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  • 151.
    Ziemke, Tom
    et al.
    University of Skövde, Department of Computer Science.
    Jirenhed, Dan-Anders
    Lund University.
    Hesslow, Germund
    Lund University.
    Blind Adaptive Behavior Based on Internal Simulation of Perception2002Report (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    This paper presents experiments, based on a neuroscientific hypothesis, exploring the possibility of an 'inner world' based on internal simulation of perception rather than an explicit representational world model. First a series of initial experiments is discussed, in which recurrent neural networks were evolved to (a) control collision-free corridor following behavior in a simulated Khepera robot, and (b) predict the next time step's sensory input as accurately as possible. Attempts to let the robot act 'blindly', repeatedly using its own prediction instead of the real sensory input, were not particularly successful. This motivated the second series of experiments, on which this paper focuses. A feed-forward network was used which, as above, controlled behavior and predicted sensory input. However, weight evolution was now guided by the sole fitness criterion of successful, 'blind' corridor following behaviour, including timely turns, as above using as input only own predictions rather than real sensory input. The trained robot is in some cases actually able to move 'blindly' in a simple environment for hundreds of time steps, successfully handling several multi-step turns. Somewhat surprisingly, however, it does so based on self-generated input that is very different from the actual sensory values.

  • 152.
    Ziemke, Tom
    et al.
    University of Skövde, School of Humanities and Informatics.
    Jirenhed, Dan-Anders
    Department of Experimental Medical Science, Lund University, BMC F10, 22184 Lund, Sweden.
    Hesslow, Germund
    Department of Experimental Medical Science, Lund University, BMC F10, 22184 Lund, Sweden.
    Internal Simulation of Perception: A Minimal Neuro-robotic Model2005In: Neurocomputing, ISSN 0925-2312, E-ISSN 1872-8286, Vol. 68, no 1-4, p. 85-104Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This paper explores the possibility of providing robots with an ‘inner world’ based on internal simulation of perception rather than an explicit representational world model. First a series of initial experiments is discussed, in which recurrent neural networks were evolved to control collision-free corridor following behavior in a simulated Khepera robot and predict the next time step's sensory input as accurately as possible. Attempts to let the robot act blindly, i.e. repeatedly using its own prediction instead of the real sensory input, were not particularly successful. This motivated the second series of experiments, on which this paper focuses. A feed-forward network was used which, as above, controlled behavior and predicted sensory input. However, weight evolution was now guided by the sole fitness criterion of successful, ‘blindfolded’ corridor following behavior, including timely turns, as above using as input only own sensory predictions rather than actual sensory input. The trained robot is in some cases actually able to move blindly in a simple environment for hundreds of time steps, successfully handling several multi-step turns. Somewhat surprisingly, however, it does so based on self-generated input that is not particularly similar to the actual sensory values.

  • 153.
    Ziemke, Tom
    et al.
    University of Skövde, School of Humanities and Informatics.
    Lindblom, Jessica
    University of Skövde, School of Humanities and Informatics.
    Some methodological issues in android science2006In: Interaction Studies: Social Behaviour and Communication in Biological and Artificial Systems, ISSN 1572-0373, E-ISSN 1572-0381, Vol. 7, no 3, p. 339-342Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 154.
    Ziemke, Tom
    et al.
    University of Skövde, School of Humanities and Informatics. University of Skövde, The Informatics Research Centre.
    Lowe, Robert
    University of Skövde, School of Humanities and Informatics. University of Skövde, The Informatics Research Centre.
    On the Role of Emotion in Embodied Cognitive Architectures: From Organisms to Robots2009In: Cognitive Computation, ISSN 1866-9956, E-ISSN 1866-9964, Vol. 1, no 1, p. 104-117Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

     

    The computational modeling of emotion has been an area of growing interest in cognitive robotics research in recent years, but also a source of contention regarding how to conceive of emotion and how to model it. In this paper, emotion is characterized as (a) closely connected to embodied cognition, (b) grounded in homeostatic bodily regulation, and (c) a powerful organizational principle—affective modulation of behavioral and cognitive mechanisms—that is ‘useful’ in both biological brains and robotic cognitive architectures. We elaborate how emotion theories and models centered on core neurological structures in the mammalian brain, and inspired by embodied, dynamical, and enactive approaches in cognitive science, may impact on computational and robotic modeling. In light of the theoretical discussion, work in progress on the development of an embodied cognitive-affective architecture for robots is presented, incorporating aspects of the theories discussed.

     

  • 155.
    Ziemke, Tom
    et al.
    University of Skövde, School of Humanities and Informatics. University of Skövde, The Informatics Research Centre.
    Lowe, Robert
    University of Skövde, School of Humanities and Informatics. University of Skövde, The Informatics Research Centre.
    Morse, Anthony
    Univ Plymouth, Plymouth PL4 8AA, Devon, England.
    Affective robotics - modelling emotion and motivation2010In: Connection science (Print), ISSN 0954-0091, E-ISSN 1360-0494, Vol. 22, no 3, p. 193-195Article in journal (Other academic)
  • 156.
    Ziemke, Tom
    et al.
    University of Skövde, School of Humanities and Informatics. University of Skövde, The Informatics Research Centre.
    Lowe, RobertUniversity of Skövde, School of Humanities and Informatics. University of Skövde, The Informatics Research Centre.Morse, Anthony
    Affective Robotics: Special Issue of the journal Connection Science2010Collection (editor) (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
  • 157.
    Ziemke, Tom
    et al.
    University of Skövde, School of Humanities and Informatics.
    Nilsson, Maria
    University of Skövde, School of Humanities and Informatics.
    Rethinking Level 5: Distributed Cognition and Information Fusion2006In: the 9th International Conference on Information Fusion, IEEE conference proceedings, 2006, p. 1-8Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The focus of most information fusion research, so far, has been on the technology, i.e. information processing in machines. However, the importance of also understanding human information processing, and the interaction between humans and machines, is gaining increasing recognition. This position paper argues that a distributed cognition perspective, which considers cognitive processes not as taking place solely inside people's heads, but as distributed over human thought processes and the material, social and organizational environment they are embedded in, may help to provide a deeper understanding of information fusion processes

  • 158.
    Ziemke, Tom
    et al.
    University of Skövde, School of Informatics. University of Skövde, The Informatics Research Centre. Human-Centered Systems, Department of Computer and Information Science, Linköping University, Sweden.
    Thill, Serge
    University of Skövde, School of Informatics. University of Skövde, The Informatics Research Centre.
    Robots are not embodied!: Conceptions of embodiment and their implications for social human-robot interaction2014In: Sociable Robots and the Future of Social Relations: Proceedings of Robo-Philosophy 2014 / [ed] Johanna Seibt, Raul Hakli & Marco Nørskov, Amsterdam: IOS Press, 2014, p. 49-53Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 159.
    Ziemke, Tom
    et al.
    University of Skövde, School of Informatics. University of Skövde, The Informatics Research Centre.
    Thill, Serge
    University of Skövde, School of Informatics. University of Skövde, The Informatics Research Centre.
    Vernon, David
    University of Skövde, School of Informatics. University of Skövde, The Informatics Research Centre.
    Embodiment is a Double-Edged Sword in Human-Robot Interaction: Ascribed vs. Intrinsic Intentionality2015In: Proc. Workshop on Cognition: A Bridge between Robotics and Interaction, 2015, p. 9-10Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 160.
    Ziemke, Tom
    et al.
    University of Skövde, School of Humanities and Informatics. University of Skövde, The Informatics Research Centre.
    Zlatev, JordanFrank, Roslyn M.
    Body, Language and Mind: Vol. 1, Embodiment2007Collection (editor) (Other academic)
  • 161.
    Åström, Emil
    et al.
    University of Skövde, Department of Computer Science. Swedish Institute of Computer Science.
    Ziemke, Tom
    University of Skövde, Department of Computer Science. University of Sheffield, UK.
    Robot Navigation using the Connectionist Navigational Map1997Report (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    The `grounding problem' poses the question of how the function and internal mechanisms of a machine, natural or artificial, can be intrinsic to the machine itself, i.e. independent of an external designer or observer. Searle's and Harnad's analyses of the grounding problem are briefly reviewed as well as different approaches to solving it, based on the cognitivist and the enactive paradigms in cognitive science. It is argued that, although the two categories of grounding approaches differ in their nature and the problems they have to face, both, so far, fail to provide fully grounded systems for similar reasons: Only isolated parts of systems are grounded, whereas other, essential, parts are left ungrounded. Hence, it is further argued that grounding should instead be understood and approached as radical bottom-up development of complete robotic agents in interaction with their environment.

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