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  • 151.
    Göransson, Carina
    et al.
    School of Health and Welfare, Halmstad University, Halmstad, Sweden / Faculty of Medicine and Health, School of Health Sciences, Örebro University, Örebro, Sweden.
    Wengström, Yvonne
    Division of Nursing, Department of Neurobiology, Care Science and Society, Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Ziegert, Kristina
    School of Health and Welfare, Halmstad University, Halmstad, Sweden.
    Langius-Eklöf, Ann
    Division of Nursing, Department of Neurobiology, Care Science and Society, Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Eriksson, Irene
    University of Skövde, School of Health and Education. University of Skövde, Health and Education.
    Kihlgren, Annica
    Faculty of Medicine and Health, School of Health Sciences, Örebro University, Örebro, Sweden.
    Blomberg, Karin
    Faculty of Medicine and Health, School of Health Sciences, Örebro University, Örebro, Sweden.
    Perspectives of health and self-care among older persons-To be implemented in an interactive information and communication technology-platform2017In: Journal of Clinical Nursing, ISSN 0962-1067, E-ISSN 1365-2702, Vol. 26, no 23-24, p. 4745-4755Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    AIM AND OBJECTIVES: To acquire knowledge regarding the contents to be implemented in an interactive information and communication technology-platform perceived to be relevant to health and self-care among older persons based on the literature, healthcare professionals and the older persons themselves.

    BACKGROUND: The growing ageing population places demands on the healthcare system to promote healthy ageing and to strengthen the older person's self-care ability. This requires innovative approaches to facilitate communication between the older person and healthcare professionals, and to increase the older person's participation in their care. An information and communication technology-platform could be used for this purpose, but the content needs to be relevant to both the older persons and the healthcare professionals.

    DESIGN: Descriptive qualitative design.

    METHODS: This study was based on three samplings: a scoping review of the literature (n = 20 articles), interviews with healthcare professionals (n = 5) and a secondary analysis of interviews with older persons (n = 8) and nursing assistants (n = 7). The data were analysed using qualitative content analysis.

    RESULTS: Four areas were identified to be of relevance to older persons' perceived health: frame of mind, having relationships and social activities, physical ability and concerns, and maintaining self-care. Self-care was described in the literature and by the healthcare professionals more than by the older persons.

    CONCLUSIONS: The results show a concordance in the data samplings that give a clear indication of the areas relevant to older persons' health and self-care that can be integrated in an interactive information and communication technology-platform for use in regular daily care assessments. Descriptions of self-care were limited indicating a possible gap in knowledge that requires further research.

    RELEVANCE TO CLINICAL PRACTICE: Areas relevant to older persons' health and self-care could be used for regular assessment to support and promote healthy ageing.

  • 152.
    Hafskjold, Linda
    et al.
    Faculty of Health Sciences, Buskerud and Vestfold University College, Drammen, Norway.
    Sundler, Annelie Johansson
    University of Skövde, School of Health and Education. University of Skövde, Health and Education. School of Health, Care and Social Welfare, Mälardalen University, Västerås, Sweden.
    Holmström, Inger K.
    School of Health, Care and Social Welfare, Mälardalen University, Västerås, Sweden / Department of Public Health and Caring Sciences, Uppsala University, Uppsala, Sweden.
    Sundling, Vibeke
    Faculty of Health Sciences, Buskerud and Vestfold University College, Drammen, Norway.
    van Dulmen, Sandra
    Faculty of Health Sciences, Buskerud and Vestfold University College, Drammen, Norway / NIVEL (Netherlands Institute for Health Services Research), Utrecht, The Netherlands / Department of Primary and Community Care, Radboud University Medical Center, Nijmegen, The Netherlands.
    Eide, Hilde
    Faculty of Health Sciences, Buskerud and Vestfold University College, Drammen, Norway.
    A cross-sectional study on person-centred communication in the care of older people: The COMHOME study protocol2015In: BMJ Open, ISSN 2044-6055, E-ISSN 2044-6055, Vol. 5, no 4, article id e007864Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Introduction: This paper presents an international cross-sectional study on person-centred communication with older people receiving healthcare (COMHOME). Person-centred care relies on effective communication, but few studies have explored this with a specific focus on older people. The main aim of the COMHOME study is to generate knowledge on person-centred communication with older people (>65 years) in home healthcare services, radiographic and optometric practice. Methods and analysis: This study will explore the communication between care providers and older persons in home care services. Home healthcare visits will be audiorecorded (n=500) in Norway, the Netherlands and Sweden. Analyses will be performed with the Verona Coding Definitions for Emotional Sequences (VR-CoDES), the Roter Interaction Analysis System (RIAS) and qualitative methods. The content of the communication, communicative challenging situations as well as empathy, power distance, decision-making, preservation of dignity and respect will be explored. In Norway, an additional 100 encounters, 50 in optometric practice (video recorded) and 50 in radiographic practice (audiorecorded), will be analysed. Furthermore, healthcare providers' self-reported communication skills, empathy, mindfulness and emotional intelligence in relation to observed person-centred communication skills will be assessed using well-established standardised instruments. Ethics and dissemination: Depending on national legislation, approval of either the central ethical committees (eg, nation or university), the national data protection officials or the local ethical committees (eg, units of home healthcare) was obtained. Study findings will be disseminated widely through peer-reviewed publications and conference presentations. The research findings will add knowledge to improve services provided to this vulnerable group of patients. Additionally, the findings will underpin a training programme for healthcare students and care providers focusing on communication with older people. © 2015, BMJ Publishing Group. All rights reserved

  • 153.
    Hagelin, Carina Lundh
    et al.
    Sophiahemmet University, Stockholm, Sweden / Stockholms Sjukhem Foundation, Stockholm, Sweden / Department of Learning, Informatics, Management and Ethics, Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Melin-Johansson, Christina
    Department of Nursing, Mid Sweden University, Östersund, Sweden / Institute of Caring Sciences and Health, The Sahlgrenska Academy, University of Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Henoch, Ingela
    Institute of Caring Sciences and Health, The Sahlgrenska Academy, University of Gothenburg, Sweden / Angered's Local Hospital, Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Bergh, Ingrid
    University of Skövde, School of Health and Education. University of Skövde, Health and Education.
    Ek, Kristina
    University of Skövde, School of Health and Education. University of Skövde, Health and Education.
    Hammarlund, Kina
    University of Skövde, School of Health and Education. University of Skövde, Health and Education.
    Prahl, Charlotte
    Department of Health Care Sciences, Ersta Sköndal University College, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Strang, Susann
    Institute of Caring Sciences and Health, The Sahlgrenska Academy, University of Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Westin, Lars
    University of Skövde, School of Health and Education. University of Skövde, Health and Education.
    Österlind, Jane
    Department of Health Care Sciences, Ersta Sköndal University College, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Browall, Maria
    University of Skövde, School of Health and Education. University of Skövde, Health and Education.
    Factors influencing attitude toward care of dying patients in first-year nursing students2016In: International Journal of Palliative Nursing, ISSN 1357-6321, E-ISSN 2052-286X, Vol. 22, no 1, p. 28-36Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    AIM: To describe Swedish first-year undergraduate nursing students' attitudes toward care of dying patients. Possible influences such as age, earlier care experiences, care education, experiences of meeting dying patients and place of birth were investigated.

    METHOD: The Frommelt Attitude Toward Care of the Dying Scale (FATCOD) was used in six universities. Descriptive statistics and regression analysis were used.

    RESULTS: Some 371 students (67.3%) reported overall positive attitude toward caring for dying patients (total mean FATCOD 119.5, SD 10.6) early in their first semester. Older students, students with both earlier care experience and earlier education, those with experience of meeting a dying person, and students born in Sweden reported the highest scores, a more positive attitude.

    CONCLUSION: Age, earlier care experience and education, experiences of meeting a dying person and place of birth seems to affect students' attitudes toward care of the dying and need to be considered among nursing educators.

  • 154.
    Hagquist, Curt
    et al.
    Centre for Research on Child and Adolescent Mental Health, Karlstad University, Karlstad, Sweden.
    Välimaa, Raili
    Department of Health Sciences, University of Jyväskylä, Jyväskylä, Finland.
    Simonsen, Nina
    Department of Public Health, University of Helsinki, Helsinki, Finland / Folkhälsan Research Center, Helsinki, Finland.
    Suominen, Sakari
    University of Skövde, School of Health and Education. University of Skövde, Health and Education. University of Turku, Turku, Finland.
    Differential Item Functioning in Trend Analyses of Adolescent Mental Health: Illustrative Examples Using HBSC-Data from Finland2017In: Child Indicators Research, ISSN 1874-897X, E-ISSN 1874-8988, Vol. 10, no 3, p. 673-691Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Although there is an increasing focus on trend analyses of adolescent mental health, yet too little attention is paid to the methodological challenges and pitfalls inherent in this type of analyses. The purpose of the study is to analyse the psychometric properties of a Finnish instrument on psychosomatic problems, with a major focus on Differential Item Functioning (DIF) across time. Questionnaire data collected in 1994, 1998, 2006 and 2014 among Finnish schoolchildren in grade 9 (15-year-olds) as part of the Health Behaviour in School-aged Children (HBSC) study were utilised. The polytomous Rasch model was used to examine the psychometric properties of a composite measure of psychosomatic problems. The results clearly indicate that the composite measure on psychosomatic problems consisting of nine items does not work invariantly over time. In particular, the item depressed shows DIF across years of investigations. This item works quite differently at the first year of investigation compared to the last year showing higher expected values 2014 (=less frequent problems) than 1994. This DIF affects the person measure of change in psychosomatic problems between 1994 and 2014. Resolving the item depressed for year of investigation DIF, or removing it, increases the difference in person mean values between the two years, implying increasing psychosomatic problems over time. Since the DIF affects the trend results, different options to address the problems need to be considered. Removing the item depressed would bring the Finnish measure of psychosomatic problems in better accordance with the content of the questions on psychosomatic problems in the international HBSC protocol in which the item depressed is not included.

  • 155.
    Hamari, Lotta
    et al.
    Department of Nursing Science, University of Turku, Finland / Turku University Hospital, Turku, Finland.
    Heinonen, Olli J.
    Paavo Nurmi Centre & Department of Physical Activity and Health, University of Turku, Turku, Finland / Turku University Hospital, Turku, Finland.
    Aromaa, Minna
    Children and Adolescents Out-patient Clinic, Turku, Finland / Department of Public Health, University of Turku, Finland.
    Asanti, Riitta
    Department of Teacher Education, University of Turku, Finland.
    Koivusilta, Leena
    University Consortium of Seinajoki, School of Health Sciences, University of Tampere, Seinäjoki, Finland.
    Koski, Pasi
    Department of Teacher Education, Rauma Unit, University of Turku, Rauma, Finland.
    Laaksonen, Camilla
    Turku University of Applied Sciences, Health and Well-being, Turku, Finland.
    Matomäki, Jaakko
    Turku University Hospital, Clinical Research Centre, Turku, Finland.
    Pahkala, Katja
    Paavo Nurmi Centre & Department of Health and Physical Activity, University of Turku, Finland / Research Centre of Applied and Preventive Cardiovascular Medicine, University of Turku, Turku, Finland.
    Pakarinen, Anni
    Department of Nursing Science, University of Turku, Finland / Turku University Hospital, Turku, Finland.
    Suominen, Sakari
    University of Skövde, School of Health and Education. University of Skövde, Health and Education. Department of Public Health, University of Turku, Finland.
    Salanterä, Sanna
    Department of Nursing Science, University of Turku, Finland / Turku University Hospital, Turku, Finland.
    Association of Self-Perceived Physical Competence and Leisure-Time Physical Activity in Childhood: A Follow-Up Study2017In: Journal of School Health, ISSN 0022-4391, E-ISSN 1746-1561, Vol. 87, no 4, p. 236-243Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    BACKGROUNDThe basis of self-perceived physical competence is built in childhood and school personnel have an important role in this developmental process. We investigated the association between initial self-perceived physical competence and reported leisure-time physical activity (LTPA) longitudinally in 10-, 12-, and 15-year-old children.

    METHODSThis longitudinal follow-up study comprises pupils from an elementary school cohort (N = 1346) in the city of Turku, Finland (175,000 inhabitants). The self-perceived physical competence (fitness and appearance) and LTPA data were collected with questionnaires. The full longitudinal data were available from 571 pupils based on repeated studies at the ages of 10, 12, and 15 years in 2004, 2006, and 2010. We analyzed the association of self-perceived physical competence and LTPA using regression models.

    RESULTSSelf-perceived physical competence was positively associated with LTPA at all ages (10 years p < .05, 12 years p < .0001, 15 years p < .0001). Increase in the self-perceived physical fitness scores was likely to associate with higher LTPA at each age point (10 years [odds ratio, OR] = 1.18, 95% confidence interval, CI: 1.09-1.27; 12 years [OR] = 1.27, 95% CI: 1.18-1.37; and 15 years [OR] = 1.28, 95% CI: 1.19-1.38).

    CONCLUSIONSSelf-perceived physical competence is associated with LTPA in children and adolescents, and the association is strengthened with age.

  • 156.
    Hammad, Yasser A.
    et al.
    Department of Anesthesia, ICU and Perioperative Medicine, Hamad Medical Corporation, Doha, Qatar / Weill Cornell Medicine Qatar, Doha, Qatar.
    El Ansari, Walid
    University of Skövde, School of Health and Education. University of Skövde, Health and Education. Department of Surgery, Hamad General Hospital, Doha, Qatar / College of Medicine, Qatar University, Doha, Qatar.
    Shallik, Nabil A.
    Department of Anesthesia, ICU and Perioperative Medicine, Hamad Medical Corporation, Doha, Qatar / Weill Cornell Medicine Qatar, Doha, Qatar / Department of Anesthesia and SICU, Tanta University, Egypt.
    Sadek, Monzer H.
    Sidra Medicine, Doha, Qatar.
    Feki, Abdellatif M.
    Department of Anesthesia, ICU and Perioperative Medicine, Hamad Medical Corporation, Doha, Qatar.
    Bedhiaf, Kaouther
    Department of Anesthesia, ICU and Perioperative Medicine, Hamad Medical Corporation, Doha, Qatar.
    Khecharem, Fekria
    Department of Anesthesia, ICU and Perioperative Medicine, Hamad Medical Corporation, Doha, Qatar.
    Shehata, Walid M.
    Department of Transplant Surgery, Hamad General Hospital, Doha, Qatar.
    Bali, Souad
    Department of Anesthesia, ICU and Perioperative Medicine, Hamad Medical Corporation, Doha, Qatar.
    Muhammed, Abdulkader
    Department of Anesthesia, ICU and Perioperative Medicine, Hamad Medical Corporation, Doha, Qatar.
    Quality improvement can decrease blood delivery turnaround time: Evidence from a single tertiary-care academic medical center2018In: Middle East Journal of Anesthesiology, ISSN 0544-0440, Vol. 25, no 3, p. 273-281Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Context: Blood transfusion services are critical to any hospitals’ functioning, and timely blood/ component therapy resuscitation is lifesaving. Yet, few blood delivery turnaround time (TAT) studies have been undertaken. Aims: We assessed blood delivery TAT at our institution before and after implementing an intervention. Settings and Design: This before-after study assessed blood delivery TAT at our institution at baseline (first audit, December 2015 - February 2016); analyzed the causes of any delays and implemented a multipronged organizational, educational and operational remedial actions for risk mitigation for 3 months, aiming to shorten the blood delivery TAT; and then 9 months later assessed the blood delivery TAT again (second audit, November 2017 - December 2017). Methods and Material: For each of the two audits, we assessed three indices that comprise TAT: Response time (time from doctor’s request until blood is ready for collection, T1); processing time (time from the arrival of technician to blood bank and start of paperwork processing at the blood bank’s front desk until actual collection of the blood, T2); and, Transport time (time from blood bank to arrival to operating theatre, T3). Statistical analysis used: The observed proportions for categorical variables were reported as percentage and compared using Chi square test. Results: After implementing the remedial actions, the second audit confirmed considerable improvements across all three components that comprise the blood TAT. The transport time significantly decreased from an initial majority of > 15 mins duration, to a majority of < 15 mins transport time after the second audit; there was a 50% improvement in 30 mins response time; and the percentage of requests processed in < 10 mins were significantly higher after the second audit. Conclusions: Our program and its findings in terms of much improved blood delivery TAT after implementing this quality improvement approach represent an appropriate and effective solution to the challenge of making blood available fast enough to meet true hemorrhagic emergencies.

  • 157.
    Hammarlund, Kina
    et al.
    University of Skövde, School of Health and Education. University of Skövde, Health and Education.
    Andersson, Emilie
    Home healthcare, Falköping Municipality, Falköping, Sweden.
    Tenenbaum, Hanna
    Primary healthcare, Vara, Sweden.
    Sundler, Annelie Johansson
    University of Skövde, School of Health and Education. University of Skövde, Health and Education. Faculty of Caring Science, Work Life and Social Welfare, University of Borås, Borås, Sweden.
    We are also interested in how fathers feel: a qualitative exploration of child health center nurses' recognition of postnatal depression in fathers2015In: BMC Pregnancy and Childbirth, ISSN 1471-2393, E-ISSN 1471-2393, Vol. 15, article id 290Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    BACKGROUND: To become a parent is an emotionally life-changing experience. Paternal depression during the postnatal period has been associated with emotional and behavioral problems in children. The condition has predominantly been related to mothers, and the recognition of paternal postnatal depression (PND) has been paid less attention to. PND in fathers may be difficult to detect. However, nurses in pediatric services meet a lot of fathers and are in a position to detect a father who is suffering from PND. Therefore, the aim of this study was (a) to explore Child Health Center nurses' experiences of observing depression in fathers during the postnatal period; and (b) to explore hindrances of observing these fathers.

    METHODS: A qualitative descriptive study was conducted. Ten nurses were interviewed in 2014. A thematic data analysis was performed and data were analyzed for meaning.

    RESULTS: Paternal PND was experienced as being vague and difficult to detect. Experiences of fathers with such problems were limited, and it was hard to grasp the health status of the fathers, something which was further complicated when routines were lacking or when gender attitudes influenced the daily work of the nurses.

    CONCLUSION: This study contributes to an increased awareness of hindrances to the recognition of PND in fathers. The importance to detect all signals of paternal health status in fathers suffering from PND needs to be acknowledged. Overall, more attention needs to be paid to PND in fathers where a part of the solution for this is that they are screened just like the mothers.

  • 158.
    Hammarlund, Kina
    et al.
    University of Skövde, School of Health and Education. University of Skövde, Health and Education.
    Falck, Johanna
    Bymarken School area, Jönköping.
    Lind, Jennie
    Gallerian Health Clinic, Jönköping.
    Thorstensson, Stina
    University of Skövde, School of Health and Education. University of Skövde, Health and Education.
    Meeting and supporting students who have parents with mental ill-health2015In: British Journal of School Nursing, ISSN 1752-2803, E-ISSN 2052-2827, Vol. 10, no 4, p. 182-187Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Mental ill-health is an increasing problem in Swedish society. If a parent is suffering from mental illness, it can have negative consequences for the child’s wellbeing, health and developmental process. The challenge for school nurses is to identify and support these students. The aim of this study is to describe school nurses’ experiences from meeting and supporting students who have parents with mental ill-health. Interviews with six school nurses were performed after snowball recruitment with purposive sampling and analysed using qualitative content analysis. School nurses’ experience of meeting and supporting students who have parents with mental ill-health shows that this is complex and demands competence and collaboration. Their competences in collaboration with others as well as their ability to show an open and tolerant attitude were important in order to build trustful relations with students, their parents and other professionals.

  • 159.
    Hammarlund, Kina
    et al.
    University of Skövde, School of Health and Education. University of Skövde, Health and Education.
    Sjunnesson, Sara
    LBS kreativa gymnasiet, Lund, Sweden.
    Tettenborn, Nina
    Plusgymnasiet Malmö, Sweden.
    Jomeen, Julie
    Faculty of Health and Social Care, University of Hull, United Kingdom.
    Thorstensson, Stina
    University of Skövde, School of Health and Education. University of Skövde, Health and Education.
    ‘I had a lump in my stomach’: Swedish gay and lesbian students’ experiences of their time in school2017In: British Journal of School Nursing, ISSN 1752-2803, E-ISSN 2052-2827, Vol. 12, no 6, p. 284-290Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Gay and lesbian youth can experience ignorance and a lack of acknowledgement surrounding their sexual orientation during their time in school. This qualitative interview study describes how Swedish gay and lesbian students experience their secondary school years on the basis that society has heteronormative values.

    The data is based on eight telephone interviews with gay and lesbian young adults, aged 18–25 and was analysed using a qualitative narrative approach.

    The findings presented four themes: not fitting into the norm of heterosexuality, lacking confirmation of their own homosexuality, finding courage, seeing the school as a supportive or a non-supportive environment.

    A way to normalise homosexuality can be to discuss sexual development and attraction from a health-promoting perspective. Professionals working in school need to feel comfortable with issues such as sexuality in order to create a situation of confidence for the student.

  • 160.
    Hammerin, Zofia
    et al.
    University of Skövde, School of Health and Education.
    Andersson, Erik
    Örebro University, School of Humanities, Education and Social Sciences, Örebro, Sweden.
    Maivorsdotter, Ninitha
    University of Skövde, School of Health and Education. University of Skövde, Health and Education.
    Exploring student participation in teaching: An aspect of student health in school2018In: International Journal of Educational Research, ISSN 0883-0355, E-ISSN 1873-538X, Vol. 92, p. 63-74Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The aim of the article is to contribute knowledge about student participation in teaching as an aspect of student health in school. Teaching is approached as an everyday democratic process that affects individual health, the health of a democratic society and young people's experiences and attitudes towards democracy. Interviews conducted with high-achieving girls experiencing school-related stress in a Swedish upper secondary school are analysed using the Student Participation in Teaching Model as a methodological framework. The results indicate that the students mainly experience participation as being informed and suggest other dimensions of participation, such as reciprocal responsibility and communication. It is concluded that the teaching itself is a vital dimension of individual and societal democratic health and that this should be emphasised more in teaching practice. © 2018 Elsevier Ltd

  • 161.
    Handlin, Linda
    et al.
    University of Skövde, School of Health and Education. University of Skövde, Health and Education.
    Muller, Jasmin
    University of Skövde, School of Health and Education. University of Skövde, Health and Education.
    Ekström, Anette
    University of Skövde, School of Health and Education. University of Skövde, Health and Education.
    Promoting health of Swedish workers by complementary methods: example of a study design of a longitudinal randomized controlled intervention study2017In: Medical Research Archives, ISSN 2375-1916, Vol. 5, no 8, p. 1-13Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: When designing, implementing, and evaluating a work site health promotion program, it is necessary to ensure that the program is evidence based. The present article aims to present in-depth information on the design of a longitudinal randomized controlled complementary intervention pilot study that follows the Consort recommendations to evaluate possible effects of a health promotive intervention in healthy workers.

    Methods: Employees from four different workplaces were randomly assigned to one of the following groups: i) Massage and mental training (sitting in the armchair and receiving mechanical massage while listening to mental training programs, n=19), ii) Massage (sitting in the armchair and receiving mechanical massage only, n=19), iii) Mental training (sitting in the armchair and listening to mental training programs only, n=19), iv) Pause (sitting in the armchair but not receiving mechanical massage or listening to mental training programs, n=19), v) Control (not sitting in the armchair at all, n=17). The study lasted for eight weeks. Immediately before the randomization, after four weeks and after eight weeks the participants responded to statements from the Swedish Scale of Personality and had their heart rate, blood pressure and fingertip temperature measured.

    Results: Receiving mechanical massage and listening to mental training programs, either separately or in combination, during working hours had some positive effects on the employees’ own evaluation of their health, as well as their heart rate, blood pressure and fingertip temperature. However, the intervention need to be evaluated further.

    Conclusion: The approach described makes it possible to design, implement and evaluate a work site health promotion program, also on pilot-study level and these results should be seen as a first step towards larger randomized studies. This types of studies need to focus on healthy participants and special care should be taken to guarantee adequately powered study groups and their homogeneity.

  • 162.
    Handlin, Linda
    et al.
    University of Skövde, School of Health and Education. University of Skövde, Health and Education.
    Nilsson, Anne
    Department of Animal Environment and Health, Swedish University of Agricultural Sciences, Skara, Sweden.
    Lidfors, Lena
    Department of Animal Environment and Health, Swedish University of Agricultural Sciences, Skara, Sweden.
    Petersson, Maria
    Department of Molecular Medicine and Surgery, Endocrine and Diabetes Unit, Karolinska Institutet, Sweden.
    Uvnäs-Moberg, Kerstin
    Department of Animal Environment and Health, Swedish University of Agricultural Sciences, Skara, Sweden.
    The Effects of a Therapy Dog on the Blood Pressure and Heart Rate of Older Residents in a Nursing Home2018In: Anthrozoos, ISSN 0892-7936, E-ISSN 1753-0377, Vol. 31, no 5, p. 567-576Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The aim of the present project was to investigate whether repeated visits by a therapy dog to nursing homes might affect the older residents’ systolic blood pressure and heart rate. A secondary aim was to investigate and compare effects (differences in responses) in older people with high and normal systolic blood pressure. The project consisted of two consecutive studies; the dog study (two researchers and a therapy dog with a handler visited the residents at three nursing homes, n = 13), and the controlstudy (the two researchers alone visited the residents at three different nursinghomes, n = 13). The studies were divided into three periods; period 1(weeks 1–2), period 2 (weeks 3–4), and period 3 (weeks 5–6) and included two visits per week. The dog and her handler visited during periods 2 and 3 in the dog study. Participants’ heart rate and blood pressure were measured at 0 and 20 minutes at each visit. The data were analyzed using Friedman’s twowayanalysis of Variance by Rank with post-hoc analysis using Wilcoxonsigned-rank tests with a Bonferroni correction, and also with the mann-Whitney U test for independent samples. In the dog study, participants’ heartrate decreased significantly (p = 0.006) from period 1 to period 3. Participants with an initial systolic blood pressure ≥ 130 mmhg had a significant decreasein both systolic blood pressure (p = 0.009) and heart rate (p = 0.009). In the control study, participants’ heart rate and systolic blood pressure did not change significantly. the participants in the dog study had a significantly lower systolic blood pressure during period 3 (p = 0.016) compared with those in the control study. In conclusion, repeated visits by a therapy dog–handler team decreased the older adults’ heart rate, and for those with high initial systolic blood pressure, blood pressure also decreased. In addition, systolic blood pressure decreased significantly in the dog group when compared with the control group.

  • 163.
    Henoch, Ingela
    et al.
    Institute of Health and Care Sciences, Sahlgrenska Academy, University of Gothenburg.
    Browall, Maria
    University of Skövde, School of Health and Education. University of Skövde, Health and Education.
    Melin-Johansson, Christina
    Department of Health Sciences, Mid Sweden University, Östersund.
    Danielson, Ella
    Institute of Health and Care Sciences, Sahlgrenska Academy, University of Gothenburg / Department of Health Sciences, Mid Sweden University, Östersund.
    Udo, Camilla
    Department of Health Sciences, Mid Sweden University, Östersund.
    Johansson Sundler, Annelie
    University of Skövde, School of Health and Education.
    Björk, Maria
    University of Skövde, School of Health and Education.
    Ek, Kristina
    University of Skövde, School of Health and Education.
    Hammarlund, Kina
    University of Skövde, School of Health and Education.
    Bergh, Ingrid
    University of Skövde, School of Health and Education.
    Strang, Susann
    Institute of Health and Care Sciences, Sahlgrenska Academy, University of Gothenburg / Angered Local Hospital, Gothenburg, Sweden.
    The Swedish version of the Frommelt attitude toward care of the dying scale: Aspects of validity and factors influencing nurses' and nursing students' attitudes2014In: Cancer Nursing, ISSN 0162-220X, E-ISSN 1538-9804, Vol. 37, no 1, p. E1-E11Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    BACKGROUND: Nurses' attitudes toward caring for dying persons need to be explored. The Frommelt Attitude Toward Care of the Dying (FATCOD) scale has not previously been used in Swedish language. OBJECTIVES: The objectives of this study were to compare FATCOD scores among Swedish nurses and nursing students with those from other languages, to explore the existence of 2 subscales, and to evaluate influences of experiences on attitudes toward care of dying patients. METHODS: A descriptive, cross-sectional, and predictive design was used. The FATCOD scores of Swedish nurses from hospice, oncology, surgery clinics, and palliative home care and nursing students were compared with published scores from the United States, Israel, and Japan. Descriptive statistics, t tests, and factor and regression analyses were used. RESULTS: The sample consisted of 213 persons: 71 registered nurses, 42 enrolled nurses, and 100 nursing students. Swedish FATCOD mean scores did not differ from published means from the United States and Israel, but were significantly more positive than Japanese means. In line with Japanese studies, factor analyses yielded a 2-factor solution. Total FATCOD and subscales had low Cronbach α's. Hospice and palliative team nurses were more positive than oncology and surgery nurses to care for dying patients. CONCLUSIONS: Although our results suggest that the Swedish FATCOD may comprise 2 distinct scales, the total scale may be the most adequate and applicable for use in Sweden. Professional experience was associated with nurses' attitudes toward caring for dying patients. IMPLICATION FOR PRACTICE: Care culture might influence nurses' attitudes toward caring for dying patients; the benefits of education need to be explored.

  • 164.
    Henoch, Ingela
    et al.
    The Sahlgrenska Academy, University of Gothenburg, Institute of Health and Care Sciences, Gothenburg, Sweden / Angered Local Hospital, Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Melin-Johansson, Christina
    The Sahlgrenska Academy, University of Gothenburg, Institute of Health and Care Sciences, Gothenburg, Sweden / Mid Sweden University, Department of Health Sciences, Östersund, Sweden.
    Bergh, Ingrid
    University of Skövde, School of Health and Education. University of Skövde, Health and Education.
    Strang, Susann
    The Sahlgrenska Academy, University of Gothenburg, Institute of Health and Care Sciences, Gothenburg, Sweden / Angered Local Hospital, Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Ek, Kristina
    University of Skövde, School of Health and Education. University of Skövde, Health and Education.
    Hammarlund, Kina
    University of Skövde, School of Health and Education. University of Skövde, Health and Education.
    Lundh Hagelin, Carina
    Sophiahemmet University, Stockholm, Sweden / Karolinska Institutet, Department of Learning, Informatics, Management and Ethics, Stockholm, Sweden / Stockholms Sjukhem Foundation, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Westin, Lars
    University of Skövde, School of Health and Education. University of Skövde, Health and Education.
    Österlind, Jane
    Ersta Sköndal University College and Ersta Hospital, Palliative Research Centre, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Browall, Maria
    University of Skövde, School of Health and Education. University of Skövde, Health and Education. Karolinska Institutet, Department of Neurobiology, Care Science and Society, Division of Nursing, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Undergraduate nursing students' attitudes and preparedness toward caring for dying persons: A longitudinal study2017In: Nurse Education in Practice, ISSN 1471-5953, E-ISSN 1873-5223, Vol. 26, p. 12-20, article id S1471-5953(17)30384-0Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Nursing education needs to prepare students for care of dying patients. The aim of this study was to describe the development of nursing students' attitudes toward caring for dying patients and their perceived preparedness to perform end-of-life care. A longitudinal study was performed with 117 nursing students at six universities in Sweden. The students completed the Frommelt Attitude Toward Care of the Dying Scale (FATCOD) questionnaire at the beginning of first and second year, and at the end of third year of education. After education, the students completed questions about how prepared they felt by to perform end-of-life care. The total FATCOD increased from 126 to 132 during education. Five weeks' theoretical palliative care education significantly predicted positive changes in attitudes toward caring for dying patients. Students with five weeks' theoretical palliative care training felt more prepared and supported by the education to care for a dying patient than students with shorter education. A minority felt prepared to take care of a dead body or meet relatives.

  • 165.
    Henoch, Ingela
    et al.
    University of Gothenburg, The Sahlgrenska Academy, Institute of Health and Care Sciences, Gothenburg, Sweden / Ersta Sköndal University College and Ersta Hospital, Palliative Research Centre, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Strang, Susann
    University of Gothenburg, The Sahlgrenska Academy, Institute of Health and Care Sciences, Gothenburg, Sweden / Angered Local Hospital, Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Browall, Maria
    University of Skövde, School of Health and Education. University of Skövde, Health and Education. Karolinska Institute, Department of Neurobiology, Care Science and Society, Division of Nursing, Solna, Sweden.
    Danielson, Ella
    University of Gothenburg, The Sahlgrenska Academy, Institute of Health and Care Sciences, Gothenburg, Sweden / Mid Sweden University, Department of Health Sciences, Östersund, Sweden.
    Melin-Johansson, Christina
    University of Gothenburg, The Sahlgrenska Academy, Institute of Health and Care Sciences, Gothenburg, Sweden / Mid Sweden University, Department of Health Sciences, Östersund, Sweden.
    Development of an existential support training program for healthcare professionals2015In: Palliative & Supportive Care, ISSN 1478-9515, E-ISSN 1478-9523, Vol. 13, no 6, p. 1701-1709Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    OBJECTIVE: Our aim was to describe the developmental process of a training program for nurses to communicate existential issues with severely ill patients.

    METHOD: The Medical Research Council (MRC) framework for the development and evaluation of complex interventions was used to develop a training program for nurses to communicate about existential issues with their patients. The steps in the framework were employed to describe the development of the training intervention, and the development, feasibility and piloting, evaluation, and implementation phases. The development and feasibility phases are described in the Methods section. The evaluation and implementation phases are described in the Results section.

    RESULTS: In the evaluation phase, the effectiveness of the intervention was shown as nurses' confidence in communication increased after training. The understanding of the change process was considered to be that the nurses could describe their way of communicating in terms of prerequisites, process, and content. Some efforts have been made to implement the training intervention, but these require further elaboration.

    SIGNIFICANCE OF RESULTS: Existential and spiritual issues are very important to severely ill patients, and healthcare professionals need to be attentive to such questions. It is important that professionals be properly prepared when patients need this communication. An evidence-based training intervention could provide such preparation. Healthcare staff were able to identify situations where existential issues were apparent, and they reported that their confidence in communication about existential issues increased after attending a short-term training program that included reflection. In order to design a program that should be permanently implemented, more knowledge is needed of patients' perceptions of the quality of the healthcare staff's existential support.

  • 166.
    Henriksson Persson, Anna
    et al.
    Högskolan Dalarna.
    Olson, Maria
    University of Skövde, School of Health and Education. University of Skövde, Health and Education. Högskolan Dalarna / Stockholms universitet.
    Att göra demokrati i samhällskunskapsämnet på mellanstadiet2016In: SO-undervisning på mellanstadiet: Forskning och praktik / [ed] Maria Olson och Sara Irisdotter Aldenmyr, Malmö: Gleerups Utbildning AB, 2016, 1, p. 139-158Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 167.
    Hofverberg, Hanna
    et al.
    Department of Education, Uppsala University, Uppsala, Sweden.
    Maivorsdotter, Ninitha
    University of Skövde, School of Health and Education. University of Skövde, Health and Education.
    Recycling, crafting and learning - an empirical analysis of how students learn with garments and textile refuse in a school remake project2018In: Environmental Education Research, ISSN 1350-4622, E-ISSN 1469-5871, Vol. 24, no 6, p. 775-790Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 168.
    Horoz, Nil
    et al.
    Department of Clinical, Neuro and Developmental Psychology, VU University Amsterdam, Amsterdam, The Netherlands.
    Huizink, Anja
    University of Skövde, School of Health and Education. University of Skövde, Health and Education. Department of Clinical, Neuro and Developmental Psychology, VU University Amsterdam, Amsterdam, The Netherlands.
    Delforterie, Monique J.
    Department of Clinical, Neuro and Developmental Psychology, VU University Amsterdam, Amsterdam, Netherlands / Trajectum, Zwolle, The Netherlands.
    Creemers, Hanneke E.
    Forensic Child and Youth Care Sciences, University of Amsterdam, The Netherlands.
    Well-Being of Turkish and Moroccan Youth in the Netherlands: Parental Control, Parental Solicitation, and Acculturation to the Dutch Culture2019In: Zeitschrift fur Psychologie mit Zeitschrift fur angewandte Psychologie, ISSN 2190-8370, E-ISSN 2151-2604, Vol. 227, no 2, p. 144-148Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This study examined whether parental control, parental solicitation, and acculturation to the Dutch culture were related to the well-being of Dutch adolescents with Turkish and Moroccan backgrounds. Additionally, moderation by gender and ethnic background was tested. Cross-sectional data from 76 adolescents were used (Mage = 16.7 years, female = 50%, Turkish background = 35.5%). Hierarchical regression analyses showed that parental solicitation was positively associated with well-being, whereas parental control and acculturation were not associated with well-being. Associations were similar between genders and ethnic backgrounds. Positive links between parental solicitation and well-being should not be overlooked, as well-being is critical for positive youth development, integration, and social cohesion. 

  • 169.
    Hrybanova, Yana
    et al.
    Högskolan Väst.
    Ekström, Anette
    Högskolan Väst.
    Thorstensson, Stina
    University of Skövde, School of Health and Education. University of Skövde, Health and Education.
    First-time fathers’ experiences of professional support from child health nurses2019In: Scandinavian Journal of Caring Sciences, ISSN 0283-9318, E-ISSN 1471-6712Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Nowadays, in Sweden, fathers are expected to be active in their father role and to share caring responsibilities for their children equally with mothers. This active role of a father in a family can be challenging, especially for the first-time fathers. Child health nurses’ support is an important factor for fathers to become confident caregivers. The Father Perceived Professional Support scale (FaPPS scale) can be used in nursing practice for better understanding father’s needs of professional support.

    The aim of this study was to describe first-time fathers’ experiences of the professional support received from child health nurses and to validate the instrument: ‘FaPPS scale’. A qualitative design, with inductive and deductive approaches, was used in this study.

    Twelve first-time fathers participated in the semi-structured interviews, thereafter grading the FaPPS scale items and commenting on them. The fathers experienced nurses’ support positively when nurses provided practical information and stimulated them to be involved in care of their children. In contrast, the support was experienced negatively because of nurses’ lack of commitment, availability and adaptation to the fathers’ individual needs. The fathers also felt inequality between the support received by fathers and by mothers. Although some fathers perceived it as negative, others considered it fair, believing that mothers needed more support. In addition, fathers expect nurses to actively offer support to them and supervise them in childcare. The fathers also needed meeting other parents, for example in parental groups.This study also indicates that FaPPS scale can be used both in research and clinical practice, though still needing further development.

  • 170.
    Hussain, A. H. M. Enayet
    et al.
    Directorate General of Health Services, Dhaka, Bangladesh.
    Ferdoush, Junnatul
    Centre for Injury Prevention and Research Bangladesh, Dhaka, Bangladesh.
    Mashreky, Saidur Rahman
    Centre for Injury Prevention and Research Bangladesh, Dhaka, Bangladesh / Bangladesh University of Health Sciences, Dhaka, Bangladesh / National Institute of Ophthalmology, Dhaka, Bangladesh.
    Rahman, A. K. M. Fazlur
    Centre for Injury Prevention and Research Bangladesh, Dhaka, Bangladesh / Bangladesh University of Health Sciences, Dhaka, Bangladesh / National Institute of Ophthalmology, Dhaka, Bangladesh.
    Ferdausi, Nahid
    National Institute of Ophthalm ology, Dhaka, Bangladesh.
    Dalal, Koustuv
    University of Skövde, School of Health and Education. University of Skövde, Health and Education. Higher School of Public Health, Al-Farabi Kazakh National University, Almaty, Kazakhstan.
    Epidemiology of childhood blindness: A community-based study in Bangladesh2019In: PLoS ONE, ISSN 1932-6203, E-ISSN 1932-6203, Vol. 14, no 6, article id e0211991Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This study aimed to investigate the prevalence and causes of childhood blindness in a rural area of Bangladesh. We adopted a cross-sectional quantitative study design for this study, which was performed in three unions (sub-districts) located in Raiganj Upazila of the Sirajganj district in Bangladesh. Using a validated tool, a screening program was conducted at the household level. After initial screening, a team of ophthalmologists confirmed the diagnoses by clinical examinations. The prevalence of childhood blindness was observed to be 6.3 per 10,000 children, whereas the rate of uniocular blindness was 4.8 per 10,000 children. Congenital problems were the major causes of both uniocular and binocular blindness (uniocular blindness: 84% and binocular blindness: 92%). The whole globe was the site responsible for binocular blindness (28.0%, 95% confidence interval [CI]: 13.1, 47.7), whereas the cornea was responsible for uniocular blindness (57.8%, 95% CI: 35.3, 78.1). Childhood blindness is a public health problem in Bangladesh and is highly prevalent, regardless of sex. The major causes of childhood blindness are congenital.

  • 171.
    Huusko, Linda
    et al.
    Närhälsan Skövde Women's Health Clinic, Skövde, Sweden.
    Sjöberg, Sandra
    Women's Health Clinic, Umeå, Sweden.
    Ekström, Anette
    University of Skövde, School of Health and Education. University of Skövde, Health and Education. Department of Health Sciences, University West, Trollhättan, Sweden.
    Hertfelt Wahn, Elisabeth
    University of Skövde, School of Health and Education. University of Skövde, Health and Education.
    Thorstensson, Stina
    University of Skövde, School of Health and Education. University of Skövde, Health and Education.
    First-Time Fathers’ Experience of Support from Midwives in Maternity Clinics: An Interview Study2018In: Nursing Research and Practice, ISSN 2090-1429, E-ISSN 2090-1437, article id 9618036Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: Research shows that first-time fathers want to take part in preparation for birth and parenthood but they describe being excluded by health professionals. Aim: The aim of this study was to illustrate first-time fathers’ experiences of support from midwives in maternity clinics as a step in the validation of “The Father Perceived-Professional-Support” (The FaPPS) scale. Methods: A qualitative content analysis with an inductive and deductive approach was used; seven first-time fathers were strategically selected and interviewed. In the inductive part the following open question was asked: “How did you perceive the support from the antenatal midwife/midwives?” In the deductive part, the fathers were asked to respond to the FaPPS scale, in order to receive their thoughts and understanding of the scale, inspired by the “Think-aloud” method. Findings. The inductive results showed two main categories: Experience of not knowing what support they needed and Experience of being excluded. The fathers found support from other fathers in parental education classes, but they lack time to discuss. Overall it seems as if the fathers answered both from their own perspective and from the mothers’ perspective. This was not evident in the deductive results. The FaPPs scale should therefore include professionals’ ability to strengthen social support from other first-time fathers and professionals’ ability to offer support to the mother. Conclusion and Clinical Implications. The fathers experienced exclusion both by themselves and also by midwives. Midwives should offer both parents the opportunity to pose questions. It is important for expectant fathers that time for discussion is planned in parental education classes. The FaPPS scale is useful but needs further development. Parts of our result are in line with earlier research, for decades; therefore it is necessary to focus more on support for fathers.

  • 172.
    Höglund, Annelie
    et al.
    University of Skövde, School of Health and Education.
    Larsson, Evelina
    University of Skövde, Health and Education.
    Socialt Spelande: Etik och moral i onlinespel utifrån spelarnas egna upplevelser2014Independent thesis Basic level (degree of Bachelor), 15 credits / 22,5 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [en]

    In a society in which gamers are considered to engage in an amoral environment, we intended with this study to examine how ethics and morality appears in the virtual world through a symbolic interactionist perspective. Through qualitative interviews eleven gamers have been able to give their own views about their experiences of the interaction they undergo daily. With help from detailed theories about ethics and morality, symbolic interactionism and gaming culture, this study has a wide theoretical foundation which applies in a hermeneutical analysis. The results show that ethics and morality exists within online games, as well as an amoral gaming culture. It appears to be two cultures, in which this study puts its focus on the first and describes both what the phenomenon is made of, and how it appears. The essence is about the social aspect, what we call sociality. This essence was found through five themes, all regarding group, sociality and interaction. The conclusion shows that there is a moral gaming culture as well as an amoral one, based on the degree of sociality and immersion. The moral gaming culture is created and recreated from the creation of meaning and social needs through the gamers as well as the flexibility of the virtual world.

     

    Keywords: Ethics, Morality, Online game, Game culture, Symbolic interactionism.

  • 173.
    Iguacel, Isabel
    et al.
    GENUD (Growth, Exercise, NUtrition and Development) Research Group, Faculty of Health Sciences, University of Zaragoza, Edificio del SAI, C/Pedro Cerbuna s/n, 50009 Zaragoza, Spain / Instituto Agroalimentario de Aragón (IA2), Zaragoza, Spain / Instituto de Investigación Sanitaria Aragón (IIS Aragón), Zaragoza, Spain / Centro de Investigación Biomédica en Red de Fisiopatología de la Obesidad y Nutrición (CIBERObn), Zaragoza, Spain.
    Michels, Nathalie
    Department of Public Health, Ghent University, Ghent, Belgium.
    Ahrens, Wolfgang
    Leibniz Institute for Prevention Research and Epidemiology – BIPS, Bremen, Germany / Institute of Statistics, University of Bremen, Bremen, Germany.
    Bammann, Karin
    Leibniz Institute for Prevention Research and Epidemiology – BIPS, Bremen, Germany / Institute for Public Health and Nursing Sciences (IPP), University of Bremen, Bremen, Germany.
    Eiben, Gabriele
    University of Skövde, School of Health and Education. University of Skövde, Health and Education. Section for Epidemiology and Social Medicine (EPSO), Sahlgrenska Academy, University of Gothenburg, Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Fernández-Alvira, Juan M.
    GENUD (Growth, Exercise, NUtrition and Development) Research Group, Faculty of Health Sciences, University of Zaragoza, Edificio del SAI, C/Pedro Cerbuna s/n, 50009 Zaragoza, Spain / Fundación Centro Nacional de Investigaciones Cardiovasculares Carlos III (CNIC), Madrid, Spain.
    Mårild, Staffan
    Section for Epidemiology and Social Medicine (EPSO), Sahlgrenska Academy, University of Gothenburg, Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Molnár, Dénes
    Department of Paediatrics, University of Pécs, Pécs, Hungary.
    Reisch, Lucia
    Copenhagen Business School, Copenhagen, Denmark.
    Russo, Paola
    Institute of Food Sciences, National Research Council, Avellino, Italy.
    Tornaritis, Michael
    Research and Education Institute of Child Health, Strovolos, Cyprus.
    Veidebaum, Toomas
    Department of Chronic Diseases, National Institute for Health Development, Tallinn, Estonia.
    Wolters, Maike
    Leibniz Institute for Prevention Research and Epidemiology – BIPS, Bremen, Germany.
    Moreno, Luis A.
    GENUD (Growth, Exercise, NUtrition and Development) Research Group, Faculty of Health Sciences, University of Zaragoza, Edificio del SAI, C/Pedro Cerbuna s/n, 50009 Zaragoza, Spain / Instituto Agroalimentario de Aragón (IA2), Zaragoza, Spain / Instituto de Investigación Sanitaria Aragón (IIS Aragón), Zaragoza, Spain / Centro de Investigación Biomédica en Red de Fisiopatología de la Obesidad y Nutrición (CIBERObn), Zaragoza, Spain.
    Börnhorst, Claudia
    Leibniz Institute for Prevention Research and Epidemiology – BIPS, Bremen, Germany.
    Prospective associations between socioeconomically disadvantaged groups and metabolic syndrome risk in European children: Results from the IDEFICS study2018In: International Journal of Cardiology, ISSN 0167-5273, E-ISSN 1874-1754, Vol. 272, p. 333-340Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    OBJECTIVE: Socioeconomic disadvantages during childhood are hypothesised to have negative implications for health. We aimed to investigate the association between socioeconomic disadvantages and children's total metabolic syndrome (MetS) score at baseline and follow-up and the extent to which socioeconomic disadvantages over time and the accumulation of these socioeconomic disadvantages can affect children's MetS risk.

    METHODS: The two-year longitudinal IDEFICS study included 2401 European children (aged 2.0-9.9) with complete information of the 16,229 participating at baseline. Sociodemographic variables, psychosocial factors and lifestyle were proxy-reported via questionnaires. Socioeconomically disadvantaged groups included children from families with low income, low education, migrant origin, unemployed parents, parents who lacked a social network, and from non-traditional families. MetS risk score was calculated as the sum of z-scores of waist circumference, blood pressure, lipids and insulin resistance. Linear mixed-effects models were used to study the association between social disadvantages and MetS risk. Models were adjusted for sex, age, well-being and lifestyle (fruit and vegetables consumption, physical activity, screen time).

    RESULTS: At both time points, children from low-income families (0.20 [0.03-0.37]); (β estimate and 99% confidence interval), children from non-traditional families (0.14 [0.02-0.26]), children whose parents were unemployed (0.31 [0.05-0.57]) and children who accumulated >3 disadvantages (0.21 [0.04-0.37]) showed a higher MetS score compared to non-socioeconomically disadvantaged groups.

    CONCLUSION: Children from socioeconomically disadvantaged families are at high metabolic risk independently of diet, physical activity, sedentary behaviours and well-being. Interventions focusing on these socioeconomically disadvantaged groups should be developed to tackle health disparities.

  • 174.
    Intemann, Timm
    et al.
    Leibniz Institute for Prevention Research and Epidemiology-BIPS, Bremen, Germany / Institute of Statistics, Bremen University, Germany.
    Pigeot, Iris
    Leibniz Institute for Prevention Research and Epidemiology-BIPS, Bremen, Germany / Institute of Statistics, Bremen University, Germany.
    De Henauw, Stefaan
    Department of Public Health, Ghent University, Belgium.
    Eiben, Gabriele
    University of Skövde, School of Health and Education. University of Skövde, Health and Education. Section for Epidemiology and Social Medicine, Sahlgrenska Academy, University of Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Lissner, Lauren
    Section for Epidemiology and Social Medicine, Sahlgrenska Academy, University of Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Krogh, Vittorio
    Epidemiology and Prevention Unit, Fondazione IRCSS Istituto Nazionale dei Tumori, Milan, Italy.
    Dereń, Katarzyna
    Institute of Nursing and Health Sciences, Medical Faculty, University of Rzeszow, Poland.
    Molnár, Dénes
    Department of Paediatrics, University of Pécs, Hungary.
    Moreno, Luis A
    Universidad de Zaragoza, Instituto Agroalimentario de Aragón (IA2), Instituto de Investigación Sanitaria de Aragón (IIS Aragón) and Centro de Investigación Biomédica en Red de Fisiopatología de la Nutrición y la Obesidad (CIBEROBN), Zaragoza, Spain.
    Russo, Paola
    Institute of Food Sciences, National Research Council, Avellino, Italy.
    Siani, Alfonso
    Institute of Food Sciences, National Research Council, Avellino, Italy.
    Sirangelo, Ivana
    University of Campania "L. Vanvitelli", Naples, Italy.
    Tornaritis, Michael
    Research and Education Institute of Child Health, Strovolos, Cyprus.
    Veidebaum, Toomas
    National Institute for Health Development, Tallinn, Estonia.
    Pala, Valeria
    Epidemiology and Prevention Unit, Fondazione IRCSS Istituto Nazionale dei Tumori, Milan, Italy.
    Urinary sucrose and fructose to validate self-reported sugar intake in children and adolescents: results from the I.Family study2019In: European Journal of Nutrition, ISSN 1436-6207, E-ISSN 1436-6215, Vol. 58, no 3, p. 1247-1258Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    PURPOSE: Excessive consumption of free sugar increases the risk for non-communicable diseases where a proper assessment of this intake is necessary to correctly estimate its association with certain diseases. Urinary sugars have been suggested as objective biomarkers for total and free sugar intake in adults but less is known about this marker in children and adolescents. Therefore, the aim of this exploratory study is to evaluate the relative validity of self-reported intake using urinary sugars in children and adolescents.

    METHODS: The study was conducted in a convenience subsample of 228 participants aged 5-18 years of the I.Family study that investigates the determinants of food choices, lifestyle and health in European families. Total, free and intrinsic sugar intake (g/day) and sugar density (g/1000 kcal) were assessed using 24-h dietary recalls (24HDRs). Urinary sucrose (USUC) and urinary fructose (UFRU) were measured in morning urine samples and corrected for creatinine excretion (USUC/Cr, UFRU/Cr). Correlation coefficients, the method of triads and linear regression models were used to investigate the relationship between intake of different types of sugar and urinary sugars.

    RESULTS: The correlation between usual sugar density calculated from multiple 24HDRs and the sum of USUC/Cr and UFRU/Cr (USUC/Cr + UFRU/Cr) was 0.38 (p < 0.001). The method of triads revealed validity coefficients for the 24HDR from 0.64 to 0.87. Linear regression models showed statistically significant positive associations between USUC/Cr + UFRU/Cr and the intake of total and free sugar.

    CONCLUSIONS: These findings support the relative validity of total and free sugar intake assessed by self-reported 24HDRs in children and adolescents.

  • 175.
    Jilani, Hannah
    et al.
    Leibniz Institute for Prevention Research and Epidemiology—BIPS, Germany / Institute for Public Health and Nursing Science, University of Bremen, Germany.
    Pohlabeln, Hermann
    Leibniz Institute for Prevention Research and Epidemiology—BIPS, Germany.
    De Henauw, Stefaan
    Department of Public Health, Ghent University, Belgium.
    Eiben, Gabriele
    University of Skövde, School of Health and Education. University of Skövde, Health and Education.
    Hunsberger, Monica
    Department of Public Health and Community Medicine, University of Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Molnar, Denes
    Department of Pediatrics, Medical School, University of Pécs, Hungary.
    Moreno, Luis A.
    GENUD (Growth, Exercise, Nutrition and Development) Research Group, Faculty of Health Sciences, University of Zaragoza, Spain.
    Pala, Valeria
    Department of Research, Epidemiology and Prevention Unit, Fondazione IRCCS Istituto Nazionale dei Tumori, Italy.
    Russo, Paola
    Institute of Food Sciences, National Research Council, Italy.
    Solea, Antonia
    Research and Education Institute of Child Health, Cyprus.
    Veidebaum, Toomas
    Department of Chronic Diseases, National Institute for Health Development, Estonia.
    Ahrens, Wolfgang
    Leibniz Institute for Prevention Research and Epidemiology—BIPS, Germany / Institute of Statistics, Faculty of Mathematics and Computer Science, University of Bremen, Germany.
    Hebestreit, Antje
    Leibniz Institute for Prevention Research and Epidemiology—BIPS, Germany.
    Relative Validity of a Food and Beverage Preference Questionnaire to Characterize Taste Phenotypes in Children Adolescents and Adults2019In: Nutrients, ISSN 2072-6643, E-ISSN 2072-6643, Vol. 11, no 7, article id 1453Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    To assess the relative validity of our food and beverage preference questionnaire we investigated the association between sweet and fatty taste preference scores (assessed using a food and beverage preference questionnaire) and sweet and fatty food propensity scores (derived from a food frequency questionnaire). In I.Family, a large European multi-country cohort study, 12,207 participants from Cyprus, Estonia, Germany, Hungary, Italy, Spain and Sweden, including 5291 adults, 3082 adolescents, and 3834 children, completed a food and beverage preference questionnaire with 63 items. Cumulative preference scores for sweet and fatty taste were calculated from the single item ranking ranging from 1 to 5. The relative consumption frequency of foods classified as sweet and fatty was used to calculate the corresponding consumption propensities, a continuous variable ranging from 0 to 100. We conducted regression analyses to investigate the association between sweet and fatty taste preference scores and sweet and fatty food propensity scores, respectively, separately for adults, adolescents >= 12 years, and for children <12 years. The overall sweet taste preference score was positively associated with the sweet food consumption propensity score (beta = 2.4, 95% CI: 2.1;2.7) and the fatty taste preference score was positively associated with the fatty food consumption propensity score (beta = 2.0, 95% CI: 1.8;2.2). After stratification for age (children <12 years, adolescents >= 12 years, and adults), the effect remained significant in all age groups and was strongest in adolescents and adults. We conclude that our food and beverage preference questionnaire is a useful instrument for epidemiological studies on sensory perception and health outcomes and for the characterization of sensory taste phenotypes.

  • 176.
    Jilani, Hannah S.
    et al.
    Leibniz Institute for Prevention Research and Epidemiology - BIPS, Bremen, Germany / Institute for Public Health and Nursing Research, University of Bremen and Health Sciences Bremen, University of Bremen, Bremen, Germany.
    Pohlabeln, Hermann
    Leibniz Institute for Prevention Research and Epidemiology - BIPS, Bremen, Germany.
    Buchecker, Kirsten
    Department of Food Science, TTZ, Bremerhaven, Germany.
    Gwozdz, Wencke
    Department of Management, Society and Communication, Copenhagen Business School, Frederiksberg, Denmark.
    De Henauw, Stefaan
    Department of Public Health, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences, Ghent University, Ghent, Belgium.
    Eiben, Gabriele
    University of Skövde, School of Health and Education. University of Skövde, Health and Education. Department of Public Health and Community Medicine, University of Gothenburg, Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Molnar, Dénes
    Department of Pediatrics, University of Pécs, Medical School, Pécs, Hungary.
    Moreno, Luis A.
    GENUD (Growth, Exercise, Nutrition and Development) Research Group, Faculty of Health Sciences, University of Zaragoza, Zaragoza, Spain.
    Pala, Valeria
    Department of Preventive and Predictive Medicine, Fondazione IRCCS Istituto Nazionale dei Tumori, Milan, Italy.
    Reisch, Lucia
    Department of Management, Society and Communication, Copenhagen Business School, Frederiksberg, Denmark.
    Russo, Paola
    Epidemiology and Population Genetics, Institute of Food Sciences, National Research Council, Avellino, Italy.
    Veidebaum, Toomas
    Department of Chronic Diseases, National Institute for Health Development, Tallinn, Estonia.
    Ahrens, Wolfgang
    Leibniz Institute for Prevention Research and Epidemiology - BIPS, Bremen, Germany / Institute of Statistics, Faculty of Mathematics and Computer Science, University of Bremen, Bremen, Germany.
    Hebestreit, Antje
    Leibniz Institute for Prevention Research and Epidemiology - BIPS, Bremen, Germany.
    Association between parental consumer attitudes with their children's sensory taste preferences as well as their food choice2018In: PLoS ONE, ISSN 1932-6203, E-ISSN 1932-6203, Vol. 13, no 8, article id e0200413Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background We investigated the association between the consumer attitudes of European parents and their children's taste preferences and food choice. Furthermore, we studied whether the parental consumer attitudes were related to education level.

    Methods This analysis included 1,407 IDEFICS study children aged 6.0 to 11.8 years and from 7 European countries, who participated in the sensory taste perception module between 2007 and 2010. Parental consumer attitude was operationalized as 'trusting in foods known from advertisements' (trusting advertisements) and as 'not avoiding additives in food' (not avoiding additives). Parents reported their educational attainment and completed a food frequency questionnaire for their children. Consumption frequencies of sweet, fatty and processed foods as well as a healthy diet adherence score were calculated. Children performed fat, sweet and umami taste preference tests. Multivariable logistic models were used to analyse the association between parental consumer attitudes and their children's taste preference frequencies as well as parental education. Linear regression models were used to analyse the association between parental consumer attitudes and their children's food consumption.

    Results Parental consumer attitudes were not associated with children's fat, sweet and umami taste preferences. Children of parents trusting advertisements consumed more frequently processed foods (beta = 1.21, 95% CI: 0.49; 1.93). Children of parents not avoiding additives consumed more often sweet, fatty and processed foods and had a lower healthy diet adherence score (beta = 2.37, 95% CI: 1.03; 3.70; beta = 2.27, 95% CI: 1.12; 3.43; beta = 0.91, 95% CI: 0.22; 1.59; beta = -2.87, 95% CI: -3.89; -1.85, respectively). Unfavourable parental consumer attitudes were associated with a lower parental education level across Europe (Compared to high education: Odds Ratio (OR) of trusting advertisements with medium education: 1.04, 95% CI: 0.77; 1.40; OR with low education: 2.01, 95% CI: 1.15; 3.54; OR of not avoiding additives with medium education: 1.91, 95% CI: 1.44; 2.54; OR with low education: 1.76, 95% CI: 0.96; 3.24).

    Conclusions Across Europe, unfavourable parental consumer attitudes are associated with a lower diet quality of their children. Parental consumer attitudes in turn were associated with their own level of education. This has implications for policy makers, interventions and health promotion programmes that aim to promote healthy eating.

  • 177.
    Johansson, Anna
    et al.
    University of Skövde, School of Health and Education. University of Skövde, Health and Education. Department of Cardiology, Skaraborgs Hospital, Skövde / Department of Medical and Health Sciences, University of Linköping, Sweden.
    Adamson, Anita
    Department of Physical Therapy, Skaraborgs Hospital, Skövde, Sweden.
    Ejdebäck, Jan
    Department of Cardiology, Skaraborgs Hospital, Skövde, Sweden.
    Edéll-Gustafsson, Ulla
    Department of Medical and Health Sciences, University of Linköping, Sweden.
    Evaluation of an individualised programme to promote self-care in sleep-activity in patients with coronary artery disease - a randomised intervention study2014In: Journal of Clinical Nursing, ISSN 0962-1067, E-ISSN 1365-2702, Vol. 23, no 19-20, p. 2822-2834Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Aims and objectives: To evaluate the effectiveness of an individualised programme to promote self-care in sleep-activity in patients with coronary artery disease. Background: Recent scientific findings have shown that low physical exercise and stress interfere with coronary artery disease patients' sleep quality and sleep efficiency independent of gender, age and co-morbidity. Design: A randomised pretest-post-test control design. Methods: Forty-seven patients who had undergone a coronary revascularisation procedure and/or pharmacological treatment three to seven weeks earlier at a general hospital were randomised to either an intervention group or a control group. Data collection was carried out by questionnaires, a study-specific sleep diary and actigraphy registration for 10 consecutive 24-hour periods, with a follow-up after three to four months. The intervention group underwent a nurse-led individualised education programme to promote self-care of sleep-activity. Sleep habits and sleep-related lifestyle together formed the basis for setting up individual goals together with the nurse. Individual advice on physical training, relaxation exercise and a CD-based relaxation programme was provided by a physiotherapist. Both groups received a brochure about sleep and stress. Results: At a three- to four-month follow-up, the main improvements were seen in the intervention group regarding sleep quality, sleep duration and sleep efficiency in the sleep diary and sleep efficiency in actigraphy. Statistical improvements in health-related quality of life were revealed. This was not so obvious in the control group. Conclusions: An individualised intervention programme to promote self-care of sleep-activity including relaxation in patients with coronary artery disease led by a nurse may improve sleep quality. However, a longitudinal study to promote self-care in sleep-activity should be performed using a larger sample and multiple sites with continuous follow-ups to determine whether any positive effects remain stable over time. Relevance to clinical practice: Implementation of a multiprofessional individualised programme to promote self-care of sleep-activity including relaxation based on patients' needs, supported by a healthcare team and led by nurses, is important in clinical practice. © 2014 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  • 178.
    Johansson, Barbro
    et al.
    University of Skövde, School of Health and Education.
    Mårtensson, Lena B.
    University of Skövde, School of Health and Education. University of Skövde, Health and Education.
    Ways of strategies to knowing the patient described by nursing students2019In: Nurse Education in Practice, ISSN 1471-5953, E-ISSN 1873-5223, Vol. 38, p. 120-125Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 179.
    Johansson, Karin
    et al.
    Department of Health and Care Sciences, Faculty of Health and Life Science, Linnaeus University, Växjö, Sweden / Department of Administration/Primary Care, Region Kronoberg County Council, Växjö, Sweden.
    Almerud Österberg, Sofia
    Department of Health and Care Sciences, Faculty of Health and Life Science, Linnaeus University, Växjö, Sweden.
    Leksell, Janeth
    School of Health and Social Sciences, University Dalarna, Falun, Sweden / Department of Medical Sciences, Uppsala University, Uppsala, Sweden.
    Berglund, Mia
    University of Skövde, School of Health and Education. University of Skövde, Health and Education.
    Manoeuvring between anxiety and control: Patients' experience of learning to live with diabetes: A lifeworld phenomenological study2015In: International Journal of Qualitative Studies on Health and Well-being, ISSN 1748-2623, E-ISSN 1748-2631, Vol. 10, article id 27147Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Research shows that people with diabetes want their lives to proceed as normally as possible, but some patients experience difficulty in reaching their desired goals with treatment. The learning process is a complex phenomenon interwoven into every facet of life. Patients and healthcare providers often have different perspectives in care which gives different expectations on what the patients need to learn and cope with. The aim of this study, therefore, is to describe the experience of learning to live with diabetes. Interviews were conducted with 12 patients afflicted with type 1 or type 2 diabetes. The interviews were then analysed with reference to the reflective lifeworld research approach. The analysis shows that when the afflicted realize that their bodies undergo changes and that blood sugar levels are not always balanced as earlier in life, they can adjust to their new conditions early. The afflicted must take responsibility for balancing their blood sugar levels and incorporating the illness into their lives. Achieving such goals necessitates knowledge. The search for knowledge and sensitivity to changes are constant requirements for people with diabetes. Learning is driven by the tension caused by the need for and dependence on safe blood sugar control, the fear of losing such control, and the fear of future complications. The most important responsibilities for these patients are aspiring to understand their bodies as lived bodies, ensuring safety and security, and acquiring the knowledge essential to making conscious choices.

  • 180.
    Johansson, Karin
    et al.
    Department of Health and Care Sciences, Faculty of Health and Life Science, Linnaeus University, Växjö, Sweden / Department of Administration, Kronoberg County Council, Växjö, Sweden / Primary Care, Region Kronoberg County Council, Växjö, Sweden.
    Almerud Österberg, Sofia
    Department of Health and Care Sciences, Faculty of Health and Life Science, Linnaeus University, Växjö, Sweden.
    Leksell, Janeth
    School of Health and Social Sciences, University Dalarna, Falun, Sweden / Department of Medical Sciences, Uppsala University, Uppsala, Sweden.
    Berglund, Mia
    University of Skövde, Health and Education. University of Skövde, School of Health and Education.
    Patients' experiences of support for learning to live with diabetes to promote health and well-being: A lifeworld phenomenological study2016In: International Journal of Qualitative Studies on Health and Well-being, ISSN 1748-2623, E-ISSN 1748-2631, Vol. 11, article id 31330Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Learning to live with diabetes in such a way that the new conditions will be a normal and natural part of life imposes requirements on the person living with diabetes. Previous studies have shown that there is no clear picture of what and how the learning that would allow persons to incorporate the illness into their everyday life will be supported. The aim of this study is to describe the phenomenon of support for learning to live with diabetes to promote health and well-being, from the patient’s perspective. Data were collected by interviews with patients living with type 1 or type 2 diabetes. The interviews were analysed using a reflective lifeworld approach. The results show that reflection plays a central role for patients with diabetes in achieving a new understanding of the health process, and awareness of their own responsibility was found to be the key factor for such a reflection. The constituents are responsibility creating curiosity and willpower, openness enabling support, technology verifying bodily feelings, a permissive climate providing for participation and exchanging experiences with others. The study concludes that the challenge for caregivers is to create interactions in an open learning climate that initiates and supports reflection to promote health and well-being.

  • 181.
    Johansson, Karin
    et al.
    Region Kronoberg.
    Almerud Österberg, Sofia
    Linnaeus University.
    Leksell, Janeth
    University Dalarna / Uppsala University.
    Berglund, Mia
    University of Skövde, School of Health and Education. University of Skövde, Health and Education.
    Supporting patients learning to live with diabetes: a phenomenological study2018In: British Journal of Nursing, ISSN 0966-0461, E-ISSN 2052-2819, Vol. 27, no 12, p. 697-704Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This article describes a study of the phenomenon of supporting patients who are learning to live with diabetes, from a diabetes specialist nurse (DSN) perspective. Guided by principles of reflective lifeworld research, data from six interviews (four in groups and two individual) with 16 DSNs were analysed. The results show that, in order to support learning, DSNs use a self-critical approach with the insight that they should not take over responsibility for their patients’ diabetes. The DSNs support, encourage and challenge the patients to self-reflect and take responsibility based on patients’ own goals and needs. To provide support, DSNs need to assume a tactful, critically challenging approach, dare to confront patients’ fears and other emotions and have the insight to know that the responsibility for learning and integration of the condition lies with the patient. To be able to support patients in this way, it is necessary that the DSN is mentored and supported in this role.

  • 182.
    Johansson, Yvonne A.
    et al.
    Skaraborg Hospital, Skövde, Sweden / Jönköping University, Jönköping, Sweden.
    Bergh, Ingrid
    University of Skövde, School of Health and Education. University of Skövde, Health and Education.
    Ericsson, Iréne
    Jönköping University, Jönköping, Sweden.
    Kenne Sarenmalm, Elisabeth
    Skaraborg Hospital, Skövde, Sweden.
    Delirium in older hospitalized patients—signs and actions: a retrospective patient record review2018In: BMC Geriatrics, ISSN 1471-2318, E-ISSN 1471-2318, Vol. 18, no 1, p. 1-11, article id 43Article, review/survey (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background

    Delirium is common in older hospitalized patients, and is associated with negative consequences for the patients, next of kin, healthcare professionals and healthcare costs. It is important to understand its clinical features, as almost 40% of all cases in hospitals may be preventable. Yet, delirium in hospitalized patients is often unrecognized and untreated. Few studies describe thoroughly how delirium manifests itself in older hospitalized patients and what actions healthcare professionals take in relation to these signs. Therefore, the aim of this study was to describe signs of delirium in older hospitalized patients and action taken by healthcare professionals, as reported in patient records.

    Methods

    Patient records from patients aged ≥65 (n = 286) were retrospectively reviewed for signs of delirium, which was found in 78 patient records (27%). Additionally, these records were reviewed for action taken by healthcare professionals in relation to the patients’ signs of delirium. The identified text was analyzed with qualitative content analysis in two steps.

    Results

    Healthcare professionals responded only in part to older hospitalized patients’ needs of care in relation to their signs of delirium. The patients displayed various signs of delirium that led to a reduced ability to participate in their own care and to keep themselves free from harm. Healthcare professionals met these signs with a variation of actions and the care was adapted, deficient and beyond the usual care. A systematic and holistic perspective in the care of older hospitalized patients with signs of delirium was missing.

    Conclusion

    Improved knowledge about delirium in hospitals is needed in order to reduce human suffering, healthcare utilization and costs. It is important to enable older hospitalized patients with signs of delirium to participate in their own care and to protect them from harm. Delirium has to be seen as a preventable adverse event in all hospitals units. To improve the prevention and management of older hospitalized patients with signs of delirium, person-centered care and patient safety may be important issues.

  • 183.
    Jonefjäll, Börje
    et al.
    Institute of Medicine, Sahlgrenska Academy, University of Gothenburg, Department of Internal Medicine and Clinical Nutrition, Gothenburg, Sweden / Department of Internal Medicine, Kungälv Hospital, Kungälv, Sweden.
    Simrén, Magnus
    Institute of Medicine, Sahlgrenska Academy, University of Gothenburg, Department of Internal Medicine and Clinical Nutrition, Gothenburg, Sweden / Center for Functional GI and Motility Disorders, University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill, NC, USA.
    Lasson, Anders
    Department of Internal Medicine, Södra Älvsborgs Hospital, Bora ̊ s, Sweden 5 Institute of Biomedicine, Sahlgrenska Academy, University of Gothenburg.
    Öhman, Lena
    University of Skövde, School of Health and Education. University of Skövde, Health and Education. Institute of Medicine, Sahlgrenska Academy, University of Gothenburg, Department of Internal Medicine and Clinical Nutrition, Gothenburg, Sweden / Institute of Biomedicine, Sahlgrenska Academy, University of Gothenburg, Department of Microbiology and Immunology, Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Strid, Hans
    Institute of Medicine, Sahlgrenska Academy, University of Gothenburg, Department of Internal Medicine and Clinical Nutrition, Gothenburg, Sweden / Department of Internal Medicine, Södra Älvsborgs Hospital, Bora ̊ s, Sweden 5 Institute of Biomedicine, Sahlgrenska Academy, University of Gothenburg.
    Psychological distress, iron deficiency, active disease and female gender are independent risk factors for fatigue in patients with ulcerative colitis2018In: United European Gastroenterology journal, ISSN 2050-6406, E-ISSN 2050-6414, Vol. 6, no 1, p. 148-158Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: Patients with ulcerative colitis often report fatigue. Objectives: To investigate prevalence of and risk factors for fatigue in patients with ulcerative colitis with active disease and during deep remission. Methods: In this cross-sectional study, disease activity was evaluated with endoscopy and calprotectin, and patients were classified as having active disease (n=133) or being in deep remission (n=155). Blood samples were analysed to assess anaemia, iron deficiency and systemic immune activity. Patients completed questionnaires to assess fatigue, psychological distress, gastrointestinal symptoms and quality of life. Results: The prevalence of high fatigue (general fatigue >= 13, Multidimensional Fatigue Inventory) was 40% in the full study population. Among patients with high fatigue, female gender and iron deficiency were more prevalent, and these patients had more severe disease activity and reported higher levels of anxiety, depression and decreased quality of life compared with patients with no/mild fatigue. A logistic regression analysis identified probable psychiatric disorder (odds ratio (OR) (confidence interval) 6.1 (3.1-12.2)), iron deficiency (OR 2.5 (1.2-5.1)), active disease (OR 2.2 (1.2-3.9)) and female gender (OR 2.1 (1.1-3.7)) as independent risk factors for high fatigue. Similar results were found concerning psychological distress, gender and quality of life, but immune markers did not differ in patients in deep remission with high vs. no/mild fatigue. Conclusions: Probable psychiatric disorder, iron deficiency, active disease and female gender are independent risk factors for high fatigue in patients with ulcerative colitis. Low-grade immune activity does not seem to be the cause of fatigue among patients in deep remission.

  • 184.
    Jukkala, Tanya
    et al.
    University of Skövde, School of Health and Education. University of Skövde, Health and Education. Södertörn University, Stockholm Centre on Health of Societies in Transition (SCOHOST), Huddinge, Sweden.
    Makinen, Ilkka Henrik
    Södertörn University, Stockholm Centre on Health of Societies in Transition (SCOHOST), Huddinge, Sweden / Uppsala University, Department of Sociology, Sweden.
    Stickley, Andrew
    Södertörn University, Stockholm Centre on Health of Societies in Transition (SCOHOST), Huddinge, Sweden / University of Tokyo, The Department of Human Ecology, Graduate School of Medicine, Japan / London School of Hygiene and Tropical Medicine, European Centre on Health of Societies in Transition (ECOHOST), London, United Kingdom.
    The Historical Development of Suicide Mortality in Russia, 1870-20072015In: Archives of Suicide Research, ISSN 1381-1118, E-ISSN 1573-8159, Vol. 19, no 1, p. 117-130Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Russia has one of the highest suicide mortality rates in the world. This study investigates the development of Russian suicide mortality over a longer time period in order to provide a context within which the contemporary high level might be better understood. Annual sex- and age-specific suicide-mortality data for Russia for the period 1870-2007 were studied, where available. Russian suicide mortality increased 11-fold over the period. Trends in male and female suicide developed similarly, although male suicide rates were consistently much higher. From the 1990s suicide has increased in a relative sense among the young (15-34), while the high suicide mortality among middle-aged males has reduced. Changes in Russian suicide mortality over the study period may be attributable to modernization processes.

  • 185.
    Kajonius, Petri J.
    University of Skövde, School of Health and Education. University of Skövde, Health and Education. Department of Psychology, University of Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Test-dependent activations of Neuroticism and Dark Triad predicting self-estimated intelligence2014Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The relationship between self-estimated and observed intelligence has sparked an interest among researchers in recent years. However, studies on the relationship between how personality traits predict self-estimations of intelligence in different test-settings are still not explored. This study set up a two-way experimental within-subjects design (N = 84) to test how prior personality traits predict self-estimated intelligence, immidiately after having performed an intelligence-test. At a first occasion, an explicitly easy intelligence-test (Kajonius, 2014) under relaxed pretenses was given to a number of work psychology students, and at a second occasion two months later a difficult intelligence test (Condon & Revelle, 2014, ICAR16) with time pressure was given to the same students. No test-scores or personality traits’ results were revealed until after the study. An expected relationship between self-estimated and observed intelligence of similar strength was found in both conditions (r ~ .55). Also, the students’ prior personality tests (Big Five Inventory-44) showed that neuroticism had a negative relationship with self-estimated intelligence (r ~ -.30), similarly in both conditions. However, the self-enhancing traits of Machiavellianism and narcissism (Short Dark Triad-3) showed a significant positive relationship with self-estimated intelligence only in the easy condition (r = .30) and not in the difficult condition (r = .10). The discussion suggests that neither student exits nor adjustment effects can explain the differences in the impact of dark triad traits between the conditions. The conclusion is that the study implies that test situations can activate personality traits differently, while the accuracy of self-perceived intelligence is more constant.

  • 186.
    Kajonius, Petri J.
    et al.
    University of Skövde, School of Health and Education. University of Skövde, Health and Education.
    Kazemi, Ali
    University of Skövde, School of Health and Education. University of Skövde, Health and Education.
    Advancing the Big Five of User-Oriented Elderly Care and Accounting for its Variations2016In: International Journal of Health Care Quality Assurance, ISSN 0952-6862, E-ISSN 1758-6542, Vol. 29, no 2, p. 162-176Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Purpose – Care process quality (i.e., how care is enacted by a care worker toward a client at the interpersonal level) is a strong predictor of satisfaction in a wide range of health care services. The present research aims at describing the basic elements of care process quality as user-oriented care. Specifically, the questions of how and why quality in user-oriented care varies were investigated in the context of elderly care.

    Design – Two municipalities were selected for in-depth field studies. First, in each municipality, we interviewed and observed care workers’ interactions with the older persons in both home care and nursing homes during two weeks (Study 1). Second, in an attempt to gain a deeper understanding of why process quality in terms of user-oriented care varies, we conducted interviews with care workers and care unit managers (Study 2).

    Findings – A new taxonomy for categorising process quality variation, the Big Five of user-oriented care (Task-focus, Person-focus, Affect, Cooperation, and Time-use), is proposed. In addition, the perceived reasons for process quality variation are reported in our own developed Quality Agents Model, suggesting that variations in care process evaluations may be explained from different perspectives at multiple levels (i.e., older person, care worker-, unit-, department-, and municipality-level).

    Value – The proposed taxonomy and model are useful for describing user-oriented care quality and the reasons for its variations. These findings are of relevance for future quality developments of elderly care services, but also may be adapted to applications in any other enterprise employing a user-oriented approach.

    Keywords elderly care, quality, satisfaction, person-centered care, individualised care, user-oriented care

  • 187.
    Kajonius, Petri J.
    et al.
    University of Skövde, School of Health and Education. Psykologiska Institutionen, Göteborgs Universitet.
    Kazemi, Ali
    University of Skövde, School of Health and Education. University of Skövde, Health and Education.
    Older Persons’ Subjective Evaluations of Care Quality: Three studies Analyzing the National Survey of Swedish Elderly Care2014Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    As the proportion of older people in coming years is increasing, and as the organizations of home care and nursing homes grow to manage the expectations from the population, the debate on the quality of elderly care has gained a new momentum. Today, most decision-makers within elderly care in Sweden base their actions on the nation-wide annual quality report on elderly care from the Swedish National Board of Health and Welfare, Open Comparisons. This research presents findings from this national survey conducted in 2012, including a wide variety of indicators for elderly care services in all Swedish municipalities (N = 324) based on the responses from over 95,000 older persons. Study I presents that structural variables (i.e., budget resources and personnel training) overall did not correlate with older persons’ perceived quality of care, while processual variables (i.e., influence, respect, and access to information) showed moderate to strong correlations. Study II presents that overall satisfaction with care was strongly correlated with evaluation of relationship with care personnel and feelings of safeness. Study III presents an overall municipality quality-index with which comparisons between municipalities can be made, showing that the highest and the lowest ranked municipalities did not differ strongly on indicators of quality (d < 0.6). The conclusion is that there currently exists no reliable and valid measure which manages to tap quality of municipal elderly care, and that developing a new client-care centered climate scale should prove to be fruitful. Seeing how a person-centered theoretical approach is receiving support from this large national sample, implications for extending the theoretical frame of person-centeredness into psychological climate research in organizations is proposed. 

  • 188.
    Kajonius, Petri J.
    et al.
    University of Skövde, School of Health and Education. Psykologiska Institutionen, Göteborgs Universitet.
    Kazemi, Ali
    University of Skövde, School of Health and Education. University of Skövde, Health and Education.
    Rankning av Sveriges kommuners äldreomsorg i Öppna jämförelser2014In: Socialmedicinsk Tidskrift, ISSN 0037-833X, Vol. 91, no 4, p. 323-331Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [sv]

    Med den ökande andelen äldre personer i Sverige har diskussionen om kvalitet i äldreomsorgen tagit ny fart. Idag är äldreomsorgsbeslut baserat på den omfattande årsrapporten, Öppna jämförelser, som rankar alla Sveriges kommuner utifrån ett antal kvalitetsindikatorer. Relevant för området sociala studier och hälsa, visar sekundäranalyser av dessa data att Öppna jämförelser gör en missvisande rankning som inte tar hänsyn till hur de äldre har svarat, och inte heller påtalar hur små skillnaderna mellan högst och lägst rankade kommuner är. Genom att använda effektstorleksmått presenteras i artikeln ett nytt och mer korrekt sätt att ranka kommuner. Vidare föreslås i denna artikel att Öppna jämförelser i sina framtida mätningar inkluderar reliabla och valida mått på brukarorienterad omsorg då detta har visat sig ha positiva effekter på äldres upplevelse av omsorgskvalitet.

  • 189.
    Kajonius, Petri J.
    et al.
    University of Skövde, School of Health and Education. University of Skövde, Health and Education. Department of Psychology, University of Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Kazemi, Ali
    University of Skövde, School of Health and Education. University of Skövde, Health and Education.
    Safeness and Treatment Mitigate the Effect of Loneliness on Satisfaction with Elderly Care2016In: The Gerontologist, ISSN 0016-9013, E-ISSN 1758-5341, Vol. 56, no 5, p. 928-936Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Maximizing satisfaction among the older persons is the goal of modern individualized elderly care and how to best achieve this is of relevance for anyone planning and providing for elderly care services. Purpose of the study: What predicts satisfaction with care among older persons can be conceived as a function of process (how care is performed), and the older person. Inspired by the long-standing person versus situation debate, the present research investigated the interplay between person- and process aspects in predicting satisfaction with elderly care. Design and method: A representative nationwide sample was analyzed, based on a questionnaire sent out to 95,000 individuals using elderly care services. Results: The results showed that person-related factors (i.e., anxiety, health, and loneliness) were significant predictors of satisfaction with care, although less strongly than process-related factors (i.e., treatment, safeness, and perceived staff- and time availability). Among the person-related factors, loneliness was the strongest predictor of satisfaction among older persons in nursing homes. Interestingly, a path analysis revealed that safeness and treatment function as mediators in linking loneliness to satisfaction. Implications: The results based on a large national sample demonstrate that the individual aging condition to a significant degree can be countered by a well-functioning care process, resulting in higher satisfaction with care among older persons. 

  • 190.
    Kajonius, Petri J.
    et al.
    University of Skövde, School of Health and Education. University of Skövde, Health and Education. Department of Psychology, University of Gothenburg, Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Kazemi, Ali
    University of Skövde, School of Health and Education. University of Skövde, Health and Education.
    Structure and Process Quality as Predictors of Satisfaction with Elderly Care2016In: Health & Social Care in the Community, ISSN 0966-0410, E-ISSN 1365-2524, Vol. 24, no 6, p. 699-707Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The structure versus process approach to quality of care presented by Donabedian is one of the most cited ever. However, there has been a paucity of research into the empirical validity of this framework, specifically concerning the relative effects of structure and process on satisfaction with elderly care as perceived by the older persons themselves. The current research presents findings from a national survey, including a wide range of quality indicators for elderly care services, conducted in 2012 at the request of the Swedish National Board of Health and Welfare in which responses from 95,000 elderly people living in 324 municipalities and districts were obtained. The results revealed that the only structural variable which significantly predicted quality of care was staffing, measured in terms of the number of caregivers per older resident. More interestingly, process variables (e.g. respect and access to information) explained 40% and 48% of the variance in satisfaction with care, over and above the structural variables, in home care and nursing homes respectively. The findings from this large nationwide sample examining Donabedian's model suggest that quality in elderly care is primarily determined by factors pertaining to process, that is, how caregivers behave towards the older persons. This encourages a continued quality improvement in elderly care with a particular focus on process variables.

  • 191.
    Kajonius, Petri J.
    et al.
    University of Skövde, School of Health and Education. University of Skövde, Health and Education. University West, Sweden.
    Roos, Magnus
    University of Skövde, School of Health and Education. University of Skövde, Health and Education.
    The American Dream in a Swedish Representative Sample: Personality Traits Predict Life Outcomes Better than Childhood Background2016Conference paper (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    The American Dream is that any individual, not regarding family background, can achieve what they desire, in terms of life, economic liberty, and happiness. An indication of the American dream would be if individual adult personality traits predicted life outcomes better than childhood background.

    A sample of the Swedish population, representative in age, sex, and occupation (N = 5,280) was 2012 measured on adult personality traits, childhood socioeconomic status (SES), and 3 life outcomes – education, income, and life outcome satisfaction.

    Childhood SES accounted for almost twice the disattenuated variance (22%) compared to personality (12%) in educational attainment, while personality accounted for almost twice the variance (12%) compared to childhood SES (7%) in annual income. Life outcome satisfaction was only predicted by personality (37%) and not by childhood SES (0%). Moreover, particularly the traits extraversion and neuroticism showed a full compensating catch-up effect on high childhood SES in annual income.

    Expressions of personality may be growing in predictive importance and constitute a societal trademark of the American dream being present. Sweden is a renowned progressive, individualistic, and egalitarian country, which could make the results of wide-reaching interest. 

  • 192.
    Kajonius, Petri
    et al.
    University of Skövde, School of Health and Education. University of Skövde, Health and Education. Department of Psychology, University of Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Kazemi, Ali
    University of Skövde, School of Health and Education. University of Skövde, Health and Education.
    Tengblad, Stefan
    University of Skövde, School of Business. University of Skövde, Enterprises for the Future.
    Organizing Principles and Management Climate in High-Performing Municipal Elderly Care2016In: Leadership in Health Services, ISSN 1751-1879, E-ISSN 1751-1887, Vol. 29, no 1, p. 82-94Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Purpose – Previous research has shown that user-oriented care predicts older persons’ satisfaction with care. What is yet to be researched is how senior management facilitates the implementation of user-oriented care. The present study set out to investigate the organizing principles and management climate characterizing successful elderly care organizations.

    Design – The care organization in one highly ranked municipality was selected and compared with a more average municipality. On-site semi-structured in-depth interviews with managers as well as participatory observations at managers’ meetings were conducted in both municipalities.

    Findings – The results revealed three key principles for successful elderly care: 1) organizing care from the viewpoint of the older service user, 2) recruiting and training competent and autonomous employees, 3) instilling a vision for the mission which guides operations at all levels in the organization. Furthermore, using climate theory to interpret the material, in the highly successful municipality the management climate was characterized by affective support and cognitive autonomy, in contrast to a more instrumental work climate primarily focusing on organizational structure and doing things right characterizing the more average municipality.

    Value – We suggest that guiding organizing principles are intertwined with management climate and that there are multiple perspectives that must be considered by the upper management, i.e., the views of the older persons, the co-workers, and the mission. The results can guide future care quality developments and increase the understanding of the importance of organizational climate at the senior management level.

  • 193.
    Kariminejad, Ariana
    et al.
    Kariminejad-Najmabadi Pathology and Genetics Center, Tehran, Iran.
    Dahl-Halvarsson, Martin
    Department of Pathology, University of Gothenburg, Sahlgrenska University Hospital, Sweden.
    Ravenscroft, Gianina
    Centre for Medical Research, The University of Western Australia and the Harry Perkins Institute for Medical Research, Nedlands, Western Australia, Australia.
    Afroozan, Fariba
    Kariminejad-Najmabadi Pathology and Genetics Center, Tehran, Iran.
    Keshavarz, Elham
    Department of Radiology, Mahdieh Hospital, Shahid Beheshti University of Medical Science, Tehran, Iran.
    Goullée, Hayley
    Centre for Medical Research, The University of Western Australia and the Harry Perkins Institute for Medical Research, Nedlands, Western Australia, Australia.
    Davis, Mark R.
    Department of Diagnostic Genomics, Pathwest, QEII Medical Centre, Nedlands, Western Australia, Australia.
    Faraji Zonooz, Mehrshid
    Kariminejad-Najmabadi Pathology and Genetics Center, Tehran, Iran.
    Najmabadi, Hossein
    Kariminejad-Najmabadi Pathology and Genetics Center, Tehran, Iran.
    Laing, Nigel G.
    Centre for Medical Research, The University of Western Australia and the Harry Perkins Institute for Medical Research, Nedlands, Western Australia, Australia.
    Tajsharghi, Homa
    University of Skövde, School of Health and Education. University of Skövde, Health and Education. Centre for Medical Research, The University of Western Australia and the Harry Perkins Institute for Medical Research, Nedlands, Western Australia, Australia.
    TOR1A variants cause a severe arthrogryposis with developmental delay, strabismus and tremor2017In: Brain, ISSN 0006-8950, E-ISSN 1460-2156, Vol. 140, no 11, p. 2851-2859Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Autosomal dominant torsion dystonia-1 is a disease with incomplete penetrance most often caused by an in-frame GAG deletion (p.Glu303del) in the endoplasmic reticulum luminal protein torsinA encoded by TOR1A.

    We report an association of the homozygous dominant disease-causing TOR1A p.Glu303del mutation, and a novel homozygous missense variant (p.Gly318Ser) with a severe arthrogryposis phenotype with developmental delay, strabismus and tremor in three unrelated Iranian families. All parents who were carriers of the TOR1A variant showed no evidence of neurological symptoms or signs, indicating decreased penetrance similar to families with autosomal dominant torsion dystonia-1. The results from cell assays demonstrate that the p.Gly318Ser substitution causes a redistribution of torsinA from the endoplasmic reticulum to the nuclear envelope, similar to the hallmark of the p.Glu303del mutation.

    Our study highlights that TOR1A mutations should be considered in patients with severe arthrogryposis and further expands the phenotypic spectrum associated with TOR1A mutations. 

  • 194.
    Karlsson, Christina
    University of Skövde, School of Health and Education. University of Skövde, Health and Education. Högskolan i Jönköping, Hälsohögskolan.
    Detection and assessment of pain in dementia care practice: Registered nurses’ and certified nursing assistants’ experiences2015Doctoral thesis, comprehensive summary (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Aim: The overall aim of the thesis was to explore and describe registered nurses’ (RNs) and certified nursing assistants’ (CNAs) experiences of detection and assessment of pain in older people with cognitive impairment and dementia. A further aim was to evaluate the Abbey Pain Scale-SWE (APS-SWE) in dementia care practice.

    Methods: An exploratory and descriptive design was used in Study I. An exploratory and interpreting design was used in Study II and Study III. A prospective, descriptive, observational and instrumental design was used in Study IV. Focus group interviews (I) and individual interviews (II, III) were applied to explore and describe RNs’ and CNAs’ experiences of pain assessment in people living with dementia. Qualitative content analysis (I) and philosophical hermeneutics (II) were used to analyse qualitative data. Observation, instrument, and questionnaire were applied to evaluate reliability and face validity of the APS-SWE for pain assessment. Descriptive statistics and reliability analyses were used to analyse quantitative data (IV).

    Results: RNs in special housing accommodation settings experiences that pain assessment in people with dementia is challenging primarily due to their changed RN consultant role, which to a great extent is directed into administrative and consultative tasks rather than bedside care. This has led to decreased time in daily nursing care, preventing recognising symptoms of pain. This have also led to that RNs are dependent on information from CNAs who are the front-line staff providing daily care (I). CNAs’ perception of signs of pain in people with dementia emerges from being present in the care situation and alertness on physical and behavioural changes that could be due to pain, and from providing the care in a preventive, protective and supportive way to prevent painful situations occurring (II). RNs and CNAs working in home healthcare team use a variety of strategies to detect and assess pain. A trustful work relationship based on staff continuity and a good relation to the person in need of care facilitates pain assessment situations (III). Systematic observation of older people living in special housing accommodation during rest and mobility using the APS-SWE demonstrates that the scale has adequate internal consistency, reliability, and face validity for pain assessment (IV).

    Conclusions: This thesis found that the RNs’ and CNAs’ detections and assessments of pain rely on solid cooperation, staff continuity, and good knowledge of the person cared for. It was also revealed that there is a lack of using appropriate and assisting pain tools. The APS-SWE show adequate reliability and face validity and can serve as a useful pain tool to assist in detection and assessment of pain in older people who are limited in verbalising pain recognisable. Further evaluation of how the person-centred perspective is applied in pain assessment situations is needed in order to evaluate positive outcomes in people with dementia. Further psychometric evaluation of the APS-SWE in clinical dementia care practice is needed to strengthen validity and reliability.

  • 195.
    Karlsson, Christina Elisabeth
    et al.
    University of Skövde, School of Health and Education. University of Skövde, Health and Education.
    Ernsth Bravell, Marie
    Institute of Gerontology, University of Jönköping, Jönköping, Sweden.
    Ek, Kristina
    University of Skövde, School of Health and Education. University of Skövde, Health and Education.
    Bergh, Ingrid
    University of Skövde, School of Health and Education. University of Skövde, Health and Education.
    Home healthcare teams' assessments of pain in care recipients living with dementia: a Swedish exploratory study2015In: International Journal of Older People Nursing, ISSN 1748-3735, E-ISSN 1748-3743, Vol. 10, no 3, p. 190-200Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 196.
    Karlsson, Veronika
    et al.
    University of Skövde, School of Health and Education. University of Skövde, Health and Education.
    Bergbom, Ingegerd
    University of Gothenburg, Sweden.
    ICU Professionals’ Experiences of Caring for Conscious Patients Receiving MVT2015In: Western Journal of Nursing Research, ISSN 0193-9459, E-ISSN 1552-8456, Vol. 37, no 3, p. 360-375Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Over the last decade, caring for patients who are conscious while receiving mechanical ventilator treatment has become common in Scandinavian intensive care units. Therefore, this study aimed to describe anesthetists’, nurses’, and nursing assistants’ experiences of caring for such patients. Nine persons were interviewed. A hermeneutic method inspired by Gadamer’s philosophy was used to interpret and analyze the interview text. Staff members found it distressing to witness and be unable to alleviate suffering, leading to ethical conflicts, feelings of powerlessness, and betrayal of the promises made to the patient. They were frustrated about their inability to understand what the patients were trying to say and often turned to colleagues for help. When caring for conscious patients, it takes time to get to know them and establish communication and a trusting relationship.

  • 197.
    Karlsson, Veronika
    et al.
    University of Skövde, School of Health and Education. University of Skövde, Health and Education. Department of Anesthesia and Intensive Care, Sahlgrenska University Hospital, Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Bergbom, Ingegerd
    Institute of Health and Care Sciences, Sahlgrenska Academy, University of Gothenburg, Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Ringdal, Mona
    Institute of Health and Care Sciences, Sahlgrenska Academy, University of Gothenburg, Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Jonsson, Annikki
    School of Health Science, Borås University College, Borås, Sweden.
    After discharge home: a qualitative analysis of older ICU patients' experiences and care needs2016In: Scandinavian Journal of Caring Sciences, ISSN 0283-9318, E-ISSN 1471-6712, Vol. 30, no 4, p. 749-756Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 198.
    Kazemi, Ali
    University of Skövde, School of Technology and Society. University of Skövde, Health and Education.
    Avslutande reflektioner kring socialpsykologiska aspekter på välbefinnande2009In: Välbefinnande i arbetslivet: socialpsykologiska perspektiv / [ed] Ali Kazemi, Lund: Studentlitteratur, 2009, 1, p. 195-200Chapter in book (Refereed)
  • 199.
    Kazemi, Ali
    University of Skövde, School of Health and Education. University of Skövde, Health and Education.
    Conceptualizing and measuring occupational social well-being: a validation study2017In: International Journal of Organizational Analysis, ISSN 1934-8835, E-ISSN 1758-8561, Vol. 25, no 1, p. 45-61Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Purpose: The current conceptualizations and measurements of well-being are inadequate in the context of work. Specifically, well-being research has neglected the social aspects of well-being. Therefore, the present study aims to investigate the validity of a multi-dimensional view of occupational social well-being. Design/methodology/approach: Data were collected in an educational setting, i.e. six different schools in a Swedish municipality. A total of 314 teachers and other categories of school staff (239 females and 75 males) participated in a survey study. Findings: Results provided empirical support for a multi-dimensional view of occupational social well-being. The dimensions were integration, acceptance, contribution, actualization and coherence, and they were differentially correlated with previous measures of well-being. Furthermore, occupational social well-being accounted for additional variance in work tension, overall job satisfaction and organizational commitment over and above the variance accounted for by positive and negative affect and satisfaction with life, indicating the value of taking domain-specific social indicators of well-being into account in explaining various employee outcomes. Practical implications: Occupational social well-being is an umbrella term for describing the well-lived social life in the context of work. As such, this is a crucial part of a holistic view of well-being at work. Thus, effective employee well-being enhancement programs should not only focus on physical and mental health promotion or competence development but must also include measures of relational experience and functioning as discussed in the present study. Originality/value: This is the first study to measure and validate occupational social well-being as an attempt to complement existing measures of subjective and psychological well-being. Measures of social aspects of well-being are crucial to assess as it has been argued in previous research that context-free measures of well-being might render misleading results.

  • 200.
    Kazemi, Ali
    University of Skövde, School of Health and Education. University of Skövde, Health and Education.
    Examining the Interplay of Justice Perceptions, Motivation, and School Achievement among Secondary School Students2016In: Social Justice Research, ISSN 0885-7466, E-ISSN 1573-6725, Vol. 29, no 1, p. 103-118Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    There is a paucity of empirical research on the social psychology of justice in educational settings. A few previous studies have predominantly focused on distributive and procedural justice concerns, and knowledge about the role of what have been called informational and interpersonal justice for school outcomes is very scarce. In the present study, data from 227 eighth- and ninth-grade students who participated in a survey study were analyzed to examine the interplay between relational justice concerns (decomposed into procedural, interpersonal, and informational justice), motivation to study, and school achievement. A comprehensive theoretically grounded multi-item measure of informational justice was developed and validated. The results showed that informational justice significantly predicts school grades, and that motivation to study fully mediates this effect. Neither procedural nor interpersonal justice was associated with school grades. The implications of these results for research and practice are discussed in detail.

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