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  • 151.
    Andersson, Thomas
    et al.
    University of Skövde, School of Technology and Society.
    Kazemi, Ali
    University of Skövde, School of Technology and Society.
    Tengblad, Stefan
    University of Skövde, School of Technology and Society.
    Wickelgren, Mikael
    University of Skövde, School of Technology and Society.
    Uppdrag butikschef: Att leda i butik2013 (ed. 1)Book (Refereed)
    Abstract [sv]

    Vad innebär det att arbeta med ledaruppdrag inom handeln och hur kan man nå framgång som butikschef? Detta är två centrala frågor i boken Uppdrag butikschef – att leda i butik som tar ett helhetsgrepp om följande centrala aspekter på butikschefsarbete: 

    • ledarskap och medarbetarskap 
    • motivation och kommunikation 
    • personalarbete och arbetsrätt 
    • kompetensutveckling och etik

    Boken är skriven av forskare inom företagsekonomi och socialpsykologi, verksamma vid Högskolan i Skövde, och den bygger delvis på ett aktuellt forskningsprojekt om ledarskap och medarbetarskap inom svensk handel.

  • 152.
    Andersson, Thomas
    et al.
    University of Skövde, Enterprises for the Future. University of Skövde, School of Business.
    Kazemi, Ali
    University of Skövde, School of Health and Education.
    Wickelgren, Mikael
    University of Skövde, Enterprises for the Future. University of Skövde, School of Business.
    Career in Swedish Retail2016Report (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    A career in retailing is to a large extent a boundaryless career. A career in retail does not limit the individual to a single organisation, to a single role/position, or to a hierarchical rung on the organisational ladder. Both co-workers and managers move quite easily among organisations within the same retail area, between different retail areas, and in and out of the retail sector.

    • In the past, the description of retailing as a transitory employment sector has had a negative connotation. Yet this description can also have quite a positive connotation. For example, experience acquired in the retail sector can be very useful in other work sectors. Moreover, people working in retail are generally motivated by job security, a job that is possible to combine to leisure/family, and a job close to home. They are typically much less motivated by traditional career advancement opportunities, the exercise of power over others, and by the desire to make decisions.

    • People working in retail have a rather limited interest in becoming managers in part because their major work motivators are not the motivators one usually associates with management career paths.

    • Gender is a relatively weak distinguishing variable in terms of retail careers, but there are some statistically significant – yet small – differences in the work characteristics of men and women in retail. For example, women in retail prioritize work-life balance, the proximity of workplace to home, and outside interests more than men in retail. These priorities have a limiting effect on their opportunities to accept managerial positions and to follow traditional, upward career paths.

    • There are more women than men working in the retail sector today, but a larger percentage of men in management positions. However, this cannot be explained by differences between the motivations of men and women to become managers or in their attitudes towards their own managerial capabilities. The explanation lies in other, more indirect factors such as the expectations of today’s managers.

    • Women generally earn less than men in the retail sector. This inequality is especially evident when differences in work responsibilities exist (e.g., specialized areas, subbranches, management tasks).

    • There is some general scepticism among employees in the retail sector as far as the extent to which their employers are willing to commit to their well-being and development. This finding has important practical implications when employees sense a lack of employer commitment to them.

    • People outside retail sector generally have a more negative picture of the retail sector than the people within the sector. People in the retail sector are relatively satisfied and think their work is varied and interesting.

    • The number of women at the lower management levels (at the store-level) is increasing. Because of this trend, which is expected to continue, in the relatively near future there may be as many female managers as male managers at this level. However, at the upper management levels in retail, there are more than ten men for every woman and no indications of change.

    • Job security is the most important career anchor for retail employees in Sweden. This finding has very important practical implications because job security is typically not associated with employment in the retail sector. It is a factor that can be an important consideration for retailers.

  • 153.
    Andersson, Thomas
    et al.
    University of Skövde, School of Business. University of Skövde, Enterprises for the Future.
    Kazemi, Ali
    University of Skövde, School of Health and Education. University of Skövde, Health and Education.
    Wickelgren, Mikael
    University of Skövde, School of Business. University of Skövde, Enterprises for the Future.
    Karriärvägar i detaljhandeln2016Report (Refereed)
  • 154.
    Andersson, Thomas
    et al.
    University of Skövde, School of Business. University of Skövde, Enterprises for the Future.
    Liff, Roy
    Borås University, Borås, Sweden.
    Co-optation as a response to competing institutional logics: Professionals and managers in healthcare2018In: Journal of Professions and Organization, ISSN 2051-8803, E-ISSN 2051-8811, Vol. 5, no 2, p. 71-87Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Researchers working under the institutional logics perspective find the struggle between managerial logic and various professional logics one of the most intriguing issues in healthcare organizations. Previous research provided several explanations at both the organizational level (mediation, hybridization, and selective coupling) and the individual actor level (hierarchization, sense making, reinterpretation, and hijacking) for the coexistence of professional and managerial logics in healthcare. However, all of these explanations are based on the underlying institutional logics not changing. In this article, we show that co-optation can explain the coexistence of institutional logics, but that it also causes the underlying institutional logics to change. Co-optation means that an actor adopts a strategic element from another logic that retains the most important elements of its own logic. Empirically, this article illustrates co-optation processes through a qualitative study of outpatient units in child and adolescent psychiatric care in Sweden. Using an institutional logics framework, we describe and explain how managers co-opted elements of professional logics and professionals co-opted elements of managerial logic in their attempts to support their own interests. Even if co-optation is performed to protect the home logic, the co-opted elements ultimately change it. This study contributes to the institutional logics framework by describing and explaining how co-optation can be a dynamic response to competing logics at the individual actor level.

  • 155.
    Andersson, Thomas
    et al.
    University of Skövde, School of Technology and Society.
    Liff, Roy
    Gothenburg Research Institute, Göteborg, Sweden.
    Does patient-centred care mean risk aversion and risk ignoring?: Unintended consequences of NPM reforms2012In: International Journal of Public Sector Management, ISSN 0951-3558, E-ISSN 1758-6666, Vol. 25, no 4, p. 260-271Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Purpose – This article aims to describe and analyze the results of efforts to improve patient-centered care (PCC) in psychiatric healthcare.

    Design/methodology/approach – Using the methodology of a qualitative case study, the authors studied three Swedish child and adolescent psychiatric care (CAP) units in order to describe how patient-centered actions are performed. They conducted 62 interviews, made 11 half-day observations, and shadowed employees for two days.

    Findings – The article shows that the increased focus on accountability for unit performance and medical risks results in unintended consequences. The patient’s medical risk is transformed to a personal risk for the psychiatrist and the resource risk is transformed to a personal risk for the unit manager. Patients become risk objects for both psychiatrists and unit managers, which creates an alignment between them to try to send patients elsewhere. New public management (NPM) reforms may consequently lead to the institutionalization of unintended healthcare practices.

    Practical implications – The article shows that accountability pressure to reduce patient risk may create new risks for patients.

    Originality/value – The study uses theoretical concepts of risk tradeoffs (risk substitution and risk transformation), which were developed for the macro level, to explain the unintended consequences of NPM reforms at the micro level.

  • 156.
    Andersson, Thomas
    et al.
    University of Skövde, School of Technology and Society.
    Liff, Roy
    Gothenburg Research Institute, Göteborg, Sweden.
    Multiprofessional Cooperation and Accountability Pressures: Consequences of a post-new public management concept in a new public management context2012In: Public Management Review, ISSN 1471-9037, E-ISSN 1471-9045, Vol. 14, no 6, p. 835-855Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This article examines how multiprofessional healthcare teams, working as a post-New Public Management (post-NPM) reform, respond to accountability pressure resulting from the implementation of NPM reforms. The team members use three strategies to respond to this pressure: responsibility avoiding that results in conflict; responsibility ignoring that results in parallel work and responsibility sharing that results in cooperation. Depending on how the professionals respond to different contextual factors, the choice of strategies can either foster or inhibit cooperation in multiprofessional teams. Achieving holistic patient care is threatened when accountability pressure increases for teams that have not yet developed their internal routines of cooperation.

  • 157.
    Andersson, Thomas
    et al.
    University of Skövde, School of Technology and Society.
    Liff, Roy
    Gothenburg Research Institute.
    Tengblad, Stefan
    University of Skövde, School of Technology and Society.
    Ledarskap och medarbetarskap inom vård- och omsorgsarbete: En studie inom Barn- och ungdomspsykiatrin2011Report (Refereed)
  • 158.
    Andersson, Thomas
    et al.
    University of Skövde, School of Technology and Society.
    Liff, Roy
    Tengblad, Stefan
    University of Skövde, School of Technology and Society.
    Medarbetarskap, professioner och samarbeten internt och externt2012In: Studiematerial: Hållbart chefskap i hälso- och sjukvården med vinjetter om engagemang, stress, tidsanvändning, medarbetarskap och vårdpraktik / [ed] Dellve, L., Västra Götalandsregionen , 2012, p. 30-43Chapter in book (Refereed)
  • 159.
    Andersson, Thomas
    et al.
    University of Skövde, School of Technology and Society.
    Liff, Roy
    GRI vid Handelshögskolan i Göteborg / Högskolan i Borås.
    Tengblad, Stefan
    University of Skövde, School of Technology and Society.
    Multiprofessionella team – mellan ideal och verklighet2013In: Att utveckla vården: Erfarenheter av kvalitet, verksamhetsutveckling och förbättringsarbete / [ed] Nomie Eriksson, Kajsa-Mia Holgers, Tomas Müllern, Lund: Studentlitteratur, 2013, 1, p. 205-224Chapter in book (Refereed)
  • 160.
    Andersson, Thomas
    et al.
    University of Skövde, School of Business. University of Skövde, Enterprises for the Future.
    Liff, Roy
    Borås University and Gothenburg Research Institute.
    Tengblad, Stefan
    University of Skövde, School of Business. University of Skövde, Enterprises for the Future.
    The cooptation of managerialism: Professionals' responses on accountability pressures2014In: International Labour Process Conference, 2014Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 161.
    Andersson, Thomas
    et al.
    University of Skövde, Enterprises for the Future. University of Skövde, School of Business.
    Tengblad, Stefan
    University of Skövde, School of Business. University of Skövde, Enterprises for the Future.
    An experience based view on leader development: leadership as an emergent and complex accomplishment2016In: Development and Learning in Organizations: An International Journal, ISSN 1477-7282, E-ISSN 1758-6097, Vol. 30, no 6, p. 30-32Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Purpose

    The paper aims to identify and address matching problems in leader development and to propose how these problems can be dealt with.

    Design/methodology/approach

    Based on previous research, traditional leadership development (LD) is criticized and alternative approaches are suggested.

    Findings

    This research identifies two major matching problems in traditional LD – between participant and development effort and between development effort and realities of managerial work. A context-sensitive and emergent view of LD is suggested to address these matching problems.

    Practical implications

    The paper illustrates the need of leader development that is addressing the complex nature of managerial work in a more holistic way and to help participants to understand how such complexities can be dealt with.

    Originality/value

    An alternative view of leader development is identified. It matches managers’ diversities and the realities of managerial work better than traditional leader development does.

  • 162.
    Andersson, Thomas
    et al.
    University of Skövde, School of Technology and Society.
    Tengblad, Stefan
    University of Skövde, School of Technology and Society.
    Analyzing concepts for work-life transformations – Making the case for co-workership2007Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 163.
    Andersson, Thomas
    et al.
    University of Skövde, School of Business. University of Skövde, Enterprises for the Future.
    Tengblad, Stefan
    University of Skövde, School of Business. University of Skövde, Enterprises for the Future.
    Medledarskap: Ledarskap som kollektiv initiativförmåga2015In: Ledarskapsboken / [ed] Sten Jönsson, Lars Strannegård, Stockholm: Liber, 2015, 2, p. 248-272Chapter in book (Refereed)
  • 164.
    Andersson, Thomas
    et al.
    University of Skövde, School of Technology and Society.
    Tengblad, Stefan
    University of Skövde, School of Technology and Society.
    Medledarskap: Ledarskap som kollektiv initiativförmåga2009In: Ledarskapsboken / [ed] Sten Jönsson, Lars Strannegård, Malmö: Liber, 2009, 1:1, p. 249-272Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 165.
    Andersson, Thomas
    et al.
    University of Skövde, School of Technology and Society.
    Tengblad, Stefan
    University of Skövde, School of Technology and Society.
    Organisatorisk resiliens hos ett underleverantörsföretag utan egna produkter2010In: Arbetsliv i förändring, Forum för arbetslivsforskning (FALF) , 2010, p. 19-31Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 166.
    Andersson, Thomas
    et al.
    University of Skövde, School of Technology and Society.
    Tengblad, Stefan
    University of Borås, Borås, Sweden.
    When complexity meets culture: new public management and the Swedish police2009In: Qualitative Research in Accounting & Management/Emerald, ISSN 1176-6093, E-ISSN 1758-7654, Vol. 6, no 1/2, p. 41-56Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Purpose: The purpose of this paper is to demonstrate how new public management (NPM) reform from the national level is implemented as practice in a local unit within the police sector in Sweden.Design/methodology/approach: A qualitative case-study approach is applied using semi-structured interviews, participant observations and analysis of documents.Findings: The paper illustrates different kinds of resistance at the organizational level. The dominant form of resistance was found to be cultural distancing. The paper demonstrates a tendency among police officers to deal with a changing and more complex work context by embracing a traditional work role.Research limitations/implications: The paper shows that reforms that add complexity may fail because of potential contradictions and the limited capacity and motivation of employees to deal with the complexity in the manner prescribed by NPM. Practical implications: The paper shows that the popular trend to adopt multi-dimensional forms of control (for instance the balanced-scorecard approach) may fail if there is a lack of consensus about what goals and measurement are important and/or there is a lack of dialogue about how the new goals should be implemented in practice.Originality/value: Research about NPM-reforms in the police sector is rare. The original contribution of this paper is to study NPM-reforms with a focus on the role of complexity in relation to resistance.

  • 167.
    Andersson, Thomas
    et al.
    University of Skövde, School of Technology and Society.
    Wickelgren, Mikael
    University of Skövde, School of Technology and Society.
    Who is colonizing whom?: Intertwined identities in product development projects2009In: Ephemera : Theory and Politics in Organization, ISSN 2052-1499, E-ISSN 1473-2866, Vol. 9, no 2, p. 168-181Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Despite the considerable number of studies on workplace identities in the organizational literature, the project management area of research is relatively de-personalized. In seeking to develop this research, this qualitative, longitudinal study of a product development project in the automotive industry focuses on how individuals use the project as a resource for their own identity construction while at the same time the project colonizes their identities. The study reveals that the identity construction processes of the project leaders and of the project are closely intertwined and co-constructed. The project leaders face a paradoxical situation: their identities are colonized, regulated, and controlled by their company (or car, or project), and yet they believe they make their choices voluntarily. However, the core values of projectified society are ‘hidden’ in the identity work that an automobile company consciously uses to develop cars associated with specific emotions and values.

  • 168.
    Andersson, William
    et al.
    University of Skövde, School of Business.
    Gustafsson, Andreas
    University of Skövde, School of Business.
    Styrningens påverkan på butikschefers motivation2014Independent thesis Basic level (degree of Bachelor), 10 credits / 15 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [en]

    Background: Since the 1990s, the major clothing companies have taken an increasingly large market share. This has led to that the clothing industry has become more centralized. Because of this, the store manager who has primary responsibility for the store is more guided in their work. The store manager has goals to relate to while he or she is guided in their actions to achieve their goals.

    Purpose: The aim is that through interviews provide an understanding of how the store managers' motivation is influenced by the designed control system and explain what motivators store managers find most motivating in their work.

    Implementation: The study was conducted by six semi-structured interviews with store managers and is thus a qualitative approach. This methodology allows for the study of store managers in more depth. The interviews have transcribed and then analyzed using the theoretical framework of the study. The four clothing companies in the study all have a turnover of over 1 billion annually and uses a centralized control.

    Outcome: Store managers in the study pronounce that their goals must be perceived as fair to be motivating. It is also important to the long-term budgetary objective, combined with short-term goals, as several goals at work are perceived as positive and the long term goal does not feel as distant. Responsibility is an important part of the work, however more responsibility does not always lead to higher motivation and therefore store managers' cases should be at a reasonable level. Feedback is something that store managers need regularly. It is important that feedback not only contains information about the results, but they also want to get a directive on how they can change the work for the better.

  • 169.
    Andersén, Annelie
    Högskolan i Jönköping, HLK, Livslångt lärande/Encell.
    Att röja väg till den öppna högskolan2009In: Folkhögskolans praktiker i förändring / [ed] Bernt Gustavsson, Gunnel Andersdotter, Lena Sjöman, Lund: Studentlitteratur AB, 2009, 1, p. 201-223Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 170.
    Andersén, Annelie
    University of Skövde, School of Health and Education. University of Skövde, Health and Education.
    Den nya yrkeslärarutbildningen - Utkomster i form av yrkeskompetens2013In: Utbildning och Lärande, ISSN 2001-4554, Vol. 7, no 1, p. 88-101Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This article describes and discusses a group of newly trained vocational teachers' experiences of outcomes of their teacher education in terms of professional skills. Seven students participated in focus group discussions concering one of the professional teacher training national objectives. The results show that the newly trained vocational teachers acquired a new vision of the teaching profession and that they have strengthened both their professional identity and their self confidence. They have new, broader and more improved tools to use in teaching. and they see the importance of having a vocational teacher education. Skills that are considered important in new vocational teachers' profession are for example to able to see the individual students and reach out o them with a message, and to make just assessment and set fair grades. 

  • 171.
    Andersén, Annelie
    Högskolan i Jönköping, HLK, Livslångt lärande/Encell.
    Ett särskilt perspektiv på högre studier?: Folkhögskoledeltagares sociala representationer om högskola och universitet2011Doctoral thesis, monograph (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    The thesis aims to investigate folk high school participants’ social representations of university. According to the theory of social representa­tions, folk high school participants’ social representations of university are created socially and change depending on their experiences of university. The thesis also aims to investigate the origins of these social representations and how they have developed over time, as well as whether and how these rep­resent­ations have been affected by other social representa­tions, such as those of the distinctive character of folk high school. In order to identify folk high schools participants’ social identities and social rep­resenta­tions, I have made use of empirical data collected through free associa­tions and interviews with folk high school participants and former folk high school participants. To discover the origin of the representations and how they developed over time, I conducted a document study of an important folk high school teacher magazine. The results show that throughout the history of folk high schools, the institution has remained true to two basic ideas. These two fundamental ideas explain why different social identities and different representa­tions exist among the participants. The idea of folk high school as something different and special, leads to representations of folk high school as an alternative to other forms of education and to representations of university as some­­thing unlike folk high school. The second idea – that folk high school must adapt to the surrounding community – leads to representations of folk high school as a second chance and social representations of university as a goal.

  • 172.
    Andersén, Annelie
    University of Skövde, School of Humanities and Informatics.
    Folkhögskolans många ansikten i de högskoleförberedande kurserna2012In: Årsbok om folkbildning: Forskning & utveckling 2011 / [ed] Stellan Boozon, Krister Hansson, Maj-Britt Imnander, Ants Viirman, Stockholm: Föreningen för folkbildningsforskning , 2012, p. 108-119Chapter in book (Refereed)
  • 173.
    Andersén, Annelie
    Encell - National Centre for Lifelong Learning, School of Education and Communication, Jönköping University.
    Social Representations and Social Identity in Swedish Folk High Schools: an application of Duveen and Lloyd2010In: Papers on Social Representations, ISSN 1021-5573, E-ISSN 1819-3978, Vol. 19, no 1, p. 10.1-10.14Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This article extends Duveen's work on social representations and social gender identity by discussing how it can be applied to the context of Swedish folk high school participants' social representations of folk high school and university, then examines the influence of these representations on participants' desires and ambitions to progress to university.  Adopting Duveen's framework to analyze several previous data regarding folk high schools (i.e., a document study of folk high school teachers' magazines, an association study on folk high school participants, and interviews with folk high school participants), I seek to illustrate in this article how most premises concerning the formation of children's social identity (as described by Duveen) also hold for adults entering a new social context.

  • 174.
    Andersén, Annelie
    Högskolan i Jönköping, HLK, Livslångt lärande/Encell.
    Swedish folk high school as a second chance to attain acess to university2011In: NCEE 2011, 2011Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Folk high schools are part of popular, or liberal adult education in Sweden. By participating in the general course at a folk high school, students who have failed to meet the requirements necessary for continued study at university level have a second chance to fulfil such requirements. This paper describes different approaches of Swedish folk high schools with regard to preparing their participants for university studies. The paper also discusses how these different ways of working affect how participants perceive university studies and how these perceptions affect their choices of whether or not to continue on to university after completion of their folk high school education. Based on empirical data collected through free associations, interviews with then-current and former folk high school participants, articles from a leading folk high school teacher magazine, and material found on the folk high schools’ homepages, the results show that throughout the history of the Swedish folk high school, this institution has remained true to two basic ideas: the idea of differentiation and the idea of adaptation.

    The results also show that folk high schools work in different ways with regard to widening participation, depending on which of these two ideas they tend to focus on most. The prevalence of these two fundamental ideas explains why different social identities and different representations exist among the participants. The idea of folk high school as something different and special leads to representations of folk high school as an alternative to other forms of education and to representations of university as something difficult and different than folk high school. The second idea – that folk high school must adapt to the surrounding community – leads to representations of folk high school as a second chance and of university as a goal.

  • 175.
    Andersén, Annelie
    Högskolan i Jönköping, HLK, Livslångt lärande/Encell.
    When 'they' become 'us'2010Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This paper elaborates on how representations changes when social identity does. Social representations are not static, representations can change over time, together with the identity. Social identity is not only based on how members of a group represent themselves, but also how the group is represented by others. It is also a representation of ‘we’ as something that is not ‘them’. In my research, I found out that the perception of ‘us’ as folk high school participants is instrumental in the formation of ‘they’, involving, among others, university students. Social representations of university among folk high school participants are often formed by second-hand and reproduced experiences, as participants themselves have not yet studied at university. Most of them have neither visited a university, or know any current or former university students. The folk high school identity is only the object of association during a very short period in a person’s life, for only one or a couple of years, which means that a change of education also leads to a rapid change between identities, i.e. what was previously referred to as ‘they’, becomes ‘us’. However, the key question addressed in this paper is what happens then?

    This study includes an association study with one hundred participants taking the folk high school general course. In this study, I asked the participants about their associations regarding the words folk high school and university. Five years after the participants from the first association study finished folk high school I called them up and asked them again about their associations regarding the terms folk high school and university. Here I found out that the participants who had continued to university studies, in contrast to the result of the earlier study,  do not represent university as a (final) goal. The other two representations who was common among the folk high school participants – university as a (final) step in a stairway and university as not being folk high school – still occur, but in a quiet different form.

  • 176.
    Andersén, Annelie
    Högskolan i Jönköping, HLK, Livslångt lärande/Encell.
    When they becomes us: Att byta identitet från folkhögskoledeltagare till universitetsstudent2010Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 177.
    Andersén, Jim
    Swedish Business School at Örebro University, Örebro, Sweden.
    A critical examination of the EO-performance relationship2010In: International Journal of Entrepreneurial Behaviour & Research, ISSN 1355-2554, E-ISSN 1758-6534, Vol. 16, no 4, p. 309-328Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Purpose The purpose of this study is to critically analyze the assertion that there is a statistical significant relationship between EO and performance. Design In several publications it has been stated that there is a positive relationship between entrepreneurial orientation (EO) and the performance of a firm. These studies have generally used the same core references, and these seminal contributions are examined critically in this article. The EO-performance relationship is also analyzed in an empirical study, consisting of 172 Swedish SMEs in the manufacturing sector. Findings The result of the literature review is that the notion of a positive EO-performance relationship can be questioned. Earlier studies have neglected some important issues, mainly regarding the use of perceptual performance data, common method biases and survival biases. Some of the conclusions presented are supported by the empirical study. Originality/value The main point of this paper is to show that the relationship between EO and performance is more complicated than previous studies have implied. More care should be taken when generalizing the results of core references and scholars ought to have a more cautious approach when stating that there is a general correlation between EO and performance.

  • 178.
    Andersén, Jim
    Örebro universitet, Handelshögskolan vid Örebro universitet.
    A resource-based taxonomy of manufacturing MSMEs2012In: International Journal of Entrepreneurial Behaviour & Research, ISSN 1355-2554, E-ISSN 1758-6534, Vol. 18, no 1, p. 98-122Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Purpose – The purpose of this paper is to develop a contemporary resource-based taxonomy of manufacturing micro, small, and medium-sized enterprises (MSMEs) and to relate the findings to other small to medium-sized enterprise (SME) taxonomies and to resource-based theory.

    Design/methodology/approach – Cluster analysis of 186 Swedish manufacturing MSMEs. The cluster analysis is based on resources and capabilities. The cluster variables were identified through case studies and a literature review of contemporary studies in resource-based theory.

    Findings – The cluster analysis resulted in identification of six different clusters: Ikeas, conservatives, technocrats, marketeers, craftsmen, and nomads. The results are related to other SME taxonomies and the usefulness of going beyond the one-dimensional scale of entrepreneurs and non-entrepreneurs is discussed.

    Originality/value – Classifications of firms, for example the Miles and Snow typology, have been used successfully in numerous studies. Also, the resource-based view of the firm has had a great impact on business research and there has been increasing interest in MSMEs. However, there are very few contemporary resource-based taxonomies of MSMEs.

  • 179.
    Andersén, Jim
    Örebro universitet, Handelshögskolan vid Örebro universitet.
    Aggregated social representations, sensemaking and entrepreneurial strategies2010Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 180.
    Andersén, Jim
    University of Skövde, School of Technology and Society.
    Protective capacity and absorptive capacity: Managing the balance between retention and creation of knowledge-based resources2012In: The Learning Organization, ISSN 0969-6474, Vol. 19, no 5, p. 440-452Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Purpose – In order to understand the pros and cons of an open organization regarding the flow of knowledge between firms, this paper introduces the concept of “protective capacity”. The purpose of the paper is to elaborate the concept of “protective capacity” especially in relation to absorptive capacity, by presenting a number of propositions.

    Design/methodology/approach – Literature on mainly interfirm relationships, absorptive capacity and resources-based theory are reviewed and combined.

    Findings – Protective capacity is defined as the “capacity to sustain, or to reduce the speed of depreciation of knowledge-based resources by preventing knowledge from being identified, imitated, and/or acquired by direct or indirect competitors”. Owing to the strong moderating factor of organizational openness, it is argued that protective capacity is inversely related to absorptive capacity. A number of propositions that can explain and moderate the inverse relationship between protective capacity and absorptive capacity are elaborated and discussed. These propositions concern organizational openness, knowledge management practices, realized and potential absorptive capacity, and dyadic relationships.

    Originality/value – Acquiring external knowledge is a key feature of knowledge management. In order for a firm to absorb external knowledge, it is generally argued that it has to be open towards the environment. However, according to resource-based theory, firms have to safeguard their knowledge by, for example, having a secluded organization, thereby enhancing the uncertainty associated with tacit knowledge in order to sustain their competitive advantages. Whereas numerous studies have discussed the capacity to absorb knowledge, few studies have analyzed the capacity to protect knowledge.

  • 181.
    Andersén, Jim
    Örebro universitet, Handelshögskolan vid Örebro universitet.
    Resource-based competitiveness: managerial implications of the resource-based view2010In: Strategic Direction, ISSN 0258-0543, E-ISSN 1758-8588, Vol. 26, no 5, p. 3-5Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Purpose:                           

    The purpose of this article is to identify and discuss the practical implications of the resource based-view of the firm.

    Methodology:                   

    Review of relevant literature.

    Findings:                           

    A number of recommendations are put forward and the practical implications constitute the main findings of this study.

    Practical implications:     

    The implications can be summarized by these recommendations: Diversify based on capabilities and not on the markets you are currently serving, focus on creating value together with your customers based on your resources instead of offering a set of products, integrate HRM practices with strategic management processes. The complexity of imitating resources is also discussed.

    Originality:                      

    Few publications have set out to develop implications of the resource-based view from a CEO’s point of view. This paper provides an easy-to-access review and summary of some of the main implications of the resource-based view.

  • 182.
    Andersén, Jim
    University of Skövde, School of Business.
    SHRM, employee wellbeing and firm performance: Some initial propositions on the relationships and identification of moderating variables2013In: Proceedings of the 23rd International Business Research Conference, 2013Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 183.
    Andersén, Jim
    Swedish Business School, Örebro University, Örebro, Sweden.
    Strategic resources and firm performance2011In: Management Decision, ISSN 0025-1747, E-ISSN 1758-6070, Vol. 49, no 1, p. 87-98Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Purpose – Numerous studies have set out to examine the relationship between strategic resources and firm performance. The traditional VRIO attributes have been the point of departure in most resource-based studies. This paper sets out to argue that the relationship between resources and performance is more complex. Thus, the purpose of this paper is to illustrate the complex relationship between a strategic resource and firm performance by providing an overview of different factors that can influence this relationship.

    Design/methodology/approach – Relevant literature is reviewed and discussed.

    Findings – It was found that five criteria must be fulfilled for resources to generate superior performance. These are identified and discussed. These criteria fit with existing resources, management capability, marketing capability, firm appropriation of rent, and non-competitive disadvantages.

    Research limitations/implications – By using the criteria identified, resource-based theory can become less tautological. Also, the criteria highlight the importance of resource utilization and appropriation of resource-based rents.

    Practical implications – The paper could contribute to an increased awareness among practitioners of the importance of focusing on factors which are additional to the VRIO-attributes when analyzing potential strategic resources. The criteria provide an easy-to-access framework for strategic analysis.

    Originality/value – Whereas some specific aspects of the relationship between the possession of resources and firm performance have been reviewed in some RBT contributions, few studies have addressed the issue using a more holistic approach. Thus, this paper affords a broader approach on the relationship between strategic resources and firm performance.

  • 184.
    Andersén, Jim
    Mälardalens högskola, Ekonomihögskolan.
    Strategiska resurser och långvarig lönsamhet: En resursbaserad modell för varaktiga konkurrensfördelar i små tillverkningsföretag2005Doctoral thesis, monograph (Other academic)
  • 185.
    Andersén, Jim
    University of Skövde, School of Business. University of Skövde, Enterprises for the Future.
    The absorptive capacity of family firms - how familiness affects potential and realized absorptive capacity2015In: Journal of Family Business Management, ISSN 2043-6238, E-ISSN 2043-6246, Vol. 5, no 1, p. 73-89Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Purpose

    Absorptive capacity is a key competitive advantage and is defined as the capacity to absorb knowledge from the environment. Although some studies have examined how various antecedents to absorptive capacity differ between family firms and non-family firms, no studies have set out to specifically analyze absorptive capacity in the context of family firms. This paper discusses the ability of family firms to absorb external knowledge by analyzing the relationship between “familiness” and “absorptive capacity”.

    Design/methodology/approach

    By reviewing and combining studies on absorptive capacity and knowledge-management practices of family firms, new insights into the absorptive capacity of family firms are developed.

    Findings

    It is argued that due to higher levels of social capital, familiness is positively related to the ability to transform and use external knowledge (i.e. realized absorptive capacity). However, firms with high levels of familiness are likely to be inferior in acquiring and assimilating external knowledge (i.e. potential absorptive capacity).

    Originality/value

    Although previous studies have analyzed various knowledge-management practices of family firms, no studies have set out to specifically explore how familiness affects various dimensions of absorptive capacity.

  • 186.
    Andersén, Jim
    Örebro universitet, Handelshögskolan vid Örebro universitet.
    The Competitiveness of Chinese SMEs2010In: Business, Finance and Economics of China / [ed] Lian Guo, Fai Zong, New York: Nova Science Publishers, Inc., 2010, p. 129-141Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 187.
    Andersén, Jim
    University of Skövde, School of Technology and Society. Örebro University, Sweden.
    The Overlooked Elements of Renewal of Strategic Resources: Hard Work and Stubbornness2011In: Studies in Industrial Renewal: Coping with changing contexts / [ed] Esbjörn Segelod, Karin Berglund, Erik Bjurström, Erik Dahlquist, Lars Hallén & Ulf Johanson, Västerås: Mälardalen University , 2011, p. 47-56Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 188.
    Andersén, Jim
    University of Skövde, School of Business. University of Skövde, Enterprises for the Future.
    What about the employees in entrepreneurial firms?: A multi-level analysis of the relationship between entrepreneurial orientation, role ambiguity, and social support2017In: International Small Business Journal, ISSN 0266-2426, E-ISSN 1741-2870, Vol. 35, no 8, p. 969-990Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Research on entrepreneurial orientation (EO) has mainly addressed outcomes of EO at the level of the firm. However, few studies have examined how EO affects employees. Using a multi-level analysis of 343 employees nested in 25 SMEs, revealed that EO will increase the degree of role ambiguity among employees. Social support from management was not found to have any effect on the relationship between EO and role ambiguity. However, social support from co-workers weakens the EO-ambiguity relationship and can counteract the negative effects of EO to some degree. The study contributes to the EO literature by being one of very few that have considered possible negative consequences of EO, and it also highlights how to reduce role ambiguity in entrepreneurial SMEs.

  • 189.
    Andersén, Jim
    et al.
    University of Skövde, School of Business. University of Skövde, Enterprises for the Future.
    Andersén, Annelie
    University of Skövde, School of Health and Education. University of Skövde, Health and Education.
    Deconstructing resistance to organizational change – A social representation theory approach2014In: International Journal of Organizational Analysis, ISSN 1934-8835, E-ISSN 1758-8561, Vol. 22, no 3, p. 342-355Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Purpose - Social representation theory (SRT) is a growing theory in social psychology research. SRT is about how individuals co-construct representations of various objects in different social settings. These social representations govern the attitudes and actions of individuals and groups. In spite of the growing interest in SRT in various fields, no studies have used SRT to understand resistance to organizational change. Thus, the purpose of this work is to illustrate how SRT can be used to understand the concept of resistance to change.

    Design/methodology/approach - Review of the relevant literature on resistance to change and SRT in order to develop a conceptual framework for understanding resistance from the standpoint of SRT.

    Findings - We develop a model that illustrates how three interrelated objects, i.e. the organizational process and the pre- and post-change situation, are co-constructed in social contexts. Also, we discuss how representations of these objects can co-exist (cognitive polyphasia). Our study illustrates the complexity of resistance to change by deconstructing the concept.

    Originality/value - Application of SRT in order to analyze resistance to organizational change is a novel approach that provides several new insights. For example, whereas most publications regard advocates of change as sense-givers in the change recipient’s sense-making process, we argue for a more constructionist approach. Thus, all actors involved in the change process will affect each other and together co-construct the social representations. These social representations govern attitudes to change.

  • 190.
    Andersén, Jim
    et al.
    University of Skövde, School of Technology and Society.
    Andersén, Annelie
    University of Skövde, School of Humanities and Informatics.
    The relationship between employee well-being and firm performance: A resource-based analysis2012In: Proceedings of the 12th Annual Hawaii International Conference on Business, Hawaii International Conference on Business , 2012, p. 719-724Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Enhancing the wellbeing of employees is a key feature of human resource management (HRM) and numerous HRM-practices to strengthen the wellbeing of co-workers have been developed. Although the benefits for the employees of such practices are obvious, the relationship between employee wellbeing and firm performance is unclear. In order to strengthen this relationship some studies have extended the concept of firm performance by including additional "soft" dimensions of performance. However, investing in wellbeing is, of course, associated with costs and several scholars argue that investments in the wellbeing of employees can be regarded as any other investment and from an owner's perspective it is essential to get a return on the investment. In the field of strategic HRM (SHRM), some attempts have been made to analyze the relationship between wellbeing, firm resources and firm performance. Most studies have, however, focused on the relationship between specific HRM-activities and firm performance or certain aspects of resource features. For example, how the wellbeing of employees can enhance the retention of human resources or how wellbeing can stimulate intrapreneurship and thereby generate short-term increases in profits. Thus, few studies have analysed the relationship between wellbeing, competetive advantages and performance from a holistic approach. Consequently, in this paper we present a resource-based analysis of the relationship between the wellbeing of employees and firm performance. We present three propositions regarding the relationship between wellbeing, resources and firm performance. These propositions illustrate the complexity of the relationship by discussing why wellbeing can enhance as well as reduce firm performance.

  • 191.
    Andersén, Jim
    et al.
    University of Skövde, School of Business. University of Skövde, Enterprises for the Future.
    Jansson, Christian
    University of Skövde, School of Business. University of Skövde, Enterprises for the Future.
    Ljungkvist, Torbjörn
    University of Skövde, School of Business. University of Skövde, Enterprises for the Future.
    A Dynamic Approach to Causal Ambiguity - How Organizational Learning Affects Causal Ambiguity2015In: Proceedings of ICICKM 2015 The 12th International Conference on Intellectual Capital Knowledge Management and Organisational Learning / [ed] Vincent Ribière & Lugkana Worasinchai, Academic Conferences and Publishing International Limited , 2015Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 192.
    Andersén, Jim
    et al.
    University of Skövde, School of Business.
    Jansson, Christian
    University of Skövde, School of Business.
    Ljungkvist, Torbjörn
    University of Skövde, School of Business.
    A model for measuring resource immobility2014Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 193.
    Andersén, Jim
    et al.
    University of Skövde, School of Business. University of Skövde, Enterprises for the Future.
    Jansson, Christian
    University of Skövde, School of Business. University of Skövde, Enterprises for the Future.
    Ljungkvist, Torbjörn
    University of Skövde, Enterprises for the Future. University of Skövde, School of Business.
    Rent appropriation management of strategic human capital in practice2017Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 194.
    Andersén, Jim
    et al.
    University of Skövde, School of Business. University of Skövde, Enterprises for the Future.
    Jansson, Christian
    University of Skövde, School of Business. University of Skövde, Enterprises for the Future.
    Ljungkvist, Torbjörn
    University of Skövde, School of Business. University of Skövde, Enterprises for the Future.
    Resource immobility and sustained performance: A systematic assessment of how immobility has been considered in empirical resource-based studies2016In: International journal of management reviews (Print), ISSN 1460-8545, E-ISSN 1468-2370, Vol. 18, no 4, p. 371-396Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The core notion of the resource-based view (RBV) is that the possession of certain resources can result in superior performance and, in order for this performance to be sustained, these resources cannot be perfectly mobile. Whereas previous reviews have mainly focused on the relationship between resources and temporary performance, no studies have systematically analyzed the extent to which empirical RBV studies have specifically considered immobility of resources. By analyzing a sample of 218 empirical RBV studies, the authors found that 17% of the studies directly measured some dimension of immobility (by, for example, actually measuring the level of social complexity, unique history, tacitness or tradability). Fewer than 2% of the studies measured the outcome of resource immobility, i.e. sustained performance differences. Based on these results, this paper discusses the consequences of overlooking this key dimension of the RBV (i.e. immobility) and suggests that, and discusses how, future research should consider resource immobility to a greater extent.

  • 195.
    Andersén, Jim
    et al.
    Örebro universitet, Handelshögskolan vid Örebro universitet.
    Kask, Johan
    Örebro universitet, Handelshögskolan vid Örebro universitet.
    Asymmetrically realized absorptive capacity and relationship durability2012In: Management Decision, ISSN 0025-1747, E-ISSN 1758-6070, Vol. 50, no 1, p. 43-57Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Purpose – Absorbing knowledge from partner firms is a key feature of marketing relationships. Recent publications have called for more dynamic and cognitive approaches in marketing relationship research. Also, established definitions of absorptive capacities have been questioned. This article aims to address propositions that take these overlooked and questioned elements into consideration, which can help explain conducts and dependencies, and affect relationship durability.

    Design/methodology/approach – The authors put forward four propositions by combining literature on interfirm relationships and managerial cognition with evolutionary ideas from marketing and management literature.

    Findings – The authors embrace a redefinition of potential absorptive capacity (the disposed capacity to absorb knowledge) and realized absorptive capacity (the absorption of knowledge actually performed). This distinction can, to some extent, be explained by the degree of cognitive attention given to the marketing relationship. Moreover, asymmetrically realized absorptive capacityvis-à-vis a partner substantially influences the dynamics of partners' conduct and dependency, which may vary the risk that the relationship will end.

    Practical implications – The propositions illustrate how a motivated partner that gives more attention to the relationship is more likely to absorb more knowledge than its counterpart, which can threaten the durability of a relationship. Thus, managers need to be able to understand possible long-term consequences of the partner's conduct in order to avoid losses of joint strategic resources and relational benefits.

    Originality/value – By advocating an evolutionary approach, an impetus for more dynamism in marketing relationship research is presented. This study also shows the importance of including the longitudinal dimension in analysis if one wants to understand change in – and durability of – marketing relationships.

  • 196.
    Andersén, Jim
    et al.
    University of Skövde, School of Business. University of Skövde, Enterprises for the Future.
    Ljungkvist, Torbjörn
    University of Skövde, School of Business. University of Skövde, Enterprises for the Future.
    Entrepreneurial orientation and employee well-being2015Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 197.
    Andersén, Jim
    et al.
    University of Skövde, School of Business. University of Skövde, Enterprises for the Future.
    Ljungkvist, Torbjörn
    University of Skövde, School of Business. University of Skövde, Enterprises for the Future.
    Jansson, Christian
    University of Skövde, School of Business. University of Skövde, Enterprises for the Future.
    An integrated approach to rent appropriation and rent generation2016Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 198.
    Andersén, Jim
    et al.
    University of Skövde, School of Business. University of Skövde, Enterprises for the Future.
    Ljungkvist, Torbjörn
    University of Skövde, Enterprises for the Future. University of Skövde, School of Business.
    Svensson, Lotten
    University of Skövde, Enterprises for the Future. University of Skövde, School of Business.
    Entrepreneurially oriented in what? A business model approach to entrepreneurship2015In: Journal of Small Business and Enterprise Development, ISSN 1462-6004, E-ISSN 1758-7840, Vol. 22, no 3, p. 433-449Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Purpose – The purpose of this paper is to illustrate and argue for the necessity of deconstructing the entrepreneurship concept by analyzing entrepreneurial orientation (EO) at various levels of the business model.

    Design/methodology/approach – Literature review supplemented with five illustrative cases.

    Findings – A business model approach to entrepreneurship enables identification of the component of the business model in which entrepreneurship was started. This has several implications for analysis of the EO-performance relationship and for the identification of antecedents to EO.

    Originality/value – The EO of firms has generally been analyzed at a generic level, i.e. the concept has been used to measure and analyze the overall entrepreneurship of firms. In this paper, the authors argue that EO can be present in various dimensions of a business and that firms can be entrepreneurial in certain areas and conservative in other areas.

  • 199.
    Andersén, Jim
    et al.
    University of Skövde, School of Business. University of Skövde, Enterprises for the Future.
    Samuelsson, Joachim
    University of Skövde, School of Business. University of Skövde, Enterprises for the Future.
    Resource organization and firm performance: How entrepreneurial orientation and management accounting influence the profitability of growing and non-growing SMEs2016In: International Journal of Entrepreneurial Behaviour & Research, ISSN 1355-2554, E-ISSN 1758-6534, Vol. 22, no 4, p. 466-484Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Purpose

    The aim of this study is to examine how entrepreneurial orientation (EO) and the use of management accounting practices (MAPs) in decision making affects the profitability of SMEs, and also to analyze the extent to which EO and the use of MAPs affects profitability differently in growing and non-growing SMEs.

    Design/methodology/approach

    The paper employs an empirical investigation which is based on a sample of 153 Swedish manufacturing SMEs. The data is analyzed by two- and three way interaction regressions.

    Findings

    EO and MAPs have a positive effect on profitability in non-growing SMEs, but the combined effect of EO and MAPs has no additional effect. However, for growing SMEs, high usage of MAPs in decision making is a prerequisite for EO to influence profitability.

    Originality/value

    This study is the first to use the resource-based view to examine the relationship between two dimensions of resource organization and SME profitability. Entrepreneurial orientation (EO) is used as a proxy for how resources are organized in order to identify opportunities, and management accounting practices (MAPs) are used as a proxy for how efficiently resources are organized.

  • 200.
    Andréasson, Magnus
    University of Skövde, School of Informatics.
    Towards a Digital Analytics Maturity Model: A Design Science Research Approach2017Independent thesis Basic level (degree of Bachelor), 20 credits / 30 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [sv]

    Digital analytics kallas den samling teknologier som med olika teknikeranalyserar digitala kanaler (webbsidor, email och även offline data) för attsöka förståelse för kunders beteenden och intentioner. Digital Analytics harblivit en mycket viktig komponent till en stor del webbaserade systemmiljöer,där den stödjer och underlättar affärer och beslutsfattande för organisationer.Men hur väl tillämpas dessa teknologier och hur ser den digitalatransformationen ut som utspelar sig inom organisationer, och hur kan manmäta denna digitala mognadsprocess?Denna studie tillämpar en Design Science Research-approach för att uppfyllamålet om att utveckla en Digital Analytics Maturity Model (DAMM) lämpligför små till medelstora företag, varav en expertpanel bestående av 6 st ledandeforskare inom mognadsforskning och Digital Analytic är tillsatt i formen av enDelphi-undersökning. Resultaten från studien visar bl.a att organisatoriskaaspekter spelar en viktig roll för Digital Analytics samt att utvecklingen av enfunktionsduglig DAMM som är redo att tas i burk är möjligt.

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