his.sePublications
Change search
Refine search result
3456789 251 - 300 of 444
CiteExportLink to result list
Permanent link
Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf
Rows per page
  • 5
  • 10
  • 20
  • 50
  • 100
  • 250
Sort
  • Standard (Relevance)
  • Author A-Ö
  • Author Ö-A
  • Title A-Ö
  • Title Ö-A
  • Publication type A-Ö
  • Publication type Ö-A
  • Issued (Oldest first)
  • Issued (Newest first)
  • Created (Oldest first)
  • Created (Newest first)
  • Last updated (Oldest first)
  • Last updated (Newest first)
  • Disputation date (earliest first)
  • Disputation date (latest first)
  • Standard (Relevance)
  • Author A-Ö
  • Author Ö-A
  • Title A-Ö
  • Title Ö-A
  • Publication type A-Ö
  • Publication type Ö-A
  • Issued (Oldest first)
  • Issued (Newest first)
  • Created (Oldest first)
  • Created (Newest first)
  • Last updated (Oldest first)
  • Last updated (Newest first)
  • Disputation date (earliest first)
  • Disputation date (latest first)
Select
The maximal number of hits you can export is 250. When you want to export more records please use the Create feeds function.
  • 251.
    Klaar, Susanne
    et al.
    University of Skövde, School of Health and Education. University of Skövde, Health and Education. School of Humanities, Education and Social Sciences, Örebro University, Sweden.
    Öhman, Johan
    School of Humanities, Education and Social Sciences, Örebro University, Sweden.
    Children's meaning-making of nature in an outdoor-oriented and democratic Swedish preschool practice2014In: European Early Childhood Education Research Journal, ISSN 1350-293X, E-ISSN 1752-1807, Vol. 22, no 2, p. 229-253Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Previous research has shown that the Swedish preschool educational tradition is characterised by outdoor-oriented and democratic approaches. The purpose of this study is to empirically investigate what consequences these approaches have for preschool children's meaning-making of nature, when studied in practice, in children's spontaneous outdoor activities. The methodology is based on John Dewey's pragmatism with a specific focus on transaction, habits and customs. A transactional analysis method has been developed to fulfil the purpose of the investigation. The analysis illuminates relations between: (1) the Swedish preschool's educational tradition in terms of national customs; and (2) the local customs expressed in practice. Fifty-seven events were chosen for further analysis including play with water and sand, and sliding on snow. Consequences for children's meaning-making of nature are shown as possibilities for experience-based inquiry based on children's own choices and also for enjoying and feeling good in nature. The results show fewer possibilities for scientific concept learning. The results can thus be seen as a contribution to the early childhood educational discussion about how to arrange learning situations of natural phenomena and processes in preschools and at the same time maintain their democratic/outdoor-oriented characteristics.

  • 252.
    Klaeson, Kicki
    et al.
    University of Skövde, School of Health and Education. University of Skövde, Health and Education. Skaraborgs Hospital, Department of Oncology, Skövde, Sweden.
    Berglund, Mia
    University of Skövde, School of Health and Education. University of Skövde, Health and Education.
    Gustavsson, Susanne
    University of Skövde, School of Health and Education. University of Skövde, Health and Education.
    The character of nursing students' critical reflection at the end of their education2017In: Journal of Nursing Education and Practice, ISSN 1925-4040, E-ISSN 1925-4059, Vol. 7, no 5, p. 55-61Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: In nursing education, theoretical and practical knowledge are intertwined and integrated in the prospective nurses’ lifeworld. To enable this, and to develop a critical reflective approach, students should adopt a critical attitude. This study aims to gain a deeper understanding of the character of prospective nurses’ critical reflection.

    Methods: This is a descriptive qualitative study. Data were gathered using written narratives, individual and focus group interviews. Qualitative content analysis was employed.

    Results: Three themes were identified: being open to changes, distancing oneself, and challenging one’s understanding. In the first theme, students’ critical reflection was expressed through an openness to changes of self-perception and openness to professional development during the education. In the second theme, critical reflection was identified as variations on distancetaking.

    Inserting distance from a direct experience makes the experience easier to process, understand and relate to the learner’s concept of nursing. In the third theme, courage to question what was taken for granted is identified as a necessity to challenging self-understanding and willingness to engage in uncertainty.

    Conclusions: It would appear that the academic part of training, with the possibility of reflection in small groups, provides students with conceptual tools for reflective learning as well as giving them the opportunity to relate critically to professional practice and to the professional nurse role.

  • 253.
    Klaeson, Kicki
    et al.
    University of Skövde, School of Health and Education. University of Skövde, Health and Education. Oncology Department, Skaraborgs hospital, Sweden.
    Hovlin, Lina
    Home care, Skara Municipality, Skara, Sweden .
    Guvå, Hanna
    Psychiatric Department, Skaraborgs hospital, Sweden.
    Kjellsdotter, Anna
    University of Skövde, Health and Education. University of Skövde, School of Health and Education.
    Sexual Health in Primary Healthcare: A Qualitative Study of Nurses' Experiences2017In: Journal of Clinical Nursing, ISSN 0962-1067, E-ISSN 1365-2702, Vol. 26, no 11-12, p. 1545-1554Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Aim and objectives: To illuminate nurses’ experiences and opportunities to discuss sexual health with patients in primary healthcare.

    Background: Sexual health is a concept associated with many taboos and research shows that nurses feel uncomfortable talking to patients about sexual health and therefore avoid it. This avoidance forms a barrier between patient and nurse which prevents nurses from giving satisfactory healthcare to patients.

    Design: A qualitative descriptive design.

    Method: Semi-structured interviews were conducted with nine nurses in primary healthcare in Sweden. Data were analysed by using qualitative content analysis.

    Results: During the analysis phase, five subcategories and two main categories were identified. The two main categories were: “Factors that influence nurses’ opportunities to talk to patients about sexual health” and “Nurses’ experiences of talking to patients about sexual health”. Social norms in society were an obstacle for health professionals’ opportunities to feel comfortable and act professionally. The nurses’ personal attitude and knowledge were of great significance in determining if they brought up the topic of sexual health or not. The nurses found it easier to bring up the topic of sexual health with middle-aged men with for example diabetes. One reason for this is that they found it easier to talk to male patients. A further reason is the fact that they had received training in discussing matters of sexual health in relation to diabetes and other conditions affecting sexual health.

    Conclusion: Nurses in primary care express the necessity of additional education and knowledge on the subject of sexual health. The healthcare organization must be reformed to put focus on sexual health.

    Relevance for clinical practiceGuidelines for addressing the topic of sexual health must be implemented to establish conditions that will increase nurse's knowledge and provide them with the necessary tools for discussing sexual health with patients.

  • 254.
    Kokosar, Milana
    et al.
    Department of Physiology, Institute of Neuroscience and Physiology, Sahlgrenska Academy, University of Gothenburg, Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Benrick, Anna
    University of Skövde, School of Health and Education. University of Skövde, Health and Education. Department of Physiology, Institute of Neuroscience and Physiology, Sahlgrenska Academy, University of Gothenburg, Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Perfilyev, Alexander
    Epigenetics and Diabetes, Department of Clinical Sciences, Lund University Diabetes Centre, Lund University, Clinical Research Centre, Scania University Hospital, Malmö, Sweden.
    Nilsson, Emma
    Epigenetics and Diabetes, Department of Clinical Sciences, Lund University Diabetes Centre, Lund University, Clinical Research Centre, Scania University Hospital, Malmö, Sweden.
    Källman, Thomas
    Department of Medical Biochemistry and Microbiology, NBIS - National Bioinformatics Infrastructure Sweden, SciLifeLab, Uppsala University, Uppsala, Sweden.
    Ohlsson, Claes
    Centre for Bone and Arthritis Research, Department of Internal Medicine and Clinical Nutrition, Institute of Medicine, Sahlgrenska Academy, University of Gothenburg, Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Ling, Charlotte
    Epigenetics and Diabetes, Department of Clinical Sciences, Lund University Diabetes Centre, Lund University, Clinical Research Centre, Scania University Hospital, Malmö, Sweden.
    Stener-Victorin, Elisabet
    Department of Physiology and Pharmacology, Karolinska Institutet, 17177, Stockholm, Sweden.
    A Single Bout of Electroacupuncture Remodels Epigenetic and Transcriptional Changes in Adipose Tissue in Polycystic Ovary Syndrome2018In: Scientific Reports, ISSN 2045-2322, E-ISSN 2045-2322, Vol. 8, article id 1878Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    A single bout of electroacupuncture results in muscle contractions and increased whole body glucose uptake in women with polycystic ovary syndrome (PCOS). Women with PCOS have transcriptional and epigenetic alterations in the adipose tissue and we hypothesized that electroacupuncture induces epigenetic and transcriptional changes to restore metabolic alterations. Twenty-one women with PCOS received a single bout of electroacupuncture, which increased the whole body glucose uptake. In subcutaneous adipose tissue biopsies, we identified treatment-induced expression changes of 2369 genes (Q < 0.05) and DNA methylation changes of 7055 individual genes (Q = 0.11). The largest increase in expression was observed for FOSB (2405%), and the largest decrease for LOC100128899 (54%). The most enriched pathways included Acute phase response signaling and LXR/RXR activation. The DNA methylation changes ranged from 1-16%, and 407 methylation sites correlated with gene expression. Among genes known to be differentially expressed in PCOS, electroacupuncture reversed the expression of 80 genes, including PPAR gamma and ADIPOR2. Changes in the expression of Nr4 alpha 2 and Junb are reversed by adrenergic blockers in rats demonstrating that changes in gene expression, in part, is due to activation of the sympathetic nervous system. In conclusion, low-frequency electroacupuncture with muscle contractions remodels epigenetic and transcriptional changes that elicit metabolic improvement.

  • 255.
    Koponen, Anne M.
    et al.
    University of Helsinki, Finland / Folkhälsan Research Center, Finland.
    Simonsen, Nina
    University of Helsinki, Finland / Folkhälsan Research Center, Finland.
    Laamanen, Ritva
    University of Helsinki, Finland / Folkhälsan Research Center, Finland.
    Suominen, Sakari
    University of Skövde, School of Health and Education. University of Skövde, Health and Education. Folkhälsan Research Center, Finland / University of Turku, Finland.
    Health-care climate, perceived self-care competence, and glycemic control among patients with type 2 diabetes in primary care2015In: Health Psychology Open, ISSN 2055-1029, Vol. 2, no 1Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This study showed, in line with self-determination theory, that glycemic control among patients with type 2 diabetes (n=2866) was strongly associated with perceived self-care competence, which in turn was associated with autonomous motivation and autonomy-supportive health-care climate. These associations remained after adjusting for the effect of important life-context factors. Autonomous motivation partially mediated the effect of health-care climate on perceived competence, which fully mediated the effect of autonomous motivation on glycemic control. The results of the study emphasize health-care personnel's important role in supporting patients' autonomous motivation and perceived self-care competence.

  • 256.
    Koponen, Anne M.
    et al.
    Folkhälsan Research Center, Finland / University of Helsinki, Finland.
    Simonsen, Nina
    Folkhälsan Research Center, Finland / University of Helsinki, Finland.
    Suominen, Sakari
    University of Skövde, School of Health and Education. University of Skövde, Health and Education. University of Turku, Finland.
    How to promote fruits, vegetables, and berries intake among patients with type 2 diabetes in primary care?: A self-determination theory perspective2019In: Health Psychology Open, E-ISSN 2055-1029, Vol. 6, no 1Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The results of this study showed the importance of autonomous motivation for healthy eating. Autonomous motivation and female gender were the determinants most strongly associated with fruits, vegetables, and berries intake among patients with type 2 diabetes. Other determinants of fruits, vegetables, and berries intake were high education, high social support, high age, and a strong sense of coherence. Autonomous motivation and self-care competence mediated the effect of perceived autonomy support from a physician on fruits, vegetables, and berries intake. Thus, physicians can promote patients’ fruits, vegetables, and berries intake by supporting their autonomous motivation and self-care competence. The results are in line with self-determination theory.

  • 257.
    Koponen, Anne M.
    et al.
    Folkhälsan Research Center and Department of Public Health, University of Helsinki, Finland.
    Simonsen, Nina
    Folkhälsan Research Center and Department of Public Health, University of Helsinki, Finland.
    Suominen, Sakari
    University of Skövde, School of Health and Education. University of Skövde, Health and Education. Department of Public Health, University of Turku, Finland.
    Success in increasing physical activity (PA) among patients with type 2 diabetes: a self-determination theory perspective2018In: Health Psychology and Behavioral Medicine, ISSN 2164-2850, Vol. 6, no 1, p. 104-119Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: Increased physical activity (PA) is crucial for achieving and maintaining glycemic control and is beneficial for overall well-being of patients with type 2 diabetes as well. Despite that, many patients fail to make changes in their exercise behavior. Self-determination theory (SDT) addresses this problem and suggests that perceived autonomy support, autonomous motivation and self-care competence play a key role in the process of health behavior change. This study investigated the impact of these three factors on success in increasing PA among patients with type 2 diabetes but considered also the role of other important life-context factors, such as mental health, stress and social support. The effect of these other factors may outweigh the effect of SDT constructs; however, previous studies based on SDT have largely overlooked them. Methods: This cross-sectional mail survey was carried out in 2011. Out of 2866 respondents, those who had been over 2 years in care in their present and principal primary care health center and had during the past two years tried to increase PA either with or without success (n = 1256, mean age 63 years, 52% men), were included in this study. Logistic regression and mediation analyses were the main methods used in the data analysis. Results: Autonomous motivation predicted success in increasing PA even after controlling for the effect of other important life-context factors. Other predictors of success were felt energy, good perceived health, younger age and less social support. Autonomous motivation mediated the effect of perceived autonomy support from a doctor on success in increasing PA. Conclusion: The results were in line with SDT showing the importance of autonomous motivation for success in increasing PA. Doctor-patient relationships and lifestyle interventions should focus on promoting self-motivated reasons for health behavior change.

  • 258.
    Kovalenko, Anton A.
    et al.
    The Arctic University of Norway, Tromsø, Norway / Northern State Medical University, Arkhangelsk, Russia.
    Anda, Erik Eik
    The Arctic University of Norway, Tromsø, Norway.
    Odland, Jon Øyvind
    The Arctic University of Norway, Tromsø, Norway.
    Nieboer, Evert
    McMaster University, Hamilton, ON, Canada.
    Brenn, Tormod
    The Arctic University of Norway, Tromsø, Norway.
    Krettek, Alexandra
    University of Skövde, School of Health and Education. University of Skövde, Health and Education. The Arctic University of Norway, Tromsø, Norway / Sahlgrenska Academy at University of Gothenburg, Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Risk Factors for Ventricular Septal Defects in Murmansk County, Russia: A Registry-Based Study2018In: International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health, ISSN 1661-7827, E-ISSN 1660-4601, Vol. 15, no 7, article id E1320Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Cardiovascular malformations are one of the most common birth defects among newborns and constitute a leading cause of perinatal and infant mortality. Although some risk factors are recognized, the causes of cardiovascular malformations (CVMs) remain largely unknown. In this study, we aim to identify risk factors for ventricular septal defects (VSDs) in Northwest Russia. The study population included singleton births registered in the Murmansk County Birth Registry (MCBR) between 1 January 2006 and 31 December 2011. Infants with a diagnosis of VSD in the MCBR and/or in the Murmansk Regional Congenital Defects Registry (up to two years post-delivery) constituted the study sample. Among the 52,253 infants born during the study period there were 744 cases of septal heart defects (SHDs), which corresponds to a prevalence of 14.2 [95% confidence interval (CI) of 13.2⁻15.3] per 1000 infants. Logistic regression analyses were carried out to identify VSD risk factors. Increased risk of VSDs was observed among infants born to mothers who abused alcohol [OR = 4.83; 95% CI 1.88⁻12.41], or smoked during pregnancy [OR = 1.35; 95% CI 1.02⁻1.80]. Maternal diabetes mellitus was also a significant risk factor [OR = 8.72; 95% CI 3.16⁻24.07], while maternal age, body mass index, folic acid and multivitamin intake were not associated with increased risk. Overall risks of VSDs for male babies were lower [OR = 0.67; 95% CI 0.52⁻0.88].

  • 259.
    Kovalenko, Anton A.
    et al.
    Department of Community Medicine, UiT -The Arctic University of Norway, Tromsø, Norway / International School of Public Health, Northern State Medical University, Arkhangelsk, Russia.
    Brenn, Tormod
    Department of Community Medicine, UiT -The Arctic University of Norway, Tromsø, Norway.
    Odland, Jon Øyvind
    Department of Community Medicine, UiT -The Arctic University of Norway, Tromsø, Norway.
    Nieboer, Evert
    Department of Biochemistry and Biomedical Sciences, McMaster University, Hamilton, ON, Canada.
    Krettek, Alexandra
    University of Skövde, School of Health and Education. University of Skövde, Health and Education. Department of Community Medicine, UiT -The Arctic University of Norway, Tromsø, Norway / Department of Internal Medicine and Clinical Nutrition, Institute of Medicine, Sahlgrenska Academy at University of Gothenburg, Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Anda, Erik Eik
    Department of Community Medicine, UiT -The Arctic University of Norway, Tromsø, Norway.
    Risk Factors for hypospadias in Northwest Russia: A Murmansk County Birth Registry Study2019In: PLoS ONE, ISSN 1932-6203, E-ISSN 1932-6203, Vol. 14, no 4, article id e0214213Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    BACKGROUND: Hypospadias is the most common congenital anomaly of the penis, but its causes are mainly unknown. Of the risk factors identified, the most plausible are hormonal and genetic. The aim of this study was to identify risk factors for hypospadias in Northwest Russia based on registry data.

    METHODS: The study population included male infants registered in the Murmansk County Birth Registry between 1 January 2006 and 31 December 2011 (n = 25 475). These infants were followed-up for 2 years using the Murmansk Regional Congenital Defects Registry to identify cases of hypospadias not diagnosed at birth. We used logistic regression analysis to examine the contributions of hypospadias risk factors.

    RESULTS: Out of 25 475 male infants born during the study period, 148 had isolated hypospadias. The overall prevalence rate was 54.2 (95% CI 53.6-54.8) per 10 000 male infants. Those born to mothers with preeclampsia (OR = 1.65; 95% CI 1.03-2.66) or infant birthweight < 2500 g (OR = 2.06; 95% CI 1.18-3.60) exhibited increased risk for hypospadias. Maternal age, smoking during pregnancy, folic acid intake during pregnancy or hepatitis B surface antigen positivity did not associate with increased risk of hypospadias.

    CONCLUSIONS: Combining data from a birth registry with those from a congenital defects registry provided optimal information about the prevalence of hypospadias and its association with low infant birthweight and preeclampsia. These factors have in common changes in hormone levels during pregnancy, which in turn may have contributed to hypospadias development.

  • 260.
    Kovalenko, Anton A.
    et al.
    Department of Community Medicine, UiT The Arctic University of Norway, Tromsø, Norway / International School of Public Health, Northern State Medical University, Arkhangelsk, Russia.
    Brenn, Tormod
    Department of Community Medicine, UiT The Arctic University of Norway, Tromsø, Norway.
    Odland, Jon Øyvind
    Department of Community Medicine, UiT The Arctic University of Norway, Tromsø, Norway.
    Nieboer, Evert
    Department of Biochemistry and Biomedical Sciences, McMaster University, Hamilton, Canada.
    Krettek, Alexandra
    University of Skövde, School of Health and Education. University of Skövde, Health and Education. Department of Community Medicine, UiT The Arctic University of Norway, Tromsø, Norway / Department of Internal Medicine and Clinical Nutrition, Institute of Medicine, Sahlgrenska Academy at University of Gothenburg, Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Anda, Erik Eik
    Department of Community Medicine, UiT The Arctic University of Norway, Tromsø, Norway.
    Under-reporting of major birth defects in Northwest Russia: a registry-based study2017In: International Journal of Circumpolar Health, ISSN 1239-9736, E-ISSN 2242-3982, Vol. 76, no 1, p. 1-10, article id 1366785Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The objective was to assess the prevalence of selected major birth defects, based on data from two medical registries in Murmansk County, and compare the observed rates with those available for Norway and Arkhangelsk County, Northwest Russia. It included all newborns (≥22 completed weeks of gestation) registered in the Murmansk County Birth Registry (MCBR) and born between 1 January 2006 and 31 December 2009 (n=35,417). The infants were followed-up post-partum for 2 years through direct linkage to the Murmansk Regional Congenital Defects Registry (MRCDR). Birth defects identified and confirmed in both registries constituted the "cases" and corresponded to one or more of the 21 birth defect types reportable to health authorities in Moscow. The overall prevalence of major birth defects recorded in the MRCDR was 50/10,000 before linkage and 77/10,000 after linkage with the MCBR. Routine under-reporting to the MRCDR of 40% cases was evident. This study demonstrates that birth registry data improved case ascertainment and official prevalence assessments and reduced the potential of under-reporting by physicians. The direct linkage of the two registries revealed that hypospadias cases were the most prevalent among the major birth defects in Murmansk County.

    ABBREVIATIONS: ICD-10, International Classification of Diseases, 10th revision; MCBR, Murmansk County Birth Registry; MRCDR, Murmansk Regional Congenital Defects Registry; MGC, Murmansk Genetics Center.

  • 261.
    Krettek, Alexandra
    et al.
    University of Skövde, School of Health and Education. University of Skövde, Health and Education. Avdelningen för invärtesmedicin och klinisk nutrition, Institutionen för medicin, Sahlgrenska akademin, Göteborgs universitet.
    Magnusson, Maria
    Enheten för kommunikation och folkhälsa, Angereds närsjukhus.
    Hallmyr, Moa
    Enheten för kommunikation och folkhälsa, Angereds närsjukhus.
    Ascher, Henry
    Avdelningen för samhällsmedicin och folkhälsa, Institutionen för medicin, Sahlgrenska akademin, Göteborgs universitet / FoU-enheten och flyktingbarnteamet, Angereds närsjukhus.
    Apropå! »Alla vet att man ska äta frukt och grönt och röra på sig«2018In: Läkartidningen, ISSN 0023-7205, E-ISSN 1652-7518, Vol. 115, article id E3YZArticle in journal (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
  • 262.
    Krettek, Alexandra
    et al.
    University of Skövde, School of Health and Education. University of Skövde, Health and Education.
    Suominen, Sakari
    University of Skövde, School of Health and Education. University of Skövde, Health and Education.
    Folkhälsovetenskaplig utbildning på distans med unik profil för framtiden2017In: Socialmedicinsk Tidskrift, ISSN 0037-833X, Vol. 94, no 3, p. 327-339Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Public Health at University of Skövde is expanding as a strategic effort by the University. The ambition is to provide unique public health education that gives students preparedness to work with current and future public health challenges. To date, University of Skövde offers three educational programmes in public health; the two-year Health Coach, the three-year Public Health Sciences Study Programme and the master’s programme in Public Health Science: Infection Prevention and Control. The latter is unique and one-of-a-kind in both Sweden and the Nordic countries. All educational programmes are given as distance education with a few gatherings on campus. The article therefore also highlights challenges and possibilities with distance education and provides advice on how to make students successfully progress through such educational programmes.

  • 263.
    Kylberg, Elisabeth
    et al.
    University of Skövde, School of Health and Education. University of Skövde, Health and Education.
    Stark Ekman, Diana
    University of Skövde, School of Health and Education. University of Skövde, Health and Education.
    Kazemi, Ali
    University of Skövde, School of Health and Education. University of Skövde, Health and Education.
    Nutritional services and assessment2014In: Encyclopedia of Human Services and Diversity / [ed] Linwood H. Cousins, Thousand Oaks, California: Sage Publications, 2014, p. 975-977Chapter in book (Refereed)
  • 264.
    Lagström, Hanna
    et al.
    Department of Public Health, University of Turku, Finland / Turku University Hospital, Finland.
    Halonen, Jaana I.
    Finnish Institute of Occupational Health, Helsinki, Finland.
    Kawachi, Ichiro
    Department of Social and Behavioral Sciences, Harvard School of Public Health, Boston, USA.
    Stenholm, Sari
    Department of Public Health, University of Turku, Finland / Turku University Hospital, Finland.
    Pentti, Jaana
    Department of Public Health, University of Turku, Finland / Turku University Hospital, Finland.
    Suominen, Sakari
    University of Skövde, School of Health and Education. University of Skövde, Health and Education. Department of Public Health, University of Turku, Finland / Turku University Hospital, Finland.
    Kivimäki, Mika
    Clinicum, Faculty of Medicine, University of Helsinki, Finland / Department of Epidemiology and Public Health, University College London, UK.
    Vahtera, Jussi
    Department of Public Health, University of Turku, Finland / Turku University Hospital, Turku, Finland.
    Neighborhood socioeconomic status and adherence to dietary recommendations among Finnish adults: A retrospective follow-up study2019In: Health and Place, ISSN 1353-8292, E-ISSN 1873-2054, Vol. 55, p. 43-50Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Neighborhood socioeconomic status (SES) is associated with dietary habits among the residents, but few studies have examined this association separately among long-term residents and movers. We calculated cumulative neighborhood SES score weighted by residential time in each address over 6 years for non-movers (n = 7704) and movers (n = 8818) using national grid database. Increase in average neighborhood SES was associated with higher adherence to dietary recommendations in both groups. Among the movers, an upward trajectory from low to high neighborhood SES was also associated with better adherence. Our findings suggest high SES areas might offer healthier food environments than low SES areas.

  • 265.
    Landegren, Nils
    et al.
    Department of Medicine (Solna), Karolinska University Hospital, Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden / Department of Medical Sciences, Science for Life Laboratory, Uppsala University, Uppsala, Sweden.
    Sharon, Donald
    Department of Genetics, Stanford University, CA, USA / Department of Molecular, Cellular, and Developmental Biology, Yale University, New Haven, CT 06511, USA.
    Shum, Anthony K.
    Division of Pulmonary and Critical Care, Department of Medicine, University of California San Francisco, San Francisco, CA 94143, USA.
    Khan, Imran S.
    Diabetes Center, University of California San Francisco, San Francisco, CA 94143, USA.
    Fasano, Kayla J.
    Diabetes Center, University of California San Francisco, San Francisco, CA 94143, USA.
    Hallgren, Åsa
    Department of Medicine (Solna), Karolinska University Hospital, Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden / Department of Medical Sciences, Science for Life Laboratory, Uppsala University, Uppsala, Sweden.
    Kampf, Caroline
    Department of Immunology, Genetics, and Pathology, Uppsala University, Uppsala, Sweden.
    Freyhult, Eva
    Cancer Pharmacology and Computational Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences, Bioinformatics Infrastructure for Life Sciences, Science for Life Laboratory, Uppsala University, Uppsala, Sweden.
    Ardesjö-Lundgren, Brita
    Department of Animal Breeding and Genetics, Swedish University of Agricultural Sciences, Uppsala, Sweden.
    Alimohammadi, Mohammad
    Department of Medicine (Solna), Karolinska University Hospital, Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden / Department of Medical Sciences, Science for Life Laboratory, Uppsala University, Uppsala, Sweden / Department of Medical Sciences, Uppsala University, Uppsala, Sweden.
    Rathsman, Sandra
    Department of Laboratory Medicine/Microbiology, Örebro University Hospital, Örebro, Sweden.
    Ludvigsson, Jonas F.
    Department of Medical Epidemiology and Biostatistics, Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Lundh, Dan
    University of Skövde, School of Bioscience. University of Skövde, Health and Education.
    Motrich, Ruben
    Centro de Investigaciones en Bioquímica Clínica e Inmunología, Departamento de Bioquímica Clínica, Facultad de Ciencias Químicas, Universidad Nacional de Córdoba, Córdoba 5000, Argentina.
    Rivero, Virginia
    Centro de Investigaciones en Bioquímica Clínica e Inmunología, Departamento de Bioquímica Clínica, Facultad de Ciencias Químicas, Universidad Nacional de Córdoba, Córdoba 5000, Argentina.
    Fong, Lawrence
    University of California San Francisco Helen Diller Family Comprehensive Cancer Center, San Francisco, CA 94115, USA.
    Giwercman, Aleksander
    Molecular Reproduction Research, Department of Clinical Sciences Malmö, Lund University, Malmö, Sweden.
    Gustafsson, Jan
    Department of Women’s and Children’s Health, Uppsala University, Uppsala, Sweden.
    Perheentupa, Jaakko
    The Hospital for Children and Adolescents, University of Helsinki, Helsinki 00029, Finland.
    Husebye, Eystein S.
    Department of Clinical Science, University of Bergen, and Department of Medicine, Haukeland University Hospital, Bergen 5020, Norway.
    Anderson, Mark S.
    Diabetes Center, University of California San Francisco, San Francisco, CA 94143, USA.
    Snyder, Michael
    Department of Genetics, Stanford University, Stanford 94305, CA, USA.
    Kämpe, Olle
    Department of Medicine (Solna), Karolinska University Hospital, Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden / Department of Medical Sciences, Science for Life Laboratory, Uppsala University, Uppsala, Sweden.
    Transglutaminase 4 as a prostate autoantigen in male subfertility2015In: Science Translational Medicine, ISSN 1946-6234, E-ISSN 1946-6242, Vol. 7, no 292, article id 292ra101Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Autoimmune polyendocrine syndrome type 1 (APS1), a monogenic disorder caused by AIRE gene mutations, features multiple autoimmune disease components. Infertility is common in both males and females with APS1. Although female infertility can be explained by autoimmune ovarian failure, the mechanisms underlying male infertility have remained poorly understood. We performed a proteome-wide autoantibody screen in APS1 patient sera to assess the autoimmune response against the male reproductive organs. By screening human protein arrays with male and female patient sera and by selecting for gender-imbalanced autoantibody signals, we identified transglutaminase 4 (TGM4) as a male-specific autoantigen. Notably, TGM4 is a prostatic secretory molecule with critical role in male reproduction. TGM4 autoantibodies were detected in most of the adult male APS1 patients but were absent in all the young males. Consecutive serum samples further revealed that TGM4 autoantibodies first presented during pubertal age and subsequent to prostate maturation. We assessed the animal model for APS1, the Aire-deficient mouse, and found spontaneous development of TGM4 autoantibodies specifically in males. Aire-deficient mice failed to present TGM4 in the thymus, consistent with a defect in central tolerance for TGM4. In the mouse, we further link TGM4 immunity with a destructive prostatitis and compromised secretion of TGM4. Collectively, our findings in APS1 patients and Aire-deficient mice reveal prostate autoimmunity as a major manifestation of APS1 with potential role in male subfertility.

  • 266.
    Langeheine, Malte
    et al.
    Leibniz Institute for Prevention Research and Epidemiology–BIPS, Bremen, Germany.
    Pohlabeln, Hermann
    Leibniz Institute for Prevention Research and Epidemiology–BIPS, Bremen, Germany.
    Lauria, Fabio
    Institute of Food Sciences, National Research Council, Avellino, Italy.
    Veidebaum, Toomas
    National Institute for Health Development, Tallinn, Estonia.
    Tornaritis, Michael
    Research and Education Institute of Child Health, Strovolos, Cyprus.
    Molnar, Denes
    Department of Pediatrics, Medical School, University of Pécs, Pécs, Hungary.
    Eiben, Gabriele
    University of Skövde, School of Health and Education. University of Skövde, Health and Education. Section for Epidemiology and Social Medicine, Sahlgrenska Academy, University of Gothenburg, Gothenburg, Sweden.
    de Henauw, Stefaan
    Department of Public Health, Ghent University, Ghent, Belgium.
    Moreno, Luis A.
    Growth, Exercise, Nutrition and Development, Research Group, Faculty of Health Sciences, University of Zaragoza, Instituto Agroalimentario de Aragón, Instituto de Investigación Sanitaria de Aragón and Centro de Investigación Biomédica en Red de Fisiopatología de la Obesidad y Nutrición, Zaragoza, Spain.
    Williams, Garrath
    Department of Politics, Philosophy and Religion, Lancaster University, Lancaster, United Kingdom.
    Ahrens, Wolfgang
    Leibniz Institute for Prevention Research and Epidemiology–BIPS, Bremen, Germany / Faculty of Mathematics and Computer Science, Institute of Statistics, University Bremen, Bremen, Germany.
    Rach, Stefan
    Leibniz Institute for Prevention Research and Epidemiology–BIPS, Bremen, Germany.
    Attrition in the European Child Cohort IDEFICS/I. Family: Exploring Associations Between Attrition and Body Mass Index2018In: Frontiers in Pediatrics, ISSN 2296-2360, Vol. 6, article id 212Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Attrition may lead to bias in epidemiological cohorts, since participants who are healthier and have a higher social position are less likely to drop out. We investigated possible selection effects regarding key exposures and outcomes in the IDEFICS/I.Family study, a large European cohort on the etiology of overweight, obesity and related disorders during childhood and adulthood. We applied multilevel logistic regression to investigate associations of attrition with sociodemographic variables, weight status, and study compliance and assessed attrition across time regarding children's weight status and variations of attrition across participating countries. We investigated selection effects with regard to social position, adherence to key messages concerning a healthy lifestyle, and children's weight status. Attrition was associated with a higher weight status of children, lower children's study compliance, older age, lower parental education, and parent's migration background, consistent across time and participating countries. Although overweight (odds ratio 1.17, 99% confidence interval 1.05–1.29) or obese children (odds ratio 1.18, 99% confidence interval 1.03–1.36) were more prone to drop-out, attrition only seemed to slightly distort the distribution of children's BMI at the upper tail. Restricting the sample to subgroups with different attrition characteristics only marginally affected exposure-outcome associations. Our results suggest that IDEFICS/I.Family provides valid estimates of relations between socio-economic position, health-related behaviors, and weight status.

  • 267.
    Larsson, Margaretha
    et al.
    University of Skövde, School of Health and Education. University of Skövde, Health and Education. Linnæus University, Växjö, Sweden.
    Björk, Maria
    University of Skövde, School of Health and Education. CHILD Research Group, Department of Nursing Science, School of Health Sciences, Jönköping University, Jönköping, Sweden.
    Ekebergh, Margaretha
    Linnæus University, Växjö, Sweden.
    Johansson Sundler, Annelie
    University of Skövde, School of Health and Education.
    Striving to Make a Positive Difference: School Nurses’ Experiences of Promoting the Health and Well-Being of Adolescent Girls2014In: Journal of School Nursing, ISSN 1059-8405, E-ISSN 1546-8364, Vol. 30, no 5, p. 358-365Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In Sweden, school nurses are part of the School Health Service with the main objective of health promotion to support students’ health and attainment of educational goals. The aim in this phenomenological study was to illuminate the experiences of school nurses in promoting the health and well-being of adolescent girls. Seventeen school nurses were interviewed, both in groups and individually, to facilitate personal disclosure and expressions from their lived experiences. To achieve their goal of improving the health of adolescent girls, school nurses require flexibility in their approach and in endeavoring to make a positive difference they experience many challenges. This study concluded that school nurses can tactfully provide adolescent girls with knowledge and health guidance adjusted to individual needs and empowering the individual girl to participate in her own health process.

  • 268.
    Larsson, Margaretha
    et al.
    University of Skövde, School of Health and Education. University of Skövde, Health and Education. Faculty of Health and Life Sciences, Linnaeus University of Växjö, Växjö, Sweden.
    Sundler, Annelie Johansson
    University of Skövde, School of Health and Education. University of Skövde, Health and Education. School of Health, Care and Social Welfare, Mälardalens University, Västerås, Sweden.
    Ekebergh, Margaretha
    Faculty of Health and Life Sciences, Linnaeus University of Växjö, Växjö, Sweden.
    Björk, Maria
    University of Skövde, School of Health and Education. University of Skövde, Health and Education. The Research Group CHILD, Jönköping University, Jönköping, Sweden.
    Altering the Parenting Role: Parents' Experience of Supporting the Health and Well-Being of Their Adolescent Girls2015In: Child and Youth Care Forum, ISSN 1053-1890, E-ISSN 1573-3319, Vol. 44, no 3, p. 419-432Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background

    In research the relationships between parents and their adolescent daughters have been viewed from problem oriented perspectives, usually exploring negative effects and health-related problems. Health and well-being are complex phenomena and knowledge is needed on how parents can support the health and well-being of their daughter.

    Objectives

    The aim of this study was to illuminate parents’ experiences of supporting the health and well-being of their adolescent girls.

    Methods

    A descriptive design with a phenomenological approach including interviews, individually or in group with ten mothers and five fathers was conducted.

    Results

    Supporting the health and well-being of adolescent girls was experienced as challenging. The parents needed to altering the parenting role: from being the one who had previously set the limits they needed to rethink and be available for support. In this process interplay, communication and trust were important to support the health and well-being of the girls in an efficient way. This meaning was further illuminated by four constituents: Balancing the need for control, maintaining a trusting relationship, interplay to facilitate their daughters’ transition to independence, and an ambiguous parenting role.

    Conclusions

    This study highlights the importance of parents being involved in the everyday life of their adolescent daughter to support her health and well-being. The parents’ ability to contribute to the health and well-being of their girl seemed in this study dependent on their ability to communicate and alter the parenting role with sensitivity to the lifeworld of the adolescent girl.

  • 269.
    Lee, Nigel
    et al.
    School of Nursing, Midwifery and Social Work, University of Queensland, Australia / Mater Research Institute UQ, Queensland, Australia.
    Jomeen, Julie
    Faculty of Health Sciences, University of Hull, Cottingham, United Kingdom.
    Mårtensson, Lena B.
    University of Skövde, School of Health and Education. University of Skövde, Health and Education.
    Emery, Vanessa
    Bradford Teaching Hospitals NHS Foundation Trust, Bradford Royal Infirmary, United Kingdom.
    Kildea, Sue
    School of Nursing, Midwifery and Social Work, University St Lucia, Australia / Mater Research Institute UQ, Aubigny Place, South Brisbane, Australia / Mater Mothers’ Hospital, Mater Health Services, Australia.
    Knowledge and use of sterile water injections amongst midwives in the United Kingdom: A cross-sectional study2019In: Midwifery, ISSN 0266-6138, E-ISSN 1532-3099, Vol. 68, p. 9-14Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: The use of sterile water injections (SWI) for the relief of pain in labour is popular amongst midwives in countries such as Sweden and Australia. Anecdotal reports suggest the procedure is used less commonly in the United Kingdom (UK) and that a number of barriers to introducing the practice may exist. Objective: The objective of this study was to explore the awareness and use of SWI amongst midwives in the UK. Design: A cross-sectional study using an internet-based questionnaire. Participants: Midwives with Nursing and Midwifery Council Registration and currently practicing. Setting: The questionnaire was distributed via the Royal College of Midwives Facebook page and Twitter account. Invitations to participate were also sent to Heads of Midwifery to distribute to staff. Findings: Three hundred and ninety-eight midwives completed the survey. Eighty-two percent of midwives did not use SWI in practice although 69% would consider learning the procedure. There was considerable variation in techniques amongst midwives that did provide SWI. The lack of available practice guidelines and the advice from the National Institute for Health and Care Excellence to not use SWI were cited as the main barriers. Key conclusions: SWI use is uncommon in the UK although midwives are interested in incorporating the procedure into practice. Implications for practice: National guidance on SWI and the lack of information and training is restricting the use of the procedure in practice, despite SWI being widely used in other countries and being effective in the treatment of pain in labour.

  • 270.
    Lee, Richard G.
    et al.
    Univ Western Australia, Ctr Med Res, Nedlands, WA, Australia / Harry Perkins Inst Med Res, Nedlands, WA, Australia.
    Sedghi, Maryam
    Univ Isfahan, Dept Genet, Esfahan, Iran.
    Salari, Mehri
    Shahid Beheshti Univ Med Sci, Shohada Tajrish Neurosurg Ctr Excellence, Funct Neurosurg Res Ctr, Tehran, Iran.
    Shearwood, Anne-Marie J.
    Univ Western Australia, Ctr Med Res, Nedlands, WA, Australia / Harry Perkins Inst Med Res, Nedlands, WA, Australia.
    Stentenbach, Maike
    Univ Western Australia, Ctr Med Res, Nedlands, WA, Australia / Harry Perkins Inst Med Res, Nedlands, WA, Australia.
    Kariminejad, Ariana
    Kariminejad Najmabadi Pathol & Genet Ctr, Tehran, Iran.
    Goullee, Hayley
    Univ Western Australia, Ctr Med Res, Nedlands, WA, Australia / Harry Perkins Inst Med Res, Nedlands, WA, Australia.
    Rackham, Oliver
    Univ Western Australia, Ctr Med Res, Nedlands, WA, Australia / Harry Perkins Inst Med Res, Nedlands, WA, Australia / Univ Western Australia, Sch Mol Sci, Crawley, Australia.
    Laing, Nigel G.
    Univ Western Australia, Ctr Med Res, Nedlands, WA, Australia / Harry Perkins Inst Med Res, Nedlands, WA, Australia / QEII Med Ctr, PathWest, Dept Diagnost Genom, Nedlands, WA, Australia.
    Tajsharghi, Homa
    University of Skövde, School of Health and Education. University of Skövde, Health and Education.
    Filipovska, Aleksandra
    Univ Western Australia, Ctr Med Res, Nedlands, WA, Australia / Harry Perkins Inst Med Res, Nedlands, WA, Australia / Univ Western Australia, Sch Mol Sci, Crawley, Australia.
    Early-onset Parkinson disease caused by a mutation in CHCHD2 and mitochondrial dysfunction2018In: Neurology Genetics, ISSN 2376-7839, Vol. 4, no 5, article id e276Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Objective Our goal was to identify the gene(s) associated with an early-onset form of Parkinson disease (PD) and the molecular defects associated with this mutation. Methods We combined whole-exome sequencing and functional genomics to identify the genes associated with early-onset PD. We used fluorescence microscopy, cell, and mitochondrial biology measurements to identify the molecular defects resulting from the identified mutation. Results Here, we report an association of a homozygous variant in CHCHD2, encoding coiled-coil-helix-coiled-coil-helix domain containing protein 2, a mitochondrial protein of unknown function, with an early-onset form of PD in a 26-year-old Caucasian woman. The CHCHD2 mutation in PD patient fibroblasts causes fragmentation of the mitochondrial reticular morphology and results in reduced oxidative phosphorylation at complex I and complex IV. Although patient cells could maintain a proton motive force, reactive oxygen species production was increased, which correlated with an increased metabolic rate. Conclusions Our findings implicate CHCHD2 in the pathogenesis of recessive early-onset PD, expanding the repertoire of mitochondrial proteins that play a direct role in this disease.

  • 271.
    Leksell, Janeth
    et al.
    School of Health and Social Studies, Dalarna University, Sweden.
    Koinberg, Ingalill
    Health and care sciences; Gothenburg University, Sweden.
    Ringsberg, Karin
    Health and care sciences; Gothenburg University, Sweden.
    Berglund, Mia
    University of Skövde, School of Health and Education. University of Skövde, Health and Education.
    Friberg, Febe
    Department of Health Studies, Faculty of Social Sciences, University of Stavanger, Norway.
    The capability approach as a framework for person-centered learning?2014In: / [ed] Harshida Patel,, Göteborgs universitet, 2014, p. 193-194Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 272.
    Lietzén, Raija
    et al.
    Department of Public Health, University of Turku, Turku, Finland.
    Virtanen, Pekka
    School of Health Sciences, University of Tampere, Tampere, Finland.
    Kivimäki, Mika
    Department of Public Health, Clinicum, Faculty of Medicine, University of Helsinki, Helsinki, Finland / Department of Epidemiology and Public Health, University College London Medical School, London, United Kingdom.
    Korkeila, Jyrki
    Department of Psychiatry, University of Turku and Harjavalta Hospital, Satakunta Hospital District, Harjavalta, Finland.
    Suominen, Sakari
    University of Skövde, School of Health and Education. University of Skövde, Health and Education. Department of Public Health, University of Turku, Turku, Finland.
    Sillanmäki, Lauri
    Department of Public Health, Clinicum, Faculty of Medicine, University of Helsinki, Helsinki, Finland.
    Koskenvuo, Markku
    Department of Public Health, Clinicum, Faculty of Medicine, University of Helsinki, Helsinki, Finland.
    Vahtera, Jussi
    Department of Public Health, University of Turku and Turku University Hospital, Turku, Finland.
    Change in β2-agonist use after severe life events in adults with asthma: A population-based cohort study Life events and bronchodilator usage among adults with asthma2017In: Journal of Psychosomatic Research, ISSN 0022-3999, E-ISSN 1879-1360, Vol. 100, p. 46-52Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Objective: This prospective, population-based cohort study of 1102 Finnish adults with asthma, examined whether exposure to stressful life events is associated with the intensity of usage of inhaled short-acting β2- agonists. Methods: Survey data was collected by two postal questionnaires. Baseline characteristics were obtained in 1998 and data on 19 specific stressful events (e.g. death of a child or spouse or divorce) within the six preceding months in 2003. Exposure to life events was indicated by a sum score weighted by mean severity of the events. Participants were linked to records of filled prescriptions for inhaled short-acting β2-agonists from national registers from 2000 through 2006. The rates of purchases of short-acting β2-agonists before (2000−2001), during (2002−2003) and after (2004–2006) the event exposure were estimated using repeated-measures Poisson regression analyses with the generalized estimating equation. Results: Of the 1102 participants, 162 (15%) were exposed to highly stressful events, 205 (19%) to less stressful events. During the 7-year observation period, 5955 purchases of filled prescription for inhaled short-acting β2- agonists were recorded. After exposure to highly stressful events, the rate of purchases of β2-agonists was 1.50 times higher (95% confidence interval (CI): 1.05, 2.13) than before the stressful event occurred. Among those with low or no exposure to life events, the corresponding rate ratios were not elevated (rate ratio 0.81, 95% CI: 0.66, 0.99 and 0.95, 95% CI: 0.83, 1.09 respectively). Conclusion: An increase in β2-agonist usage after severe life events suggests that stressful experiences may worsen asthma symptoms

  • 273.
    Liljestrand, Johan
    et al.
    Faculty of Education and Business Studies, University of Gävle, Gävle, Sweden.
    Olson, Maria
    University of Skövde, School of Health and Education. University of Skövde, Health and Education. School of Education, Health and Social Studies, Dalarna University, Falun, Sweden / Centre for Teaching and Learning in the Humanities, Stockholm University, Stockholm, Sweden.
    The (educational) meaning of religion as a quality of liberal democratic citizenship2016In: Journal of Curriculum Studies, ISSN 0022-0272, E-ISSN 1366-5839, Vol. 48, no 2, p. 151-166Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Religion has become a prominent issue in times of pluralism and in relation to citizenship in school and in society. As religious education (RE) is assigned to be one of the main school subject where issues of what religion is are to be raised, RE teachers’ conceptualizations of religion are of vital concern to investigate. In this article, RE teachers’ descriptions of ‘religion’ are scrutinized and analysed in terms of implications for citizenship with special regard to the role of RE. Three vital conceptions of religion emerge in teachers’ descriptions. First, religion is mainly individual or private, secondly, it denotes ethical guidance, and thirdly, it relates to sociocultural systems for thinking. Taken together, these conceptualizations share two characteristics about religion: religion as being individual-centred and private, and religion as being mind oriented. Out of this analysis, we discuss the role of religion and RE in contemporary liberal democratic life in society. The discussion is concluded by addressing two key things; the importance of the RE teacher as a curriculum maker, and the importance of religion and RE as active interventions in today’s contemporary discussion about pluralism in liberal democratic societies.

  • 274.
    Lindblom, Jessica
    et al.
    University of Skövde, School of Informatics. University of Skövde, The Informatics Research Centre.
    Kjellström, Anita
    University of Skövde, School of Health and Education. University of Skövde, Health and Education.
    Pedagogisk meritering och pedagogisk karriärstege utifrån ett akademiskt lärarskap2018In: NU2018 - Det akademiska lärarskapet, 2018, article id 829Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [sv]

    Det är allmänt vedertaget att högre utbildning har flera olika syften, bland annat att förbereda studenterna för ett aktivt medborgarskap, framtida yrkesliv, anställningsbarhet samt bidra till personlig utveckling. För att kunna nå upp till dessa syften behöver det finnas en pedagogisk praktik inom högre utbildning som främjar ett vetenskapligt förhållningssätt till studenternas lärande. Från ett studentperspektiv driver Sveriges förenade studentkårer (SFS) [1] ett arbete för att främja förutsättningar för en god undervisning vid högskolestudier. Ett sätt att främja det systematiska kvalitetsarbetet är att fokusera på pedagogisk meritering av lärare. I arbetet med att revidera samt vidareutveckla innehållet i och processerna för pedagogisk meritering vid lärosätet har utgångspunkten varit att meritera engagerade, kunniga och ämneskompetenta lärare med hänsyn till lärargärningens olika möjligheter och begräsningar för att bedriva ett systematiskt kvalitetsutvecklingsarbete. Det övergripande syftet för lärosätets modell för pedagogisk karriärstege är att bidra till den excellenta lärmiljön genom kvalitetsdrivande högskolepedagogiska processer i högre utbildning. Målet med den pedagogiska karriärstegen är att kompetensutveckla och bedöma ämneskunniga lärares skicklighet i att bedriva pedagogisk verksamhet i praktiken. Detta kan exempelvis ske genom att stimulera lärare att utveckla en hög pedagogisk kompetens, stimulera lärosätet och institutionerna att skapa goda förutsättningar för pedagogisk utveckling samt uppmärksamma och premiera hög högskolepedagogisk kompetens hos undervisande personal.

    Motiveringen till att utgå ifrån begreppet akademiskt lärarskap (eng. Scholarship of Teaching and Learning [2], SoTL) för den reviderade pedagogiska karriärstegen är att den är i linje med Sveriges universitets- och högskoleförbunds (SUHF:s) uppdaterade rekommendation [3] om mål för behörighetsgivande högskolepedagogisk utbildning samt ömsesidigt erkännande (Rek 2016:1).

    I vårt bidrag åskådliggörs det akademiska lärarskapet utifrån ett högskoleperspektiv, med utgångspunkt i processen att revidera och förankra synen på pedagogisk meritering och denpedagogiska karriärstegen vid lärosätet. I styrdokumentet ”Riktlinjer för pedagogisk karriärstege vid Högskolan i Skövde” (Dnr HS 2017/405) [4] beskrivs begreppet akademiskt läarskap som ”… att ha ett vetenskapligt förhållningssät till kunskap och kunskapsbildning och vad det innebä att vara lärare i höre utbildning. Det akademiska lärarskapet innebär en kvalitetsdrivande strategi där läraren reflekterar över och argumenterar för sin lärargäning i ett kontinuerligt utvecklingsarbete. Ett akademiskt lärarskap innefattar förutom skicklighet i undervisning och handledning även inslag av pedagogisk kritisk sjävreflektion”. Som ett resultat av det genomförda reviderings- och utvecklingsarbetet har exempelvis begreppet akademiskt lärarskap introducerats i lärosätets utvecklingsplan 2017-2022 [5] samt att ett råd för högskolepedagogisk meritering har inrättats. Vi kommer att beskriva vå utvecklings- och revideringsprocess och beskriva de möjligheter och utmaningar som vi stött på i olika sammanhang under resans gång med att förankra begreppet akademiskt lärarskap i organisationen. Dessutom diskuterar vi våra förväntningar och farhågor under det pågående och framtida arbetet. Vi hoppas att inspirera andra lärosäten som planerar att inrätta någon form av pedagogisk meritering utifrån ett akademiskt lärarskap.

    Referenser

    [1] https://www.sfs.se/publikation/agenda-pedagogik

    [2] Kreber, C. (2002). “Teaching excellence, teaching expertise, and the scholarship of teaching.” Innovative Higher Education, 27(1), pp. 5-23.

    [3] REK 2016-1 Mål för behörighetsgivande högskolepedagogisk utbildning samt ömsesidigt erkännande. Tillgäglig på

    http://www.suhf.se/BinaryLoader.axd?OwnerID=f66b107a-bb35-44b1-a4bd-98518d2d6950&OwnerType=0&PropertyName=EmbeddedFile_1937ad3d-3d25-4e4d-8dc5-

    9c490b27432e&FileName=REK+2016-

    1+Om+beh%c3%b6righetsgivande+h%c3%b6gskolepedagogisk+utbildning_Dnr+024-16.pdf&Attachment=True

    [4] http://www.his.se/Policies/Forskning_utbildning_forskningsniva/Riktlinjer%20pedagogisk%20meritering%20-%20beslutad.pdf

    [5] http://www.his.se/Policies/StrategierKvalitetOrganisation/utvecklingsplan_for_his_2017_2022.pdf

  • 275.
    Lundin, Anette
    et al.
    University of Skövde, School of Health and Education. University of Skövde, Health and Education. School of Health Sciences at Jönköping University, Sweden.
    Berg, Lars-Erik
    University of Skövde, School of Health and Education.
    Hellström Muhli, Ulla
    Department of Sociology (Faculty of Social Sciences), Uppsala University, Uppsala, Sweden.
    Witnessing presence: Swedish care professionals' experiences of supporting resident's well-being processes within the frame of residential care homes (RCH)2016In: Journal of Aging Studies, ISSN 0890-4065, E-ISSN 1879-193X, Vol. 37, p. 1-9Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The purpose of this article is to analyse the phenomenon of supportive care for older persons' well-being. The phenomenon is seen from the eldercarers' meaning-making through their lifeworld perspective at a residential care home. Based on primary empirical interview material with twelve professionals in the context of Swedish eldercare, a phenomenological analysis was undertaken. The result shows that the phenomenon of supportive care for older persons' well-being creates certain ambiguities in the professionals' meaning-making. In practice, it balances between the older persons' (from hereon called residents) needs and the conditions of the eldercare organization. The ambiguities (the what) is made up by three constituents: (i) freedom of choice for the older persons vs. institutional constraints, (ii) the residents' need for activation vs. wanting not to be activated, and (iii) the residents' need for routine vs. the eldercarers' not being able to know what the residents need. The conclusions drawn are that this ambiguity has consequences for the eldercarers' choice of handling supportive care for older persons' well-being (the how). They have to navigate between the support for authenticity, dwelling and mobility, and their own presence and time. In performing supportive care for older persons' well-being, the eldercarers have to consider aspects concerning the resident's lifeworld, the social setting of the eldercare ward, and the institutional demands of the organization. The practical implications for supporting well-being in the care of older residents are manifested in the importance of 'the little things', and the eldercarer's ability to give receptive attention, which requires presence.

  • 276.
    Magnusson Hanson, Linda L.
    et al.
    Stress Research Institute, Stockholm University, Sweden.
    Rod, Naja Hulvej
    Section of Epidemiology, Department of Public Health, University of Copenhagen, Social Medicine Section, Copenhagen, Denmark / National Research Centre for the Working Environment, Copenhagen, Denmark.
    Vahtera, Jussi
    Department of Public Health, University of Turku, Finland / Turku University Hospital, Finland.
    Peristera, Paraskevi
    Stress Research Institute, Stockholm University, Sweden.
    Pentti, Jaana
    Department of Public Health, University of Turku, Finland.
    Rugulies, Reiner
    Section of Epidemiology, Department of Public Health, University of Copenhagen, Social Medicine Section, Copenhagen, Denmark / National Research Centre for the Working Environment, Copenhagen, Denmark / Department of Psychology, University of Copenhagen, Denmark.
    Madsen, Ida Elisabeth Huitfeldt
    National Research Centre for the Working Environment, Copenhagen, Denmark.
    Lamontagne, Anthony D.
    McCaughey Centre, Centre for Health Equity, Melbourne School of Population and Global Health, University of Melbourne, Melbourne, Victoria, Australia / Population Health Strategic Research Centre, School of Health and Social Development, Deakin University, Burwood, Victoria, Australia.
    Milner, Allison
    Disability and Health Unit, Centre for Health Equity, Melbourne School of Population and Global Health, University of Melbourne, Victoria, Australia.
    Lange, Theis
    Section of Biostatistics, Department of Public Health, University of Copenhagen, Denmark.
    Suominen, Sakari
    University of Skövde, School of Health and Education. University of Skövde, Health and Education. Department of Public Health, University of Turku, Finland.
    Stenholm, Sari
    Department of Public Health, University of Turku, Finland.
    Xu, Tianwei
    Section of Epidemiology, Department of Public Health, University of Copenhagen, Social Medicine Section, Copenhagen, Denmark / National Research Centre for the Working Environment, Copenhagen, Denmark.
    Kivimäki, Mika
    Clinicum, Faculty of Medicine, University of Helsinki, Finland / Department of Epidemiology and Public Health, University College London, UK.
    Westerlund, Hugo
    Stress Research Institute, Stockholm University, Sweden.
    Multicohort study of change in job strain, poor mental health and incident cardiometabolic disease2019In: Occupational and Environmental Medicine, ISSN 1351-0711, E-ISSN 1470-7926, Vol. 76, p. 785-792Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Objectives: Several recent large-scale studies have indicated a prospective association between job strain and coronary heart disease, stroke and diabetes. Job strain is also associated with poorer mental health, a risk factor for cardiometabolic disease. This study investigates the prospective relationships between change in job strain, poor mental health and cardiometabolic disease, and whether poor mental health is a potential mediator of the relationship between job strain and cardiometabolic disease. Methods: We used data from five cohort studies from Australia, Finland, Sweden and UK, including 47 757 men and women. Data on job strain across two measurements 1-5 years apart (time 1 (T1)-time 2 (T2)) were used to define increase or decrease in job strain. Poor mental health (symptoms in the top 25% of the distribution of the scales) at T2 was considered a potential mediator in relation to incident cardiometabolic disease, including cardiovascular disease and diabetes, following T2 for a mean of 5-18 years. Results: An increase in job strain was associated with poor mental health (HR 1.56, 95% CI 1.38 to 1.76), and a decrease in job strain was associated with lower risk in women (HR 0.70, 95% CI 0.60-0.84). However, no clear association was observed between poor mental health and incident cardiometabolic disease (HR 1.08, 95% CI 0.96-1.23), nor between increase (HR 1.01, 95% CI 0.90-1.14) and decrease (HR 1.08, 95% CI 0.96-1.22) in job strain and cardiometabolic disease. Conclusions: The results did not support that change in job strain is a risk factor for cardiometabolic disease and yielded no support for poor mental health as a mediator.

  • 277.
    Magnusson, Maria K.
    et al.
    Department of Microbiology and Immunology, Institute for Biomedicine, Sahlgrenska Academy, University of Gothenburg, Gothenburg, Sweden / Department of Internal Medicine and Clinical Nutrition, Institute for Medicine, Sahlgrenska Academy, University of Gothenburg, Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Strid, Hans
    Department of Internal Medicine, Södra Älvsborg Hospital, Borås, Sweden.
    Isaksson, Stefan
    Department of Microbiology and Immunology, Institute for Biomedicine, Sahlgrenska Academy, University of Gothenburg, Gothenburg, Sweden / Department of Internal Medicine and Clinical Nutrition, Institute for Medicine, Sahlgrenska Academy, University of Gothenburg, Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Simrén, Magnus
    Department of Internal Medicine and Clinical Nutrition, Institute for Medicine, Sahlgrenska Academy, University of Gothenburg, Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Öhman, Lena
    University of Skövde, School of Health and Education. University of Skövde, Health and Education. Department of Microbiology and Immunology, Institute for Biomedicine, Sahlgrenska Academy, University of Gothenburg, Gothenburg, Sweden / Department of Internal Medicine and Clinical Nutrition, Institute for Medicine, Sahlgrenska Academy, University of Gothenburg, Gothenburg, Swede.
    The Mucosal Antibacterial Response Profile and Fecal Microbiota Composition Are Linked to the Disease Course in Patients with Newly Diagnosed Ulcerative Colitis2017In: Inflammatory Bowel Diseases, ISSN 1078-0998, E-ISSN 1536-4844, Vol. 23, no 6, p. 956-966Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: The clinical disease course of ulcerative colitis (UC) varies substantially between individuals and can currently not be reliably predicted. The gut microbiota and the host's immune defense are key players for gut homeostasis and may be linked to disease outcome. The aim of this study was to determine fecal microbiota composition and mucosal antibacterial response profile in untreated patients with newly diagnosed UC and the impact of these factors on disease course. Methods: Stool samples and intestinal biopsies were obtained from therapy-naive newly diagnosed patients with UC. Patients were defined to have mild or moderate/severe disease course assessed by disease activity during the 3 years follow-up. Fecal microbiota was analyzed by the GA-map Dysbiosis test (n = 18), and gene expression in intestinal biopsies was analyzed by RT2 Profiler polymerase chain reaction array (n = 13) and real-time polymerase chain reaction (n = 44). Results: At the time of diagnosis of UC, the fecal microbiota composition discriminated between patients with mild versus moderate/severe disease course. Also, the mucosal antibacterial gene expression response profile differed between patients with mild versus moderate/severe disease course with bactericidal/permeability-increasing protein (BPI) being most important for the discrimination. Mucosal bactericidal/permeability-increasing protein gene expression at diagnosis was higher in patients with mild versus moderate/severe disease course when confirmed in a larger patient cohort (P = 0.0004, n = 44) and was a good predictor for the number of flares during the 3 years follow-up (R-2 = 0.395, P < 0.0001). Conclusions: In patients with newly diagnosed UC, fecal microbiota composition and mucosal antibacterial response profile, especially bactericidal/permeability-increasing protein, are linked to disease course.

  • 278.
    Maivorsdotter, Ninitha
    et al.
    University of Skövde, School of Health and Education. University of Skövde, Health and Education.
    Lundvall, Suzanne
    The Swedish School of Sport and Health Sciences, Sweden.
    Quennerstedt, Mikael
    University of Örebro, Sweden.
    Being a competent athlete or a competent teacher?: Aesthetic experiences in physical education teacher education2014In: European Physical Education Review, ISSN 1356-336X, E-ISSN 1741-2749, Vol. 20, no 3, p. 407-422Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The aim of this study was to explore physical education teacher education students' meaning-making of participating in lessons - in this case gymnastics and basketball - based on their aesthetic judgements, expressed in written stories. A transactional approach, drawing on the work of John Dewey, was used in the study and the empirical data was generated through observations and collection of students' written stories. A practical epistemology analysis was used in order to explore the students' meaning-making in-depth. The purposes that the students ascribed to participating in the lessons were to develop both as athletes and as teachers. When analysing the stories, the importance of being a competent athlete emerged as the main purpose of participating in the lessons, and the majority of the students never included the purpose of developing as a teacher in their stories at all. By making the competent athlete the centre of their participation, other positions of participation were excluded or marginalized. However, even if all the students' stories contribute to the collective appropriation of the type, the majority did not include the projected, ideal type in all respects. In their stories, it was clear that many of the students expressed a tension between doing gymnastics or basketball within the context of competitive sport and doing the same activities within the context of physical education teacher education. Even if the students did not fulfil this awareness of contrasting ideals by undoing the competent athlete' completely, many of them did highlight the conflict.

  • 279.
    Maivorsdotter, Ninitha
    et al.
    University of Skövde, School of Health and Education. University of Skövde, Health and Education.
    Quennerstedt, Mikael
    Örebro University.
    Exploring gender habits: A practical epistemology analysis of exergaming in school2019In: European Physical Education Review, ISSN 1356-336X, E-ISSN 1741-2749, Vol. 25, no 4, p. 1176-1192Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Digitisation is an ongoing process in society as well as in physical education (PE) and research has identified digital technologies as a trend that influences the PE curriculum. A number of studies have explored the topic from different angles, although very few have empirically looked at the critical aspects of digitised PE in educational practice. This is particularly striking when it comes to issues of gender. Against this background, the aim of the paper is to explore gender habits in a digitised PE practice. A transactional approach, drawing on the work of the pragmatist feminist Shannon Sullivan, is used in the study. The data consists of video- and audio recordings of ongoing video gaming organised by the PE teacher. A practical epistemology analysis (PEA) is employed to explore the teenagers’ gender habits in depth. In the analysis, it is clear that the use of exergames in school reinforces traditional gender habits, rather than weakens them. This is particularly evident when the teenagers play in single sex groups. This is also the case when playing in mixed gender groups, although here some changes in gender habits can be identified. However, gender habits are not easily transformed and the findings support the argument that deliberate teaching is important when issues of gender are raised in practice.

  • 280.
    Majzoub, Ahmad
    et al.
    Hamad Medical Corporation, Doha, Qatar.
    Arafa, Mohamad
    Hamad Medical Corporation, Doha, Qatar.
    Mahdi, Mohamed
    Hamad Medical Corporation, Doha, Qatar.
    Agarwal, Ashok
    Cleveland Clinic Foundation, Cleveland, United States.
    Al Said, Sami
    Hamad Medical Corporation, Doha, Qatar.
    Al-Emadi, Ibrahim
    Hamad Medical Corporation, Doha, Qatar.
    El Ansari, Walid
    University of Skövde, School of Health and Education. University of Skövde, Health and Education. Hamad General Hospital, Hamad Medical Corporation, Doha, Qatar / Qatar University, Doha, Qatar.
    Alattar, Alia
    Women's Hospital, Hamad Medical Corporation, Doha, Qatar.
    Al Rumaihi, Khalid
    Hamad Medical Corporation, Doha, Qatar.
    Elbardisi, Haitham
    Hamad Medical Corporation, Doha, Qatar.
    Oxidation–reduction potential and sperm DNA fragmentation, and their associations with sperm morphological anomalies amongst fertile and infertile men2018In: Arab Journal of Urology, ISSN 2090-598X, Vol. 16, no 1, p. 87-95Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Objective: To assess seminal oxidation–reduction potential (ORP) and sperm DNA fragmentation (SDF) in male infertility and their relationships with sperm morphology in fertile and infertile men. Patients and methods: Prospective case-control study comparing the findings of infertile men (n = 1168) to those of men with confirmed fertility (n = 100) regarding demographics and semen characteristics (conventional and advanced semen tests). Spearman rank correlation assessed the correlation between ORP, SDF, and different morphological indices. Means of ORP and SDF were assessed in variable levels of normal sperm morphology amongst all participants. Results: Infertile patients had a significantly lower mean sperm count (32.7 vs 58.7 × 106 sperm/mL), total motility (50.1% vs 60.4%), and normal morphology (5.7% vs 9.9%). Conversely, infertile patients had significantly higher mean head defects (54% vs 48%), and higher ORP and SDF values than fertile controls. ORP and SDF showed significant positive correlations and significant negative correlations with sperm head defects and normal morphology in infertile patients, respectively. ORP and SDF were significantly inversely associated with the level of normal sperm morphology. Using receiver operating characteristic curve analysis, ORP and SDF threshold values of 1.73 mV/106 sperm/mL and 25.5%, respectively, were associated with 76% and 56% sensitivity and 72% and 72.2% specificity, respectively, in differentiating &lt;4% from ≥4% normal morphology. Conclusion: A direct inverse relationship exists between seminal ORP and SDF with various levels of normal sperm morphology. Using ORP and SDF measures in conjunction with standard semen morphology analysis could validate the result of the fertility status of patients. © 2017 Arab Association of Urology

  • 281.
    Manti, Maria
    et al.
    Department of Physiology and Pharmacology, Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Fornes, Romina
    Department of Physiology and Pharmacology, Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Pironti, Gianluigi
    Department of Physiology and Pharmacology, Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden.
    McCann Haworth, Sarah
    Department of Physiology and Pharmacology, Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Zhengbing, Zhuge
    Department of Physiology and Pharmacology, Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Benrick, Anna
    University of Skövde, School of Health and Education. University of Skövde, Health and Education. Department of Physiology, Institute of Neuroscience and Physiology, Sahlgrenska Academy, University of Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Carlström, Mattias
    Department of Physiology and Pharmacology, Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Andersson, Daniel
    Department of Physiology and Pharmacology, Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden / Heart and Vascular Theme, Heart Failure and Congenital Heart Disease Section, Karolinska University Hospital, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Stener-Victorin, Elisabet
    Department of Physiology and Pharmacology, Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Maternal androgen excess induces cardiac hypertrophy and left ventricular dysfunction in female mice offspring2019In: Cardiovascular Research, ISSN 0008-6363, E-ISSN 1755-3245, article id 31382275Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 282.
    Manti, Maria
    et al.
    Department of Physiology and Pharmacology, Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Fornes, Romina
    Department of Physiology and Pharmacology, Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Qi, Xiaojuan
    Department of Physiology and Pharmacology, Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden / Department of Physiology, Qiqihar Medical University, Qiqihar, China.
    Folmerz, Elin
    Department of Physiology and Pharmacology, Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Lindén Hirschberg, Angelica
    Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden.
    de Castro Barbosa, Thais
    Department of Physiology and Pharmacology, Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Maliqueo, Manuel
    Department of Physiology and Pharmacology, Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden / West Division, Endocrinology and Metabolism Laboratory, School of Medicine, University of Chile, Santiago, Chile.
    Benrick, Anna
    University of Skövde, School of Health and Education. University of Skövde, Health and Education. Department of Physiology, Institute of Neuroscience and Physiology, Sahlgrenska Academy, University of Gothenburg, Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Stener-Victorin, Elisabet
    Department of Physiology and Pharmacology, Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Maternal androgen excess and obesity induce sexually dimorphic anxiety-like behavior in the offspring2018In: The FASEB Journal, ISSN 0892-6638, E-ISSN 1530-6860, Vol. 32, no 8, p. 4158-4171Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Maternal polycystic ovary syndrome (PCOS), a condition associated with hyperandrogenism, is suggested to increase anxiety-like behavior in the offspring. Because PCOS is closely linked to obesity, we investigated the impact of an adverse hormonal or metabolic maternal environment and offspring obesity on anxiety in the offspring. The obese PCOS phenotype was induced by chronic high-fat-high-sucrose (HFHS) consumption together with prenatal dihydrotestosterone exposure in mouse dams. Anxiety-like behavior was assessed in adult offspring with the elevated-plus maze and open-field tests. The influence of maternal androgens and maternal and offspring diet on genes implicated in anxiety were analyzed in the amygdala and hypothalamus with real-time PCR ( n = 47). Independent of diet, female offspring exposed to maternal androgens were more anxious and displayed up-regulation of adrenoceptor α 1B in the amygdala and up-regulation of hypothalamic corticotropin-releasing hormone ( Crh). By contrast, male offspring exposed to a HFHS maternal diet had increased anxiety-like behavior and showed up-regulation of epigenetic markers in the amygdala and up-regulation of hypothalamic Crh. Overall, there were substantial sex differences in gene expression in the brain. These findings provide novel insight into how maternal androgens and obesity exert sex-specific effects on behavior and gene expression in the offspring of a PCOS mouse model.-Manti, M., Fornes, R., Qi, X., Folmerz, E., Lindén Hirschberg, A., de Castro Barbosa, T., Maliqueo, M., Benrick, A., Stener-Victorin, E. Maternal androgen excess and obesity induce sexually dimorphic anxiety-like behavior in the offspring.

  • 283.
    Marcondes, Rodrigo R.
    et al.
    Department of Physiology and Pharmacology, Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden / Disciplina de Ginecologia, Laboratorio de Ginecologia Estrutural e Molecular (LIM 58), Faculdade de Medicina da Universidade de São Paulo, São Paulo, Brazil.
    Maliqueo, Manuel
    Department of Physiology and Pharmacology, Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden / Endocrinology and Metabolism Laboratory, Department of Medicine, West Division, University of Chile, Santiago, Chile.
    Fornes, Romina
    Department of Physiology and Pharmacology, Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Benrick, Anna
    University of Skövde, School of Health and Education. University of Skövde, Health and Education. Department of Physiology, Institute of Neuroscience and Physiology, Sahlgrenska Academy, University of Gothenburg, Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Hu, Min
    Department of Physiology, Institute of Neuroscience and Physiology, Sahlgrenska Academy, University of Gothenburg, Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Ivarsson, Niklas
    Department of Physiology and Pharmacology, Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Carlström, Mattias
    Department of Physiology and Pharmacology, Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Cushman, Samuel W.
    Experimental Diabetes, Metabolism, and Nutrition Section, National Institute of Diabetes and Digestive and Kidney Diseases, National Institutes of Health, Bethesda, USA.
    Stenkula, Karin G.
    Department of Experimental Medical Sciences, Lund University, Lund, Sweden.
    Maciel, Gustavo A. R.
    Disciplina de Ginecologia, Laboratorio de Ginecologia Estrutural e Molecular (LIM 58), Faculdade de Medicina da Universidade de São Paulo, São Paulo, Brazil.
    Stener-Victorin, Elisabet
    Department of Physiology and Pharmacology, Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Exercise differentially affects metabolic functions and white adipose tissue in female letrozole-and dihydrotestosterone-induced mouse models of polycystic ovary syndrome2017In: Molecular and Cellular Endocrinology, ISSN 0303-7207, E-ISSN 1872-8057, Vol. 448, p. 66-76Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Here we hypothesized that exercise in dihydrotestosterone (DHT) or letrozole (LET)-induced polycystic ovary syndrome mouse models improves impaired insulin and glucose metabolism, adipose tissue morphology, and expression of genes related to adipogenesis, lipid metabolism, Notch pathway and browning in inguinal and mesenteric fat. DHT-exposed mice had increased body weight, increased number of large mesenteric adipocytes. LET-exposed mice displayed increased body weight and fat mass, decreased insulin sensitivity, increased frequency of small adipocytes and increased expression of genes related to lipolysis in mesenteric fat. In both models, exercise decreased fat mass and inguinal and mesenteric adipose tissue expression of Notch pathway genes, and restored altered mesenteric adipocytes morphology. In conclusion, exercise restored mesenteric adipocytes morphology in DHT- and LET-exposed mice, and insulin sensitivity and mesenteric expression of lipolysis-related genes in LET-exposed mice. Benefits could be explained by downregulation of Notch, and modulation of browning and lipolysis pathways in the adipose tissue. 

  • 284.
    Melin-Johansson, Christina
    et al.
    Ersta Sköndal Bräcke University College, Department of Health Care Sciences and Palliative Research Centre, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Österlind, Jane
    Ersta Sköndal Bräcke University College, Department of Health Care Sciences and Palliative Research Centre, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Henoch, Ingela
    Sahlgrenska Academy, University of Gothenburg, Institute of Health and Care Sciences, Sweden.
    Ek, Kristina
    University of Skövde, School of Health and Education. University of Skövde, Health and Education.
    Bergh, Ingrid
    University of Skövde, School of Health and Education. University of Skövde, Health and Education.
    Hagelin, Carina Lundh
    Ersta Sköndal Bräcke University College, Department of Health Care Sciences and Palliative Research Centre, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Browall, Maria
    University of Skövde, School of Health and Education. University of Skövde, Health and Education. Jönköping University, Department of Nursing School of Health and Welfare, Sweden.
    Undergraduate nursing students' transformational learning during clinical training2018In: International Journal of Palliative Nursing, ISSN 1357-6321, E-ISSN 2052-286X, Vol. 24, no 4, p. 184-192Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: Undergraduate nursing students encounter patients at the end of life during their clinical training. They need to confront dying and death under supportive circumstances in order to be prepared for similar situations in their future career.

    Aim: To explore undergraduate nursing students' descriptions of caring situations with patients at the end of life during supervised clinical training.

    Methods: A qualitative study using the critical incident technique was chosen. A total of 85 students wrote a short text about their experiences of caring for patients at the end of life during their clinical training. These critical incident reports were then analysed using deductive and inductive content analysis.

    Findings: The theme 'students' transformational learning towards becoming a professional nurse during clinical training' summarises how students relate to patients and relatives, interpret the transition from life to death, feel when caring for a dead body and learn end-of-life caring actions from their supervisors.

    Implications: As a preparation for their future profession, students undergoing clinical training need to confront death and dying while supported by trained supervisors and must learn how to communicate about end-of-life issues and cope with emotional stress and grief.

  • 285.
    Mijwel, Sara
    et al.
    Department of Physiology and Pharmacology, Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden / Department of Neurobiology, Care Sciences and Society, Karolinska Institutet, Huddinge, Sweden.
    Backman, Malin
    Department of Neurobiology, Care Sciences and Society, Karolinska Institutet, Huddinge, Sweden / Theme Cancer, Karolinska University Hospital, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Bolam, Kate A.
    Department of Neurobiology, Care Sciences and Society, Karolinska Institutet, Huddinge, Sweden / School of Human Movement and Nutrition Sciences, The University of Queensland, Brisbane, Australia.
    Jervaeus, Anna
    Department of Neurobiology, Care Sciences and Society, Karolinska Institutet, Huddinge, Sweden.
    Sundberg, Carl Johan
    Department of Physiology and Pharmacology, Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden / Department of Learning, Informatics, Management and Ethics, Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Margolin, Sara
    Department of Clinical Science and Education, Södersjukhuset, Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden / Department of Oncology, Stockholm South General Hospital, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Browall, Maria
    University of Skövde, School of Health and Education. University of Skövde, Health and Education. Department of Neurobiology, Care Sciences and Society, Karolinska Institutet, Huddinge, Sweden.
    Rundqvist, Helene
    Department of Cell and Molecular Biology, Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Wengström, Yvonne
    Department of Neurobiology, Care Sciences and Society, Karolinska Institutet, Huddinge, Sweden / Theme Cancer, Karolinska University Hospital, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Adding high-intensity interval training to conventional training modalities: optimizing health-related outcomes during chemotherapy for breast cancer: the OptiTrain randomized controlled trial2018In: Breast Cancer Research and Treatment, ISSN 0167-6806, E-ISSN 1573-7217, Vol. 168, no 1, p. 79-93Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    PURPOSE: Exercise training is an effective and safe way to counteract cancer-related fatigue (CRF) and to improve health-related quality of life (HRQoL). High-intensity interval training has proven beneficial for the health of clinical populations. The aim of this randomized controlled trial was to compare the effects of resistance and high-intensity interval training (RT-HIIT), and moderate-intensity aerobic and high-intensity interval training (AT-HIIT) to usual care (UC) in women with breast cancer undergoing chemotherapy. The primary endpoint was CRF and the secondary endpoints were HRQoL and cancer treatment-related symptoms.

    METHODS: Two hundred and forty women planned to undergo chemotherapy were randomized to supervised RT-HIIT, AT-HIIT, or UC. Measurements were performed at baseline and at 16 weeks. Questionnaires included Piper Fatigue Scale, EORTC-QLQ-C30, and Memorial Symptom Assessment Scale.

    RESULTS: The RT-HIIT group was superior to UC for CRF: total CRF (p = 0.02), behavior/daily life (p = 0.01), and sensory/physical (p = 0.03) CRF. Role functioning significantly improved while cognitive functioning was unchanged for RT-HIIT compared to declines shown in the UC group (p = 0.04). AT-HIIT significantly improved emotional functioning versus UC (p = 0.01) and was superior to UC for pain symptoms (p = 0.03). RT-HIIT reported a reduced symptom burden, while AT-HIIT remained stable compared to deteriorations shown by UC (p < 0.01). Only RT-HIIT was superior to UC for total symptoms (p < 0.01).

    CONCLUSIONS: 16 weeks of resistance and HIIT was effective in preventing increases in CRF and in reducing symptom burden for patients during chemotherapy for breast cancer. These findings add to a growing body of evidence supporting the inclusion of structured exercise prescriptions, including HIIT, as a vital component of cancer rehabilitation.

    TRIAL REGISTRATION: Clinicaltrials.gov Registration Number: NCT02522260.

  • 286.
    Muller, Jasmin
    et al.
    University of Skövde, School of Health and Education. University of Skövde, Health and Education.
    Ekström, Anette
    University of Skövde, School of Health and Education. University of Skövde, Health and Education.
    Harlén, Mikael
    University of Skövde, School of Engineering Science. University of Skövde, The Virtual Systems Research Centre.
    Lindmark, Ulrika
    School of Health Sciences, Jönköping University, Jönköping, Sweden.
    Handlin, Linda
    University of Skövde, School of Health and Education. University of Skövde, Health and Education.
    Mechanical massage and mental training program effect employees' heart rate, blood pressure and fingertip temperature: An exploratory pilot study2016In: European Journal of Integrative Medicine, ISSN 1876-3820, E-ISSN 1876-3839, Vol. 8, no 5, p. 762-768Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Introduction: Inability to relax and recover is suggested to be a key factor for stress-related health problems. This study aimed to investigate possible effects of mechanical massage and mental training, used either separately or in combination during working hours. Methods: Employees were randomly assigned to one of the following groups: i) Mechanical massage combined with mental training (n = 19), ii) Mechanical massage (n = 19), iii) Mental training (n = 19), iv) Pause (n = 19), v) Control (n = 17). The study lasted for eight weeks. Heart rate, blood pressure and fingertip temperature were measured at start, after four and after eight weeks. Results: Between-group analysis showed that heart rate differed significantly between the groups after 4 weeks (p = 0.020) and tended to differ after eight weeks (p = 0.072), with lowest levels displayed in the massage group and the control group. Blood pressure and fingertip temperature did not differ between the groups. Within-group analysis showed that mechanical massage decreased heart rate (p = 0.038) and blood pressure (systolic p = 0.019, diastolic p = 0.026) and increased fingertip temperature (p = 0.035). Mental training programs reduced heart rate (p = 0.036). Combining the two methods increased diastolic blood pressure (p = 0.028) and decreased fingertip temperature (p = 0.031). The control group had a significant decrease in systolic blood pressure during the first four weeks of the study (p = 0.038) Conclusion: Receiving mechanical massage and listening to mental training programs, either separately or in combination, during working hours had some positive effects on the employees’ heart rate, blood pressure and fingertip temperature. The effects were especially strong for employees who received mechanical massage only.

  • 287.
    Muller, Jasmin
    et al.
    University of Skövde, School of Health and Education. University of Skövde, Health and Education.
    Handlin, Linda
    University of Skövde, School of Health and Education. University of Skövde, Health and Education.
    Harlén, Mikael
    University of Skövde, School of Engineering Science.
    Lindmark, Ulrika
    School of Health Sciences, Jönköping University, Jönköping, Sweden.
    Ekström, Anette
    University of Skövde, School of Health and Education. University of Skövde, Health and Education.
    Mechanical massage and mental training programmes affect employees´ anxiety, stress susceptibility and detachment – a randomised explorative pilot study2015In: BMC Complementary and Alternative Medicine, ISSN 1472-6882, E-ISSN 1472-6882, Vol. 15, no 1, article id 302Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    BACKGROUND:

    Working people's reduced ability to recover has been proposed as a key factor behind the increase in stress-related health problems. One not yet evidence-based preventive method designed to help employees keep healthy and be less stressed is an armchair with built-in mechanical massage and mental training programmes, This study aimed to evaluate possible effects on employees' experience of levels of "Anxiety", "Stress Susceptibility", "Detachment" and "Social Desirability" when using mechanical massage and mental training programmes, both separately and in combination, during working hours.

    METHODS:

    Employees from four different workplaces were randomly assigned to one of the following groups: i) Massage and mental training (sitting in the armchair and receiving mechanical massage while listening to the mental training programmes, n=19), ii) Massage (sitting in the armchair and receiving mechanical massage only, n=19), iii) Mental training (sitting in the armchair and listening to the mental training programmes only, n=19), iv) Pause (sitting in the armchair but not receiving mechanical massage or listening to the mental training programmes, n=19), v) Control (not sitting in the armchair at all, n=17). In order to discover how the employees felt about their own health they were asked to respond to statements from the "Swedish Scale of Personality" (SSP), immediately before the randomisation, after four weeks and after eight weeks (end-of-study).

    RESULTS:

    There were no significant differences between the five study groups for any of the traits studied ("Somatic Trait Anxiety", "Psychic Trait Anxiety", "Stress Susceptibility", "Detachment" and "Social Desirability") at any of the occasions. However, the massage group showed a significant decrease in the subscale "Somatic Trait Anxiety" (p=0.032), during the entire study period. Significant decreases in the same subscale were also observed in the pause group between start and week eight (p=0.040) as well as between week four and week eight (p=0.049) and also in the control group between the second and third data collection (p=0.014). The massage and mental training group showed a significant decrease in "Stress Susceptibility" between week four and week eight (p=0.022). The pause group showed a significant increase in the subscale "Detachment" (p=0.044).

    CONCLUSIONS:

    There were no significant differences between the five study groups for any of the traits studied. However, when looking at each individual group separately, positive effects in their levels of "Anxiety", "Stress Susceptibility" and "Detachment" could be seen. Although the results from this pilot study indicate some positive effects, mechanical chair massage and mental training programmes used in order to increase employee's ability to recover, needs to be evaluated further as tools to increase the employees ability to recover.

  • 288.
    Muller, Jasmin
    et al.
    University of Skövde, School of Health and Education. University of Skövde, Health and Education.
    Handlin, Linda
    University of Skövde, School of Health and Education. University of Skövde, Health and Education.
    Harlén, Mikael
    University of Skövde, School of Engineering Science. University of Skövde, The Virtual Systems Research Centre.
    Lindmark, Ulrika
    Högskolan i Jönköping, Sweden.
    Ekström, Anette
    University of Skövde, School of Health and Education. University of Skövde, Health and Education.
    The value of armchairs in providing mechanical massage and mental relaxation programmes is not established for workplace health promotion2016In: Focus on Alternative and Complementary Therapies, ISSN 1465-3753, E-ISSN 2042-7166, Vol. 21, no 1, p. 44-45Article in journal (Other academic)
  • 289.
    Muntlin Athlin, Åsa
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Sweden / University of Adelaide, SA, Australia / Uppsala University Hospital, Sweden.
    Browall, Maria
    University of Skövde, School of Health and Education. University of Skövde, Health and Education. Karolinska Institutet, Huddinge, Sweden.
    Wengström, Yvonne
    Karolinska Institutet, Huddinge, Sweden / Karolinska University Hospital, Radiumhemmet, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Conroy, Tiffany
    University of Adelaide, SA, Australia.
    Kitson, Alison L
    University of Adelaide, SA, Australia / Flinders University, Adelaide, SA, Australia.
    Descriptions of Fundamental Care needs in cancer care - an exploratory study2018In: Journal of Clinical Nursing, ISSN 0962-1067, E-ISSN 1365-2702, Vol. 27, no 11-12, p. 2322-2332Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    AIMS AND OBJECTIVES: To explore the experiences of the fundamentals of care for people with a cancer diagnosis, from diagnosis to after adjuvant treatment.

    BACKGROUND: More focus is needed on the experience of people living with cancer, as current cancer care more emphasises on independence and resilience without fully acknowledging that there will be moments in the cancer journey where patients will need 'basic nursing care' to manage their symptoms and care pathways.

    DESIGN: Secondary analysis of qualitative data.

    METHOD: Secondary thematic analysis of interview data from 30 people with a diagnosis of breast (n=10), colorectal (n=10) or prostate (n=10) cancer was undertaken.

    RESULTS: The findings revealed vivid descriptions of the fundamentals of care (i.e. basic needs) and participants described physical, psychosocial and relational aspects of the delivery of care. Both positive (e.g. supportive and kind) and negative (e.g. humiliating) experiences related to the relationship with the healthcare professionals were re-counted and affected the participants' experiences of the fundamentals of care. Participants' accounts of their fundamental care needs were provided without them identifying who, within the health care system, was responsible for providing these needs. Specific nursing interventions were seldom described.

    CONCLUSION: Some people with a cancer diagnosis have to strive for help and support from the nursing staff to manage to regain control over their recovery. Nurses in cancer care need to focus on the patients' fundamental care needs to optimise their patients' recovery. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved.

  • 290.
    Murtas, Rossella
    et al.
    Fdn IRCSS Ist Nazl Tumori, Epidemiol & Prevent Unit, Via Venezian 1, I-20133 Milan, Italy / Univ Cagliari, Dept Math & Comp Sci, Cagliari, Italy.
    Krogh, Vittorio
    Fdn IRCSS Ist Nazl Tumori, Epidemiol & Prevent Unit, Via Venezian 1, I-20133 Milan, Italy.
    Intemann, Timm
    Leibniz Inst Prevent Res & Epidemiol BIPS, Bremen, Germany / Bremen Univ, Inst Stat, Bremen, Germany.
    Lissner, Lauren
    Univ Gothenburg, Sahlgrenska Acad, Sect Epidemiol & Social Med, Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Eiben, Gabriele
    University of Skövde, School of Health and Education. University of Skövde, Health and Education.
    Molnar, Denes
    Univ Pecs, Med Sch, Dept Pediat, Pecs, Hungary.
    Moreno, Luis A.
    Univ Zaragoza, Growth Exercise Nutr & Dev Res Grp, Zaragoza, Spain.
    Siani, Alfonso
    CNR, Inst Food Sci, Res, Avellino, Italy.
    Tornaritis, Michael
    Res & Educ Inst Child Hlth, Strovolos, Cyprus.
    Veidebaum, Toomas
    Natl Inst Hlth Dev, Tallinn, Estonia.
    Mazur, Artur
    Univ Rzeszow, Med Fac, Inst Nursing & Hlth Sci, Rzeszow, Poland.
    Deren, Katarzyna
    Univ Rzeszow, Med Fac, Inst Nursing & Hlth Sci, Rzeszow, Poland.
    Wolters, Maike
    Leibniz Inst Prevent Res & Epidemiol BIPS, Bremen, Germany.
    Ahrens, Wolfgang
    Bremen Univ, Inst Stat, Bremen, Germany / Leibniz Inst Prevent Res & Epidemiol BIPS, Dept Epidemiol Methods & Etiol Res, Bremen, Germany.
    Pala, Valeria
    Fdn IRCSS Ist Nazl Tumori, Epidemiol & Prevent Unit, Via Venezian 1, I-20133 Milan, Italy.
    Does Providing Assistance to Children and Adolescents Increase Repeatability and Plausibility of Self-Reporting Using a Web-Based Dietary Recall Instrument?2018In: Journal of the Academy of Nutrition and Dietetics, ISSN 2212-2672, E-ISSN 2212-2680, Vol. 118, no 12, p. 2324-2330Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background It is important to find ways to minimize errors when children self-report food consumption. Objective The objective of this study was to investigate whether assistance given to children completing a self-administered 24-hour dietary recall instrument called SACANA (Self-Administered Child, Adolescent and Adult Nutrition Assessment) increased the repeatability and plausibility of energy intake (EI) estimates. Participants/setting The study was conducted between October 2013 and March 2016 in a convenience sample of 395 children, aged 8 to 17 years, from eight European countries participating in the I.Family study. Design SACANA was used to recall the previous day's food intake, twice in a day, once with and once without assistance. Main outcome measures The difference in EI between the first and second recalls was the main repeatability measure; the ratio of EI to basal metabolic rate was the plausibility measure. Statistical methods Generalized linear mixed models, adjusted for sex, age, and body mass index z-score, were used to assess whether assistance during the first vs second recall influenced repeatability and plausibility. Results The difference in estimated EI (EI from second recall minus EI from first recall) was significantly lower (P<0.001) in those assisted at first (median=-76 kcal) than those assisted at second recall (median=282 kcal). Modeling showed that EI at assisted first recall was 19% higher (95% CI 1.13 to 1.24) than in assisted second recall. Overall, 60% of recalls had a plausible EI. Modeling to estimate the simultaneous effects of second vs first recall and assistance vs no assistance on plausibility showed that those assisted at first recall had significantly higher odds of a plausible recall than those unassisted (odds ratio 3.64, 95% CI 2.20 to 6.01), with no significant difference in plausibility of second recall compared to the first (odds ratio 1.48, 95% CI 0.92 to 2.35). Conclusions When children are assisted at first recall, the plausibility and repeatability of the later unassisted recall improve. This improvement was evident for all ages. A future, adequately powered study is required to investigate the age range for which assistance is advisable.

  • 291.
    Mårdby, Ann-Charlotte
    et al.
    Research and Development, Sahlgrenska University Hospital, Gothenburg, Sweden / Section of Epidemiology and Social Medicine, Department of Public Health and Community Medicine at Institute of Medicine, University of Gothenburg, Gothenburg, Sweden / Novo Nordisk A/S, Malmö, Sweden.
    Schiöler, Linus
    Section of Occupational and Environmental Medicine, Department of Public Health and Community Medicine at Institute of Medicine, University of Gothenburg, Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Andersson Sundell, Karolina
    Section of Epidemiology and Social Medicine, Department of Public Health and Community Medicine at Institute of Medicine, University of Gothenburg, Gothenburg, Sweden / Medical Evidence and Observational Research, AstraZeneca, Mölndal, Sweden.
    Bjerkeli, Pernilla
    University of Skövde, School of Health and Education. University of Skövde, Health and Education. Nordic School of Public Health, Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Lesén, Eva
    Nordic Health Economics AB, Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Jönsson, Anna K.
    Department of Forensic Genetics and Forensic Toxicology, National Board of Forensic Medicine, Linköping, Sweden.
    Adherence to antidepressants among women and men described with trajectory models: a Swedish longitudinal study2016In: European Journal of Clinical Pharmacology, ISSN 0031-6970, E-ISSN 1432-1041, Vol. 72, no 11, p. 1381-1389Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The purpose of this study are to analyse adherence to antidepressant treatment over 2 years in Sweden among women and men who initiated treatment with citalopram and to identify groups at risk of non-adherence using trajectory models. The study population, including individuals 18-85 years who initiated citalopram use between 1 July 2006 and 30 June 2007, was identified in the Swedish Prescribed Drug Register and followed for 2 years. Adherence was estimated with continuous measure of medication acquisition (CMA) and group-based trajectory modelling, a method which describes adherence patterns over time by estimating trajectories of adherence and the individual's probability of belonging to a specific trajectory. The study population included 54,248 individuals, 64 % women. Mean CMA was 52 % among women and 50 % among men (p < 0.001). Five different adherence patterns (Trajectories) were identified. Similar proportion of women and men belonged to each Trajectory. Around 29 % of the women and 27 % of the men belonged to the Trajectory which showed full adherence throughout the 2-year study period. The other four Trajectories showed adherence that declined to different degrees and at different stages in time. Having low socioeconomic status was more common among individuals in Trajectories showing declining adherence than in the adherent Trajectory. Using trajectory modelling, five Trajectories describing different patterns of adherence to citalopram treatment over time were identified. A large proportion discontinued treatment early and having low socioeconomic status increased the risk of being non-adherent.

  • 292.
    Mårtensson, Lena B.
    et al.
    University of Skövde, School of Health and Education. University of Skövde, Health and Education.
    Ek, Kristina
    University of Skövde, School of Health and Education. University of Skövde, Health and Education.
    Ekström, Anette
    University of Skövde, School of Health and Education. University of Skövde, Health and Education.
    Bergh, Ingrid H. E.
    University of Skövde, School of Health and Education. University of Skövde, Health and Education.
    Midwifery students' conceptions of worst imaginable pain2014In: Women and Birth, ISSN 1871-5192, E-ISSN 1878-1799, Vol. 27, no 2, p. 104-107Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: The Visual Analogue Scale (VAS) is one of the most widely used pain assessment scales in clinical practice and research. However, the VAS is used less frequently in midwifery than in other clinical contexts. The issue of how people interpret the meaning of the VAS endpoints (i.e. no pain and worst imaginable pain) has been discussed. The aim of this study was to explore midwifery students' conceptions of 'worst imaginable pain'. Methods: A sample of 230 midwifery students at seven universities in Sweden responded to an open-ended question: 'What is the worst imaginable pain for you?' This open-ended question is a part of a larger study. Their responses underwent manifest content analysis. Results: Analysis of the midwifery students' responses to the open-ended question revealed five categories with 24 sub-categories. The categories were Overwhelming pain, Condition-related pain, Accidents, Inflicted pain and Psychological suffering. Conclusions: The midwifery students' conceptions of 'worst imaginable pain' are complex, elusive and diverse. © 2014 Australian College of Midwives.

  • 293.
    Mårtensson, Lena B.
    et al.
    University of Skövde, School of Health and Education. University of Skövde, Health and Education.
    Hutton, Eileen K.
    Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, McMaster University, Hamilton, Canada / Vrije Universiteit, Amsterdam, The Netherlands.
    Lee, Nigel
    Mater Research Institute University of Queensland, Brisbane, Australia / School of Nursing, Midwifery and Social Work University of Queensland, St Lucia, Australia.
    Kildea, Sue
    Mater Research Institute University of Queensland, Brisbane, Australia / School of Nursing, Midwifery and Social Work University of Queensland, St Lucia, Australia.
    Gao, Yu
    Mater Research Institute University of Queensland, Brisbane, Australia / School of Nursing, Midwifery and Social Work University of Queensland, St Lucia, Australia.
    Bergh, Ingrid
    University of Skövde, School of Health and Education. University of Skövde, Health and Education.
    Sterile water injections for childbirth pain: An evidenced based guide to practice2018In: Women and Birth, ISSN 1871-5192, E-ISSN 1878-1799, Vol. 31, no 5, p. 380-385Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: About 30% of women in labour suffer from lower back pain. Studies of sterile water injectionsfor management of low back pain have consistently shown this approach to be effective. The objective ofthis evidence-based guide is to facilitate the clinical use of sterile water injections to relieve lower backpain in labouring women.Methods: To identify relevant publications our search strategy was based on computerised literaturesearches in scientific databases. The methodological quality of each study was assessed using themodified version of the Jadad scale, 12 studies were included.Findings: Recommendations regarding the clinical use of sterile water injections for pain relief in labourare reported in terms of the location of injection administration, various injection techniques, number ofinjections used, amount of sterile water in each injection and adverse effects.Discussion: Both injection techniques provide good pain relief for lower back pain during labour. Thesubcutaneous injection technique is possibly less painful than the intracutaneous techniqueadministered, but we are unsure if this impacts on effectiveness. The effect seems to be related tothe number of injections and the amount of sterile water in each injection.Conclusion: The recommendation at present, based on the current state of knowledge, is to give fourinjections. Notwithstanding the differences in injection technique and number of injections the methodappears to provide significant levels of pain relief and can be repeated as often as required with noadverse effect (apart from the administration pain) on the woman or her foetus.

  • 294.
    Mårtensson, Lena
    et al.
    University of Skövde, School of Health and Education. University of Skövde, Health and Education.
    Mogren, Lisa
    Sahlgrenska University Hospital, Mölndal, Sweden.
    Lindblom, Emma
    Södra Älvsborg Hospital, Borås, Sweden.
    Thorstensson, Stina
    University of Skövde, School of Health and Education. University of Skövde, Health and Education.
    What helps? A description of experiences of support among primiparous women with fear of childbirth: An interview study2014In: International Journal of Nursing and Midwifery, E-ISSN 2141-2456, Vol. 6, no 5, p. 67-73Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 295.
    Nilipour, Yalda
    et al.
    Mofid Children Hospital, Shahid Beheshti University of Medical Sciences, Iran.
    Nafissi, Shahriar
    Tehran University of Medical Sciences, Iran.
    Tjust, Anton E.
    Umeå University, Sweden.
    Ravenscroft, Gianina
    The University of Western Australia and the Harry Perkins Institute for Medical Research, Nedlands, Western Australia, Australia.
    Hossein-Nejad Nedai, Hamid
    Shahid Beheshti University of Medical Sciences, Iran.
    Taylor, Rhonda L.
    The University of Western Australia and the Harry Perkins Institute for Medical Research, Nedlands, Western Australia.
    Varasteh, Vahid
    Shahid Beheshti University of Medical Sciences, Iran.
    Pedrosa Domellöf, Fatima
    Umeå University, Sweden.
    Zangi, Mahdi
    National Research Institute of Tuberculosis and Lung Diseases (NRITLD), Shahid Beheshti University of Medical Sciences, Iran.
    Tonekaboni, Seyed Hassan
    Mofid Children Hospital, Shahid Beheshti University of Medical Sciences, Iran.
    Olivé, M.
    IDIBELL-Hospital de Bellvitge, Barcelona, Spain.
    Kiiski, Kirsi
    Folkhälsan Institute of Genetics, Medicum, University of Helsinki, Finland.
    Sagath, L.
    Folkhälsan Institute of Genetics, Medicum, University of Helsinki, Finland.
    Davis, Mark R.
    Pathwest, QEII Medical Centre, Nedlands, Western Australia.
    Laing, Nigel G.
    The University of Western Australia and the Harry Perkins Institute for Medical Research, Nedlands, Western Australia.
    Tajsharghi, Homa
    University of Skövde, School of Health and Education. University of Skövde, Health and Education. The University of Western Australia and the Harry Perkins Institute for Medical Research, Nedlands, Western Australia, Australia.
    Ryanodine receptor type 3 (RYR3) as a novel gene associated with a myopathy with nemaline bodies2018In: European Journal of Neurology, ISSN 1351-5101, E-ISSN 1468-1331, Vol. 25, no 6, p. 841-847Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: Nemaline myopathy has been associated with mutations in twelve genes to date. However, for some patients diagnosed with nemaline myopathy, definitive mutations are not identified in the known genes, suggesting there are other genes involved. This study describes compound heterozygosity for rare variants in RYR3 in one such patient.

    Results: Clinical examination of the patient at 22 years of age revealed a long-narrow face, high arched palate and bilateral facial weakness. She had proximal weakness in all four limbs, mild scapular winging but no scoliosis. Muscle biopsy revealed wide variation in fibre size with type 1 fibre predominance and atrophy. Abundant nemaline bodies were located in perinuclear areas, subsarcolemmal and within the cytoplasm. No likely pathogenic mutations in known nemaline myopathy genes were identified. Copy number variation in known nemaline myopathy genes was excluded by nemaline myopathy targeted array-CGH. Next generation sequencing revealed compound heterozygous missense variants in the ryanodine receptor type 3 gene (RYR3).  RYR3 transcripts are expressed in human fetal and adult skeletal muscle as well as in human brain or cauda equina samples. Immunofluorescence of human skeletal muscle revealed a "single-row" appearance of RYR3, interspaced between the "double-rows" of RYR1 at each A-I junction.

    Conclusion: The results suggest that variants in RYR3 may cause a recessive muscle disease with pathological features including nemaline bodies. We characterize the expression pattern of RYR3 in human skeletal muscle and brain and the subcellular localization of RYR1 and RYR3 in human skeletal muscle.

  • 296.
    Nilsson, Emma
    et al.
    Epigenetics and Diabetes Unit, Department of Clinical Sciences, Lund University Diabetes Centre, Lund University, Skåne University Hospital, Malmö, Sweden.
    Benrick, Anna
    University of Skövde, School of Health and Education. University of Skövde, Health and Education. Department of Physiology, Institute of Neuroscience and Physiology, Sahlgrenska Academy, University of Gothenburg, Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Kokosar, Milana
    Department of Physiology, Institute of Neuroscience and Physiology, Sahlgrenska Academy, University of Gothenburg, Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Krook, Anna
    Department of Physiology and Pharmacology, Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Lindgren, Eva
    Department of Physiology and Pharmacology, Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Källman, Thomas
    Department of Medical Biochemistry and Microbiology, National Bioinformatics Infrastructure Sweden, SciLifeLab, Uppsala University, Uppsala, Sweden.
    Martis, Mihaela M.
    National Bioinformatics Infrastructure Sweden, Division of Cell Biology, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Linköping University, Linköping, Sweden.
    Højlund, Kurt
    Department of Endocrinology, Odense University, Odense C, Denmark.
    Ling, Charlotte
    Epigenetics and Diabetes Unit, Department of Clinical Sciences, Lund University Diabetes Centre, Lund University, Skåne University Hospital, Malmö, Sweden.
    Stener-Victorin, Elisabet
    Department of Physiology and Pharmacology, Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Transcriptional and Epigenetic Changes Influencing Skeletal Muscle Metabolism in Women With Polycystic Ovary Syndrome2018In: Journal of Clinical Endocrinology and Metabolism, ISSN 0021-972X, E-ISSN 1945-7197, Vol. 103, no 12, p. 4465-4477Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Context: Insulin resistance in skeletal muscle is a major risk factor for the development of type 2 diabetes in women with polycystic ovary syndrome (PCOS). Despite this, the mechanisms underlying insulin resistance in PCOS are largely unknown. Objective: To investigate the genome-wide DNA methylation and gene expression patterns in skeletal muscle from women with PCOS and controls and relate them to phenotypic variations. Design/Participants: In a case-control study, skeletal muscle biopsies from women with PCOS (n = 17) and age-, weight-, and body mass index. matched controls (n = 14) were analyzed by array-based DNA methylation and mRNA expression profiling. Results: Eighty-five unique transcripts were differentially expressed in muscle from women with PCOS vs controls, including DYRK1A, SYNPO2, SCP2, and NAMPT. Furthermore, women with PCOS had reduced expression of genes involved in immune system pathways. Two CpG sites showed differential DNA methylation after correction for multiple testing. However, an mRNA expression of similar to 30% of the differentially expressed genes correlated with DNA methylation levels of CpG sites in or near the gene. Functional follow-up studies demonstrated that KLF10 is under transcriptional control of insulin, where insulin promotes glycogen accumulation in myotubes of human muscle cells. Testosterone downregulates the expression levels of COL1A1 and MAP2K6. Conclusion: PCOS is associated with aberrant skeletal muscle gene expression with dysregulated pathways. Furthermore, we identified specific changes in muscle DNA methylation that may affect gene expression. This study showed that women with PCOS have epigenetic and transcriptional changes in skeletal muscle that, in part, can explain the metabolic abnormalities seen in these women.

  • 297.
    Nilsson, Håkan
    University of Skövde, School of Health and Education. University of Skövde, Health and Education. Department of Literature, History of Ideas and Religion, University of Gothenburg, Sweden.
    A four-dimensional model of mindfulness and its implications for health2014In: Psychology of Religion and Spirituality, ISSN 1941-1022, E-ISSN 1943-1562, Vol. 6, no 2, p. 162-174Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 298.
    Nilsson, Håkan
    University of Skövde, School of Health and Education. University of Skövde, Health and Education. Högskolan i Jönköping, Hälsohögskolan.
    Conceptualizing and contextualizing mindfulness: New and critical perspectives2015Doctoral thesis, comprehensive summary (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    This dissertation aims at analyzing mindfulness as a concept and a multidimensional phenomenon in its historic and primordial but also contemporary contexts. In the course of examining this more general question, this dissertation targets four specific objectives: 1) classifying existing definitions of mindfulness, 2) critically analyzing and interpreting the Buddhist and Western interpretations and practices of mindfulness, 3) elaborating on the social and existential dimensions of mindfulness, and 4) applying these dimensions in advancing the notion of mindful sustainable aging in the context of successful aging. Paper I examines and assesses the numerous definitions of mindfulness that have been presented over the years by a wide range of scholars from a variety of disciplines. Paper II traces the roots of modern mindfulness in Buddhism. It continues by exploring the utility and practices of mindfulness in the context of social work. The definitions provided in Paper I and the Buddhist underpinnings discussed in Paper II call attention to the fact that in addition to the more commonly considered physical and mental dimensions, mindfulness contains a social and an existential dimension as well – dimensions that remain under-researched and not well understood. To redress this imbalance, Paper III elaborates on these two latter dimensions, emphasizing their potential to enhance health, wellbeing and meaning in life. Paper III further argues that a more nuanced understanding of physical, mental, social and existential mindfulness can be obtained by examining the interconnectedness of all four fields. Paper IV continues the discussion of the social and the existential dimensions of mindfulness with specific emphasis on their utility for successful aging, and advances the notion of mindful sustainable aging. Paper IV highlights the potential of mindfulness for living a meaningful life and boosting the elderly’s capacity to find deeper meaning in their final stage of life.

  • 299.
    Nilsson, Håkan
    University of Skövde, School of Health and Education. University of Skövde, Health and Education.
    Mindful hållbart åldrande – holistiskt åldrande i ny belysning2016In: Socialmedicinsk Tidskrift, ISSN 0037-833X, Vol. 93, no 6, p. 692-703Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 300.
    Nilsson, Håkan
    University of Skövde, School of Health and Education. University of Skövde, Health and Education.
    Socioexistential mindfulness: Bringing empathy and compassion into health care practice2016In: Spirituality in Clinical Practice, ISSN 2326-4500, Vol. 3, no 1, p. 22-31Article in journal (Refereed)
3456789 251 - 300 of 444
CiteExportLink to result list
Permanent link
Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf