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  • 2101.
    Vaidya, Abhinav
    et al.
    Department of Community Medicine, Kathmandu Medical College / Nordic School of Public Health NHV, Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Oli, Natalia
    Department of Community Medicine, Kathmandu Medical College.
    Aryal, Umesh Raj
    Nordic School of Public Health NHV, Gothenburg, Sweden / Department of Community Medicine, Kathmandu Medical College.
    Karki, D. B.
    Department of Internal Medicine, Kathmandu Medical College.
    Krettek, Alexandra
    Nordic School of Public Health NHV, Gothenburg, Sweden / Department of Internal Medicine and Clinical Nutrition, Institute of Medicine, Sahlgrenska Academy at University of Gothenburg, Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Disparities in fruit and vegetable intake by socio-demographic characteristics in peri-urban Nepalese adults: findings from the Heart-Health Associated Research and Dissemination in the Community (HARDIC) Study, Bhaktapur, Nepal2013In: Journal of Kathmandu Medical College, ISSN 2091-1785, Vol. 2, no 1, p. 3-11Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: Inadequate fruit and vegetable intake and other adverse dietary habits – along with tobacco and alcohol abuse and sub-optimal physical activity - make up the four most important behavioural risk factors of non-communicable diseases. Low fruit and vegetable intake is particularly associated with burden of high cardiovascular disease. It has received more attention in the last decade, with studies that explore disparities and determinants in their intake, as well as interventions that attempt to improve the intake.

    Objectives: Our study aimed to determine fruit and vegetable consumption in a peri-urban community of Nepal and to compare this intake in relation to various socio-demographic variables.

    Methods: This cross-sectional study was conducted as a part of the HARDIC (Heart-Health Associated Research and Dissemination in the Community) study in the Jhaukhel-Duwakot Health Demographic Surveillance Site in the Bhaktapur district of Nepal during September-December 2011. Adults from six randomly selected clusters were interviewed by 12 trained interviewers after taking informed consent. WHO-STEPS questions were used to elicit information on fruit and vegetable intake.

    Results: Fruit and vegetable intake in the community was low with 2.1 percent of the study population consuming the WHO-recommended five servings per day. There were differences in the intake according to the various sociodemographic factors.

    Conclusions: Our study reaffirms low fruit and vegetable intake as a public health problem in the Nepalese context. Health-promotional activities aimed at specific target groups are essential. Multi-sectoral coordination of health and other health-related sectors is therefore vital in addressing the issue.

  • 2102.
    Vaidya, Abhinav
    et al.
    Department of Community Medicine, Kathmandu Medical College Teaching Hospital, Sinamangal, Kathmandu, Nepal.
    Oli, Natalia
    Department of Community Medicine, Kathmandu Medical College Teaching Hospital, Sinamangal, Kathmandu, Nepal / Department of Internal Medicine and Clinical Nutrition, Institute of Medicine, Sahlgrenska Academy at University of Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Eiben, Gabriele
    University of Skövde, School of Health and Education. University of Skövde, Health and Education. Department of Public Health and Community Medicine, University of Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Krettek, Alexandra
    University of Skövde, School of Health and Education. University of Skövde, Health and Education. Department of Internal Medicine and Clinical Nutrition, Institute of Medicine, Sahlgrenska Academy at University of Gothenburg, Gothenburg, Sweden / Department of Community Medicine, Faculty of Health Sciences, UiT The Arctic University of Norway, Tromsø, Norway.
    The heart-health associated research, dissemination and intervention in the community (HARDIC) trial for nepalese mothers regarding diet and physical activity: A process evaluation2017In: Kathmandu University Medical Journal, ISSN 1812-2027, E-ISSN 1812-2078, Vol. 15, no 58, p. 107-116Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background Mothers with young children in the peri-urban Jhaukhel-Duwakot Health Demographic Surveillance site of Bhaktapur district have misconceptions and poor behavioural practice regarding diet and physical activity. We developed the Heart-health Associated Research, Dissemination and Intervention in the Community trial - a health promotion intervention for mothers. Objective The objective of this study was to evaluate the intervention’s feasibility, acceptability, potential for transferability and scaling up, and to determine its immediate outcome. Method Duwakot and Jhaukhel were randomly selected as the intervention and control communities, respectively. We trained 47 peer mothers from Duwakot, each of whom gave classes with 10 fellow mothers of their neighbourhood. The process evaluation was carried out on a continuous basis at different points of the intervention held from August to November 2016. Result In round one, the participation and completion rates were both > 90% for peer mothers; and 85% and 70%, respectively, for the fellow mothers. However, the participation rates fell in the round two of the intervention. On the whole, the mothers expressed satisfaction and acceptance of the course content and training modality. Immediate evaluation of the intervention showed improvement of knowledge, attitude and practice of diet and physical activity among both groups of mothers. Conclusion The successful implementation of the intervention targeting diet and physical activity clearly demonstrates the feasibility of health promotional activities in the Nepalese community for improvement of cardiovascular health. © 2017, Kathmandu University. All rights reserved.

  • 2103.
    Vaidya, Abhinav
    et al.
    Kathmandu Medical College, Kathmandu, Nepal.
    Oli, Natalia
    Kathmandu Medical College, Kathmandu, Nepal / University of Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Krettek, Alexandra
    University of Skövde, School of Health and Education. University of Skövde, Health and Education. Göteborgs universitet / UiT Norges Arktiska Universitet.
    High prevalence of prehypertension in mothers of young children in peri-urban Nepal2016In: Journal of Kathmandu Medical College, ISSN 2091-1785, Vol. 5, no 2, p. 52-60Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: Prehypertension is clinically defined as a level of blood pressure between normal and hypertension, i.e. elevated systolic blood pressure between 120-139 or diastolic blood pressure between 80-89 mm Hg. Prehypertension remains neglected as a public health problem, and has not been explored in mothers with small children in Nepal.

    Objectives: We aimed to study prehypertension and its related factors including obesity-related parameters among mothers with children aged 1-7 years in Duwakot and Jhaukhel communities of Bhaktapur district, Nepal.

    Methods: We prepared a sampling frame of all the eligible mothers, and interviewed 962 mothers. The trained enumerators also measured their blood pressure, body weight, height, waist and hip circumferences. We analysed data with SPSS version 22. We received ethical approval from the Nepal Health Research Council to conduct the study, and obtained informed verbal consent from the participating mothers.

    Results: About one-third (31.8%) of the mothers had prehypertension. It was more common among Newars and those aged 30-34 years. Multivariate analysis did not reveal significant association with sociodemographic variables except for education. We found positive correlations between blood pressure and obesity parameters. Overweight and obese participants were 2.24 (95% confidence interval: 1.06-4.73) and 4.65 (95% confidence interval: 1.92-11.23) times, respectively, more likely to have prehypertension than underweight mothers.

    Conclusions: Our study demonstrated a high prevalence of prehypertension, coupled with high obesity parameters, among young mothers of peri-urban Nepal. Primordial preventive efforts at community level are needed not only for the mothers themselves, but for heart-health of their offspring as well.

  • 2104.
    Vaidya, Abhinav
    et al.
    Department of Community Medicine, Kathmandu Medical College, Kathmandu.
    Oli, Natalia
    Department of Community Medicine, Kathmandu Medical College, Kathmandu / Department of Internal Medicine and Clinical Nutrition, Institute of Medicine, Sahlgrenska Academy at University of Gothenburg, Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Krettek, Alexandra
    University of Skövde, School of Health and Education. University of Skövde, Health and Education. Department of Internal Medicine and Clinical Nutrition, Institute of Medicine, Sahlgrenska Academy at University of Gothenburg, Gothenburg, Sweden / 4Department of Community Medicine, Faculty of Health Sciences, UiT The Arctic University of Norway, Tromso, Norway .
    Eiben, Gabriele
    University of Skövde, School of Health and Education. University of Skövde, Health and Education. Department of Public Health and Community Medicine, University of Gothenburg, Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Preference of Food-items and Physical Activity of Peri-urban Children in Bhaktapur2017In: Journal of Nepal Health Research Council, ISSN 1727-5482, E-ISSN 1999-6217, Vol. 15, no 2, p. 150-158Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    BACKGROUND: Though cardiovascular diseases are mostly seen in adulthood, the foundation of diet and physical activity is largely formed during childhood. The study aimed to explore children's preference for diet and physical activity in a peri-urban area of Nepal because this is an important dimension to explore in the life-course approach to combat non-communicable diseases.

    METHODS: We conducted a cross-sectional study to enquire young peri-urban children of Duwakot and Jhaukhel villages of Bhaktapur district, Nepal on their preferences for diet and physical activity. All eligible households with children in the age range 5-10 years as enlisted from the Jhaukhel-Duwakot Health Demographic Surveillance Site database were selected for the study. Twelve enumerators visited the selected households and facilitated the eligible children to fill in the questionnaire. We used a child-friendly photo-assisted questionnaire with face-scales that easily enabled the children to select a particular preference for each of the food item and physical activity. During analysis, food items were categorized into 'green', 'yellow' and 'red' on the basis of their nutritive values. Physical activity was categorized based on severity of the activity.

    RESULTS: Four hundred and thirty seven children filled up the questionnaires. Overall, median preference scores for 'red' food were higher than for healthier 'green' food (4.16 vs. 4.03), particularly, if mothers were self-employed. Likewise, the children preferred low over moderate-to-severe physical activity (4.16 vs. 3.50), and preference was affected by parents' occupation and income.

    CONCLUSIONS: The study objectively revealed that most of the children preferred unhealthier food-items and low physical activities. It shall be useful to consider these findings while planning health promotional activities targeted at them.

  • 2105.
    Vaidya, Abhinav
    et al.
    Nordic School of Public Health, Gothenburg, Sweden / Kathmandu Medical College, Duwakot, Bhaktapur, Nepal.
    Shakya, Suraj
    Nordic School of Public Health, Gothenburg, Sweden / Nepal Medical College and Teaching Hospital, Jorpati, Kathmandu.
    Krettek, Alexandra
    Nordic School of Public Health, Gothenburg, Sweden / Sahlgrenska Academy at University of Gothenburg, Sweden .
    Obesity Prevalence in Nepal: Public Health Challenges in a Low-Income Nation during an Alarming Worldwide Trend2010In: International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health, ISSN 1661-7827, E-ISSN 1660-4601, Vol. 7, no 6, p. 2726-2744Article, review/survey (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The future toll of the obesity epidemic will likely hit hardest in low- and middle-income countries. Ongoing urbanization promotes risk factors including sedentary lifestyle and fat- and sugar-laden diets. Low-income countries like Nepal experience a double disease burden: infectious diseases as well as rising incidence of noncommunicable diseases (e.g., cardiovascular disease and diabetes mellitus) frequently characterized by obesity. Nepal currently directs efforts towards curing disease but pays little attention to preventive actions. This article highlights obesity prevalence in Nepal, delineates the challenges identified by our pilot study (including low health literacy rates), and suggests strategies to overcome this trend.

  • 2106.
    Valli, Katja
    et al.
    University of Skövde, School of Bioscience. University of Skövde, The Systems Biology Research Centre. Centre for Cognitive Neuroscience, Turku Brain and Mind Center, Department of Psychology, University of Turku, Turku, Finland.
    Frauscher, Birgit
    Department of Neurology, Medical University of Innsbruck, Innsbruck, Austria.
    Peltomaa, Taina
    Centre for Cognitive Neuroscience, Turku Brain and Mind Center, Department of Psychology, University of Turku, Turku, Finland.
    Gschliesser, Viola
    Department of Neurology, Medical University of Innsbruck, Innsbruck, Austria.
    Revonsuo, Antti
    University of Skövde, School of Bioscience. University of Skövde, The Systems Biology Research Centre. Centre for Cognitive Neuroscience, Turku Brain and Mind Center, Department of Psychology, University of Turku, Turku, Finland.
    Högl, Birgit
    Department of Neurology, Medical University of Innsbruck, Innsbruck, Austria.
    Dreaming furiously?: A sleep laboratory study on the dream content of people with Parkinson's disease and with or without rapid eye movement sleep behavior disorder2015In: Sleep Medicine, ISSN 1389-9457, E-ISSN 1878-5506, Vol. 16, no 3, p. 419-427Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    OBJECTIVE: Rapid eye movement (REM) sleep behavior disorder (RBD) has been related to altered, action-filled, vivid, and aggressive dream content, but research comparing the possible differences in dreams of Parkinson's disease (PD) patients with and without RBD is scarce. The dream content of PD patients with and without RBD was analyzed with specific focus on action-filledness, vividness, emotional valence, and threats.

    METHODS: A total of 69 REM and NREM dream reports were collected in the sleep laboratory, 37 from nine PD patients with RBD and 32 from six PD patients without RBD. A content analysis of (1) action-filledness (actions and environmental events); (2) vividness (emotions and cognitive activity); (3) intensity of actions, events and emotions; (4) emotional valence, and (5) threatening events was performed on the transcripts.

    RESULTS: Altogether 563 dream elements expressing action-filledness and vividness were found. There were no significant between-group differences in the number or distribution of elements reflecting action-filledness or vividness, emotional valence or threats. In within-group analyses, PD patients with RBD had significantly more negative compared to positive dreams (p = 0.012) and compared to PD patients without RBD, a tendency to have more intense actions in their dreams (p = 0.066).

    CONCLUSIONS: Based on the results of this study, there are no major between-group differences in the action-filledness, vividness, or threat content of dreams of PD patients with and without RBD. However, within-group analyses revealed that dreams were more often negatively than positively toned in PD patients with RBD.

  • 2107.
    Van den Bussche, Karen
    et al.
    Univ Ghent, Dept Publ Hlth, B-9000 Ghent, Belgium.
    Michels, Nathalie
    Univ Ghent, Dept Publ Hlth, B-9000 Ghent, Belgium.
    Gracia-Marco, Luis
    Univ Zaragoza, Res Grp, E-50009 Zaragoza, Spain / Univ Exeter, Sch Sport & Hlth Sci, Exeter EX1 2LU, Devon, England.
    Herrmann, Diana
    BIPS Inst Epidemiol & Prevent Res, D-28359 Bremen, Germany.
    Eiben, Gabriele
    Univ Gothenburg, Dept Pediat, Inst Clin Sci, Queen Silvia Childrens Hosp,Sahlgrenska Acad, S-41685 Gothenburg, Sweden.
    De Henauw, Stefaan
    Univ Ghent, Dept Publ Hlth, B-9000 Ghent, Belgium / Univ Coll Ghent, Dept Hlth Sci, B-9000 Ghent, Belgium.
    Sioen, Isabelle
    Univ Ghent, Dept Publ Hlth, B-9000 Ghent, Belgium / Res Fdn Flanders, FWO, B-1000 Brussels, Belgium.
    Influence of Birth Weight on Calcaneal Bone Stiffness in Belgian Preadolescent Children2012In: Calcified Tissue International, ISSN 0171-967X, E-ISSN 1432-0827, Vol. 91, no 4, p. 267-275Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The aim of this study was to investigate the relation between birth weight and calcaneal bone stiffness in a large sample of Belgian, healthy, preadolescent children. Participants were 827 children (3.6-11.2 years, 51.6 % boys) from the Belgian cohort of the IDEFICS study. Birth weight was obtained using a parental questionnaire, and quantitative ultrasound (QUS) measurements were performed to determine calcaneal broadband ultrasound attenuation (BUA), speed of sound (SOS), and stiffness index (SI) using the Lunar Achilles device. Average birth weights were 3435.7 +/- A 512.0 g for boys and 3256.9 +/- A 471.1 g for girls. Average calcaneal QUS measurements were 89.6 +/- A 24.0 (23.3-153.9) dB/MHz for BUA, 1621.4 +/- A 49.6 (1516.3-1776.5) m/s for SOS, and 92.8 +/- A 15.6 (49.0-163.0) for SI. Birth weight was positively associated with BUA (r = 0.13, p = 0.002) and SOS (r = -0.16, p < 0.001). The associations remained after correcting for age and sex in multiple regression analyses but disappeared after correcting for anthropometric covariates. Our findings suggest that birth weight, as a rough proxy indicator for genetic and environmental influences during intrauterine life, is associated with BUA and SOS in preadolescent children and may therefore influence the risk of osteoporosis later in life. Further studies using QUS are needed to investigate the consistency of the results of this study.

  • 2108. Van der Moeren, Maaike
    et al.
    Willemsen, Leen
    Hellström Muhli, Ulla
    University of Skövde, School of Life Sciences.
    Accounts of School Nursing2008In: Vård i Norden, ISSN 0107-4083, E-ISSN 1890-4238, Vol. 28, no 1, p. 45-47Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The aim of the study was to describe student’s accounts of school nursing and nursing activities. A purposive sample of nine informants was used, spanning students from two different schools aged between 17 and 19 years. Four  categories with sub categories emerged. (i) The students express emotions of being fond of the school nurse, but expect more caring attitudes from her (ii) The school nurse is seen as a good resource; however, the students’ confidence is partial. (iii) Reasons for consulting are mostly physical problems, despite psychological caring needs and (iv) SNHC activities are seen as useful, although too basic. These data expose a caring dilemma between the student’s needs and the professional/institutional achievements.

  • 2109.
    Vanaelst, Barbara
    et al.
    Department of Public Health, Ghent University, UZ-2BlokA De Pintelaan 185, 9000, Ghent, Belgium / Research Foundation – Flanders (FWO), Egmontstraat 5, Brussels, Belgium.
    Huybrechts, Inge
    Department of Public Health, Ghent University, UZ-2BlokA De Pintelaan 185, 9000, Ghent, Belgium / Dietary Exposure Assessment Group, International Agency for Research on Cancer (IARC), Lyon, France.
    De Bourdeaudhuij, Ilse
    Department of Movement and Sport Sciences, Ghent University, Watersportlaan 2, 9000, Ghent, Belgium.
    Bammann, Karin
    Bremen Institute for Prevention Research and Social Medicine, University of Bremen, Achterstr. 30, 28359, Bremen, Germany / Institute for Public Health and Nursing Care Research, University of Bremen, Postfach 330440, 28344, Bremen, Germany.
    Hadjigeorgiou, Charalambos
    Research & Education Institute of Child Health, 8 Attikis Str, 2027, Strovolos, Cyprus.
    Eiben, Gabriele
    Department of Public Health and Community Medicine, Public Health Epidemiology Unit, Sahlgrenska Academy, University of Gothenburg, Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Konstabel, Kenn
    National Institute for Health Development, Hiiu 42, 11619, Tallinn, Estonia.
    Michels, Nathalie
    Department of Public Health, Ghent University, UZ-2BlokA De Pintelaan 185, 9000, Ghent, Belgium.
    Molnar, Denes
    National Institute of Health Promotion, University of Pécs, Gyermekklinika, József Attila utca 7, 7623, Pécs, Hungary.
    Moreno, Luis A.
    Pigeot, Iris
    Bremen Institute for Prevention Research and Social Medicine, University of Bremen, Achterstr. 30, 28359, Bremen, Germany.
    Reisch, Lucia
    Department of intercultural communication and management, Copenhagen Business School, Porcelanshaven 18A, DK-2000, Frederiksberg, Denmark.
    Siani, Alfonso
    Epidemiology & Population Genetics, Institute of Food Sciences, CNR, Via Roma 64, 83100, Avellino, Italy.
    Vyncke, Krishna
    Department of Public Health, Ghent University, UZ-2BlokA De Pintelaan 185, 9000, Ghent, Belgium / Research Foundation – Flanders (FWO), Egmontstraat 5, Brussels, Belgium.
    De Henauw, Stefaan
    Department of Public Health, Ghent University, UZ-2BlokA De Pintelaan 185, 9000, Ghent, Belgium. 2 Research Foundation – Flanders (FWO), Egmontstraat 5, Brussels, Belgium.
    Prevalence of negative life events and chronic adversities in European pre- and primary-school children: results from the IDEFICS study2012In: Archives of Public Health, ISSN 0778-7367, E-ISSN 2049-3258, Vol. 70, no 1, article id 26Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    BACKGROUND: Children are not always recognized as being susceptible to stress, although childhood stressors may originate from multiple events in their everyday surroundings with negative effects on children's health.

    METHODS: As there is a lack of large-scale, European prevalence data on childhood adversities, this study presents the prevalence of (1) negative life events and (2) familial and social adversities in 4637 European pre- and primary-school children (4-11 years old), using a parentally-reported questionnaire embedded in the IDEFICS project ('Identification and prevention of Dietary- and lifestyle-induced health EFfects In Children and infantS').

    RESULTS: The following findings were observed: (1) Certain adversities occur only rarely, while others are very regular (i.e. parental divorce); (2) A large percentage of children is shielded from stressors, while a small group of children is exposed to multiple, accumulating adversities; (3) The prevalence of childhood adversity is influenced by geographical location (e.g. north versus south), age group and sex; (4) Childhood adversities are associated and co-occur, resulting in potential cumulative childhood stress.

    CONCLUSIONS: This study demonstrated the importance of not only studying traumatic events but also of focusing on the early familial and social environment in childhood stress research and indicated the importance of recording or monitoring childhood adversities.

  • 2110.
    Varinen, Aleksi
    et al.
    Department of General Practice, Faculty of Medicine and Life Sciences, Tampere University, Finland / Nokia Health Centre, Nokia, Finland.
    Kosunen, Elise
    Department of General Practice, Faculty of Medicine and Life Sciences, Tampere University, Finland / Pirkanmaa Hospital District, Centre for General Practice, Finland.
    Mattila, Kari
    Department of General Practice, Faculty of Medicine and Life Sciences, Tampere University, Finland.
    Suominen, Sakari
    University of Skövde, School of Health and Education. University of Skövde, Health and Education. Department of Public Health, University of Turku, Turku University Hospital, Finland.
    Sillanmäki, Lauri
    Department of Public Health, University of Turku, Turku University Hospital, Finland / Health care services, Welfare Division, Turku, Finland.
    Sumanen, Markku
    Department of General Practice, Faculty of Medicine and Life Sciences, Tampere University, Finland.
    The association between bullying victimization in childhood and fibromyalgia: Data from the nationwide Finnish health and social support (HeSSup) study based on a sample of 64,797 individuals2019In: Journal of Psychosomatic Research, ISSN 0022-3999, E-ISSN 1879-1360, Vol. 117, p. 48-53Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: Fibromyalgia is a functional pain syndrome presenting with various psychological symptoms. Several studies have shown that adverse life events are associated with fibromyalgia. The aim of the current study is to explore the association between self-reported bullying victimization in childhood and self-reported fibromyalgia in adulthood. Methods: The basic study setting is cross-sectional - with focused use of retrospective data - derived from a large on-going postal follow up survey (sample N = 64,797) initiated in Finland in 1998. Only respondents having answered the questions on fibromyalgia in both follow ups in 2003 and 2012 were included (N = 11,924). Severity of bullying was divided into three groups starting from no bullying followed by minor and severe bullying. Covariates having shown statistically significant associations with fibromyalgia in cross tabulation using Pearson's chi-squared test were included in the final multiple logistic regression analyses. Results: In our study, 50.6% of the respondents reported victimization of minor and 19.6% of severe bullying in childhood. Participants reporting fibromyalgia in adulthood reported more bullying, and in females alone this association was statistically significant (p =.027). In multiple logistic regression analysis statistically significant associations between bullying victimization in childhood (reference: no bullying) and fibromyalgia were found: adjusted odds ratio (OR) for minor bullying was 1.35 (95% CI 1.09–1.67) and for severe bullying 1.58 (95% CI 1.21–2.06). However, in log-linear and logistic regression interaction models the association between bullying and fibromyalgia was not statistically significant when depression was included in the models. Conclusions: Our results suggest that peer bullying victimization might be associated with fibromyalgia. However, in logistic log linear and logistic interaction models there was no statistically significant association when depression was included. As a result, there is need for further, preferably prospective cohort studies. The findings also emphasize the importance of actions to prevent childhood bullying. 

  • 2111.
    Velandia, Marianne
    et al.
    Karolinska Institute.
    Matthisen, Ann-Sofi
    Karolinska Insitute.
    Uvnäs-Moberg, Kerstin
    University of Agricultural Sciences, Skara.
    Nissen, Eva
    University of Skövde, School of Life Sciences.
    Onset of Vocal Interaction Between Parents and Newborns in Skin-to-Skin Contact Immediately After Elective Cesarean Section2010In: Birth, ISSN 0730-7659, E-ISSN 1523-536X, Vol. 37, no 3, p. 192-201Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: Cesarean  section  is  associated  with  delayed  mother-infant interaction  because  neither the mother nor the father routinely maintains skin-to-skin contact with  the  infant  after  birth. The  aim  of the  study was  to  explore  and compare  parent-newborn vocal interaction when the infant is placed in skin-to-skin contact either with the mother or the father immediately after a planned cesarean section.  Methods: A total of 37 healthy  infants  born  to  primiparas  were  randomized  to  30 minutes  of  skin-to-skin  contact either  with  fathers  or  mothers  after  an  initial  5 minutes  of  skin-to-skin  contact  with  the mothers after birth. The newborns’ and parents’ vocal interaction were recorded on a vid-eotape and audiotape. The following variables were explored: newborns’ and parents’ soliciting, newborns’ crying and whining, and parental speech directed to the other parent and to   the   newborn.  Results: Newborns’   soliciting   increased   over   time   (p = 0.032).   Both fathers  and  mothers  in  skin-to-skin  contact  communicated  more  vocally  with  the  newborn than did fathers (p = 0.003) and mothers (p = 0.009) without skin-to-skin contact. Fathers in skin-to-skin contact also communicated more with the mother (p = 0.046) and performed more  soliciting  responses  than  the  control  fathers  (p = 0.010).  Infants  in  skin-to-skin  con-tact  with  their  fathers  cried  significantly  less  than  those  in  skin-to-skin  contact  with  their mothers (p = 0.002) and shifted to a relaxed state earlier than in skin-to-skin contact with mothers (p = 0.029).  Conclusions: Skin-to-skin contact between infants and parents immediately after planned cesarean section promotes vocal interaction. When placed in skin-to-skin  contact  and  exposed  to  the  parents’  speech,  the  infants  initiated  communication  with soliciting calls with the parents within approximately 15 minutes after birth. These findings give reason to encourage parents to keep the newborn in skin-to-skin contact after cesarean section, to support the early onset of the first vocal communication.

  • 2112.
    Venson, José Eduardo
    et al.
    Instituto de Informática, Universidade Federal do Rio Grande do Sul (UFRGS), Porto Alegre, Brazil.
    Bevilacqua, Fernando
    University of Skövde, School of Informatics. University of Skövde, The Informatics Research Centre. Universidade Federal da Fronteira Sul, Chapecó, Brazil.
    Berni, Jean
    Animati Computação Aplicada à Saúde, Santa Maria, Brazil.
    Onuki, Fabio
    Medvia Diagnóstico, Porto Alegre, Brazil.
    Maciel, Anderson
    Instituto de Informática, Universidade Federal do Rio Grande do Sul (UFRGS), Porto Alegre, Brazil.
    Diagnostic concordance between mobile interfaces and conventional workstations for emergency imaging assessment2018In: International Journal of Medical Informatics, ISSN 1386-5056, E-ISSN 1872-8243, Vol. 113, p. 1-8Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Introduction

    Mobile devices and software are now available with sufficient computing power, speed and complexity to allow for real-time interpretation of radiology exams. In this paper, we perform a multivariable user study that investigates concordance of image-based diagnoses provided using mobile devices on the one hand and conventional workstations on the other hand.

    Methods

    We performed a between-subjects task-analysis using CT, MRI and radiography datasets. Moreover, we investigated the adequacy of the screen size, image quality, usability and the availability of the tools necessary for the analysis. Radiologists, members of several teams, participated in the experiment under real work conditions. A total of 64 studies with 93 main diagnoses were analyzed.

    Results

    Our results showed that 56 cases were classified with complete concordance (87.69%), 5 cases with almost complete concordance (7.69%) and 1 case (1.56%) with partial concordance. Only 2 studies presented discordance between the reports (3.07%). The main reason to explain the cause of those disagreements was the lack of multiplanar reconstruction tool in the mobile viewer. Screen size and image quality had no direct impact on the mobile diagnosis process.

    Conclusion

    We concluded that for images from emergency modalities, a mobile interface provides accurate interpretation and swift response, which could benefit patients' healthcare.

  • 2113.
    Verbestel, V.
    et al.
    Univ Ghent, Dept Movement & Sport Sci, B-9000 Ghent, Belgium.
    De Henauw, S.
    Univ Ghent, Dept Publ Hlth, B-9000 Ghent, Belgium.
    Barba, G.
    CNR, Unit Epidemiol & Populat Genet, Inst Food Sci, Avellino, Italy.
    Eiben, Gabriele
    Univ Gothenburg, Dept Publ Hlth & Community Med, Sahlgrenska Acad, Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Gallois, K.
    Leibniz Inst Prevent Res & Epidemiol BIPS, Bremen, Germany.
    Hadjigeorgiou, C.
    Res & Educ Inst Child Hlth, Strovolos, Cyprus.
    Konstabel, K.
    Natl Inst Hlth Dev, Tallinn, Estonia.
    Maes, L.
    Univ Ghent, Dept Publ Hlth, B-9000 Ghent, Belgium.
    Marild, S.
    Univ Gothenburg, Dept Pediat, Queen Silvia Childrens Univ Hosp, Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Molnar, D.
    Univ Pecs, Dept Pediat, Pecs, Hungary.
    Moreno, L. A.
    Univ Zaragoza, Fac Hlth Sci, GENUD Growth Exercise Nutr & Dev Res Grp, Zaragoza, Spain.;Univ Sao Paulo, Fac Med, Dept Prevent Med, Sao Paulo, Brazil.
    Oja, L.
    Natl Inst Hlth Dev, Tallinn, Estonia.
    Pitsiladis, Y.
    Univ Glasgow, Coll Med Vet & Life Sci, Glasgow, Lanark, Scotland.
    Ahrens, W.
    Leibniz Inst Prevent Res & Epidemiol BIPS, Bremen, Germany.;Univ Bremen, Inst Stat, Fac Math & Comp Sci, D-28359 Bremen, Germany.
    Pigeot, I.
    Leibniz Inst Prevent Res & Epidemiol BIPS, Bremen, Germany.;Univ Bremen, Inst Stat, Fac Math & Comp Sci, D-28359 Bremen, Germany.
    De Bourdeaudhuij, I.
    Univ Ghent, Dept Movement & Sport Sci, B-9000 Ghent, Belgium.
    Effectiveness of the IDEFICS intervention on objectively measured physical activity and sedentary time in European children2015In: Obesity Reviews, ISSN 1467-7881, E-ISSN 1467-789X, Vol. 16, p. 57-67Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    BackgroundThis paper reports on the effectiveness of the prevention of dietary- and lifestyle-induced health effects in children and infants (IDEFICS) intervention on objectively measured physical activity (PA) and sedentary time (ST) in 2- to 9.9-year-old European boys and girls. MethodsThe intervention was evaluated after 2years through a non-randomized cluster-controlled trial in eight European countries (one control and one intervention community per country). All children in the intervention group received a culturally adapted childhood obesity prevention programme through the community, schools/kindergartens and family. A random sub-sample of children participating in the IDEFICS study wore an accelerometer at baseline and follow-up for at least 3days (n=9,184). Of this sample, 81% provided valid accelerometer data at baseline (n=7,413; 51% boys; 6.211.76years; boys: 617170cpmday(-1); girls 556 +/- 156cpmday(-1)) and 3,010 children provided valid accelerometer data at baseline and during the follow-up survey 2years later. ResultsIn boys and girls, no significant differences in PA and ST were found between intervention and control groups over 2years. Strong temporal effects were found in the total sample of boys and girls: the percentage of time spent in light PA per day decreased by 4 percentage points in both boys and girls between baseline and follow-up (both: p<0.001), while time spent in ST per day increased by 4 percentage points in both sexes over time (both: p<0.001). Percentage of time spent in moderate-to-vigorous PA per day remained stable over time in boys and girls. ConclusionDespite the socio-ecological approach and implementation of a culturally adapted intervention in each country, no effects of the IDEFICS intervention were found on children's objectively measured PA and ST. Behavioural interventions for children may need to enhance specificity and intensity at the family level using other behaviour change techniques and more direct strategies to reach parents. 

  • 2114.
    Verbestel, Vera
    et al.
    Univ Ghent, Dept Movement & Sports Sci, B-9000 Ghent, Belgium.
    De Henauw, Stefaan
    Univ Ghent, Dept Publ Hlth, B-9000 Ghent, Belgium.
    Bammann, Karin
    Univ Bremen, Inst Publ Hlth & Nursing Res, D-28359 Bremen, Germany.;BIPS Inst Epidemiol & Prevent Res GmbH, Bremen, Germany.
    Barba, Gianvincenzo
    CNR, Unit Epidemiol & Populat Genet, Inst Food Sci, Avellino, Italy.
    Hadjigeorgiou, Charalambos
    Res & Educ Inst Child Hlth, Strovolos, Cyprus.
    Eiben, Gabriele
    Univ Gothenburg, Sahlgrenska Acad, Dept Publ Hlth & Community Med, Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Konstabel, Kenn
    Natl Inst Hlth Dev, Tallinn, Estonia.
    Kovacs, Eva
    Univ Pecs, Dept Pediat, Pecs, Hungary.
    Pitsiladis, Yannis
    Univ Glasgow, Coll Med Vet & Life Sci, Glasgow, Lanark, Scotland.
    Reisch, Lucia
    Copenhagen Business Sch, Dept Intercultural Commun & Management, Frederiksberg, Denmark.
    Santaliestra-Pasias, Alba M.
    Univ Zaragoza, Univ Sch Hlth Sci, GENUD Growth Exercise Nutr & Dev Res Grp, Zaragoza, Spain.
    Maes, Lea
    Univ Ghent, Dept Publ Hlth, B-9000 Ghent, Belgium.
    De Bourdeaudhuij, Ilse
    Univ Ghent, Dept Movement & Sports Sci, B-9000 Ghent, Belgium.
    Are context-specific measures of parental-reported physical activity and sedentary behaviour associated with accelerometer data in 2-9-year-old European children?2015In: Public Health Nutrition, ISSN 1368-9800, E-ISSN 1475-2727, Vol. 18, no 5, p. 860-868Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Objective: The aim of the present study was to investigate if context-specific measures of parental-reported physical activity and sedentary behaviour are associated with objectively measured physical activity and sedentary time in children. Design: Cross-sectional study. Setting: Seven European countries taking part in the IDEFICS (Identification and Prevention of Dietary-and Lifestyle-induced Health Effects in Children and Infants) study. Subjects: Data were analysed from 2-9-year-old children (n 5982) who provided both parental-reported and accelerometer-derived physical activity/sedentary behaviour measures. Parents reported their children's daily screen-time, weekly sports participation and daily outdoor playtime by means of the Outdoor Playtime Checklist (OPC) and Outdoor Playtime Recall Questions (OPRQ). Results: Sports participation, OPC-and OPRQ-derived outdoor play were positively associated with accelerometer-derived physical activity. Television viewing and computer use were positively associated with accelerometer-derived sedentary time. All parental-reported measures that were significantly associated with accelerometer outcomes explained only a minor part of the variance in accelerometer-derived physical activity or sedentary time. Conclusions: Parental-reported measures of physical activity and sedentary behaviour are not useful as a proxy for 2-9-year-old children's physical activity and sedentary time. Findings do not preclude the use of context-specific measures but imply that conclusions should be limited to the context-specific behaviours that are actually measured. Depending on the aim of the study, future research should carefully consider the choice of measurements, including the use of subjective or objective measures of the behaviour of interest or a combination of both.

  • 2115.
    Verbestel, Vera
    et al.
    Univ Ghent, Dept Movement & Sport Sci, B-9000 Ghent, Belgium.
    De Henauw, Stefaan
    Univ Ghent, Dept Publ Hlth, B-9000 Ghent, Belgium.
    Maes, Lea
    Univ Ghent, Dept Publ Hlth, B-9000 Ghent, Belgium.
    Haerens, Leen
    Univ Ghent, Dept Movement & Sport Sci, B-9000 Ghent, Belgium.;Univ Ghent, Res Fdn Flanders, B-9000 Ghent, Belgium.
    Marild, Staffan
    Univ Gothenburg, Dept Pediat, Queen Silivia Childrens Univ, S-41685 Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Eiben, Gabriele
    Univ Gothenburg, Dept Publ Hlth & Community Med, Sahlgrenska Acad, S-40530 Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Lissner, Lauren
    Univ Gothenburg, Dept Publ Hlth & Community Med, Sahlgrenska Acad, S-40530 Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Moreno, Luis A.
    Univ Zaragoza, GENUD Growth Exercise Nutr & Dev, Res Grp, Univ Sch Hlth Sci, Zaragoza 50009, Spain.
    Frauca, Natalia Lascorz
    Univ Zaragoza, GENUD Growth Exercise Nutr & Dev, Res Grp, Univ Sch Hlth Sci, Zaragoza 50009, Spain.
    Barba, Gianvincenzo
    CNR, Unit Epidemiol & Populat Genet, Inst Food Sci, I-83100 Avellino, Italy.
    Kovacs, Eva
    Univ Pecs, Dept Pediat, H-7623 Pecs, Hungary.
    Konstabel, Kenn
    Natl Inst Hlth Dev, EE-50410 Tallinn, Estonia.
    Tornaritis, Michael
    Res & Educ Inst Child Hlth, CY-2027 Strovolos, Cyprus.
    Gallois, Katharina
    Univ Bremen, Bremen Inst Prevent Res & Social Med BIPS, D-28359 Bremen, Germany.
    Hassel, Holger
    Univ Bremen, Bremen Inst Prevent Res & Social Med BIPS, D-28359 Bremen, Germany / Univ Appl Sci, Hsch Coburg, Coburg, Germany.
    De Bourdeaudhuij, Ilse
    Univ Ghent, Dept Movement & Sport Sci, B-9000 Ghent, Belgium.
    Using the intervention mapping protocol to develop a community-based intervention for the prevention of childhood obesity in a multi-centre European project: the IDEFICS intervention2011In: International Journal of Behavioral Nutrition and Physical Activity, ISSN 1479-5868, E-ISSN 1479-5868, Vol. 8, article id 82Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: The prevalence of childhood obesity has increased during the past decades and is now considered an urgent public health problem. Although stabilizing trends in obesity prevalence have been identified in parts of Europe, preventive efforts in children are still needed. Using the socio-ecological approach as the underlying theoretical perspective, the IDEFICS project aimed to develop, implement and evaluate a community-based intervention for the prevention of childhood obesity in eight European countries. The aim of the present manuscript was to describe the content and developmental process of the IDEFICS intervention. Methods: The intervention mapping protocol (IMP) was used to develop the community-based intervention for the prevention of childhood obesity in 3 to 10 years old children. It is a theory-and evidence-based tool for the structured planning and development of health promotion programs that requires the completion of six different steps. These steps were elaborated by two coordinating centers and discussed with the other participating centers until agreement was reached. Focus group research was performed in all participating centers to provide an informed basis for intervention development. Results: The application of the IMP resulted in an overall intervention framework with ten intervention modules targeting environmental and personal factors through the family, the school and the community. The summary results of the focus group research were used to inform the development of the overall intervention. The cultural adaptation of the overall intervention was realised by using country specific focus group results. The need for cultural adaptation was considered during the entire process to improve program adoption and implementation. A plan was developed to evaluate program effectiveness and quality of implementation. Conclusions: The IDEFICS project developed a community-based intervention for the prevention of childhood obesity by using to the intervention mapping heuristic. The IDEFICS intervention consists of a general and standardized intervention framework that allows for cultural adaptation to make the intervention feasible and to enhance deliverability in all participating countries. The present manuscript demonstrates that the development of an intervention is a long process that needs to be done systematically. Time, human resources and finances need to be planned beforehand to make interventions evidence-based and culturally relevant.

  • 2116.
    Vestin, Adam
    et al.
    University of Skövde, School of Health and Education.
    Spetz, Filip
    University of Skövde, School of Health and Education.
    Sjuksköterskans upplevelse av vårdande relationer med patienter med psykisk ohälsa inom somatisk akutsjukvård2018Independent thesis Basic level (degree of Bachelor), 10 credits / 15 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [en]

    Background: The number of people with mental illness is increasing in Sweden and thenumber of healthcare seekers increases. More and more patients are looking for somaticemergency care, which makes workload more challenging. A patient with mental illnesslives in a complex life situation and therefore it´s challenging for a nurse to create acomplete understanding of the patient's well-being. Strengthening the caring relationshipand preserve the nurse's role in nursing will therefore be a challenge. Objective: Thepurpose is to describe how nurses experiences caring relationships with patients withmental illness in somatic emergency care. Method: A literature review. Result: Fourthemes appear in the result. Each theme is highly influential in the caring relationship. Thethemes that emerge are: The importance of the environment, emotions and experiences,attitudes and lack of knowledge, and need of qualification. Conclusions: Unknowledge incombination with time pressure, lack of communication, attitudes and inadequate structuralenvironment adversely affects nurses' experiences of the care meetings with patients withmental illness.

  • 2117.
    Vestin, Amanda
    University of Skövde, School of Bioscience.
    Is There a You in Your Brain?: The Neuroscientific Support for the Bundle-Theory View of the Nature of the Self2019Independent thesis Basic level (degree of Bachelor), 15 credits / 22,5 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [en]

    Why do you experience yourself as a continuous self? This is a central question when regarding the self and it has two kinds of answers: either there is something like an ego inside you which is the entity perceiving all your experiences (the ego theory-view), or there is no such thing as a self or an ego and you are just a collection of different perceptions (the bundle theory-view). There are many different components all contributing to the concept of self as a whole leading to different neuroscientific ways of measuring it and some researchers are arguing for the nonexistence of a unified self-system within the brain. The aim of this thesis is to review how neuroscientific findings might contribute to the philosophical debate about the nature of self. The thesis starts off by reviewing the different concepts and components with which the self is typically described, both in philosophy and in the empirical research field of neuroscience. Then follows a presentation of three important aspects of self-awareness – first-person perspective, self-reflection, and interoception – and their specific associated brain areas (namely, the medial prefrontal cortex, the posterior and anterior cingulate cortices, and insula). The purpose here is to examine how the self is approached in these studies. After this the thesis explores to what extent neuroscience supports the bundle theory-view, with a focus on reviewing the different brain networks involved in the processing of self. In conclusion, the thesis suggests that the literature reviewed provides neuroscientific support for the bundle theory-view that there is no unified self located in the brain, mostly because of the dissimilar neural activations associated with different self-related processes. In other words, the bundle theory seems to be correct despite the experienced feeling you have of being a continuous and unified self. 

  • 2118.
    Vestman, C.
    et al.
    Department of Dialysis, Skaraborgs Hospital, Skövde, Sweden.
    Hasselroth, M.
    Department of Dialysis, Skaraborgs Hospital, Skövde, Sweden.
    Berglund, Mia
    University of Skövde, School of Health and Education. University of Skövde, Health and Education.
    Freedom and Confinement: Patients' Experiences of Life with Home Haemodialysis2014In: Nursing Research and Practice, ISSN 2090-1429, E-ISSN 2090-1437, article id 252643Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Patients with chronic end stage renal disease need dialysis to survive; however, they also need a treatment that suits their life situation. It is important that healthcare providers provide reliable, up-to-date information about different dialysis treatment options. Since home haemodialysis is a relatively new treatment, it is necessary to gather more knowledge about what the treatment entails from the patient’s perspective. The aim of this study was to describe patients’ experiences of having home haemodialysis. To gain access to the patients’ experiences, they were asked to write narratives, which describe both their good and bad experiences of life with the treatment. The narratives were analysed with a qualitative method. The results of this analysis are subdivided into five themes: freedom to be at home and control their own treatment, feeling of being alone with the responsibility, changes in the home environment, need for support, and security and well-being with home haemodialysis. The conclusion is that home haemodialysis provides a certain level of freedom, but the freedom is limited as the treatment itself is restrictive. In order to improve patients’ experiences with home haemodialysis, more research based on patients’ experiences is needed and it is necessary to involve the patients in the development of the care.

  • 2119.
    Viberg, Tove
    University of Skövde, School of Health and Education.
    Skolbaserade interventioner för stresshantering – vad fungerar?: En systematisk litteraturöversikt2018Independent thesis Basic level (degree of Bachelor), 10 credits / 15 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [en]

    Introduction: Stress is a large and growing problem in Sweden, where one of the most vulnerable groups are teenagers. Chronic stress can bring about devastating consequences for the individual as well as for the society, and measures must therefore be taken to reduce stress in this group. An important arena for this work is the school. The aim of this study was to investigate which factors that make school-based stress management interventions effective in reducing stress in teenagers. Methods: A systematic literature review was conducted, which included 15 quantitative articles published during the last ten years. The databases used were PubMed, CINAHL and PsycINFO. Results: The result showed that type of prevention, time factors and type of stress management tool had an impact on when school-based stress management interventions was effective. Discussion: The study identified three factors which had an impact on the effectiveness of stress management interventions in schools for teenagers. However, the studies are heterogenous and in several cases small, which makes it hard to draw conclusions and make recommendations. More research is needed and should be prioritized.

  • 2120.
    Videll, Isabella
    et al.
    University of Skövde, School of Health and Education.
    Wall, Filippa
    University of Skövde, School of Health and Education.
    "Att ett barn dör kan kännas orättvist": Sjuksköterskors upplevelser av att vårda barn i palliativt skede2019Independent thesis Basic level (degree of Bachelor), 10 credits / 15 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [en]

    Background: Annually about 560 children pass away in Sweden.  Nurses have a central role in the care of palliative children. Through their care, nurses should strive for a family-centered nursing method and meet the patients and family’s values and emotions in order to create a satisfactory and meaningful end of life. The care of a palliative child stands in direct contrast to the image of a long and happy life, which contributes to great emotional challenges for nurses. Purpose: To illuminate nurses' experience of caring for children in the palliative stage. Method: A literature-based study with a qualitative approach. Results: Four themes emerged from the collected data; to create a meaningful end of life, communication and to create a connection, a struggle against lack of organizational conditions and to accept a child's passing - a problematic process. Conclusion: Nurses feel that it´s an emotionally demanding job where it´s desirable to be able to create a satisfactory and meaningful end of life. However, there is a lack of education and competence for nurses to be able to provide the desired care and to handle their emotional burden. Further education and research are required to improve the nurse's knowledge of the subject.

  • 2121.
    Viking, Jenny
    University of Skövde, School of Bioscience.
    Stress: Kognitiv Påverkan och Åtgärder för Återhämtning2016Independent thesis Basic level (degree of Bachelor), 10 credits / 15 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [sv]

    Stress är i sig inte farlig om den inte blir långvarig och konstant, den här rapporten har tittat på vilka effekter och eventuella konsekvenser stress har på de fysiologiska och kognitiva systemen hos människan. En långvarig aktivering av HPA-axeln, vilken kan kallas prestations/stressaxeln, leder bland annat till kroniskt förhöjda kortisolnivåer vilket har negativa effekter för hälsan. Strukturer i hjärnan vilka ofta kopplas till stressrelaterade sjukdomar är hippocampus och prefrontala kortex. De konsekvenserna som kan följa på långvarig stress är kognitiva nedsättningar och skador på bland annat hippocampus, brister i immunförsvaret, hjärt- och kärlsjukdomar, ångest, kroniskt utmattningssyndrom, mag- och tarmbesvär samt depression. I rapporten visas att stress har stora negativa konsekvenser på individnivå både gällande kognitiva funktioner, så som minne, och även på det fysiologiska systemet. Det finns åtgärder att använda för att reducera upplevelsen av stress samt de negativa effekterna av stress, så som fysisk aktivitet, mindfulness meditation och muskulär avslappning. 

  • 2122.
    Vikman, Stina
    et al.
    University of Skövde, School of Health and Education.
    Östman, Anne
    University of Skövde, School of Health and Education.
    Skolsköterskors erfarenheter av att arbeta med gymnasieelever som har långvarig ogiltig frånvaro2017Independent thesis Advanced level (degree of Master (One Year)), 10 credits / 15 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [en]

    Students who stay at home from school have attracted increasing attention in recent years. Despite the Swedish compulsory school attendance in primary school and the voluntary nature of high school, more and more students give up school. Students health has an important role in promoting students school attendance, the focus is to put in effort in the early stage at absence.

    Aim: The aim of the study is to investigate the school nurses experience of working with high school students who have a long term absenteeism.

    Method: The study was conducted with a qualitative approach. The study is based on sixteen mail interviews with nurses working in high schools that were analyzed using significance analysis.

    Results: Four meanings were found describing the school nurses experience of working with high school students who have a long term absenteeism; the health dialogues enables to get to know the students, to achieve a safe relationship with students, cooperation with other professions and guardians and the importance of routines to promote students attendance.

    Conclusion: School nurses need to build a trustful relationship with students so that a safe relationship can occur. It’s important that students are being seen and heard in a respectful way, in the meeting with school nurses so that the cause of long term absenteeism appears.

  • 2123.
    Vingéus, Kevin
    University of Skövde, School of Informatics.
    AN INVESTIGATION ON MIMICKING WITH BREATH FOR IMMERSION: A case study on immersion comparing the differences between input-feedback and queued guidance during a breathing exercisein a VR experience using common hardware2018Independent thesis Advanced level (degree of Master (One Year)), 15 credits / 22,5 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [en]

    Practicing breathing exercises isn’t very engaging thou it is seen as great for well-being. Applications can utilize breath as a controller mechanism for interactions. With virtual reality (VR) being an effective tool for inducing the sense of immersion and presence, a breathing exercise was paired up with three alternative sessions in an application that was developed to examine the differences between mimicking and controlling input during an experience in VR, with the baseline of interaction being that of no other controllers but head-orientation-tracking of the VR device. Two pilot tests were performed to evaluate functionality and procedure. The main tests investigated the case of research. It was possible to identify mimicking as an immersive experience that promoted the breathing exercise, while input was more immersive but less beneficial towards performing the breathing exercise. The study was also conducted with- and addresses some design limitations of commonly accessible hardware.

  • 2124.
    Virtanen, Marianna
    et al.
    Department of Public Health and Caring Sciences, University of Uppsala, Uppsala, Sweden / Finnish Institute of Occupational Health, Helsinki and Turku, Finland.
    Ervasti, Jenni
    Finnish Institute of Occupational Health, Helsinki and Turku, Finland.
    Head, Jenny
    Department of Epidemiology and Public Health, University College London, London, United Kingdom.
    Oksanen, Tuula
    Finnish Institute of Occupational Health, Helsinki and Turku, Finland.
    Salo, Paula
    Finnish Institute of Occupational Health, Helsinki and Turku, Finland / Department of Psychology, University of Turku, Turku, Finland.
    Pentti, Jaana
    Department of Public Health, University of Turku and Turku University Hospital, Turku, Finland.
    Kouvonen, Anne
    Faculty of Social Sciences, University of Helsinki, Helsinki, Finland / SWPS University of Social Sciences and Humanities, Wroclaw, Poland.
    Väänänen, Ari
    Finnish Institute of Occupational Health, Helsinki and Turku, Finland / School of Social Policy, Sociology and Social Research, University of Kent, United Kingdom.
    Suominen, Sakari
    University of Skövde, School of Health and Education. University of Skövde, Health and Education. Department of Public Health, University of Turku and Turku University Hospital, Turku, Finland / Folkhälsan Research Center, Helsinki, Finland.
    Koskenvuo, Markku
    Clinicum, Faculty of Medicine, University of Helsinki, Finland.
    Vahtera, Jussi
    Department of Public Health, University of Turku and Turku University Hospital, Turku, Finland.
    Elovainio, Marko
    Department of Psychology and Logopedics, University of Helsinki, Helsinki, Finland / National Institute for Health and Welfare, Helsinki, Finland.
    Zins, Marie
    Inserm, Population-based Epidemiologic Cohorts Unit UMS 011, Villejuif, France / Paris Descartes University, Paris, France.
    Goldberg, Marcel
    Inserm, Population-based Epidemiologic Cohorts Unit UMS 011, Villejuif, France / Paris Descartes University, Paris, France.
    Kivimäki, Mika
    Department of Epidemiology and Public Health, University College London, London, United Kingdom / Clinicum, Faculty of Medicine, University of Helsinki, Finland.
    Lifestyle factors and risk of sickness absence from work: a multicohort study2018In: Lancet Public Health, ISSN 2468-2667, Vol. 3, no 11, p. E545-E554Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background Lifestyle factors influence the risk of morbidity and mortality, but the extent to which they are associated with employees' absence from work due to illness is unclear. We examined the relative contributions of smoking, alcohol consumption, high body-mass index, and low physical activity to diagnosis-specific sickness absence. Methods We did a multicohort study with individual-level data of participants of four cohorts from the UK, France, and Finland. Participants' responses to a lifestyle survey were linked to records of sickness absence episodes, typically lasting longer than 9 days; for each diagnostic category, the outcome was the total number of sickness absence days per year. We estimated the associations between lifestyle factors and sickness absence by calculating rate ratios for the number of sickness absence days per year and combining cohort-specific estimates with meta-analysis. The criteria for assessing the evidence included the strength of association, consistency across cohorts, robustness to adjustments and multiple testing, and impact assessment by use of population attributable fractions (PAF), with both internal lifestyle factor prevalence estimates and those obtained from European populations (PAF external). Findings For 74 296 participants, during 446 478 person-years at risk, the most common diagnoses for sickness absence were musculoskeletal diseases (70.9 days per 10 person-years), depressive disorders (26.5 days per 10 person-years), and external causes (such as injuries and poisonings; 12.8 days per 10 person-years). Being overweight (rate ratio [adjusted for age, sex, socioeconomic status, and chronic disease at baseline] 1.30, 95% CI 1.21-1.40; PAF external 8.9%) and low physical activity (1.23, 1.14-1.34; 7.8%) were associated with absences due to musculoskeletal diseases; heavy episodic drinking (1.90, 1.41-2.56; 15.2%), smoking (1.70, 1.42-2.03; 11.8%), low physical activity (1.67, 1.42-1.96; 19.8%), and obesity (1.38, 1.11-1.71; 5.6%) were associated with absences due to depressive disorders; heavy episodic drinking (1.64, 1.33-2.03; 11.3%), obesity (1.48, 1.27-1.72; 6.6%), smoking (1.35, 1.20-1.53; 6.3%), and being overweight (1.20, 1.08-1.33; 6.2%) were associated with absences due to external causes; obesity (1.82, 1.40-2.36; 11.0%) and smoking (1.60, 1.30-1.98; 10.3%) were associated with absences due to circulatory diseases; low physical activity (1.37, 1.25-1.49; 12.0%) and smoking (1.27, 1.16-1.40; 4.9%) were associated with absences due to respiratory diseases; and obesity (1.67, 1.34-2.07; 9.7%) was associated with absences due to digestive diseases. Interpretation Lifestyle factors are associated with sickness absence due to several diseases, but observational data cannot determine the nature of these associations. Future studies should investigate the cost-effectiveness of lifestyle interventions aimed at reducing sickness absence and the use of information on lifestyle for identifying groups at risk. 

  • 2125.
    Virtanen, Marianna
    et al.
    School of Educational Sciences and Psychology, University of Eastern Finland, Joensuu, Finland / Stress Research Institute, Stockholm University, Sweden.
    Jokela, Markus
    Department of Psychology and Logopedics, University of Helsinki, Finland.
    Lallukka, Tea
    Finnish Institute of Occupational Health, Helsinki, Finland / Department of Public Health, Clinicum, University of Helsinki, Finland.
    Magnusson Hanson, Linda
    Stress Research Institute, Stockholm University, Sweden.
    Pentti, Jaana
    Department of Public Health, Clinicum, University of Helsinki, Finland / Department of Public Health, University of Turku and Turku University Hospital, Finland / Centre for Population Health Research, University of Turku and Turku University Hospital, Finland.
    Nyberg, Solja T.
    Department of Public Health, Clinicum, University of Helsinki, Finland.
    Alfredsson, Lars
    Institute of Environmental Medicine, Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden / Centre for Occupational and Environmental Medicine, Stockholm County Council, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Batty, G. David
    Department of Epidemiology & Public Health, University College London, London, United Kingdom / School of Biological & Population Health Sciences, Oregon State University, Corvallis, United States.
    Casini, Anna-Lisa
    IPSY, Université catholique de Louvain (UCLouvain), Louvain-la-Neuve & School of Public Health, Université libre de Bruxelles (ULB), Brussels, Belgium.
    Clays, Els
    Department of Public Health, Ghent University, Belgium.
    DeBacquer, Dirk
    Department of Public Health, Ghent University, Belgium.
    Ervasti, Jenni
    Finnish Institute of Occupational Health, Helsinki, Finland / Institute of Environmental Medicine, Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Fransson, Eleonor
    Stress Research Institute, Stockholm University, Sweden / Institute of Environmental Medicine, Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden / School of Health and Welfare, Jönköping University, Sweden.
    Halonen, Jaana I.
    Stress Research Institute, Stockholm University, Sweden / Finnish Institute of Occupational Health, Helsinki, Finland.
    Head, Jenny
    Department of Epidemiology & Public Health, University College London, United Kingdom.
    Kittel, France
    IPSY, Université catholique de Louvain (UCLouvain), Louvain-la-Neuve & School of Public Health, Université libre de Bruxelles (ULB), Brussels, Belgium.
    Knutsson, Anders
    Department of Health Sciences, Mid Sweden University, Sundsvall, Sweden.
    Leineweber, Constance
    Stress Research Institute, Stockholm University, Sweden.
    Nordin, Maria
    Department of Psychology, Umeå University, Sweden.
    Oksanen, Tuula
    Finnish Institute of Occupational Health, Helsinki, Finland.
    Pietiläinen, Olli
    Department of Public Health, Clinicum, University of Helsinki, Finland.
    Rahkonen, Ossi
    Department of Public Health, Clinicum, University of Helsinki, Finland.
    Salo, Paula
    Finnish Institute of Occupational Health, Helsinki, Finland / Department of Psychology, University of Turku, Finland.
    Singh-Manoux, Archana
    Department of Epidemiology & Public Health, University College London, United Kingdom / INSERM, Villejuif, U 1018, France.
    Stenholm, Sari
    Department of Public Health, University of Turku and Turku University Hospital, Finland / Centre for Population Health Research, University of Turku and Turku University Hospital, Finland.
    Suominen, Sakari B
    University of Skövde, School of Health and Education. University of Skövde, Health and Education.
    Theorell, Töres
    Stress Research Institute, Stockholm University, Sweden.
    Vahtera, Jussi
    Department of Public Health, University of Turku and Turku University Hospital, Finland / Centre for Population Health Research, University of Turku and Turku University Hospital, Finland.
    Westerholm, Peter
    Occupational and Environmental Medicine, Uppsala University, Sweden.
    Westerlund, Hugo
    Stress Research Institute, Stockholm University, Sweden.
    Kivimäki, Mika
    Department of Public Health, Clinicum, University of Helsinki, Finland / Department of Epidemiology & Public Health, University College London, United Kingdom.
    Long working hours and change in body weight: analysis of individual-participant data from 19 cohort studies2019In: International Journal of Obesity, ISSN 0307-0565, E-ISSN 1476-5497Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Objective: To examine the relation between long working hours and change in body mass index (BMI). Methods: We performed random effects meta-analyses using individual-participant data from 19 cohort studies from Europe, US and Australia (n = 122,078), with a mean of 4.4-year follow-up. Working hours were measured at baseline and categorised as part time (&lt;35 h/week), standard weekly hours (35–40 h, reference), 41–48 h, 49–54 h and ≥55 h/week (long working hours). There were four outcomes at follow-up: (1) overweight/obesity (BMI ≥ 25 kg/m2) or (2) overweight (BMI 25–29.9 kg/m2) among participants without overweight/obesity at baseline; (3) obesity (BMI ≥ 30 kg/m2) among participants with overweight at baseline, and (4) weight loss among participants with obesity at baseline. Results: Of the 61,143 participants without overweight/obesity at baseline, 20.2% had overweight/obesity at follow-up. Compared with standard weekly working hours, the age-, sex- and socioeconomic status-adjusted relative risk (RR) of overweight/obesity was 0.95 (95% CI 0.90–1.00) for part-time work, 1.07 (1.02–1.12) for 41–48 weekly working hours, 1.09 (1.03–1.16) for 49–54 h and 1.17 (1.08–1.27) for long working hours (P for trend &lt;0.0001). The findings were similar after multivariable adjustment and in subgroup analyses. Long working hours were associated with an excess risk of shift from normal weight to overweight rather than from overweight to obesity. Long working hours were not associated with weight loss among participants with obesity. Conclusions: This analysis of large individual-participant data suggests a small excess risk of overweight among the healthy-weight people who work long hours. 

  • 2126.
    Virtanen, Marianna
    et al.
    Finnish Institute of Occupational Health, Helsinki, Finland / Department of Public Health and Caring Sciences, University of Uppsala, Sweden.
    Jokela, Markus
    Institute of Behavioral Sciences, University of Helsinki, Helsinki, Finland.
    Madsen, Ida E. H.
    National Research Centre for the Working Environment, Copenhagen, Denmark.
    Magnusson Hanson, Linda L.
    Stress Research Institute, Stockholm University, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Lallukka, Tea
    Finnish Institute of Occupational Health, Helsinki, Finland / Department of Public Health, University of Helsinki, Finland.
    Nyberg, Solja T.
    Department of Public Health, University of Helsinki, Finland.
    Alfredsson, Lars
    Institute of Environmental Medicine, Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden / Centre for Occupational and Environmental Medicine, Stockholm County Council, Sweden.
    Batty, G David
    Department of Epidemiology and Public Health, University College London, United Kingdom.
    Bjorner, Jakob B.
    National Research Centre for the Working Environment, Copenhagen, Denmark.
    Borritz, Marianne
    Department of Occupational Medicine, Koge Hospital, Koge, Denmark.
    Burr, Hermann
    Federal Institute for Occupational Safety and Health (BAuA), Berlin, Germany.
    Dragano, Nico
    Institute for Medical Sociology, Medical Faculty, University of Düsseldorf, Düsseldorf, Germany.
    Erbel, Raimund
    Department of Cardiology, West-German Heart Center Essen, University Duisburg-Essen, Essen, Germany.
    Ferrie, Jane E.
    Department of Epidemiology and Public Health, University College London, London, United Kingdom / School of Social and Community Medicine, University of Bristol, Bristol, United Kingdom.
    Heikkilä, Katriina
    Department of Health Services and Policy, London School of Hygiene and Tropical Medicine, London, United Kingdom.
    Knutsson, Anders
    Department of Health Sciences, Mid Sweden University, Sundsvall, Sweden.
    Koskenvuo, Markku
    Department of Public Health, University of Helsinki, Finland.
    Lahelma, Eero
    Department of Public Health, University of Helsinki, Finland.
    Nielsen, Martin L.
    Unit of Social Medicine, Frederiksberg University Hospital, Copenhagen, Denmark.
    Oksanen, Tuula
    Finnish Institute of Occupational Health, Helsinki, Finland.
    Pejtersen, Jan H.
    Danish National Centre for Social Research, Copenhagen, Denmark.
    Pentti, Jaana
    Department of Public Health, University of Helsinki, Finland.
    Rahkonen, Ossi
    Department of Public Health, University of Helsinki, Finland.
    Rugulies, Reiner
    National Research Centre for the Working Environment, Copenhagen, Denmark / Department of Public Health and Department of Psychology, University of Copenhagen, Copenhagen, Denmark.
    Salo, Paula
    Finnish Institute of Occupational Health, Helsinki, Finland / Department of Psychology, University of Turku, Turku, Finland.
    Schupp, Jürgen
    German Institute for Economic Research, Berlin, Germany / Free University of Berlin, Berlin, Germany.
    Shipley, Martin J.
    Department of Epidemiology and Public Health, University College London, London, United Kingdom.
    Siegrist, Johannes
    Institute for Medical Sociology, Medical Faculty, University of Düsseldorf, Düsseldorf, Germany.
    Singh-Manoux, Archana
    Department of Epidemiology and Public Health, University College London, London, United Kingdom / Centre for Research in Epidemiology and Population Health, Villejuif, France.
    Suominen, Sakari
    University of Skövde, School of Health and Education. University of Skövde, Health and Education. Department of Public Health, University of Turku, Turku, Finland / Folkhälsan Research Center, Helsinki, Finland.
    Theorell, Töres
    Stress Research Institute, Stockholm University, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Vahtera, Jussi
    Department of Public Health, University of Turku, Turku, Finland / Turku University Hospital, Turku, Finland.
    Wagner, Gert G.
    German Institute for Economic Research, Berlin, Germany / Max Planck Institute for Human Development, Berlin, Germany / Berlin University of Technology, Berlin, Germany.
    Wang, Jian Li
    University of Ottawa Institute of Mental Health Research, School of Epidemiology, Public Health and Preventive Medicine, University of Ottawa, Ottawa, Canada.
    Yiengprugsawan, Vasoontara
    Centre for Research on Ageing, Health and Wellbeing and the ARC Centre of Excellence on Population Ageing Research, The Australian National University, Canberra, Australia.
    Westerlund, Hugo
    Stress Research Institute, Stockholm University, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Kivimäki, Mika
    Finnish Institute of Occupational Health, Helsinki, Finland / Department of Public Health, University of Helsinki, Finland / Department of Epidemiology and Public Health, University College London, London, United Kingdom.
    Long working hours and depressive symptoms: systematic review and meta-analysis of published studies and unpublished individual participant data2018In: Scandinavian Journal of Work, Environment and Health, ISSN 0355-3140, E-ISSN 1795-990X, Vol. 44, no 3, p. 239-250, article id 3712Article, review/survey (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Objectives This systematic review and meta-analysis combined published study-level data and unpublished individual-participant data with the aim of quantifying the relation between long working hours and the onset of depressive symptoms. Methods We searched PubMed and Embase for published prospective cohort studies and included available cohorts with unpublished individual-participant data. We used a random-effects meta-analysis to calculate summary estimates across studies. Results We identified ten published cohort studies and included unpublished individual-participant data from 18 studies. In the majority of cohorts, long working hours was defined as working ≥55 hours per week. In multivariable-adjusted meta-analyses of 189 729 participants from 35 countries [96 275 men, 93 454 women, follow-up ranging from 1-5 years, 21 747 new-onset cases), there was an overall association of 1.14 (95% confidence interval (CI) 1.03-1.25] between long working hours and the onset of depressive symptoms, with significant evidence of heterogeneity (I 2=45.1%, P=0.004). A moderate association between working hours and depressive symptoms was found in Asian countries (1.50, 95% CI 1.13-2.01), a weaker association in Europe (1.11, 95% CI 1.00-1.22), and no association in North America (0.97, 95% CI 0.70-1.34) or Australia (0.95, 95% CI 0.70-1.29). Differences by other characteristics were small. Conclusions This observational evidence suggests a moderate association between long working hours and onset of depressive symptoms in Asia and a small association in Europe.

  • 2127.
    Visuttijai, Kittichate
    University of Skövde, School of Bioscience. University of Skövde, The Systems Biology Research Centre. Department of Medical and Clinical Genetics, Sahlgrenska Academy, University of Gothenburg, Gothenburg.
    Cellular, Molecular and Functional Characterization of the Tumor Suppressor Candidate MYO1C2016Doctoral thesis, comprehensive summary (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Tumor suppressor genes play a role as a growth regulator and a gatekeeper of a cell. Their inactivation is often detected in malignant tumors. Identification of novel tumor suppressor gene candidates may help to further understand tumorigenesis and aid in the discovery of a new treatment leading toward cure of cancer.

    This PhD research project aimed to understand functional significance of a novel tumor suppressor gene candidate, myosin IC (MYO1C) and to identify potential interaction(s) of the MYO1C protein with key components of the signaling pathways involving in cancer development.

    In an experimental rat model for endometrial carcinoma (EC), detailed molecular genetic analysis of a candidate tumor suppressor region located distal to the tumor protein 53 (Tp53) suggested the myosin IC gene (Myo1c) as the best potential target for deletion of the genetic material. The question arising was whether and how MYO1C could function as a tumor suppressor gene. By using qPCR, Western blot or immunohistochemistry analyses, we examined MYO1C protein level in panels of well-stratified human colorectal cancer (CRC) and EC respectively. We found that MYO1C was significantly down-regulated in these cancer materials and that for the EC panel, the observed down-regulation of MYO1C correlated with tumor stage, where tumors at more advanced stages had less expression of MYO1C. In cell transfection experiments, we found that over-expression of MYO1C significantly decreased cell proliferation, and silencing MYO1C with siRNA increased cell viability. Additionally, knockdown of MYO1C impaired the ability of cells to migrate, spread and adhere to the surface. Recent published studies suggested a potential interplay between MYO1C and the phosphoinositide 3-kinase (PI3K)/AKT pathway. To examine this hypothesis, we analyzed the expression and/or activation of components of the PI3K/AKT and RAS/ERK signaling pathways in vivo in CRC samples, and in vitro in cells transfected with the MYO1C gene expression construct or MYO1C-targeted siRNA. To identify other potential pathways/ mechanisms through which MYO1C may exert its tumor suppressor activity, we additionally performed new sets of MYO1C-siRNA knockdown experiments. At different time points post transfection, we performed microarray global gene expression experiments followed by bioinformatics analysis of the data. Altogether, the results suggested an early PI3K/AKT response to altered MYO1C expression. We additionally identified several cancer-related genes/pathways with late response to MYO1C knockdown. All things considered, the identification of MYO1C-expression impact on cell proliferation, migration, and adhesion in combination with its interplay between several cancer-related genes and signaling pathways provide further evidence for the initial hypothesis of a tumor suppressor activity of MYO1C. 

  • 2128.
    Visuttijai, Kittichate
    et al.
    University of Skövde, School of Bioscience. University of Skövde, The Systems Biology Research Centre. Department of Medical and Clinical Genetics, Sahlgrenska Academy, University of Gothenburg.
    Pettersson, Jennifer
    Department of Medical and Clinical Genetics, Sahlgrenska Academy, University of Gothenburg, Gothenburg.
    Mehrbani Azar, Yashar
    University of Skövde, School of Bioscience.
    van den Bout, Iman
    Department of physiology, Faculty of Health Sciences, University of Pretoria, South Africa.
    Örndal, Charlotte
    Department of Pathology, Sahlgrenska University Hospital, Gothenburg.
    Marcickiewicz, Janusz
    Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, Halland Hospital Varberg, Varberg.
    Nilsson, Staffan
    Institute of Mathematical Statistics, Chalmers University of Technology, Gothenburg.
    Hörnquist, Michael
    Department of Science and Technology, University of Linköping, Norrköping.
    Olsson, Björn
    University of Skövde, School of Bioscience. University of Skövde, The Systems Biology Research Centre.
    Ejeskär, Katarina
    University of Skövde, School of Bioscience. University of Skövde, The Systems Biology Research Centre.
    Behboudi, Afrouz
    University of Skövde, School of Bioscience. University of Skövde, The Systems Biology Research Centre.
    Lowered Expression of Tumor Suppressor Candidate MYO1CStimulates Cell Proliferation, Suppresses Cell Adhesion and Activates AKT2016In: PLoS ONE, ISSN 1932-6203, E-ISSN 1932-6203, Vol. 11, no 10, article id e0164063Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Myosin-1C (MYO1C) is a tumor suppressor candidate located in a region of recurrent losses distal to TP53. Myo1c can tightly and specifically bind to PIP2, the substrate of Phosphoinositide 3-kinase (PI3K), and to Rictor, suggesting a role for MYO1C in the PI3K pathway. This study was designed to examine MYO1C expression status in a panel of well-stratified endometrial carcinomas as well as to assess the biological significance of MYO1C as a tumor suppressor in vitro. We found a significant correlation between the tumor stage and lowered expression of MYO1C in endometrial carcinoma samples. In cell transfection experiments, we found a negative correlation between MYO1C expression and cell proliferation, and MYO1C silencing resulted in diminished cell migration and adhesion. Cells expressing excess of MYO1C had low basal level of phosphorylated protein kinase B (PKB, a.k.a. AKT) and cells with knocked down MYO1C expression showed a quicker phosphorylated AKT (pAKT) response in reaction to serum stimulation. Taken together the present study gives further evidence for tumor suppressor activity of MYO1C and suggests MYO1C mediates its tumor suppressor function through inhibition of PI3K pathway and its involvement in loss of contact inhibition.

  • 2129.
    Vixner, Linda
    et al.
    Division of Reproductive Health, Department of Women's and Children's Health, Karolinska Institutet, Retzius väg 13A, 171 77 Stockholm, Sweden / School of Health and Social Studies, Dalarna University, Högskolan Dalarna, 791 88 Falun, Sweden.
    Mårtensson, Lena B.
    University of Skövde, School of Life Sciences.
    Stener-Victorin, Elisabet
    Institute of Neuroscience and Physiology, Department of Physiology, Sahlgrenska Academy, University of Gothenburg, 405 30 Gothenburg, Sweden / Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, First Affiliated Hospital, Heilongjiang University of Chinese Medicine, Harbin 150040, China.
    Schytt, Erica
    Karolinska Inst, Div Reprod Hlth, Dept Womens & Childrens Hlth, S-17177 Stockholm, Sweden / Ctr Clin Res Dalarna, S-79182 Falun, Sweden / Division of Reproductive Health, Department of Women's and Children's Health, Karolinska Institutet, Retzius väg 13A, 171 77 Stockholm, Sweden / Centre for Clinical Research Dalarna, Nissers väg 3, 791 82 Falun, Sweden.
    Manual and Electroacupuncture for Labour Pain: Study Design of a Longitudinal Randomized Controlled Trial2012In: Evidence-based Complementary and Alternative Medicine, ISSN 1741-427X, E-ISSN 1741-4288, p. Article ID 943198-Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Introduction. Results from previous studies on acupuncture for labour pain are contradictory and lack important information on methodology. However, studies indicate that acupuncture has a positive effect on women's experiences of labour pain. The aim of the present study was to evaluate the efficacy of two different acupuncture stimulations, manual or electrical stimulation, compared with standard care in the relief of labour pain as the primary outcome. This paper will present in-depth information on the design of the study, following the CONSORT and STRICTA recommendations. Methods. The study was designed as a randomized controlled trial based on western medical theories. Nulliparous women with normal pregnancies admitted to the delivery ward after a spontaneous onset of labour were randomly allocated into one of three groups: manual acupuncture, electroacupuncture, or standard care. Sample size calculation gave 101 women in each group, including a total of 303 women. A Visual Analogue Scale was used for assessing pain every 30 minutes for five hours and thereafter every hour until birth. Questionnaires were distributed before treatment, directly after the birth, and at one day and two months postpartum. Blood samples were collected before and after the first treatment. This trial is registered at ClinicalTrials.gov:NCT01197950.

  • 2130.
    Vixner, Linda
    et al.
    Department of Women’s and Children’s Health, Division of Reproductive Health, Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden / School of Health and Social Studies, Dalarna University, Sweden.
    Mårtensson, Lena
    University of Skövde, School of Health and Education. University of Skövde, Health and Education.
    Schytt, Erica
    Department of Women’s and Children’s Health, Division of Reproductive Health, Karolinska Institutet, Sweden / Centre for Clinical Research Dalarna, Falun, Sweden.
    Acupuncture with manual and electrical stimulation for labour pain: a two month follow up of recollection of pain and birth experience2015In: BMC Complementary and Alternative Medicine, ISSN 1472-6882, E-ISSN 1472-6882, Vol. 15, no 1, article id 180Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 2131.
    Vixner, Linda
    et al.
    Department of Women's and Children's Health, Division of Reproductive Health, Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden / School of Health and Social Studies, Dalarna University, Falun, Sweden.
    Schytt, Erica
    Centre for Clinical Research Dalarna, Falun, Sweden / Bergen University Collage, Bergen, Norway.
    Mårtensson, Lena B.
    University of Skövde, School of Health and Education. University of Skövde, Health and Education.
    Associations between maternal characteristics and women's responses to acupuncture during labour: a secondary analysis from a randomised controlled trial2017In: Acupuncture in Medicine, ISSN 0964-5284, E-ISSN 1759-9873, Vol. 35, no 3, p. 180-188Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 2132.
    Vixner, Linda
    et al.
    Department of Women’s and Children’s Health, Division of Reproductive Health, Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden / School of Health and Social Studies, Dalarna University, Falun, Sweden.
    Schytt, Erica
    Department of Women’s and Children’s Health, Division of Reproductive Health, Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden / Centre for Clinical Research Dalarna, Falun, Sweden.
    Stener-Victorin, Elisabet
    Department of Physiology, Sahlgrenska Academy, Institute of Neuroscience and Physiology, University of Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Waldenström, Ulla
    Department of Women’s and Children’s Health, Division of Reproductive Health, Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Pettersson, Hans
    Department of Clinical Science and Education, Södersjukhuset Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Mårtensson, Lena B.
    University of Skövde, School of Health and Education. University of Skövde, Health and Education.
    Acupuncture with manual and electrical stimulation for labour pain: a longitudinal randomised controlled trial2014In: BMC Complementary and Alternative Medicine, ISSN 1472-6882, E-ISSN 1472-6882, Vol. 14, article id 187Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: Acupuncture is commonly used to reduce pain during labour despite contradictory results. The aim of this study is to evaluate the effectiveness of acupuncture with manual stimulation and acupuncture with combined manual and electrical stimulation (electro-acupuncture) compared with standard care in reducing labour pain. Our hypothesis was that both acupuncture stimulation techniques were more effective than standard care, and that electro-acupuncture was most effective.

    Methods: A longitudinal randomised controlled trial. The recruitment of participants took place at the admission to the labour ward between November 2008 and October 2011 at two Swedish hospitals . 303 nulliparous women with normal pregnancies were randomised to: 40 minutes of manual acupuncture (MA), electro-acupuncture (EA), or standard care without acupuncture (SC). Primary outcome: labour pain, assessed by Visual Analogue Scale (VAS). Secondary outcomes: relaxation, use of obstetric pain relief during labour and post-partum assessments of labour pain. The sample size calculation was based on the primary outcome and a difference of 15 mm on VAS was regarded as clinically relevant, this gave 101 in each group, including a total of 303 women.

    Results: Mean estimated pain scores on VAS (SC: 69.0, MA: 66.4 and EA: 68.5), adjusted for: treatment, age, education, and time from baseline, with no interactions did not differ between the groups (SC vs MA: mean difference 2.6, 95% confidence interval [CI] -1.7-6.9 and SC vs EA: mean difference 0.6 [95% CI] -3.6-4.8). Fewer number of women in the EA group used epidural analgesia (46%) than women in the MA group (61%) and SC group (70%) (EA vs SC: odds ratio [OR] 0.35; [95% CI] 0.19-0.67).

    Conclusions: Acupuncture does not reduce women’s experience of labour pain, neither with manual stimulation nor with combined manual and electrical stimulation. However, fewer women in the EA group used epidural analgesia thus indicating that the effect of acupuncture with electrical stimulation may be underestimated.

    These findings were obtained in a context with free access to other forms of pain relief.

  • 2133.
    Vojdani Moghaddam, Mohammad
    University of Skövde, School of Health and Education.
    Skyddsfaktorer som påverkar psykisk hälsa och välbefinnande hos ensamkommande barn: En litteraturstudie2018Independent thesis Basic level (degree of Bachelor), 10 credits / 15 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [en]

    Background: The number of unaccompanied children seeking asylum in Europe has increased over the last decades and reached their peak so far in 2015 with 90,000 unaccompanied asylum seekers, of whom 35,000 came to Sweden. Unaccompanied children, who fled request asylum because war, conflict and poverty. The prolonged asylum process, temporary residence and previous trauma increase the risk of depression and PTSD. Even so, there are unaccompanied children who manage to do well in very difficult circumstances. Aim: The purpose of this paper was to highlight protection factors that promote mental health and well-being of unaccompanied children. Method: This study is a systematic literature review and 16 scientific articles have been included in the analysis. Results: Four themes were identified as protection factors; Social support, motivation, religion and distraction. Social support proved to be among the important protection factor for the mental health and well-being of unaccompanied children. Discussion: The outcome of this study showed that unaccompanied children in spite of the difficulties they have undergone, have strengths and strategies that help them to new circumstances. The study also demonstrated the importance of creating secure relationships and obtaining support from trusted persons in unaccompanied children's surroundings. This study can advantageously provide actors who directly or indirectly work with unaccompanied children, with knowledge and understanding which can hopefully contribute to increased mental health and well-being of this vulnerable group.

  • 2134.
    Volanen, Salla-Maarit
    et al.
    Folkhälsan Research Center, Helsinki, Finland / Clinicum, Department of Public Health, University of Helsinki, Finland.
    Lassander, Maarit
    Institute of Behavioural Sciences, University of Helsinki, Finland.
    Hankonen, Nelli
    Social Psychology Unit, Faculty of Social Sciences, University of Helsinki, Finland.
    Santalahti, Päivi
    National Institute for Health and Welfare, Finland.
    Hintsanen, Mirka
    Unit of Psychology, University of Oulu, Finland.
    Simonsen, Nina
    Folkhälsan Research Center, Helsinki, Finland / Clinicum, Department of Public Health, University of Helsinki, Finland.
    Raevuori, Anu H.
    Clinicum, Department of Public Health, University of Helsinki, Finland / Department of Adolescent Psychiatry, Helsinki University Central Hospital, Finland / Department of Mental Health and Substance Abuse Services, National Institute for Health and Welfare, Helsinki, Finland.
    Mullola, Sari
    Institute of Behavioural Sciences, University of Helsinki, Finland / Department of Teacher Education, University of Helsinki, Finland.
    Vahlberg, Tero Juhani
    Department of Biostatistics, University of Turku, Finland.
    But, Anna
    Clinicum, Department of Public Health, University of Helsinki, Finland.
    Suominen, Sakari
    University of Skövde, School of Health and Education. University of Skövde, Health and Education. Department of Public Health, University of Turku, Finland.
    Healthy learning mind – Effectiveness of a mindfulness program on mental health compared to a relaxation program and teaching as usual in schools: A cluster-randomised controlled trial2020In: Journal of Affective Disorders, ISSN 0165-0327, E-ISSN 1573-2517, Vol. 260, p. 660-669Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: Mindfulness-Based Interventions (MBIs) have shown promising effects on mental health among children and adolescents, but high-quality studies examining the topic are lacking. The present study assessed the effects of MBI on mental health in school-setting in an extensive randomised controlled trial. Methods: Finnish school children and adolescents (N = 3519), aged 12–15 years (6th to 8th graders), from 56 schools were randomized into a 9 week MBI group, and control groups with a relaxation program or teaching as usual. The primary outcomes were resilience, socio-emotional functioning, and depressive symptoms at baseline, at completion of the programs at 9 weeks (T9), and at follow-up at 26 weeks (T26). Results: Overall, mindfulness did not show more beneficial effects on the primary outcomes compared to the controls except for resilience for which a positive intervention effect was found at T9 in all participants (β=1.18, SE 0.57, p = 0.04) as compared to the relaxation group. In addition, in gender and grade related analyses, MBI lowered depressive symptoms in girls at T26 (β=−0.49, SE 0.21, p = 0.02) and improved socio-emotional functioning at T9 (β=−1.37, SE 0.69, p = 0.049) and at T26 (β=−1.71, SE 0.73, p = 0.02) among 7th graders as compared to relaxation. Limitations: The inactive control group was smaller than the intervention and active control groups, reducing statistical power. Conclusions: A short 9-week MBI in school-setting provides slight benefits over a relaxation program and teaching as usual. Future research should investigate whether embedding regular mindfulness-based practice in curriculums could intensify the effects. 

  • 2135.
    Volanen, Salla-Maarit
    et al.
    Folkhälsan Research Center, Helsinki, Finland / Department of Public Health, University of Helsinki, Helsinki, Finland.
    Lassander, Maarit
    Institute of Behavioural Sciences, University of Helsinki, Helsinki, Finland.
    Hankonen, Nelli
    School of Social Sciences and Humanities, University of Tampere, Tampere, Finland.
    Santalahti, Päivi
    National Institute for Health and Welfare, Helsinki, Finland.
    Hintsanen, Mirka
    Unit of Psychology, University of Oulu, Oulu, Finland.
    Simonsen, Nina
    Folkhälsan Research Center, Helsinki, Finland / Department of Public Health, University of Helsinki, Helsinki, Finland.
    Raevuori, Anu
    Department of Public Health, University of Helsinki, Helsinki, Finland / Department of Adolescent Psychiatry, Helsinki University Central Hospital, Helsinki, Finland / Department of Mental Health and Substance Abuse Services, National Institute for Health and Welfare, Helsinki, Finland.
    Mullola, Sari
    Institute of Behavioural Sciences, University of Helsinki, Helsinki, Finland / Department of Teacher Education, University of Helsinki, Helsinki, Finland.
    Vahlberg, Tero
    Department of Biostatistics, University of Turku, Turku, Finland.
    But, Anna
    Department of Public Health, University of Helsinki, Helsinki, Finland.
    Suominen, Sakari
    University of Skövde, School of Health and Education. University of Skövde, Health and Education. Folkhälsan Research Center, Helsinki, Finland / Department of Public Health, University of Turku, Turku, Finland.
    Healthy Learning Mind - a school-based mindfulness and relaxation program: a study protocol for a cluster randomized controlled trial2016In: BMC Psychology, E-ISSN 2050-7283, Vol. 4, article id 35Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    BACKGROUND: Mindfulness has shown positive effects on mental health, mental capacity and well-being among adult population. Among children and adolescents, previous research on the effectiveness of mindfulness interventions on health and well-being has shown promising results, but studies with methodologically sound designs have been called for. Few intervention studies in this population have compared the effectiveness of mindfulness programs to alternative intervention programs with adequate sample sizes.

    METHODS/DESIGN: Our primary aim is to explore the effectiveness of a school-based mindfulness intervention program compared to a standard relaxation program among a non-clinical children and adolescent sample, and a non-treatment control group in school context. In this study, we systematically examine the effects of mindfulness intervention on mental well-being (primary outcomes being resilience; existence/absence of depressive symptoms; experienced psychological strengths and difficulties), cognitive functions, psychophysiological responses, academic achievements, and motivational determinants of practicing mindfulness. The design is a cluster randomized controlled trial with three arms (mindfulness intervention group, active control group, non-treatment group) and the sample includes 59 Finnish schools and approx. 3 000 students aged 12-15 years. Intervention consists of nine mindfulness based lessons, 45 mins per week, for 9 weeks, the dose being identical in active control group receiving standard relaxation program called Relax. The programs are delivered by 14 educated facilitators. Students, their teachers and parents will fill-in the research questionnaires before and after the intervention, and they will all be followed up 6 months after baseline. Additionally, students will be followed 12 months after baseline. For longer follow-up, consent to linking the data to the main health registers has been asked from students and their parents.

    DISCUSSION: The present study examines systematically the effectiveness of a school-based mindfulness program compared to a standard relaxation program, and a non-treatment control group. A strength of the current study lies in its methodologically rigorous, randomized controlled study design, which allows novel evidence on the effectiveness of mindfulness over and above a standard relaxation program.

    TRIAL REGISTRATION: ISRCTN18642659 . Retrospectively registered 13 October 2015.

  • 2136.
    von Porath, Maria
    et al.
    University of Skövde, School of Life Sciences.
    Jarneståhl, Jonna
    University of Skövde, School of Life Sciences.
    Faktorer som påverkar sjuksköterskors upplevelse av palliativ vård2009Independent thesis Basic level (degree of Bachelor), 10 credits / 15 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [en]

    Palliative care is a special kind of care that focuses on giving relief care to patients that are living with life threatening diseases. The disease is no longer in focus in palliative care and it is therefore offered to people who have an incurable life threatening disease. It focuses on relieving the patient’s discomfort and suffering, increase wellbeing and create conditions for an increased quality of life. Aim: The aim was to describe factors that influence on nurse’s experience of palliative care. Method: In order to give an objective and systematic conclusion of the current knowledge a literature study was chosen. Result: The palliative care is complex and nine factors emerged that play an important role in the nurse's experiences of palliative care. These factors were professional experience and skills, lack of professional experience and skills, strengthening relationships, co-worker support, and lack of ability to keep a professional distance, relative’s denial, lack of cooperation between the nurses and doctors, holistic care and symptom control and lack of holistic care and symptom control. These factors influenced nurse’s experiences, both positive and negative. Positive experiences were to find meaning in their work, satisfaction, personal development and confirmation. Meaningless, stress, inadequacy and anxiety were negative experiences.

  • 2137.
    Vondracek, Petr
    et al.
    Department of Pediatric Neurology, University Hospital and Masaryk University, Brno, Czech Republic.
    Hermanova, Marketa
    Department of Pathology, University Hospital and Masaryk University, Brno, Czech Republic.
    Vodickova, Kristina
    Department of Pediatric Ophtalmology, University Hospital and Masaryk University, Brno, Czech Republic.
    Fajkusova, Lenka
    Department of Molecular Biology and Gene Therapy, University Hospital and Masaryk University, Brno, Czech Republic.
    Blakely, Emma L.
    Mitochondrial Research Group, School of Neurology, Neurobiology and Psychiatry, The Medical School, University of Newcastle upon Tyne, UK.
    He, Langping
    Mitochondrial Research Group, School of Neurology, Neurobiology and Psychiatry, The Medical School, University of Newcastle upon Tyne, UK.
    Turnbull, Douglass M.
    Mitochondrial Research Group, School of Neurology, Neurobiology and Psychiatry, The Medical School, University of Newcastle upon Tyne, UK.
    Taylor, Robert W.
    Mitochondrial Research Group, School of Neurology, Neurobiology and Psychiatry, The Medical School, University of Newcastle upon Tyne, UK.
    Tajsharghi, Homa
    Department of Pathology, Sahlgrenska University Hospital, Göteborg, Sweden.
    An unusual case of congenital muscular dystrophy with normal serum CK level, external ophtalmoplegia, and white matter changes on brain MRI2007In: European journal of paediatric neurology, ISSN 1090-3798, E-ISSN 1532-2130, Vol. 11, no 6, p. 381-384Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    We report a sporadic case of congenital muscular dystrophy (CMD) in a 13-year-old girl with early manifestation of muscle weakness and hypotonia, severe contractures, bulbar syndrome, progressive external ophtalmoplegia, and white matter changes on magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) of the brain, but no mental defect. Serum creatine kinase (CK) level was normal. Muscle biopsy revealed a dystrophic picture with a prominent inflammatory infiltrate mimicking inflammatory myopathy-typical histological findings in CMD. Immunostaining showed normal expression of merosin, alpha and beta-dystroglycans. Mutation analyses of calpain3, dysferlin, and SEPN1 genes were negative. An electron microscopy revealed the accumulation of abnormally enlarged mitochondria located under the sarcolemma. Measurement of respiratory chain enzyme activities did not reveal any biochemical defect and mitochondrial genetic studies, including sequencing of the entire mitochondrial genome, were unremarkable. Phenotypic presentation of our patient is very unusual and differs considerably from other CMD variants.

  • 2138.
    Voutilainen, Anna-Stina
    et al.
    University of Skövde, School of Life Sciences.
    Sunesson, Gustaf
    University of Skövde, School of Life Sciences.
    Mäns upplevelser av att drabbas av hjärtinfarkt: studie av självbiografier2008Independent thesis Basic level (degree of Bachelor), 10 credits / 15 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [en]

    Being suffered by myocardial infarction is for many people a traumatic experience and problems can also occur in the daily life, for a long time after the infarction. The aim of the study was to analyse and describe experiences when suffering a myocardial infarction, by lived experience. Autobiographies were used to collect data. Data were analysed using qualitative content analysis. All of the autobiographies were written by men. The result is represented by four main categories; Become ill, The caring relation, Needs and Coping. In the acute care the informants’ did not have control of their situation and they had a feeling of being deserted to the caring staff. The experience could also be positive, like the possibility to be able to leave the responsibility for their health to the caring staff. There was a need of sharing experiences with fellow patients and there was also a need for professional nearness and distanced nearness and they coped with the situation by looking forward, to adjust oneself and to take one step at the time.

  • 2139.
    Vuorio, Tina
    et al.
    Department of Family Medicine, Institute of Clinical Medicine, University of Turku and Turku University Hospital, Turku, Finland.
    Suominen, Sakari
    University of Skövde, School of Health and Education. University of Skövde, Health and Education. Department of Public Health, University of Turku, Turku, Finland.
    Kautiainen, Hannu
    Folkhälsan Research Center, Helsinki, Finland / Unit of Primary Health Care, Kuopio University Hospital, Kuopio, Finland.
    Korhonen, Päivi
    Department of Family Medicine, Institute of Clinical Medicine, University of Turku and Turku University Hospital, Turku, Finland / Health Center of Harjavalta, Central Satakunta Health Federation of Municipalities, Harjavalta, Finland.
    Determinants of sickness absence rate among Finnish municipal employees2019In: Scandinavian Journal of Primary Health Care, ISSN 0281-3432, E-ISSN 1502-7724, Vol. 37, no 1, p. 3-9Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Objective: In addition to acute health problems, various aspects of health behavior, work-related and sociodemographic factors have been shown to influence the rate of sickness absence. The aim of this study was to concomitantly examine factors known to have an association with absenteeism. We hypothesized the prevalence of chronic diseases being the most important factor associated with sickness absence. Design: A cross-sectional study. Setting: Occupational health care in the region of Pori, Finland. Subjects: 671 municipal employees (89% females) with a mean age of 49 (SD 10) years. Information about the study subjects was gathered from medical records, by physical examination and questionnaires containing information about physical and mental health, health behavior, work-related and sociodemographic factors. The number of sickness absence days was obtained from the records of the city of Pori. Main outcome measures: The relationship of absenteeism rate with sociodemographic, health- and work-related risk factors. Results: In the multivariate analysis, the mean number of chronic diseases (IRR 1.24, 95% CI 1.13 to 1.36), work ability (IRR 0.83, 95% CI 0.76 to 0.91), and length of years in education (IRR 0.90, 95% CI 0.85 to 0.95) remained as independent factors associated with absenteeism. Conclusion: According to our results, chronic diseases, self-perceived work ability and length of years in education are the most important determinants of the rate of sickness absence. This implies that among working-aged people the treatment of chronic medical conditions is also worth prioritizing, not only to prevent complications, but also to avoid sickness absences. KEY POINTS Various sociodemographic, health- and work- related risk factors have been shown to influence sickness absence. The study aimed to find the most important determinants of absenteeism among several known risk factors in Finnish municipal employees. Chronic diseases, self-perceived work ability and education years remained as the most important determinants of sickness absence rates. Treatment of chronic medical conditions should be prioritized in order to reduce sickness absence rate. © 2019, © 2019 The Author(s). Published by Informa UK Limited, trading as Taylor & Francis Group.

  • 2140.
    Wadman, Ewelina
    et al.
    University of Skövde, School of Life Sciences.
    Johansson, Carina
    University of Skövde, School of Life Sciences.
    Svårigheter och möjligheter i mötet mellan sjuksköterska och patient med övervikt eller fetma.: En litteraturöversikt2009Independent thesis Basic level (degree of Bachelor), 10 credits / 15 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [sv]

    Fetma är ett ökande folkhälsoproblem runt om i världen. Sjuksköterskan har som uppgift att förebygga ohälsa hos patienter. Genom att veta patienternas svårigheter och möjligheter underlättar det mötet med sjuksköterskan. Men samtidigt måste sjuksköterskan vara medveten om sina attityder för att skapa en bra relation genom att samtala. Syftet är att beskriva svårigheter och möjligheter som kan påverka mötet mellan sjuksköterskor och patienter med övervikt eller fetma. Resultatet av litteraturöversikten bygger på 11 vetenskapliga artiklar. Dessa hittades både genom en systematisk sökning av databasen Cinahl och genom manuell sökning. Resultatet visar att sjuksköterskor har svårigheter att jobba med patienter med övervikt som inte har någon motivation. Sjuksköterskor bör också vara uppmärksamma på hur de uttrycker sig och bemöter patienter med övervikt. Sjuksköterskor och patienter har olika erfarenheter av varandra i mötet. Vilket kan ge en dålig start för en bra relation.

  • 2141.
    Wahlgren, Elin
    et al.
    University of Skövde, School of Life Sciences.
    Karlsson, Emma
    University of Skövde, School of Life Sciences.
    Sjuksköterskans kunskap i vården av patienter med HIV.: En litteraturöversikt om sjuksköterskans kunskap och dess betydelse i vården av patienter med HIV-smitta.2014Independent thesis Basic level (degree of Bachelor), 10 credits / 15 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [en]

    Background: HIV is a global problem, about 30-36 million people have the disease. Generally, people with HIV infection have worse health and sense of coherence, the need for information has health-related effects on patients.

    Purpose: The purpose is to describe nurses' knowledge and its importance in the care of patients with HIV infection.

    Method: The study consists of a literature review with thirteen articles of both quantitative and qualitative approach.

    Results: Nurses have the will and believe they need to learn more about the disease. Positive attitudes towards patients are associated with better knowledge. Education about HIV reduces fear and gives nurses greater understanding of discrimination and stigmatization.

    Conclusion: The knowledge of nurses is important in the care of patients with HIV infection; it manifests itself in attitudes and positions, as well as fear and stigma. Knowledge reduces the fear of nurses, leading to good health care for patients. The nurse's awareness that behavior affects stigma means that health is likely to increase in the patients.

  • 2142.
    Wahlgren, Emma
    et al.
    University of Skövde, School of Health and Education.
    Larsson, Therese
    University of Skövde, School of Health and Education.
    Förstföderskors upplevelser av socialt stöd under graviditet2016Independent thesis Advanced level (degree of Master (One Year)), 10 credits / 15 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [en]

    Background: One of the major events in human life is childbearing and the transition to becoming a parent.  It is a momentous time when women are especially vulnerable and the possibility of increased support should be available to create conditions for health and wellbeing. According to previous research, there is a clear correlation between perceived social support and numerous health benefits. Problem: However, there is barely research on pregnant women's experiences of social support during pregnancy. Aim: The aim of this study was to describe pregnant women's experiences of social support before childbirth and parenting. Method: A qualitative content analysis with an inductive approach was used as a method. Semi-structured telephone interviews were conducted and totally 15 first-time pregnant women were included in the study. Results: The results are presented in three categories with an overall theme. The result showed that social support during pregnancy had a keyrole in women's experiences of mental preparation and security for childbirth and parenthood. Conclusion: The women described the social support like a big puzzle, where each piece of the puzzle of social support contributed to a complete puzzle of mental preparation. Professional support, through for example, midwives, could facilitate social support. To meet the needs of pregnant women it is important that the professional who comes in contact with them are aware of how they can provide support, in order to facilitate social support.

  • 2143.
    Wahlgren, Emma
    et al.
    University of Skövde, School of Life Sciences.
    Sporrong, Sebastian
    University of Skövde, School of Life Sciences.
    LIVET EFTER EN HJÄRTINFARKT: en studie om patienters upplevelser2011Independent thesis Basic level (degree of Bachelor), 10 credits / 15 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [en]

    A great number of people suffer yearly from myocardial infarction (MI) and it´s the most common cause of death within cardiovascular disease. An MI often strikes suddenly and the patient is often unprepared, yet the diagnosis will interfere with the victim for the rest of their life. Knowledge about this illness has steadily increased but more has to be researched concerning the patients experience of their illness. The aim of this study is to describe patient experiences after an MI. The research method is a literature review, which consists of ten qualitative articles. The result is presented in five different themes: A changed approach to life, To accept or deny your illness, To make change in your lifestyle, The importance of personal support and information and To get a second chance. Most people experiences are different to each other and they cope with this change in different ways. Personal support is important but the support from medical society is often not optimal. Some people look at life in a positive way and find that their new way of life is rewarding, but others find their new situation to be scary and restrained. Thus patients experience recovery after an MI quite differently and our conclusion is that the support to patients should be individualized and often life-long.

  • 2144.
    Waldenby, Anna
    et al.
    University of Skövde, School of Life Sciences.
    Svanberg, Karin
    University of Skövde, School of Life Sciences.
    Hög köttkonsumtion och hur den kan påverka risken för folksjukdomar: en litteraturstudie baserad på kvinnor2012Independent thesis Basic level (university diploma), 5 credits / 7,5 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [en]

    Background:Our meat intake increases. Previous research has shown the connection between high meat intake, including cardiovascular disease and cancer. Information on appropriate diet to reduce the risk of endemic disease is limited. Research on health and disease in women is limited and, therefore, women's health must be taken seriously. Objective: The aim of the literature study was to investigate whether a high meat intake may influence risk of endemic diseases in women. Results: The results suggest a link between a high intake of red and processed meat and endemic diseases in women. Correlations have been found between high meat intake and breast cancer, diabetes and cardiovascular disease. Exchanges from the red and processed meat to other sources of animal protein and vegetables have been shown to reduce the risk of endemic diseases. Discussion: Advice on diet should be an important prevention strategy on endemic diseases. Advice on diet for women should include a low intake of red and processed meat and a diet rich in fruits, vegetables and protein from sources other than red and processed meat. Conclusion: Clear and consistent dietary guidelines should be developed to help reduce the endemic diseases of the female population.

  • 2145.
    Waldholm, Therese
    University of Skövde, School of Health and Education.
    Är fysisk aktivitet lösningen på framtidens sömnlöshetsproblem?: En systematisk litteraturstudie2018Independent thesis Basic level (degree of Bachelor), 10 credits / 15 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [en]

    Introduction: Insomnia is a major and growing public health problem for the adult population. Currently recommend medication and cognitive behavior therapy as treatment for the diagnosis, but no special recommendations are available for the purpose of preventing chronic insomnia och insomnia symptoms. Research shows that peoples living habits appear to be determining factors for their sleep quality, but it is still estimated that the area is relatively unexplored. Aim: This study investigate whether physical activity can prevent chronic insomnia and symptoms of insomnia in adults. Method: Systematic literature study in PubMed. Result: Physical activity was found to be associated with chronic insomnia and insomnia symptoms, and the association was affected by the body mass index (BMI) of the individual. Differences in intensity levels and physical activity were observed between the sexes and in different age groups. Discussion: The prescription of physical activity to individuals at risk for insomnia, or for treatment of those suffering from insomnia, represents a potential future public health strategy for the management and prevention of insomnia, however, cost-effectiveness of these strategies must be evaluated.

  • 2146.
    Wall, Barbro
    University of Skövde, School of Life Sciences.
    Nattfastans påverkan på äldres vikt: Ett pilotprojekt på särskilt boende2009Independent thesis Advanced level (degree of Master (One Year)), 10 credits / 15 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [sv]

    Nutritionsproblem är vanligt hos äldre på särskilt boende. Trots att problemet varit känt sedan länge, fortsätter de äldre att minska ofrivilligt i vikt. Nattfastan på särskilt boende är längre än riktlinjerna från Livsmedelsverket och Socialstyrelsen, vilket är 11 timmar.

    Syftet med studien var att belysa betydelsen av nattfastans längd i relation till de äldres viktdifferens före och efter intervention som genomfördes i två steg. Interventionen utmynnade i en ökad tillgänglighet av dryck/mat för de äldre under kväll och natt.

    Den långa nattfastan minskade efter intervention 1, de äldre blev mer viktstabila. Intervention 2 medförde ytterligare förkortning av nattfastans längd, fler äldre ökade i vikt. Intervention 2 hade effekt över tid.

    Urvalet är selektivt och litet i förhållande till kvantitativ ansats, studien ska därför ses som en förberedande pilotstudie som i liten skala prövade en arbetsrutin. Konklusion: Studien har genererat hypotesen att en förkortad nattfasta kan minimera ofrivillig viktförlust hos äldre på särskilt boende.

  • 2147.
    Wall, Marie
    et al.
    University of Skövde, School of Life Sciences.
    Lövdahl, Madeleine
    University of Skövde, School of Life Sciences.
    Förekomst av sambandet mellan fetma och psykisk ohälsa: En systematisk litteraturstudie2012Independent thesis Basic level (university diploma), 5 credits / 7,5 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [en]

    Obesity and mental illness are two global public health problems which causes not only comorbidity but also huge economic losses for societies. This systematic review was carried out with the purpose to investigate the occurrence of the association between obesity and mental illness. In this study mental illness includes anxiety, low mood and depression. Databases that were used were Lib Hub and PubMed. Ethical criteria were met and the used articles had been peer reviewed. Collected data were then analyzed and compared. The results showed that there is an association between obesity and mental illness, although there are some differences. A stronger association is found in women, in the lower educated, in people with more severe obesity and for some ethnic groups. Further research proposed to be more global and made with the same measurement techniques, to make sure that the results are generalizable and usable in different contexts.

  • 2148.
    Wallander, Marit
    et al.
    Department of Medicine Huddinge, Karolinska Institute, Stockholm, Sweden / Geriatric Medicine, Department of Internal Medicine and Clinical Nutrition, Center for Bone Research at the Sahlgrenska Academy, University of Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Axelsson, Kristian F.
    Geriatric Medicine, Department of Internal Medicine and Clinical Nutrition, Center for Bone Research at the Sahlgrenska Academy, University of Gothenburg, Sweden / Department of Orthopaedic Surgery, Skaraborg Hospital, Skövde, Sweden.
    Lundh, Dan
    University of Skövde, School of Health and Education. University of Skövde, Health and Education.
    Lorentzon, Mattias
    Geriatric Medicine, Department of Internal Medicine and Clinical Nutrition, Center for Bone Research at the Sahlgrenska Academy, University of Gothenburg, Sweden / Geriatric Medicine, Institute of Medicine, The Sahlgrenska Academy, Sahlgrenska University Hospital, Sweden.
    Patients with prostate cancer and androgen deprivation therapy have increased risk of fractures: a study from the fractures and fall injuries in the elderly cohort (FRAILCO)2019In: Osteoporosis International, ISSN 0937-941X, E-ISSN 1433-2965, Vol. 30, no 1, p. 115-125Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Summary: Osteoporosis is a common complication of androgen deprivation therapy (ADT). In this large Swedish cohort study consisting of a total of nearly 180,000 older men, we found that those with prostate cancer and ADT have a significantly increased risk of future osteoporotic fractures. Introduction: Androgen deprivation therapy (ADT) in patients with prostate cancer is associated to increased risk of fractures. In this study, we investigated the relationship between ADT in patients with prostate cancer and the risk of incident fractures and non-skeletal fall injuries both compared to those without ADT and compared to patients without prostate cancer. Methods: We included 179,744 men (79.1 ± 7.9 years (mean ± SD)) from the Swedish registry to which national directories were linked in order to study associations regarding fractures, fall injuries, morbidity, mortality and medications. We identified 159,662 men without prostate cancer, 6954 with prostate cancer and current ADT and 13,128 men with prostate cancer without ADT. During a follow-up of approximately 270,300 patient-years, we identified 10,916 incident fractures including 4860 hip fractures. Results: In multivariable Cox regression analyses and compared to men without prostate cancer, those with prostate cancer and ADT had increased risk of any fracture (HR 95% CI 1.40 (1.28–1.53)), hip fracture (1.38 (1.20–1.58)) and MOF (1.44 (1.28–1.61)) but not of non-skeletal fall injury (1.01 (0.90–1.13)). Patients with prostate cancer without ADT did not have increased risk of any fracture (0.97 (0.90–1.05)), hip fracture (0.95 (0.84–1.07)), MOF (1.01 (0.92–1.12)) and had decreased risk of non-skeletal fall injury (0.84 (0.77–0.92)). Conclusions: Patients with prostate cancer and ADT is a fragile patient group with substantially increased risk of osteoporotic fractures both compared to patients without prostate cancer and compared to those with prostate cancer without ADT. We believe that this must be taken in consideration in all patients with prostate cancer already at the initiation of ADT. 

  • 2149.
    Wallander, Märit
    et al.
    Department of Medicine Huddinge, Karolinska Institute, Stockholm, Sweden / Geriatric Medicine, Department of Internal Medicine and Clinical Nutrition, Institute of Medicine, Center for Bone Research at the Sahlgrenska Academy, Institute of Medicine, University of Gothenburg, Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Axelsson, Kristian
    Department of Orthopaedic Surgery, Skaraborg Hospital, Skövde, Sweden / Geriatric Medicine, Department of Internal Medicine and Clinical Nutrition, Institute of Medicine, Center for Bone Research at the Sahlgrenska Academy, Institute of Medicine, University of Gothenburg, Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Nilsson, Anna G.
    Geriatric Medicine, Department of Internal Medicine and Clinical Nutrition, Institute of Medicine, Center for Bone Research at the Sahlgrenska Academy, Institute of Medicine, University of Gothenburg, Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Lundh, Dan
    University of Skövde, School of Bioscience.
    Lorentzon, Mattias
    Geriatric Medicine, Department of Internal Medicine and Clinical Nutrition, Institute of Medicine, Center for Bone Research at the Sahlgrenska Academy, Institute of Medicine, University of Gothenburg, Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Type 2 Diabetes and Risk of Hip Fractures and Non-Skeletal Fall Injuries in the Elderly - A Study from the Fractures and Fall Injuries in the Elderly Cohort (FRAILCO)2017In: Journal of Bone and Mineral Research, ISSN 0884-0431, E-ISSN 1523-4681, Vol. 32, no 3, p. 449-460Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Questions remain about whether the increased risk of fractures in patients with type 2 diabetes (T2DM) is related mainly to increased risk of falling or to bone-specific properties. The primary aim of this study was to investigate the risk of hip fractures and non-skeletal fall injuries in older men and women with and without T2DM. We included 429,313 individuals (80.8 ± 8.2 years (mean ± SD), 58% women) from the Swedish registry "Senior Alert" and linked the data to several nation-wide registers. We identified 79,159 individuals with T2DM (45% with insulin (T2DM-I), 41% with oral antidiabetics (T2DM-O), and 14% with no antidiabetic treatment (T2DM-none)), and 343,603 individuals without diabetes. During a follow-up of approximately 670,000 person-years we identified in total 36,132 fractures (15,572 hip fractures) and 20,019 non-skeletal fall injuries. In multivariable Cox-regression models where the reference group was patients without diabetes and the outcome was hip fracture, T2DM-I was associated with increased risk (adjusted Hazard Ratio (HR) [95% CI] 1.24 [1.16-1.32]), T2DM-O with unaffected risk (1.03 [0.97-1.11]) and T2DM-none with reduced risk (0.88 [0.79-0.98]). Both the diagnosis of T2DM-I (HR 1.22 [1.16-1.29]) and T2DM-O (HR 1.12 [1.06-1.18]) but not T2DM-none (1.07 [0.98-1.16]) predicted non-skeletal fall injury. The same pattern was seen regarding other fractures (any, upper arm, ankle and major osteoporotic fracture) but not for wrist fracture. Subset-analyses revealed that in men, the risk of hip fracture was only increased in those with T2DM-I but in women, both the diagnosis of T2DM-O and T2DM-I were related to increased hip fracture risk. In conclusion, the risk of fractures differs substantially among patients with T2DM and an increased risk of hip fracture was primarily seen in insulin-treated patients, while the risk of non-skeletal fall injury was consistently increased in T2DM with any diabetes medication. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved.

  • 2150.
    Wallberg, Linda
    et al.
    University of Skövde, School of Health and Education.
    Junker, Martin
    University of Skövde, School of Health and Education.
    Sjuksköterskors triagearbete på akutmottagningen: En litteraturöversikt2014Independent thesis Basic level (degree of Bachelor), 10 credits / 15 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [en]

    Background: Nurses use triage guidelines to sort patients who seek care in the emergency department. It is a complex situation which demands critical thinking and medical knowledge. Nurses play an important role in patients’ experience of seeking care in the emergency department.

    Aim: To gather and identify research which describes nurses’ triage work in the emergency department.

    Method: The chosen method was a literature review. The data consisted of nine qualitative and three quantitative studies.

    Results: Four themes were identified through the analysis. These where Nurses’ way of working with triage, Nurses’ work related relationships in their triage work, Nurses’ work environment in their triage work and Nurses’ attitudes to patients in their triage work.

    Conclusions: If nurses work together they can strengthen the profession and be more confident in their triage decisions. Nurses need to have good self-knowledge. If good health care is to be conducted, nurses need the administration to provide the right conditions. The study suggest that more research is needed, which can develop nurses’ role in the triage work in the emergency department.

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