & Thomas Bossius, New York: Routledge, 2017, p. 121-130Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 309.
    Nordström, Susanna
    et al.
    University of Skövde, School of Health and Education. University of Skövde, Health and Education.
    Bohlin, Margareta
    Högskolan Väst, Trollhättan, Sverige.
    Musik, subkultur, ungdomar och risktagande2014In: Att förstå ungdomars identitetsskapande: En inspirations- och metodbok / [ed] Emma Sorbring, Åsa Andersson & Martin Molin, Stockholm: Liber, 2014, 1, p. 192-219Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 310.
    Norelius, Frida
    et al.
    University of Skövde, School of Health and Education.
    Stahre, Pernilla
    University of Skövde, Health and Education.
    Sjuksköterskors upplevelser av att vårda traumapatienter: - En litteraturöversikt2018Independent thesis Basic level (degree of Bachelor), 10 credits / 15 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [sv]

    Bakgrund: I Sverige dör cirka 3000 personer varje år till följd av fysiska trauman. Trauma innefattar tre undergrupper; multipelt trauma, stort trauma och annat trauma. Sjuksköterskor kan ställas inför de stora utmaningar som vård av traumapatienter kan innebära. Syfte: Syftet med studien är att beskriva sjuksköterskors upplevelser av att vårda traumapatienter. Metod: Studien är en litteraturöversikt som baseras på elva kvalitativa vetenskapliga artiklar. Resultat: Resultatet har delats in i sju olika kategorier som benämns: Att kunna ta ansvar i en högteknologisk vårdmiljö; Att känna sig förberedd; Att kunna kommunicera och samarbeta i vårdteamet; Att finnas till för varandra; Att vara viktig och betydelsefull; Att arbeta i en stressfylld vardag och Att kunna hantera olika känslor. Slutsats: Sjuksköterskor upplever arbetet på en högteknologisk avdelning som positivt men utmanande. De upplever att det finns både positiva och negativa aspekter med att arbeta i team. Stress samt oro är känslor som sjuksköterskor kan uppleva. Utan tillräckliga kunskaper kan vården bli opersonlig och i värsta fall skadlig för patienter.

  • 311.
    Nyberg, Solja T.
    et al.
    Clinicum, Department of Public Health, Faculty of Medicine, University of Helsinki, Finland.
    Batty, George David
    Department of Epidemiology and Public Health, University College London, UK.
    Pentti, Jaana
    Clinicum, Department of Public Health, Faculty of Medicine, University of Helsinki, Finland / Department of Public Health, University of Turku and Turku University Hospital, Turku, Finland.
    Virtanen, Marianna
    Finnish Institute of Occupational Health, Helsinki, Finland / Institute of Public Health and Caring Sciences, Uppsala University, Uppsala, Sweden / Stress Research Institute, University of Stockholm, Sweden.
    Alfredsson, Lars S.
    Centre for Occupational and Environmental Medicine, Stockholm County Council, Sweden / Institute of Environmental Medicine, Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Fransson, Eleonor I.
    Stress Research Institute, University of Stockholm, Sweden / School of Health and Welfare, Jönköping University, Jönköping, Sweden.
    Goldberg, Marcel
    Paris Descartes University, Paris, France / Inserm UMS 011, Population-Based Epidemiological Cohorts Unit, Villejuif, France.
    Heikkilä, Katriina V.
    Department of Health Services Research and Policy, London School of Hygiene & Tropical Medicine, London, United Kingdom / Clinical Effectiveness Unit, The Royal College of Surgeons, London, United Kingdom.
    Jokela, Markus
    Department of Psychology and Logopedics, Faculty of Medicine, University of Helsinki, Finland.
    Knutsson, Anders K.
    Department of Health Sciences, Mid Sweden University, Sundsvall, Sweden.
    Koskenvuo, Markku J.
    Clinicum, Department of Public Health, Faculty of Medicine, University of Helsinki, Finland.
    Lallukka, Tea
    Clinicum, Department of Public Health, Faculty of Medicine, University of Helsinki, Finland / Finnish Institute of Occupational Health, Finland.
    Leineweber, Constanze
    Stress Research Institute, University of Stockholm, Sweden.
    Lindbohm, Joni Valdemar
    Clinicum, Department of Public Health, Faculty of Medicine, University of Helsinki, Finland.
    Madsen, Ida E. H.
    National Research Centre for the Working Environment, Copenhagen, Denmark.
    Magnusson Hanson, Linda L.
    Stress Research Institute, University of Stockholm, Sweden.
    Nordin, Maria
    Stress Research Institute, University of Stockholm, Sweden / Department of Psychology, Umeå University, Umeå, Sweden.
    Oksanen, Tuula
    Finnish Institute of Occupational Health, Helsinki, Finland.
    Pietiläinen, Olli
    Clinicum, Department of Public Health, Faculty of Medicine, University of Helsinki, Finland.
    Rahkonen, Ossi
    Clinicum, Department of Public Health, Faculty of Medicine, University of Helsinki, Finland.
    Rugulies, Reiner
    National Research Centre for the Working Environment, Copenhagen, Denmark; Department of Public Health and Department of Psychology, University of Copenhagen, Denmark.
    Shipley, Martin J.
    Department of Epidemiology and Public Health, University College London, UK.
    Stenholm, Sari
    Department of Public Health, University of Turku and Turku University Hospital, Turku, Finland; Faculty of Social Sciences (Health Sciences), University of Tampere, Finland.
    Suominen, Sakari
    University of Skövde, School of Health and Education. University of Skövde, Health and Education. Department of Public Health, University of Turku and Turku University Hospital, Turku, Finland.
    Theorell, Töres
    Stress Research Institute, University of Stockholm, Sweden.
    Vahtera, Jussi
    Department of Public Health, University of Turku and Turku University Hospital, Turku, Finland.
    Westerholm, Peter J. M.
    Department of Medical Sciences, Uppsala University, Uppsala, Sweden.
    Westerlund, Hugo
    Stress Research Institute, University of Stockholm, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Zins, Marie
    Paris Descartes University, Paris, France / Inserm UMS 011, Population-Based Epidemiological Cohorts Unit, Villejuif, France.
    Hamer, Mark
    National Centre for Sport and Exercise Medicine, Loughborough University, UK.
    Singh-Manoux, Archana
    Department of Epidemiology and Public Health, University College London, London, UK / Inserm U1018, Centre for Research in Epidemiology and Population Health, Villejuif, France.
    Bell, Jousha A.
    MRC Integrative Epidemiology Unit, University of Bristol, Bristol, UK.
    Ferrie, Jane E.
    Department of Epidemiology and Public Health, University College London, London, UK / Bristol Medical School: Population Health Sciences, University of Bristol, UK.
    Kivimäki, Mika
    Clinicum, Department of Public Health, Faculty of Medicine, University of Helsinki, Helsinki, Finland / Department of Epidemiology and Public Health, University College London, UK.
    Obesity and loss of disease-free years owing to major non-communicable diseases: a multicohort study2018In: The Lancet Public Health, ISSN 2468-2667, Vol. 3, no 10, p. e490-e497Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: Obesity increases the risk of several chronic diseases, but the extent to which the obesity-related loss of disease-free years varies by lifestyle category and across socioeconomic groups is unclear. We estimated the number of years free from major non-communicable diseases in adults who are overweight and obese, compared with those who are normal weight. Methods: We pooled individual-level data on body-mass index (BMI) and non-communicable diseases from men and women with no initial evidence of these diseases in European cohort studies from the Individual-Participant-Data Meta-Analysis in Working Populations consortium. BMI was assessed at baseline (1991–2008) and non-communicable diseases (incident type 2 diabetes, coronary heart disease, stroke, cancer, asthma, and chronic obstructive pulmonary disease) were ascertained via linkage to records from national health registries, repeated medical examinations, or self-report. Disease-free years from age 40 years to 75 years associated with underweight (BMI <18·5 kg/m2), overweight (≥25 kg/m2 to <30 kg/m2), and obesity (class I [mild] ≥30 kg/m2 to <35 kg/m2; class II–III [severe] ≥35 kg/m2) compared with normal weight (≥18·5 kg/m2 to <25 kg/m2) were estimated. Findings: Of 137 503 participants from ten studies, we excluded 6973 owing to missing data and 10 349 with prevalent disease at baseline, resulting in an analytic sample of 120 181 participants. Of 47 127 men, 211 (0·4%) were underweight, 21 468 (45·6%) normal weight, 20 738 (44·0%) overweight, 3982 (8·4%) class I obese, and 728 (1·5%) class II–III obese. The corresponding numbers among the 73 054 women were 1493 (2·0%), 44 760 (61·3%), 19 553 (26·8%), 5670 (7·8%), and 1578 (2·2%), respectively. During 1 328 873 person-years at risk (mean follow-up 11·5 years [range 6·3–18·6]), 8159 men and 8100 women developed at least one non-communicable disease. Between 40 years and 75 years, the estimated number of disease-free years was 29·3 (95% CI 28·8–29·8) in normal-weight men and 29·4 (28·7–30·0) in normal-weight women. Compared with normal weight, the loss of disease-free years in men was 1·8 (95% CI −1·3 to 4·9) for underweight, 1·1 (0·7 to 1·5) for overweight, 3·9 (2·9 to 4·9) for class I obese, and 8·5 (7·1 to 9·8) for class II–III obese. The corresponding estimates for women were 0·0 (−1·4 to 1·4) for underweight, 1·1 (0·6 to 1·5) for overweight, 2·7 (1·5 to 3·9) for class I obese, and 7·3 (6·1 to 8·6) for class II–III obese. The loss of disease-free years associated with class II–III obesity varied between 7·1 and 10·0 years in subgroups of participants of different socioeconomic level, physical activity level, and smoking habit. Interpretation: Mild obesity was associated with the loss of one in ten, and severe obesity the loss of one in four potential disease-free years during middle and later adulthood. This increasing loss of disease-free years as obesity becomes more severe occurred in both sexes, among smokers and non-smokers, the physically active and inactive, and across the socioeconomic hierarchy. Funding: NordForsk, UK Medical Research Council, US National Institute on Aging, Academy of Finland, Helsinki Institute of Life Science, and Cancer Research UK. 

  • 312.
    Odh, Ida
    et al.
    Home Care, Götene County, Hällekis, Sweden.
    Löfving, Martina
    Infection Ward, Skaraborgs Hospital, Skövde, Sweden.
    Klaeson, Kicki
    University of Skövde, School of Health and Education. University of Skövde, Health and Education. Oncology Department, Skaraborgs Hospital, Skövde, Sweden.
    Existential challenges in young people living with a cancer diagnosis2016In: European Journal of Oncology Nursing, ISSN 1462-3889, E-ISSN 1532-2122, Vol. 24, p. 54-60Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Purpose: In Sweden, approximately 500 people between the ages of 15 and 39 are diagnosed with cancer each year. When someone is diagnosed with a life-threatening disease, existential issues are easily triggered. Young adults are in a developmental phase of life and are exposed to an extra amount of pressure. The Internet and social media are a daily part of the life of young adults and the use of blogs is common. The aim of this study was to elucidate the theoretical framework of Yalom and his four 'givens' expressed in blogs written by young adults living with various cancer diagnoses in Sweden. Method: This study used a qualitative method in which written stories from six public blogs were analysed using qualitative content analysis. Results: The findings offer valuable in-depth knowledge about the existential issues in this population. The results can be described as a journey with several existential challenges and with death as an impending threat. The bloggers' awareness of their mortality was described as creating a sense of loss and existential loneliness. Conclusions: This study shows that young adults are empowered by the writing of blogs and that blogs can play an important part in increasing wellbeing and a sense of coherence within this population. 

  • 313.
    Oli, Natalia
    et al.
    Kathmandu Medical College, Nepal.
    Vaidya, Abhinav
    Kathmandu Medical College, Nepal.
    Eiben, Gabriele
    University of Skövde, School of Health and Education. University of Skövde, Health and Education.
    Krettek, Alexandra
    University of Skövde, School of Health and Education. University of Skövde, Health and Education. Sahlgrenska Academy at University of Gothenburg, Sweden / UiT The Arctic University of Norway, Tromsø.
    Changes in children’s diet and physical activity as perceived by their mothers: Impact of a health promotion intervention for mothers in a sub-urban area of Nepal2018In: Journal of Kathmandu Medical College, ISSN 2091-1785, Vol. 7, no 4, p. 140-146Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background:

    Unhealthy diet and physical inactivity contribute to the growing burden of cardiovascular diseases in Nepal. Lifestyle is formed in childhood and in the Nepalese context influenced mainly by mothers, it is to date unknown how influential mothers are.

    Objectives:

    To assess changes in children’s diet and physical activity as perceived by their mothers after a health promotion intervention.

    Methodology:

    The Heart-Health Associated Research, Dissemination and Intervention in the Community is a community trial conducted in the Jhaukhel-Duwakot Health Demographic Surveillance site, in Bhaktapur district of Nepal. We conducted a health promotion intervention on diet and physical activity targeted at mothers with children aged one to nine years old in August-November 2016. Duwakot was randomized as the intervention site and Jhaukhel as the control. We conducted a follow-up study after three months to determine the outcome of the intervention. Nine trained enumerators conducted door-to-door visits to all households with eligible mothers. We calculated mean, frequency and percent changes for children’s behavior.

    Results:

    As responded by mothers, children in Duwakot consumed more healthy snacks after the intervention compared to Jhaukhel. Children in Duwakot increased consumption of water and milk. Children’s consumption of packet juices and soft drinks was decreased by 30% and 4% respectively. There was 21% increment in the duration of outdoor playing among the children at Duwakot during follow-up.

    Conclusion:

    The Heart-Health Associated Research, Dissemination and Intervention in the Community that focused on mothers showed indirect positive impact on their young children’s diet and physical activity behavior. In future, the longterm effects of such intervention should be assessed.

  • 314.
    Oli, Natalia
    et al.
    Department of Internal Medicine and Clinical Nutrition, Institute of Medicine, Sahlgrenska Academy at University of Gothenburg, Sweden / Department of Community Medicine, Kathmandu Medical College, Nepal.
    Vaidya, Abhinav
    Department of Community Medicine, Kathmandu Medical College, Nepal.
    Eiben, Gabriele
    University of Skövde, School of Health and Education. University of Skövde, Health and Education.
    Krettek, Alexandra
    University of Skövde, School of Health and Education. University of Skövde, Health and Education. Department of Internal Medicine and Clinical Nutrition, Institute of Medicine, Sahlgrenska Academy at University of Gothenburg, Sweden / Department of Community Medicine, Faculty of Health Sciences, UiT The Arctic University of Norway, Tromsø, Norway.
    Effectiveness of health promotion regarding diet and physical activity among Nepalese mothers and their young children: The Heart-health Associated Research, Dissemination, and Intervention in the Community (HARDIC) trial2019In: Global Health Action, ISSN 1654-9716, E-ISSN 1654-9880, Vol. 12, p. 1-12, article id 1670033Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: Nepal, like many low- and middle-income countries, exhibits rising burden of cardiovascular diseases. Misconceptions, poor behavior, and a high prevalence of risk factors contribute to this development. Health promotion efforts along with primary prevention strategies, including risk factor reduction in both adults and children, are therefore critical. Objectives: This study assessed the effectiveness of a health promotion intervention on mothers' knowledge, attitude and practice (KAP) and their children's behavior regarding diet and physical activity. Methods: The Heart-health Associated Research, Dissemination and Intervention in the Community (HARDIC), a community-based trial, used peer education to target mothers with 1-9-year-old children in the peri-urban Jhaukhel-Duwakot Health Demographic Surveillance Site, Nepal, during August-November 2016. In the intervention area, 47 peer mothers were trained to conduct four education classes for about 10 fellow mothers (N = 391). After 3 months, all eligible mothers in the intervention and control areas were interviewed and the results were compared with the KAP of all eligible mothers at baseline. Results: Post-intervention, mothers' KAP median scores had improved regarding heart-healthy diet and physical activity. More mothers had 'good' KAP (>75% of maximum possible scores), and mothers with 'good' knowledge increased from 50% to 81%. Corresponding control values increased only from 58% to 63%. Mothers' attitude and practice improved. Additionally, mothers in the intervention area reported improvement in their children's diet and physical activity behavior. Moreover, Difference in Differences analysis showed that the HARDIC intervention significantly increased mothers' KAP scores and children's behavior scores in the intervention area compared to the control area. Conclusions: Our intervention improves KAP scores regarding diet and physical activity and shows potential for expansion via community health workers, volunteers, and/or local women. Moreover, HARDIC can contribute to Nepal's Package of Essential Noncommunicable Diseases Initiative, which currently lacks a specific package for health promotion.

  • 315.
    Oli, Natalia
    et al.
    Sahlgrenska Academy at University of Gothenburg, Sweden / Kathmandu Medical College, Kathmandu, Nepal.
    Vaidya, Abhinav
    Kathmandu Medical College, Kathmandu, Nepal.
    Pahkala, Katja
    University of Turku, Finland.
    Eiben, Gabriele
    University of Skövde, School of Health and Education. University of Skövde, Health and Education. University of Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Krettek, Alexandra
    University of Skövde, School of Health and Education. University of Skövde, Health and Education. Sahlgrenska Academy at University of Gothenburg, Sweden / UiT The Arctic University of Norway, Tromsø, Norway.
    Knowledge, attitude and practice on diet and physical activity among mothers with young children in the Jhaukhel-Duwakot Health Demographic Surveillance Site, Nepal2018In: PLoS ONE, ISSN 1932-6203, E-ISSN 1932-6203, Vol. 13, no 7, article id e0200329Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The prevalence of cardiovascular diseases is increasing in low and middle-income countries; Nepal's population shows a high prevalence of behavioral risk factors. Our cross-sectional study in the Jhaukhel-Duwakot Health Demographic Surveillance Site (JD-HDSS), located near the capital Kathmandu, explored knowledge, attitude, and practice (KAP) of mothers with young children regarding diet and physical activity and mothers' perception of their children's attitude and behavior toward the same issues. The purpose of our study was to assess needs of the mothers concerning cardiovascular health in general and more specifically regarding diet and physical activity, and to establish a baseline for future intervention in the community by comparing two villages of JD-HDSS. In August-November 2014, nine trained enumerators interviewed all mothers of children aged 1-7 years (N = 962). We scored responses on dietary and physical activity KAP, then categorized the scores based on the percentage obtained out of the maximum possible scores into "poor," "fair," and "good." More highly educated mothers scored higher for KAP (all p<0.001); the children's behavior score reflected their mother's education level (p = 0.007). Most respondents were unfamiliar with the concept of healthy and unhealthy food. Overall, 57% of respondents in JD-HDSS had "good" knowledge, 44.6% had "good" attitude, and most (90%) had "poor" practice. We observed no significant differences between the villages regarding mothers' knowledge and attitude or children's behavior. Practice score of mothers in Jhaukhel was higher than those in Duwakot regarding diet and physical activity (p<0.001). Mothers' perceived barriers for improving lifestyle were high cost of healthy food, taste preference of other family members, and lack of knowledge regarding healthy food. Barriers for physical activity were lack of leisure time, absence of parks and playgrounds, busy caring for children and old people, feeling lazy, and embarrassed to be physically active in front of others. Our findings suggest that a health education intervention promoting a healthy lifestyle for mothers and children might improve KAP and also improve cardiovascular health. To address mothers' gap between knowledge and practice, a future intervention should consider perceived barriers.

  • 316.
    Oli, Natalia
    et al.
    Department of Community Medicine, Kathmandu Medical College, Kathmandu, Nepal / Department of Internal Medicine and Clinical Nutrition, Institute of Medicine, Sahlgrenska Academy at University of Gothenburg, Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Vaidya, Abhinav
    Department of Community Medicine, Kathmandu Medical College, Kathmandu, Nepal.
    Subedi, Madhusudan
    Department of Community Health Sciences, Patan Academy of Health Sciences, Lalitpur, Nepal.
    Eiben, Gabriele
    Department of Public Health and Community Medicine, University of Gothenburg, Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Krettek, Alexandra
    University of Skövde, School of Health and Education. University of Skövde, Health and Education. Department of Internal Medicine and Clinical Nutrition, Institute of Medicine, Sahlgrenska Academy at University of Gothenburg, Gothenburg, Sweden / Department of Community Medicine, Faculty of Health Sciences, The Arctic University of Norway, Tromsø, Norway.
    Diet and physical activity for children's health: a qualitative study of Nepalese mothers' perceptions2015In: BMJ Open, ISSN 2044-6055, E-ISSN 2044-6055, Vol. 5, no 9, article id e008197Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    OBJECTIVES: Non-communicable diseases account for 50% of all deaths in Nepal and 25% result from cardiovascular diseases. Previous studies in Nepal indicate a high burden of behavioural cardiovascular risk factors, suggesting a low level of knowledge, attitude and practice/behaviour regarding cardiovascular health. The behavioural foundation for a healthy lifestyle begins in early childhood, when mothers play a key role in their children's lives. This qualitative study, conducted in a Nepalese peri-urban community, aimed to explore mothers' perception of their children's diet and physical activity.

    DESIGN: We notated, tape-recorded and transcribed all data collected from six focus group discussions, and used qualitative content analysis for evaluation and interpretation.

    SETTING: The study was conducted in the Jhaukhel-Duwakot Health Demographic Surveillance Site in the Bhaktapur district of Nepal.

    PARTICIPANTS: Local health workers helped recruit 61 women with children aged 5-10 years. We distributed participants among six different groups according to educational status.

    RESULTS: Although participants understood the importance of healthy food, they misunderstood its composition, perceiving it as unappetising and appropriate only for sick people. Furthermore, participants did not prioritise their children's physical activities. Moreover, mothers believed they had limited control over their children's dietary habits and physical activity. Finally, they opined that health educational programmes would help mothers and recommended various intervention strategies to increase knowledge regarding a healthy lifestyle.

    CONCLUSIONS: Our data reveal that mothers of young children in a peri-urban community of Nepal lack adequate and accurate understanding about the impact of a healthy diet and physical activity. Therefore, to prevent future cardiovascular disease and other non-communicable diseases among children, Nepal needs health education programmes to improve mothers' cardiovascular health knowledge, attitude and behaviour.

  • 317.
    Olivari, Maria Giulia
    et al.
    Psychology Department, CRIdee, Università Cattolica del Sacro Cuore, Milano, Italy.
    Hertfelt Wahn, Elisabeth
    University of Skövde, School of Health and Education. University of Skövde, Health and Education.
    Maridaki-Kassotaki, Katerina
    Department of Home Economics and Ecology, Harokopio University of Athens, Athens, Greece.
    Antonopoulou, Katerina
    Department of Home Economics and Ecology, Harokopio University of Athens, Athens, Greece.
    Confalonieri, Emanuela
    Psychology Department, CRIdee, Università Cattolica del Sacro Cuore, Milano, Italy.
    Adolescent Perceptions of Parenting Styles in Sweden, Italy and Greece: An Exploratory Study2015In: Europe's Journal of Psychology, ISSN 1841-0413, E-ISSN 1841-0413, Vol. 11, no 2, p. 244-258Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 318.
    Olivari, Maria Giulia
    et al.
    Catholic University of Milan, Italy / CRIdee, Italy.
    Ionio, C.
    Catholic University of Milan, Italy / CRIdee, Italy.
    Traficante, D.
    Catholic University of Milan, Italy / CRIdee, Italy.
    Hertfelt Wahn, Elisabeth
    University of Skövde, School of Health and Education. University of Skövde, Health and Education.
    Confalonieri, Emanuela
    Catholic University of Milan, Italy / CRIdee, Italy.
    Contraceptive self efficacy among Italian adolescents2012Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 319.
    Olofsson, Peder S.
    et al.
    Center for Bioelectronic Medicine, Department of Medicine, Center for Molecular Medicine, Karolinska Institutet, Karolinska University Hospital, Stockholm, Sweden / Laboratory of Biomedical Science, The Feinstein Institute for Medical Research, Manhasset, New York, USA.
    Steinberg, Benjamin E.
    Laboratory of Biomedical Science, The Feinstein Institute for Medical Research, Manhasset, New York, USA / The Campbell Family Institute for Breast Cancer Research, University Health Network, Toronto, Ontario, Canada.
    Sobbi, Roozbeh
    Division of Cardiology, Peter Munk Cardiac Centre, University Health Network, Toronto, Ontario, Canada.
    Cox, Maureen A.
    The Campbell Family Institute for Breast Cancer Research, University Health Network, Toronto, Ontario, Canada.
    Ahmed, Mohamed N.
    Center for Heart and Lung Research, The Feinstein Institute for Medical Research, Manhasset, New York, USA.
    Oswald, Michaela
    Robert S. Boas Center for Genomics and Human Genetics, Feinstein Institute for Medical Research, Manhasset, New York, USA.
    Szekeres, Ferenc
    University of Skövde, School of Health and Education. University of Skövde, Health and Education. Department of Physiology and Pharmacology, Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Hanes, William M.
    Laboratory of Biomedical Science, The Feinstein Institute for Medical Research, Manhasset, New York, USA.
    Introini, Andrea
    Department of Medicine, Solna, Unit of Infectious Diseases, Center for Molecular Medicine, Karolinska Institutet, Karolinska University Hospital, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Liu, Shu Fang
    Center for Heart and Lung Research, The Feinstein Institute for Medical Research, Manhasset, New York, USA.
    Holodick, Nichol E.
    Center for Oncology and Cell Biology, The Feinstein Institute for Medical Research, Manhasset, New York, USA.
    Rothstein, Thomas L.
    Center for Oncology and Cell Biology, The Feinstein Institute for Medical Research, Manhasset, New York, USA.
    Lövdahl, Cecilia
    Department of Physiology and Pharmacology, Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Chavan, Sangeeta S.
    Laboratory of Biomedical Science, The Feinstein Institute for Medical Research, Manhasset, New York, USA.
    Yang, Huan
    Laboratory of Biomedical Science, The Feinstein Institute for Medical Research, Manhasset, New York, USA.
    Pavlov, Valentin A.
    Laboratory of Biomedical Science, The Feinstein Institute for Medical Research, Manhasset, New York, USA.
    Broliden, Kristina
    Department of Medicine, Solna, Unit of Infectious Diseases, Center for Molecular Medicine, Karolinska Institutet, Karolinska University Hospital, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Andersson, Ulf
    Department of Women's and Children's Health, Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Diamond, Betty
    The Center for Autoimmune and Musculoskeletal Diseases, The Feinstein Institute for Medical Research, Manhasset, New York, USA.
    Miller, Edmund J.
    Center for Heart and Lung Research, The Feinstein Institute for Medical Research, Manhasset, New York, USA.
    Arner, Anders
    Department of Physiology and Pharmacology, Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Gregersen, Peter K.
    Robert S. Boas Center for Genomics and Human Genetics, Feinstein Institute for Medical Research, Manhasset, New York, USA.
    Backx, Peter H.
    Division of Cardiology, Peter Munk Cardiac Centre, University Health Network, Toronto, Ontario, Canada / Department of Biology, York University, Toronto, Ontario, Canada.
    Mak, Tak W.
    The Campbell Family Institute for Breast Cancer Research, University Health Network, Toronto, Ontario, Canada.
    Tracey, Kevin J.
    Laboratory of Biomedical Science, The Feinstein Institute for Medical Research, Manhasset, New York, USA.
    Blood pressure regulation by CD4lymphocytes expressing choline acetyltransferase2016In: Nature Biotechnology, ISSN 1087-0156, E-ISSN 1546-1696, Vol. 34, no 10, p. 1066-1071Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Blood pressure regulation is known to be maintained by a neuro-endocrine circuit, but whether immune cells contribute to blood pressure homeostasis has not been determined. We previously showed that CD4(+) T lymphocytes that express choline acetyltransferase (ChAT), which catalyzes the synthesis of the vasorelaxant acetylcholine, relay neural signals(1). Here we show that these CD4(+)CD44(hi)CD62L(Io) T helper cells by gene expression are a distinct T-cell population defined by ChAT (CD4 T-ChAT). Mice lacking ChAT expression in CD4(+) cells have elevated arterial blood pressure, compared to littermate controls. Jurkat T cells overexpressing ChAT (JT(ChAT)) decreased blood pressure when infused into mice. Co-incubation of JT(ChAT) and endothelial cells increased endothelial cell levels of phosphorylated endothelial nitric oxide synthase, and of nitrates and nitrites in conditioned media, indicating increased release of the potent vasorelaxant nitric oxide. The isolation and characterization of CD4 T-ChAT cells will enable analysis of the role of these cells in hypotension and hypertension, and may suggest novel therapeutic strategies by targeting cell-mediated vasorelaxation.

  • 320.
    Olsen, Oddrun Elise
    et al.
    Department of Clinical and Molecular Medicine, NTNU–Norwegian University of Science and Technology, Trondheim, Norway / Department of Hematology, St. Olav’s University Hospital, Trondheim, Norway.
    Sankar, Meenu
    University of Skövde, School of Health and Education. University of Skövde, Health and Education.
    Elsaadi, Samah
    Department of Clinical and Molecular Medicine, NTNU–Norwegian University of Science and Technology, Trondheim, Norway.
    Hella, Hanne
    Department of Clinical and Molecular Medicine, NTNU–Norwegian University of Science and Technology, Trondheim, Norway.
    Buene, Glenn
    Department of Clinical and Molecular Medicine, NTNU–Norwegian University of Science and Technology, Trondheim, Norway.
    Darvekar, Sagar Ramesh
    Department of Clinical and Molecular Medicine, NTNU–Norwegian University of Science and Technology, Trondheim, Norway.
    Misund, Kristine
    Department of Clinical and Molecular Medicine, NTNU–Norwegian University of Science and Technology, Trondheim, Norway / Department of Hematology, St. Olav’s University Hospital, Trondheim, Norway.
    Katagiri, Takenobu
    Division of Pathophysiology, Research Center for Genomic Medicine, Saitama Medical University, Hidaka-shi, Saitama, Japan.
    Knaus, Petra
    Institute for Chemistry and Biochemistry, Freie Universitaet Berlin, Berlin, Germany.
    Holien, Toril
    Department of Clinical and Molecular Medicine, NTNU–Norwegian University of Science and Technology, Trondheim, Norway / Department of Hematology, St. Olav’s University Hospital, Trondheim, Norway.
    BMPR2 inhibits activin and BMP signaling via wild-type ALK22018In: Journal of Cell Science, ISSN 0021-9533, E-ISSN 1477-9137, Vol. 131, no 11, article id UNSP jcs213512Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    TGF-beta/BMP superfamily ligands require heteromeric complexes of type 1 and 2 receptors for ligand-dependent downstream signaling. Activin A, a TGF-beta superfamily member, inhibits growth of multiple myeloma cells, but the mechanism for this is unknown. We therefore aimed to clarify how activins affect myeloma cell survival. Activin A activates the transcription factors SMAD2/3 through the ALK4 type 1 receptor, but may also activate SMAD1/5/8 through mutated variants of the type 1 receptor ALK2 ( also known as ACVR1). We demonstrate that activin A and B activate SMAD1/5/8 in myeloma cells through endogenous wild-type ALK2. Knockdown of the type 2 receptor BMPR2 strongly potentiated activin A- and activin B-induced activation of SMAD1/5/8 and subsequent cell death. Furthermore, activity of BMP6, BMP7 or BMP9, which may also signal via ALK2, was potentiated by knockdown of BMPR2. Similar results were seen in HepG2 liver carcinoma cells. We propose that BMPR2 inhibits ALK2-mediated signaling by preventing ALK2 from oligomerizing with the type 2 receptors ACVR2A and ACVR2B, which are necessary for activation of ALK2 by activins and several BMPs. In conclusion, BMPR2 could be explored as a possible target for therapy in patients with multiple myeloma.

  • 321.
    Olson, Maria
    University of Skövde, School of Health and Education. University of Skövde, Health and Education. Stockholms universitet, Högskolan Dalarna.
    Det oväntade i so-ämnenas undervisning: bjudningar till annat kunskapande och tillblivande2017In: Nordidactica: Journal of Humanities and Social Science Education, ISSN 2000-9879, Vol. 2, p. 1-7Article in journal (Other academic)
    Abstract [sv]

    I detta temanummer riktar vi intresse mot So-ämnenas undervisning i skolan. Vi tar vår utgångspunkt i vad de flesta lärare vet, men kanske inte alltid finner tid, utrymme eller någon lämplig plattform att uttrycka. Nämligen att all undervisning, och i förlängningen all utbildning – av nödvändighet – är omhuldad av risk (Biesta 2013), av det som är oväntat. Vår ambition är inte i första hand att lyfta fram detta oväntade som en omständighet eller nödvändighet i allmän mening i utbildningssammanhang. Ambitionen är snarare att utifrån denna nödvändighet resa frågor till den dagliga undervisningen i de samhällsorienterade ämnena religionskunskap, samhällskunskap och historia, alternativt i so-undervisning generellt. Utifrån skilda empiriska, i högre eller lägre grad teoretiskt färgade ansatser, prövar vi att resa frågor som på olika sätt knyter an till vårt överordnade syfte i temanumret, vilket är att undersöka om, och i så fall vilka särskilda villkor eller bevekelsegrunder som kan tänkas prägla just de samhällsorienterade ämnenas undervisning, sett i ljuset av det oväntade som en potential, som möjlighet.

  • 322.
    Olson, Maria
    University of Skövde, School of Health and Education. University of Skövde, Health and Education. Stockholms universitet.
    Ungas medborgerliga engagemang i samhällsundervisningen2015In: Kontroversiella frågor: om kunskap och politik i samhällsundervisningen / [ed] Carsten Ljunggren, Ingrid Unemar Öst & Tomas Englund, Malmö: Gleerups Utbildning AB, 2015, 1, p. 169-186Chapter in book (Other academic)
    Abstract [sv]

    Kapitlet handlar om ungas medborgerliga engagemang i samhällsundervisningen i skolan. Mera precist handlar det om hur de unga själva tolkar och förstår detta engagemang - beroende på vilka frågor som de möter innanför och utanför klassrummet. Syftet är att lyfta fram lärarens roll i samhällsundervisningen; betydelsen av att hon eller hand reser olika slags frågor om medborgerligt engagemang. Eftersom de olika svar och reaktioner som dessa frågor ger både bär spår av och spårar vår samtid och vår framtid som medborgare i samhället.

  • 323.
    Olson, Maria
    University of Skövde, School of Health and Education. University of Skövde, Health and Education. Högskolan Dalarna / Stockholms universitet.
    Vilken roll spelar rösten?: Förvaltandet av röster från barn och unga i för/skolan som inflytandets måttstock2015In: Barns och ungas röster i utbildning: Delaktighetens komplexitet i förskola och skola, Malmö: Ett samarbete mellan Regionalt utvecklingscentrum Malmö och Malmö högskola , 2015Conference paper (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
  • 324.
    Olson, Maria
    et al.
    University of Skövde, School of Health and Education. University of Skövde, Health and Education. Stockholms university, Centrum för de humanistiska ämnenas didaktik (CeHum) / University of Skövde , Sweden .
    Dahlstedt, Magnus
    Linköping University.
    Citizenship formation for a new millennium in Sweden: a prognosis of our time2014In: The Journal for Critical Education Policy Studies, ISSN 2051-0969, E-ISSN 1740-2743, Vol. 12, no 2, p. 200-224Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The aim of this article is to forecast the present situation of citizenship formation in the field of Swedish education. In highlighting trends and tendencies in the educational assignment to provide for democratic citizenship in the first decade of the 21st century, which can be characterised as lacking collective visions for change, three depictions of citizenship are prevailing: citizenship formation for deliberation, for entrepreneurship and for therapeutic intervention. These depictions are analysed in terms of the direction for action taking and attention that they stress and produce as concerns citizenship in the making. The first one, citizenship formation for deliberation, stresses an inward-looking and inward-feeling citizenship. The second one, citizenship formation for entrepreneurship, stresses an inward-looking and outward-making citizenship, and the third one, citizenship formation for therapeutic intervention, stresses an inward-looking and outward-making citizenship. Taking on this forecast, which actualises democracy as something that is already achieved as a consequence of an assumedly post political situation, we argue that citizenship as well as society itself risks being pictured as apolitical and democratically “saturated.” This situation is hazardous, we argue, as it does not open up for change to come into question as desirable or even possible. Put differently, it leaves us with the notion that things have to be as they are, as we are living in the best of worlds. 

  • 325.
    Olson, Maria
    et al.
    University of Skövde, School of Health and Education. University of Skövde, Health and Education. Stockholms universitet, Centrum för de humanistiska ämnenas didaktik (CeHum).
    Dahlstedt, Magnus
    Linköping University.
    Medborgarskapande för ett nytt millennium: utbildning och medborgarfostran i 2000-talets Sverige2014In: Utbildning och Demokrati, ISSN 1102-6472, E-ISSN 2001-7316, Vol. 23, no 2, p. 7-25Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [sv]

    Citizenship in the making for a new millenium – education and citizen formation in 21st century Sweden. The aim of this article is to analyse citizenship formation in Swedish education. In highlighting trends regarding the assignment of the educational system to provide for democratic citizenship there are certain depictions of citizenship prevail- ing. The first stresses an inward-looking and inward-feeling citizenship, characterizing the citizen as deliberative and emotional. The second stresses an inward-looking and outward-making citizenship, characterizing the citizen as entrepreneurial and willing. Here, democracy is portrayed as already achieved. This, we argue, is hazardous as society risk being pictured as apolitical and democratically ‘saturated’. This situation does not open up for democratic change to come into question as desirable or even possible. Put differently, it leaves us with the notion that things have to be as they are, as we are living in the best of worlds.

  • 326.
    Olson, Maria
    et al.
    University of Skövde, School of Health and Education. University of Skövde, Health and Education. Centre for Teaching and Learning in the Humanities, Stockholm University, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Fejes, Andreas
    Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Linköping University, Linköping, Sweden.
    Dahlstedt, Magnus
    Department of Social and Welfare Studies, Linköping University, Linköping, Sweden.
    Nicoll, Kathrine
    School of Education, University of Stirling, United Kingdom.
    Citizenship discourses: production and curriculum2015In: British Journal of Sociology of Education, ISSN 0142-5692, E-ISSN 1465-3346, Vol. 36, no 7, p. 1036-1053Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This paper explores citizenship discourses empirically through upper secondary school student’s understandings, as these emerge in and through their everyday experiences. Drawing on a post-structuralist theorisation inspired by the work of Michel Foucault, a discourse analysis of data from interviews with students is carried out. This analysis characterises three discourses of the active citizen – a knowledgeable citizen, a responsive and holistic citizen and a self-responsible “free” citizen. The analysis raises questions over the implications of contemporary efforts for the intensification of standardising forces through citizenship education. It also stresses the notion that engaging students actively does always also involve discourses other than those stressed through the curriculum, which nurtures the body and nerve of democracy itself.

  • 327.
    Olson, Maria
    et al.
    University of Skövde, School of Health and Education. University of Skövde, Health and Education. Stockholm University.
    Gamalielsson, Jonas
    University of Skövde, School of Informatics. University of Skövde, The Informatics Research Centre.
    Gustavsson, Susanne
    University of Skövde, School of Health and Education. University of Skövde, Health and Education.
    Lundell, Björn
    University of Skövde, School of Informatics. University of Skövde, The Informatics Research Centre.
    Addressing Democratic and Didactic Implications of Different Technological Offerings in Compulsory School Teaching Practices2014In: Next Generation Learning Conference: Conference Summary / [ed] Erik Brunnert Walfridsson, Högskolan Dalarna, 2014, p. 52-62Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This paper draws from a multidisciplinary research study that aims to identify and analyse democratic and didactic implications of different technological offerings in compulsory school teaching practices. The research study also aims to develop strategies to promote learning through open knowledge processes in Swedish educational contexts. The overarching goal of our research is to contribute to systematic and in-depth knowledge of specific, education-related challenges in one of today’s most important ongoing changes in schools, the implementation of IT. In this paper we report on the current state of practice concerning the use of technological offerings in school and its democratic and didactic implications to the aim of elaborating on pedagogical and technological challenges in the context of compulsory school.

  • 328.
    Olson, Maria
    et al.
    University of Skövde, School of Health and Education. University of Skövde, Health and Education. Högskolan Dalarna / Stockholms universitet.
    Irisdotter Aldenmyr, SaraHögskolan Dalarna.
    SO-undervisning på mellanstadiet: Forskning och praktik2016Collection (editor) (Other academic)
  • 329.
    Olson, Maria
    et al.
    University of Skövde, School of Health and Education. University of Skövde, Health and Education. CeHum, Stockholm University, Sweden.
    Zimenkova, Tatjana
    Dortmund Competence Center for Teacher Training and Educational Research, Technical University Dortmund, Germany.
    (Hidden) Normativity in Social Science Education and History Education2015In: Journal of Social Science Education, ISSN 1611-9665, E-ISSN 1618-5293, Vol. 14, no 1, p. 2-5Article in journal (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Hidden and unhidden normativity in Social science education and History education are being intensively researched and criticized in both educational scientific and media discourses (Gatto 2002). In addition, they are extensively discussed in teacher education and concealed or explicated in education policies and curricula for these school subjects. These discussions are further, to more or less extent, related to civic and citizenship education, as well as to political discourses more generally (e.g. Papastephanou, 2007; Hedtke, Zimenkova & Hippe, 2008 in previous issues of JSSE).

    Not only do political actors at macro level try to provide for citizen formation with help of Social science education and History education . A multitude of other actors at regional and local level – be it non- governmental, religious or economic actors, or parents – bring their own agendas and normative stances into the school subjects of Social science education and History Education. The term “hidden curricula” and the idea of (hidden) normativity are further associated with national and supra national policy agendas and grand cultural narratives. However, local and regional specifics that are intimately connected to the normatively laden conceptions of citizenship edu- cation and learning inside and outside of school, we argue, can and should be provided increased attention in research. In this special issue, two school subjects are highlighted: Social science education and History education.

    The very idea of normativity of Social science education and History education is being evaluated quite differently in different national educational settings and subject didactic traditions. It encom- passes the whole range from being considered as allowable and wishful in order to reach some central moral, political or other normative goals of society to absolute ban and resolute absence of any substantive or normative qualification of social science and history teachers as professionals (for the German discussion, cf. Besand et al., 2011).

    This special issue of the JSSE, entitled (Hidden) Normativity in Social Science Education and History Education brings together empirical, methodological and theoretical contributions that in one way or the other elaborate on normativity in Social science edu- cation and History education. Central questions addressed in the call are: How is normativity visible and formed within Social science education and History education? How can these processes be approached empirically? Is there something wrong with normativity, and if so why? Which role does normativity play for social science teachers and history teachers in their profession? The authors in this issue have created vital responses to these questions, suggesting new comparative methodologies and opening up innovative areas of empirical research in more or less theoretical framings. The following specific approaches to research on normativity in Social science education and History education are embraced by the authors:

    - Normativity is stressed as a phenomenon indisputably related to Social science education and History education. But the modes of normativity, its explicitness, direction, strength and actors alter.

    Education policy and practice are deeply entwined, and processes of normative change come to the fore -- in critical and constructive investigations of central concepts in these school subjects, at different school levels and over time. Out of different theoretical and methodological approaches, the authors demon- strate convincingly the necessity to consider differ- rent sources of empirical material in order not only to map and describe different facets of normativity in Social science education and History education. But also to make a case for the complexity involved in the intermingling of hidden and unhidden normativity in the everyday practice of teaching and learning of these school subjects.

    - Focusing different forms of knowledge and conceptual uses in policy and practice in Social science education and History education (at mainly upper secondary level) allow for approaching normativity not only as a matter of detecting where it is situated in these school subjects and why this is so. It also contributes to the development of relevant subject specific methodological frameworks that may be considered key for the development of this field of research.

    - Sociological and other educational theories and methods deriving from social sciences are being use innovatively by the authors. In doing so, we argue, they open up for a widening of the scope as regards the meaning and importance of theoretically underpinned comparative approaches to the research field of subject didactics.

    - By stressing critical concepts and conceptual uses in Social science education and History edu- cation, the intimate connection between these subjects and their assigned task to see to citizenship learning and social formation emerges. 

  • 330.
    Pahrne, Sandra
    et al.
    Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Chavez, Johanna Y. Andrews
    Tufts University, Boston, USA.
    Dalal, Koustuv
    University of Skövde, School of Health and Education. University of Skövde, Health and Education. Centre for Injury Prevention and Safety Promotion, School of Health and Medical Sciences, Örebro University, Örebro, Sweden.
    Economic Cost of Pedestrian Injuries in Stockholm City2014In: Health, ISSN 1949-4998, E-ISSN 1949-5005, Vol. 6, no 19, p. 2736-2742Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 331.
    Palmér, Lina
    et al.
    Department of Caring Science, Work Life and Social Welfare, University of Borås, Sweden.
    Nyström, Maria
    Department of Caring Science, Work Life and Social Welfare, University of Borås, Sweden.
    Carlsson, Gunilla
    Department of Caring Science, Work Life and Social Welfare, University of Borås, Sweden.
    Gillsjö, Catharina
    University of Skövde, School of Health and Education. University of Skövde, Health and Education. University of Rhode Island, Kingston, RI, USA.
    Eriksson, Irene
    University of Skövde, School of Health and Education. University of Skövde, Health and Education.
    Dalheim-Englund, Ann-Charlotte
    Department of Caring Science, Work Life and Social Welfare, University of Borås, Sweden.
    The meaning of growing old: A lifeworld hermeneutic study on existential matters during the third age of life2019In: Healthy Aging Research, E-ISSN 2261-7434, Vol. 8, no 2, p. 1-7, article id 8Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This study investigates existential matters in the third age of life, which encompasses the years after retirement and ends when extensive support needs emerge in the fourth age. As the theoretical starting point in a lifeworld hermeneutic approach, 18 healthy older adults were interviewed about what it means for them to grow old. The interviews were interpreted according to Gadamer's principles of openness and Ricoeur's proposal to provide suggestions on how meaning can be explained. The findings are presented in three interpreted themes: Feeling free, Becoming vulnerable, and Existing in closeness to death. The themes are further interpreted, and a comprehensive understanding is reached with theoretical support from Jean-Paul Sartre's idea of factuality and project. The meaning of growing old is discussed in terms of positive factors, such as healthy aging, transition and gerotranscendence, but also in respect to concerns over future suffering in relation to illness and dependence. It is concluded that the freedom of the third age is greatly appreciated for a healthy life, but also threatened by increased risks of ill health. It is not morbidity in itself that worries most, but the risk of being dependent on care and support from others. This is important to consider when planning and performing care in order to promote a healthy aging.

  • 332.
    Peilot, Birgitta
    et al.
    Sahlgrenska Academy at the University of Gothenburg, Sahlgrenska University Hospital, Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Andréll, Paulin
    Sahlgrenska Academy at the University of Gothenburg, Sahlgrenska University Hospital, Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Samuelsson, Anita
    Health Centre, Landvetter, Sweden.
    Mannheimer, Clas
    Sahlgrenska Academy at the University of Gothenburg, Sahlgrenska University Hospital, Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Frodi, Ann
    University of Wisconsin, Iowa, Michigan, Rochester, NY, USA.
    Sundler, Annelie J.
    University of Skövde, School of Health and Education. University of Skövde, Health and Education. School of Health, Care and Social Welfare, Mälardalen University, Eskilstuna, Sweden.
    Time to gain trust and change: - experiences of attachment and mindfulness-based cognitive therapy among patients with chronic pain and psychiatric co-morbidity2014In: International Journal of Qualitative Studies on Health and Well-being, ISSN 1748-2623, E-ISSN 1748-2631, Vol. 9, article id 24420Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The treatment of patients with chronic pain disorders is complex. In the rehabilitation of these patients, coping with chronic pain is seen as important. The aim of this study was to explore the meaning of attachment and mindfulness-based cognitive therapy (CT) among patients with chronic pain and psychiatric co-morbidity. A phenomenological approach within a lifeworld perspective was used. In total, 10 patients were interviewed after completion of 7- to 13-month therapy. The findings reveal that the therapy and the process of interaction with the therapist were meaningful for the patients’ well-being and for a better management of pain. During the therapy, the patients were able to initiate a movement of change. Thus, CT with focus on attachment and mindfulness seems to be of value for these patients. The therapy used in this study was adjusted to the patients’ special needs, and a trained psychotherapist with a special knowledge of patients with chronic pain might be required.

  • 333.
    Perlaki, Gabor
    et al.
    MTA-PTE Clinical Neuroscience MR Research Group, Pecs, Hungary / Department of Neurology, University of Pecs, Medical School, Hungary.
    Molnar, Denes
    Department of Pediatrics, University of Pecs, Medical School, Pecs, Hungary.
    Smeets, Paul A. M.
    Utrecht University, Netherlands / Wageningen University & Research, Netherlands.
    Ahrens, Wolfgang
    Leibniz Institute for Prevention Research and Epidemiology BIPS, Bremen, Germany.
    Wolters, Maike
    Leibniz Institute for Prevention Research and Epidemiology BIPS, Bremen, Germany.
    Eiben, Gabriele
    University of Skövde, School of Health and Education. University of Skövde, Health and Education. Department of Public Health and Community Medicine, University of Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Lissner, Lauren
    Department of Public Health and Community Medicine, University of Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Erhard, Peter
    University of Bremen, Germany.
    van Meer, Floor
    Utrecht University, Netherlands.
    Herrmann, Manfred
    University of Bremen, Germany.
    Janszky, Jozsef
    MTA-PTE Clinical Neuroscience MR Research Group, Pecs, Hungary / Department of Neurology, University of Pecs, Medical School, Hungary.
    Orsi, Gergely
    MTA-PTE Clinical Neuroscience MR Research Group, Pecs, Hungary / Department of Neurology, University of Pecs, Medical School, Hungary.
    Volumetric gray matter measures of amygdala and accumbens in childhood overweight/obesity2018In: PLoS ONE, ISSN 1932-6203, E-ISSN 1932-6203, Vol. 13, no 10, article id e0205331Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Objectives Neuroimaging data suggest that pediatric overweight and obesity are associated with morphological alterations in gray matter (GM) brain structures, but previous studies using mainly voxel-based morphometry (VBM) showed inconsistent results. Here, we aimed to examine the relationship between youth obesity and the volume of predefined reward system structures using magnetic resonance (MR) volumetry. We also aimed to complement volumetry with VBM-style analysis. Methods Fifty-one Caucasian young subjects (32 females; mean age: 13.8±1.9, range: 10.2–16.5 years) were included. Subjects were selected from a subsample of the I.Family study examined in the Hungarian center. A T1-weighted 1 mm3 isotropic resolution image was acquired. Age- and sex-standardized body mass index (zBMI) was assessed at the day of MRI and ~1.89 years (mean±SD: 689±188 days) before the examination. Obesity related GM alterations were investigated using MR volumetry in five predefined brain structures presumed to play crucial roles in body weight regulation (hippocampus, amygdala, accumbens, caudate, putamen), as well as whole-brain and regional VBM. Results The volumes of accumbens and amygdala showed significant positive correlations with zBMI, while their GM densities were inversely related to zBMI. Voxel-based GM mass also showed significant negative correlation with zBMI when investigated in the predefined amygdala region, but this relationship was mediated by GM density. Conclusions Overweight/obesity related morphometric brain differences already seem to be present in children/adolescents. Our work highlights the disparity between volume and VBM-derived measures and that GM mass (combination of volume and density) is not informative in the context of obesity related volumetric changes. To better characterize the association between childhood obesity and GM morphometry, a combination of volumetric segmentation and VBM methods, as well as future longitudinal studies are necessary. Our results suggest that childhood obesity is associated with enlarged structural volumes, but decreased GM density in the reward system. © 2018 Perlaki et al. This is an open access article distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original author and source are credited. This is an open access article distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original author and source are credited.

  • 334.
    Petersson, Caroline
    et al.
    University of Skövde, School of Health and Education. University of Skövde, Health and Education.
    Johansson, Jennie
    University of Skövde, School of Health and Education.
    En god vårdrelation - ur ett patientperspektiv: En inblick i cancervården2017Independent thesis Basic level (degree of Bachelor), 10 credits / 15 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [en]

    Background: Cancer is one of the world's most common diseases and the second most common cause of death. Patients' right to participate in care and treatment is statutory and underpins medical treatment and care. Seeing the person behind the patient is important to understand their life world. Nursing's basic care role is to support patients with what they do not manage. Objective: To describe patients' experience of how the nurse can promote a good care relationship, at an oncology department. Method: The study is a literature review. The data material consisted of twelve qualitative, three quantitative and two mixed designed scientific articles. Results: The analyzed result is presented in four different main themes and associated subheadings. These main themes are: Treatment and information as a basis for the care relationship, Relieving patient needs, Emotional support, Creation of a close care relationship. Discussion: The discussion shows that patients need personalized information and support. In order for this to happen, the nurse must be able to identify the patient's needs. Unless the needs are met, it can create an unnecessary care suffering for the patient. A good care relationship is therefore based on the patient feeling safe and seen in the care.   

  • 335.
    Petersson, Maria
    et al.
    Endocrine and Diabetes Unit, Department of Molecular Medicine and Surgery, Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Uvnäs-Moberg, Kerstin
    Department of Animal Environment and Health, Swedish University of Agricultural Sciences, Skara, Sweden.
    Nilsson, Anne
    Department of Animal Environment and Health, Swedish University of Agricultural Sciences, Skara, Sweden.
    Gustafsson, Lise-Lotte
    Department of Animal Environment and Health, Swedish University of Agricultural Sciences, Skara, Sweden.
    Hydbring-Sandberg, Eva
    Department of Anatomy, Physiology and Biochemistry, Swedish University of Agricultural Sciences, Uppsala, Sweden.
    Handlin, Linda
    University of Skövde, School of Health and Education. University of Skövde, Health and Education.
    Oxytocin and Cortisol Levels in Dog Owners and Their Dogs Are Associated with Behavioral Patterns: An Exploratory Study2017In: Frontiers in Psychology, ISSN 1664-1078, E-ISSN 1664-1078, Vol. 8, article id 1796Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    We have previously shown that dog–owner interaction results in increasing oxytocin levels in owners and dogs, decreasing cortisol levels in owners but increasing cortisol levels in dogs. The present study aimed to further investigate whether oxytocin and cortisol levels in the previously tested owners and dogs were associated with their behaviors during the interaction experiment. Ten female volunteer dog–owners and their male Labrador dogs participated in a 60 min interaction experiment with interaction taking place during 0–3 min and blood samples for analysis of oxytocin and cortisol were collected at 0, 1, 3, 5, 15, 30, and 60 min. The entire experiment was videotaped and the following variables were noted; the different types (stroking, scratching, patting and activating touch, i.e., scratching and patting combined) as well as the frequency of touch applied by the owner, the number of times the owner touched her dog, the dog’s positions and time spent in each position. Correlations were analyzed between the behavioral variables and basal oxytocin levels, maximum oxytocin levels, delta oxytocin levels, basal cortisol levels and cortisol levels at 15 min. Owners with low oxytocin levels before and during the interaction touched their dogs more frequently (0 min: Rs = −0.683, p = 0.042; oxytocin maximum: Rs = −0.783, p = 0.013). The lower the dogs’ oxytocin levels during the interaction, the more stroking they received (Rs = −0.717, p = 0.041). The more frequently activating touch was applied by the owner, the higher the dogs’ cortisol levels became (15 min: Rs = 0.661, p = 0.038). The higher the owners’ maximum oxytocin level the fewer position changes the dogs made (Rs = −0.817, p = 0.007) and the shorter time they spent sitting (Rs = −0.786, p = 0.036), whereas the higher the owners’ basal cortisol levels, the longer time the dogs spent standing (0 min: Rs = 0.683, p = 0.041). In conclusion, oxytocin and cortisol levels, both in dogs and in their owners, are associated with the way the owners interact with their dogs and also with behaviors caused by the interaction.

  • 336.
    Povlsen, Lene
    et al.
    Unit for Health Promotion Research, University of Southern Denmark, Esbjerg, Denmark.
    Aryal, Umesh Raj
    Institute of Medicine, Department of Internal Medicine and Clinical Nutrition, Sahlgrenska Academy at University of Gothenburg, Sweden / Public Health and Environment Research Centre, Katmandu, Nepal.
    Petzold, Max
    Centre for Applied Biostatistics, Occupational and Environmental Medicine, University of Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Krettek, Alexandra
    University of Skövde, School of Health and Education. University of Skövde, Health and Education. Institute of Medicine, Department of Internal Medicine and Clinical Nutrition, Sahlgrenska Academy at University of Gothenburg, Sweden / Faculty of Health Sciences, Department of Community Medicine, UiT The Arctic University of Norway, Tromsø, Norway.
    Adolescents' knowledge and opinions about smoking: a qualitative study from the Jhaukhel-Duwakot Health Demographic Surveillance Site, Bhaktapur District, Nepal2018In: International Journal of Adolescent Medicine and Health, ISSN 0334-0139, E-ISSN 2191-0278, Vol. 30, no 1, article id 20150124Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    BACKGROUND: The use of tobacco products among adolescents in Southeast Asia represents a major public health burden. Two out of ten adolescents attending school are tobacco users and several factors influence them to initiate tobacco use. Most studies related to tobacco use are quantitative, whereas qualitative studies exploring adolescents' smoking behavior and their views, knowledge and experiences are scarce.

    OBJECTIVE: To gain a deep understanding of Nepalese adolescents' knowledge and opinions about smoking and reasons for smoking initiation.

    SUBJECTS: Adolescents from four secondary schools in the Bhaktapur district, Nepal.

    METHODS: Eight focus-group discussions were conducted with 71 adolescents aged 13-16 years and from grades 8-10. Data were analyzed using manifest qualitative content analysis.

    RESULTS: The participants knew that smoking represents health risks as well as socio-economic risks, but few described the addictive nature of tobacco and health risks related to passive smoking. Most participants related smoking initiation to the smoking behavior of peers and family members, but easy accessibility to cigarettes, ineffective rules and regulations, and exposure to passive smoking also created environments for smoking. Some expressed confidence to resist peer pressure and refuse to start smoking, but also expressed the need for prevention strategies in schools and for governmental initiatives, such as more strict implementation of tobacco control and regulations to prevent and reduce smoking.

    CONCLUSION: Curbing the tobacco epidemic in Nepal requires healthy public policies and multifaceted interventions to address the knowledge gap on health consequences associated with smoking among adolescents, teachers and parents/adults.

  • 337.
    Prättälä, Ritva
    et al.
    National Institute for Health and Welfare, Helsinki, Finland.
    Levälahti, Esko
    National Institute for Health and Welfare, Helsinki, Finland.
    Lallukka, Tea
    Finnish Institute of Occupational Health, Helsinki, Finland / Department of Public Health, University of Helsinki, Helsinki, Finland.
    Männistö, Satu
    National Institute for Health and Welfare, Helsinki, Finland.
    Paalanen, Laura
    National Institute for Health and Welfare, Helsinki, Finland.
    Raulio, Susanna
    National Institute for Health and Welfare, Helsinki, Finland.
    Roos, Eva
    Department of Public Health, University of Helsinki, Helsinki, Finland / Folkhälsan Research Center, Finland / Department of Public Health, University of Helsinki, Helsinki, Finland.
    Suominen, Sakari
    University of Skövde, School of Health and Education. University of Skövde, Health and Education. Folkhälsan Research Center, Finland / Department of Public Health, University of Helsinki, Helsinki, Finland / Department of Public Health, University of Turku, Turku, Finland.
    Mäki-Opas, Tomi
    National Institute for Health and Welfare, Helsinki, Finland.
    From margarine to butter: predictors of changing bread spread in an 11-year population follow-up2016In: Public Health Nutrition, ISSN 1368-9800, E-ISSN 1475-2727, Vol. 19, no 9, p. 1707-1717Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Objective: Finland is known for a sharp decrease in the intake of saturated fat and cardiovascular mortality. Since 2000, however, the consumption of butter-containing spreads - an important source of saturated fats - has increased. We examined social and health-related predictors of the increase among Finnish men and women. Design: An 11-year population follow-up. Setting: A representative random sample of adult Finns, invited to a health survey in 2000. Subjects: Altogether 5414 persons aged 30-64 years at baseline in 2000 were re-invited in 2011. Of men 1529 (59 %) and of women 1853 (66 %) answered the questions on bread spreads at both time points. Respondents reported the use of bread spreads by choosing one of the following alternatives: no fat, soft margarine, butter-vegetable oil mixture and butter, which were later categorized into margarine/no spread and butter/butter-vegetable oil mixture (= butter). The predictors included gender, age, marital status, education, employment status, place of residence, health behaviours, BMI and health. Multinomial regression models were fitted. Results: Of the 2582 baseline margarine/no spread users, 24.6% shifted to butter. Only a few of the baseline sociodemographic or health-related determinants predicted the change. Finnish women were more likely to change to butter than men. Living with a spouse predicted the change among men. Conclusions: The change from margarine to butter between 2000 and 2011 seemed not to be a matter of compliance with official nutrition recommendations. Further longitudinal studies on social, behavioural and motivational predictors of dietary changes are needed.

  • 338.
    Ranch, Matilda Möller
    et al.
    Neonatal Care Unit, NÄL Hospital Trollhättan, Sweden.
    Jämtén, Sofia
    Pediatric Healthcare Setting, Capio, Lysekil, Sweden.
    Thorstensson, Stina
    University of Skövde, School of Health and Education. University of Skövde, Health and Education.
    Ekström-Bergström, Anette C.
    University of Skövde, School of Health and Education. University of Skövde, Health and Education. Department of Health Sciences, University West, Sweden.
    First-Time Mothers Have a Desire to Be Offered Professional Breastfeeding Support by Pediatric Nurses: An Evaluation of the Mother-Perceived-Professional Support Scale2019In: Nursing Research and Practice, ISSN 2090-1429, E-ISSN 2090-1437, Vol. 2019, article id 8731705Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background. Although the World Health Organization recommends exclusive breastfeeding for six months, the rate of breastfeeding has decreased worldwide. Breastfeeding is the natural way of feeding a baby, but it is a process that has to be learnt. It is not unusual for problems to occur and hence support for breastfeeding is vital. The aim of this study was to explore first-time mothers' experiences of the breastfeeding support offered by pediatric nurses, as well as to develop and evaluate the Mother Perceived Support from Professionals (MoPPS) scale. Methods. A qualitative design involving both inductive and deductive approaches was chosen. Nine first-time mothers were interviewed regarding their experiences of the breastfeeding support offered by pediatric nurses. Semistructured interviews were conducted. The mothers were also asked to grade their experiences of breastfeeding support on the MoPPS scale. A qualitative content analysis was applied when analyzing the data obtained using both the inductive (interviews) and deductive (MoPPS scale) approaches. Results. The results revealed that the mothers felt the desire to breastfeed, although they all experienced some difficulties. They wanted the pediatric nurses to be perceptive and provide professional support based on their own experiences. When the pediatric nurses took time and booked extra appointments, the mothers felt supported. The inductive analysis resulted in one theme: When wanting to breastfeed, mothers have a desire to be offered professional breastfeeding support. Two main categories were identified, namely Mothers wanted but lacked breastfeeding support and Mothers received professional support. The deductive analysis of the MoPPS scale showed similar results, and the questions were perceived as relevant to the aim. The mothers considered it important that the pediatric nurses had sufficient knowledge about breastfeeding. It was also considered important that the pediatric nurses involved the mothers' partners in the breastfeeding support. Therefore, we suggest that these areas should be included in the MoPPS scale for pediatric nurses. Conclusions. The MoPPS scale can be a useful tool for helping pediatric nurses to offer mothers professional breastfeeding support. Indeed, when offering breastfeeding support, pediatric nurses can use the items included on the MoPPS scale as guidance.

  • 339.
    Risal, Sanjiv
    et al.
    Department of Physiology and Pharmacology, Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Pei, Yu
    Department of Physiology and Pharmacology, Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden / Center for Molecular Medicine, Karolinska University Hospital, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Lu, Haojiang
    Department of Physiology and Pharmacology, Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Manti, Maria
    Department of Physiology and Pharmacology, Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Fornes, Romina
    Department of Physiology and Pharmacology, Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Pui, Han-Pin
    Department of Physiology and Pharmacology, Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Zhao, Zhiyi
    Department of Physiology and Pharmacology, Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden / Department of Gynecology, Shandong Provincial Qianfoshan Hospital, Jinan, China.
    Massart, Julie
    Department of Molecular Medicine and Surgery, Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Ohlsson, Claes
    Centre for Bone and Arthritis Research, Department of Internal Medicine and Clinical Nutrition, Institute of Medicine, Sahlgrenska Academy, University of Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Lindgren, Eva
    Department of Physiology and Pharmacology, Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Crisosto, Nicolas
    Endocrinology and Metabolism Laboratory, West Division, School of Medicine, University of Chile, Carlos Schachtebeck 299, Santiago, Chile / Endocrinology Unit, Clinica Las Condes, Santiago, Chile.
    Maliqueo, Manuel
    Endocrinology and Metabolism Laboratory, West Division, School of Medicine, University of Chile, Santiago, Chile.
    Echiburú, Barbara
    Endocrinology and Metabolism Laboratory, West Division, School of Medicine, University of Chile, Santiago, Chile.
    Ladrón de Guevara, Amanda
    Endocrinology and Metabolism Laboratory, West Division, School of Medicine, University of Chile, Santiago, Chile.
    Sir-Petermann, Teresa
    Endocrinology and Metabolism Laboratory, West Division, School of Medicine, University of Chile, Santiago, Chile.
    Larsson, Henrik
    Department of Medical Epidemiology and Biostatistics, Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden / School of Medical Sciences, Örebro University, Örebro, Sweden.
    Rosenqvist, Mina A.
    Department of Medical Epidemiology and Biostatistics, Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Cesta, Carolyn E.
    Department of Medicine, Solna, Centre for Pharmacoepidemiology, Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Benrick, Anna
    University of Skövde, School of Health and Education. University of Skövde, Health and Education. Department of Physiology, Sahlgrenska Academy, University of Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Deng, Qiaolin
    Department of Physiology and Pharmacology, Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden / Center for Molecular Medicine, Karolinska University Hospital, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Stener-Victorin, Elisabet
    Department of Physiology and Pharmacology, Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Prenatal androgen exposure and transgenerational susceptibility to polycystic ovary syndrome2019In: Nature Medicine, ISSN 1078-8956, E-ISSN 1546-170X, Vol. 25, no 12, p. 1894-1904Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    How obesity and elevated androgen levels in women with polycystic ovary syndrome (PCOS) affect their offspring is unclear. In a Swedish nationwide register-based cohort and a clinical case-control study from Chile, we found that daughters of mothers with PCOS were more likely to be diagnosed with PCOS. Furthermore, female mice (F0) with PCOS-like traits induced by late-gestation injection of dihydrotestosterone, with and without obesity, produced female F1-F3 offspring with PCOS-like reproductive and metabolic phenotypes. Sequencing of single metaphase II oocytes from F1-F3 offspring revealed common and unique altered gene expression across all generations. Notably, four genes were also differentially expressed in serum samples from daughters in the case-control study and unrelated women with PCOS. Our findings provide evidence of transgenerational effects in female offspring of mothers with PCOS and identify possible candidate genes for the prediction of a PCOS phenotype in future generations.

  • 340.
    Rodin, Lika
    University of Skövde, School of Health and Education. University of Skövde, Health and Education.
    Biopolitics, Border Management and the Frame of Humanization of 'Total Institutions': Experiences and Representations of Swedish Immigrant Detention2016In: Zhurnal Issledovanii Sotsial'noi Politiki / The Journal of Social Policy Studies, ISSN 1727-0634, Vol. 14, no 2, p. 275-290Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This study addresses the issue of international migration and border management. Specifically, it focuses on the phenomenon of immigrant detention within a framework of humanizing closed institutions. With the help of structural semiotics, I examine the widely debated documentary 'Detained' (2015), which explores sociality unfolding in a detention centre in southern Sweden. I scrutinize four categories of film characters and their interrelationships. Giorgio Agamben's conception of biopolitics is used to interpret the study results. This theory highlights the fundamental vulnerability of detained non-citizens and explains this as a result of disruption in the linkages between 'natural life' and politics, which grounds the system of modern sovereignty. I argue the film should be recognized as a critique of biopolitical border regulation. It demonstrates that attempts to improve the detention system and its practices along the lines of a more civic model are both fundamentally undermined by the contradictory nature of the confinement ideology and insufficient as long as the very legitimacy of detention as a part of border control remains uncontested. On the one hand, custodial humanism is always fragmented by the organizational priorities of effectiveness and security. On the other hand, the sociality of staff-detainees is deeply framed by the overall regime of border management. As representatives of social activists, the film's producers are sensitive to the limited effects of the humanization project and attempt to mobilize public opinion to contest practices of policing irregular migration. The study concludes with an emphasis on the need for further research on civil society's response to the recent immigrant crises and its related policies.

  • 341.
    Rodin, Lika
    University of Skövde, School of Health and Education. University of Skövde, Health and Education.
    From othering to belonging: Integration politics, social intervention and the limits of cultural ideology2017In: Zhurnal Issledovanii Sotsial'noi Politiki / The Journal of Social Policy Studies, ISSN 1727-0634, Vol. 15, no 4, p. 603-616Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    With the shift of political discourse in the European Union away from the idea of multiculturalism, the notion of 'civic integration', frequently accompanied by the language of cultural differences, has become prominent in policies and social interventions. This study explores the experiences of an integration project entitled 'Cultural Friend Tibro', initiated in Western Sweden by local authorities. The main idea of the project is to bring together representatives of different cultural groups - immigrants and local residents - and facilitate the development of friendship-like relationships. Mutual learning, exchange and joy are especially emphasised as a means to overcoming prejudices and social divisions. No specific requirements in terms of ethnicity are demanded of the participants: local residents involved in the project are not expected to be of Swedish origin. Instead, the requirement is that they possess sufficient knowledge of Swedish culture and society. Both categories of participants are considered 'cultural friends'. The procedure of 'matching' newly arrived and 'established Swedes' is hoped to initiate interpersonal interactions. Matching couples individuals or families is done with reference to gender, family situation and possible common interests or hobbies. It is left to the participants themselves to decide whether they would like to develop further relationships. In spite of the seemingly open and friendly format initially promoted by the project organisers, practices of estrangement ('othering') have surfaced in participant reflections on how the project was implemented. In this study, I identify and critically examine manifestations of othering as an effect of employing the notion of culture in the project's rhetoric, as well as possible ways by which participants may spontaneously destabilise the constructed cultural boundaries. This case study is built on the analysis of multiple sources, including ten semi-structured interviews with project participants, inquiries with the project leader, analysis of project documents and advertisements and social media materials.

  • 342.
    Rodin, Lika
    University of Skövde, School of Health and Education. University of Skövde, Health and Education.
    "Governmentality" in the Clinical Context: The Paradoxes of Humanization of Healthcare in Sweden2015In: Zhurnal Issledovanii Sotsial'noi Politiki / The Journal of Social Policy Studies, ISSN 1727-0634, Vol. 13, no 4, p. 643-656Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The humanization of healthcare provision is a vibrant topic in academic and public discussions. Sweden has pioneered innovative educational policies seeking to forge commitment among a new generation of doctors to a "patient-centred" approach. In accordance with Michel Foucault's theoretical elaborations, this study takes the discourse of humanization to be a feature of politico-economic regulation or governing, and measures the adherence of doctors to this humanization project. Conducted in western and southern Sweden among practitioners in public primary and specialized care, the survey confirmed the importance of patient-centeredness at the level of doctors' rhetoric, self-reflection and in self-reported clinical practice. Additionally, another discourse shaping the collective professional "mentality" - the discourse of economic efficiency - emerged from the collected data, potentially destabilizing the effects of humanization.

  • 343.
    Rodin, Lika
    University of Skövde, School of Health and Education. University of Skövde, Health and Education.
    Horizons of sustainability and individual ethics: The case of the International Space Station2019In: Zhurnal Issledovanii Sotsial'noi Politiki / The Journal of Social Policy Studies, ISSN 1727-0634, Vol. 17, no 2, p. 293-306Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Sustainability is a hot topic in contemporary politics both nationally and internationally. While the current framing of sustainability promoted at the international level favours social policies, doubts about their possible success are growing. If social aspirations are not realised, technological solutions to ecological problems might appear to be the only options. This study contributes to the field of sociology of the future. It explores and problematizes the technologically-oriented approach to sustainability. I consider a radical case of sustainable living – a spacecraft – looking at the emerging challenges to individual human ethics and the general order of sociality. More specifically, the largest contemporary manned space project, the International Space Station (ISS), is taken into analytical focus. With the help of the Foucauldian notion of governmentality, I examine routines and discourses related to the utilization of the life support system at the ISS in regard to human conduct, both terrestrial and extra-terrestrial. Mass-media materials comprise a large part of the dataset for this research. As demonstrated, techno-functionalism characterizes sustainability as governmental rationality. It imposes a subordination of individual human actors to the general order driven by systemic objectives frequently framed in pragmatic and technical terms. Specific practices, including ethically controversial ones, might be requested from individual humans in the name of the system’s stability and efficiency. Those practices are naturalized and normalized within a truth regime constituted by scientific discourse, the authority of experts, media events and the related public discussions.

  • 344.
    Rodin, Lika
    University of Skövde, School of Health and Education. University of Skövde, Health and Education.
    Robo-Revolution: A Marxist Approach to Social Uprising in the High-Tech Age2019In: Sociologiceskoe Obozrenie, ISSN 1728-192X, Vol. 18, no 3, p. 224-244Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    With the increasing role of technological agents in contemporary society, questions surrounding the future of socio-economic organization are intensely debated. A variety of predictions have been made, ranging from conservative views that emphasize the gradual integration of techno-actors into human social collectives to radical outlooks that assume the inevitability of a dramatic historic break This study employs the method of simulation, exploring the ongoing path towards automation with the help of classical Marxism. It seeks to understand whether robots and artificial intelligence (AI) might become new value producers and a revolutionary social class. As demonstrated, the continuity of capitalist relationships may facilitate the formation of new social groups and recast class-based political agendas.

  • 345.
    Rodin, Lika
    University of Skövde, School of Health and Education. University of Skövde, Health and Education.
    Studies on Governmentality: Six Epistemological Pitfalls2017In: Sotsiologicheskoe Obozrenie, ISSN 1728-192X, Vol. 16, no 2, p. 9-28Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The notion of governmentality, developed in the works of Michel Foucault, is actively employed across academic disciplines. Reviewing the secondary literature, this paper specifies and systematizes some particularities of Foucault's theoretical account which are reflected in contemporary studies on governmentality. Six latent epistemological obstacles in research on governmentality are described-the essentialization of power; the impossibility of agency and counteraction; latent idealism; the inconsistent presentation of governmentality; the shortage of explanatory perspective on the micro-macro linkage; and a vanishing critical standpoint-to stimulate an academic discussion on possible methodological insights capable of overcoming some of those difficulties. Those limitations are seen to be immanent in Foucault's overall theoretical account rather than the effects of deviation from it. Examples of studies associated with the fields of international relations and sociology support the central arguments of the paper. As demonstrated, the regrounding of a Foucault-inspired analysis of power in the updated version of historical materialism might have the potential to ensure rigor in governmentality research and redefine its critical intent. Further, a consensus is needed on the fundamental notions of governmentality studies to stabilize the research agenda. Recognizing the importance of Foucault's overall contribution to the understanding of contemporary phenomena and practices, scholars need to acknowledge its conceptual and social limitations.

  • 346.
    Rodin, Lika
    et al.
    University of Skövde, School of Health and Education. University of Skövde, Health and Education.
    Rodin, Andre
    Department of Social Work, University of Gothenburg, Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Brunke, Susanne
    Komvux Adult Education, Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Language training and well-being for qualified migrants in Sweden2017In: International Journal of Migration, Health and Social Care, ISSN 1747-9894, E-ISSN 2042-8650, Vol. 13, no 2, p. 220-233Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Purpose - The purpose of this paper is to examine the role of "Korta Vagen" (The short cut), a targeted language program for qualified migrants in Sweden, in self-maintaining, well-being and perspectives for socio-economic integration for foreigners with academic diploma. Design/methodology/approach - In-class observations, individual semi-structured interviews, focus-group interviews and written essays were used for data collection. A thematic analysis was applied as a method of data analysis. Amartya Sen's capability approach constituted a theoretical framework of the research discussion. Findings - Korta Vagen provides various resources for the participants, some of which (language training and internship) can become real advantages for employment. Others (IT, interview training and CV writing) are less translatable into concrete outcomes. The study suggests that satisfaction with the program is modulated by commitment to one's professional identity, initial language proficiency, scope of cultural knowledge, the participants' goals and the flexibility of the training offered. The acculturation frame of the program does not necessarily correspond with the objective need of many participants for quick entry into the labor market. Originality/value - Insights into the social-psychological aspects of targeted language training as a measure for socio-economic integration can serve to enhance educational and institutional policies and professional practice.

  • 347.
    Roos, John Magnus
    et al.
    University of Skövde, School of Health and Education. University of Skövde, Health and Education. Veryday, Sweden / University of Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Kajonius, Petri
    University of Skövde, School of Health and Education. University of Skövde, Health and Education. University College West, Sweden / University of Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Non-verbal personality assessment with 10 cartoon-like portrayals2015In: ECPA 13th European Conference on Psychological Assessment, Zurich, July 22-25, 2015: Book of abstracts / [ed] Willibald Ruch, 2015, p. 78-79Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This paper describes a non-verbal personality assessment that consists of 10 cartoon-like portrayals, one for each factor in the five-factor model of personality and their counterparts (i.e. open-minded, conscientious, extravert, agreeable, and neurotic; versus close-minded, impulsive, introvert, antagonistic, and emotionally stable). The assessment has been constructed in collaboration with graphic designers at an international top-ranking design and innovation agency, Veryday. Unlike existing personality assessments, this assessment is developed for interviews and combines the respondent´s perceived self and ideal self rather than only focusing on the ECPA13 Zurich 79 Paper Sessions respondent´s self-reported perceived self. The aim of the assessment is to provide insight into gaps that reside in incongruity between the respondent´s perceived self and ideal self and thereafter focusing the interview on how to bridge the gap(s). The portrayals have been validated through 156 undergraduate students at Stockholm University. The content validity was verified via tag clouds of top-of-mind words and the criterion validity was verified via the verbal assessment criterion, HP5i. The preliminary analyses are promising in terms of reshaping and adjusting established personality assessments into non-verbal tools for interview settings in therapy and user-studies. However, the assessment need to be further validated and discussed with experts in the field of psychological assessments.

  • 348.
    Roos, John Magnus
    et al.
    University of Skövde, School of Health and Education. University of Skövde, Health and Education. Centre for Consumer Research, University of Gothenburg, Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Kazemi, Ali
    University of Skövde, School of Health and Education. University of Skövde, Health and Education.
    Personality traits and Internet usage across generation cohorts: Insights from a nationally representative study2018In: Current Psychology, ISSN 1046-1310, E-ISSN 1936-4733Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Studies examining the relationship between personality and Internet usage have usually used small and non-representative samples. In the present study, we examine the relationship between the Five Factor Model of Personality and Internet usage in a large nationally representative Swedish sample (N = 1694). Neuroticism was negatively associated with overall Internet usage, whereas extraversion and openness to experience were shown to be positively associated with overall Internet usage. However, exploring these associations across categories of Internet usage and generation cohorts revealed some other interesting patterns. Specifically, neuroticism was negatively associated with using the Internet for activities relating to information and duties but not for leisure and social activities. Extraversion was positively associated with using the Internet for leisure and social activities among DotNets (born 1977–1999), whereas among Dutifuls (born 1910–1945) and Baby Boomers (born 1946–1964) extraversion was positively associated with using the Internet for information and duty activities. Openness to experience was positively associated with Internet usage but only among Baby Boomers. Conscientiousness was a significant predictor of Internet usage only for DotNets and GenXers (born 1965–1976). In these cohorts, conscientiousness was positively associated with using the Internet for information and duty activities but negatively associated with using the Internet for leisure and social activities. Apparently, understanding the relationship between personality and Internet usage is not possible without considering the modifying role of categories of Internet usage and generation cohorts. The implications of the results for theory and practice are discussed in detail.

  • 349.
    Roos, Magnus
    University of Skövde, School of Health and Education. University of Skövde, Health and Education. University of Gothenburg, Sweden.
    The winner takes IT all: Swedish digital divides in global internet usage2018In: Digital Transformation and Global Society / [ed] Daniel A. Alexandrov, Alexander V. Boukhanovsky, Andrei V. Chugunov, Yury Kabanov, Olessia Koltsova, Springer Verlag , 2018, Vol. 859, p. 3-18Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In the present study, we examined the influence of personality factors and demographic factors on Internet usage. Personality was defined from the Five Factor Model of personality in terms of Openness, Conscientiousness, Extraversion, Agreeableness, and Neuroticism, while demographic factors were defined as gender, age and socioeconomic status (e.g. income and educational attainment). The results from a large, representative Swedish sample (N = 1,694) show that global Internet usage can be explained by a high degree of Extraversion, young age and high socioeconomic status. Our findings are consistent with some previous studies, but in contrast with others. We discuss contrasting results in terms of different study designs, cultures and time periods of Internet development. The results are discussed in terms of the “rich get richer model” and digital divides, and what broader implication our findings might have for society. The study may help facilitate our understanding regarding future challenges in the Internet design. 

  • 350.
    Roos, Magnus
    et al.
    University of Skövde, School of Health and Education. University of Skövde, Health and Education. Centre for Consumer Science, University of Gothenburg, Sweden / Department of Business Administration and Textile Management, University of Borås, Sweden.
    Kajonius, Petri J.
    Department of Social and Behavioural Studies, University West, Sweden.
    Expert validity on non-verbal personality characters2017In: 14th Conference on Psychological Assessment, July 5-8, 2017, Lisbon, Portugal: Book of Abstracts / [ed] Paula Ferreira, Aristides Ferreira, Inês Afonso, & Ana Margarida Veiga Simão, Lisbon: Faculty of Psychology of the University of Lisbon , 2017, p. 81-Conference paper (Refereed)
456789 301 - 350 of 444
CiteExportLink to result list
Permanent link
Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf