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  • 101.
    Rhén, Ida-Märta
    et al.
    University of Skövde, School of Technology and Society. University of Skövde, The Virtual Systems Research Centre.
    Hanson, L.
    Chalmers University of Technology.
    Högberg, Dan
    University of Skövde, School of Technology and Society. University of Skövde, The Virtual Systems Research Centre.
    Risk exposure assessment of dynamic wrist motions of a digital human model2011In: Proceedings of the 43rd Annual Nordic Ergonomics Society Conference, University of Oulu , 2011, p. 386-391Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Software tools as Digital Human Modelling (DHM) has been designed to simulate and visualize the human work and to assess ergonomics conditions. No methods in commercial DHM software calculate time-dependent information, which is adequate in defining the relations between exposure and risk of disorders. The paper presents and discusses how an assembly task can be analysed with the help from a DHM-tool. Out comes from the study revealed that it is possible to generate output files with time-dependent wrist exposure data from a manikin in a DHM-tool. However, current evaluation methods do not take time-dependent information into consideration.

  • 102.
    Ruiz Castro, Pamela
    et al.
    University of Skövde, School of Engineering Science. University of Skövde, The Virtual Systems Research Centre.
    Högberg, Dan
    University of Skövde, School of Engineering Science. University of Skövde, The Virtual Systems Research Centre.
    Ramsen, Håkan
    Volvo Trucks, Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Bjursten, Jenny
    Volvo Trucks, Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Hanson, Lars
    University of Skövde, School of Engineering Science. University of Skövde, The Virtual Systems Research Centre. Industrial Development, Scania, Södertälje, Sweden.
    Virtual Simulation of Human-Robot Collaboration Workstations2019In: Proceedings of the 20th Congress of the International Ergonomics Association (IEA 2018): Volume V: Human Simulation and Virtual Environments, Work With Computing Systems (WWCS), Process Control / [ed] Sebastiano Bagnara, Riccardo Tartaglia, Sara Albolino, Thomas Alexander, Yushi Fujita, Springer, 2019, Vol. 822, p. 250-261Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The constant call in manufacturing for higher quality, efficiency, flexibility and cost effective solutions has been supported by technology developments and revised legislations in the area of collaborative robots. This allows for new types of workstations in industry where robots and humans co-operate in performing tasks. In addition to safety, the design of such collaborative workstations needs to consider the areas of ergonomics and task allocation to ensure appropriate work conditions for the operators, while providing overall system efficiency. The aim of this study is to illustrate the development and use of an integrated robot simulation and digital human modelling (DHM) tool, which is aimed to be a tool for engineers to create and confirm successful collaborative workstations. An assembly scenario from the vehicle industry was selected for its redesign into a collaborative workstation. The existing scenario as well as potential collaborative concepts are simulated and assessed using a version of the simulation tool IPS IMMA. The assembly use case illustrates the capabilities of the tool to represent and evaluate collaborative workstations in terms of ergonomics and efficiency assessments.

  • 103.
    Ruiz Castro, Pamela
    et al.
    University of Skövde, School of Engineering Science. University of Skövde, The Virtual Systems Research Centre.
    Mahdavian, Nafise
    University of Skövde, School of Engineering Science. University of Skövde, The Virtual Systems Research Centre.
    Brolin, Erik
    University of Skövde, School of Engineering Science. University of Skövde, The Virtual Systems Research Centre.
    Högberg, Dan
    University of Skövde, School of Engineering Science. University of Skövde, The Virtual Systems Research Centre.
    Hanson, Lars
    University of Skövde, School of Engineering Science. University of Skövde, The Virtual Systems Research Centre. Industrial Development, Scania, Södertälje, Sweden.
    IPS IMMA for designing human-robot collaboration workstations2017In: Proceedings of the 5th International Digital Human Modeling Symposium / [ed] Sascha Wischniewski & Thomas Alexander, Federal Institute for Occupational Safety and Health , 2017, p. 263-273Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The global competition has forced manufacturing companies to further increase their productivity. This, together with technology development and changes in regulations, have led to the introduction of new types of workstations in production lines, where human operators collaborate with industrial robots to perform work tasks. As any type of product, these workstations need to be designed in the most optimal way to deliver the expected value. In the design process of these collaborative workstations, separate virtual simulations of industrial robots and human operators can be made with multiple commercial software. Separate simulations reduce the efficiency of the design process and makes it harder to identify successful design solutions. Hence, there is a need for software tools that are capable of simultaneous simulation of the human-robot collaboration in a workstation. Providing engineers with such tools will assist their tasks to optimize the human and robot workflow, while proactively ensuring proper ergonomic conditions for operators.This paper describes and illustrates how the digital human modelling (DHM) tool IPS IMMA can aid in the design of human-robot collaboration workstations. A use case where the human operator collaborates with a robot to produce a section of a pedal car in a virtual scenario is described. The use case illustrates the current capabilities and limitations of the software to simulate human-robot collaborations in workstations. Hence, the use case aims to provide input for further development of DHM tools aimed to assist the design of human-robot collaboration workstations.

  • 104.
    Sun, Jiong
    et al.
    University of Skövde, School of Informatics. University of Skövde, The Informatics Research Centre.
    Billing, Erik
    University of Skövde, School of Informatics. University of Skövde, The Informatics Research Centre.
    Seoane, Fernando
    Swedish School of Textiles, University of Borås, Borås, Sweden / Inst. for Clinical Science, Intervention and Technology, Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden / Dept. Biomedical Engineering, Karolinska University Hospital, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Zhou, Bo
    German Research Center for Artificial Intelligence, Kaiserslautern, Germany.
    Högberg, Dan
    University of Skövde, School of Engineering Science. University of Skövde, The Virtual Systems Research Centre.
    Hemeren, Paul
    University of Skövde, School of Informatics. University of Skövde, The Informatics Research Centre.
    Categories of touch: Classifying human touch using a soft tactile sensor2017Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Social touch plays an important role not only in human communication but also in human-robot interaction. We here report results from an ongoing study on affective human-robot interaction. In our previous research, touch type is shown to be informative for communicated emotion. Here, a soft matrix array sensor is used to capture the tactile interaction between human and robot and a method based on PCA and kNN is applied in the experiment to classify different touch types, constituting a pre-stage to recognizing emotional tactile interaction. Results show an average recognition rate for classified touch type of 71%, with a large variability between different types of touch. Results are discussed in relation to affective HRI and social robotics.

  • 105.
    Sun, Jiong
    et al.
    University of Skövde, School of Informatics. University of Skövde, The Informatics Research Centre.
    Redyuk, Sergey
    University of Skövde, School of Informatics. University of Skövde, The Informatics Research Centre.
    Billing, Erik
    University of Skövde, School of Informatics. University of Skövde, The Informatics Research Centre.
    Högberg, Dan
    University of Skövde, School of Engineering Science. University of Skövde, The Virtual Systems Research Centre.
    Hemeren, Paul
    University of Skövde, School of Informatics. University of Skövde, The Informatics Research Centre.
    Tactile Interaction and Social Touch: Classifying Human Touch using a Soft Tactile Sensor2017In: HAI '17: Proceedings of the 5th International Conference on Human Agent Interaction, New York: Association for Computing Machinery (ACM), 2017, p. 523-526Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This paper presents an ongoing study on affective human-robot interaction. In our previous research, touch type is shown to be informative for communicated emotion. Here, a soft matrix array sensor is used to capture the tactile interaction between human and robot and 6 machine learning methods including CNN, RNN and C3D are implemented to classify different touch types, constituting a pre-stage to recognizing emotional tactile interaction. Results show an average recognition rate of 95% by C3D for classified touch types, which provide stable classification results for developing social touch technology. 

  • 106.
    Svensson, Erik
    et al.
    University of Skövde, The Virtual Systems Research Centre. University of Skövde, School of Technology and Society.
    Bertilsson, Erik
    University of Skövde, The Virtual Systems Research Centre. University of Skövde, School of Technology and Society.
    Högberg, Dan
    University of Skövde, The Virtual Systems Research Centre. University of Skövde, School of Technology and Society.
    Hanson, Lars
    Chalmers University of Technology.
    Anthropometrics and Ergonomics Assessment in the IMMA Manikin2010In: Proceedings of the 3rd Applied Human Factors and Ergonomics (AHFE) International Conference / [ed] Gavriel Salvendy, Waldemar Karwowski, Louisville: AHFE International , 2010Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Digital Human Modeling (DHM) tools are useful for simulating human work and proactively evaluating ergonomic conditions. IMMA (Intelligently Moving Manikin) is a project that aims to develop software that combines digital human modeling and path planning. The work in the IMMA project is divided into a number of work packages that gradually increases the complexity of the problem. This poster paper regards both the functionality for ergonomics assessment and consideration of anthropometric diversity in the DHM tool being developed. Reviews of current DHM tools and interviews with DHM users and ergonomics specialists were done to clarify problems, needs and opportunities when working with anthropometrics and ergonomics evaluations. Interviews showed that simulations and following evaluations are almost solely based on static postures and with few human models. The main reason for this is claimed to be complex and time consuming processes when creating and evaluating simulations. Both the review of current DHM tools and the interviews confirmed that there is an evident need for more time-dependant evaluation methods and a better coverage of the intended users’ diversity. Attained knowledge from the analysis of current DHM tools and interviews are used to create work processes and two specific modules intended to be implemented in the new IMMA DHM tool. Key issues for the modules are ease of use and flexibility. The overall objective with the IMMA DHM system is to offer a tool that support faster and more correct ergonomics analyses.

  • 107.
    Svensson, Erik
    et al.
    University of Skövde, The Virtual Systems Research Centre. University of Skövde, School of Technology and Society.
    Bertilsson, Erik
    University of Skövde, The Virtual Systems Research Centre. University of Skövde, School of Technology and Society.
    Högberg, Dan
    University of Skövde, The Virtual Systems Research Centre. University of Skövde, School of Technology and Society.
    Hanson, Lars
    Chalmers University of Technology.
    Review of the incorporation, utilization and future demands of ergonomic evaluation methods in Digital Human Modelling2010In: Proceedings of the 42nd annual Nordic Ergonomic Society Conference: Proactive Ergonomics - implementation of ergonomics in planning of jobs, tasks, systems and environments, 2010, p. D1-6-D1-10Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This study reviews assessment methods in DHM tools and explore the utilization of these methods in  industry. Interviews  with  DHM  users  and  ergonomics  specialists  within the Swedish  automotive  industry  showed  that  simulations  and  following  evaluations  are almost  solely  based  on  static  postures.  Integrated  evaluation  tools  in  current  DHM systems are seldom utilized; instead they use company specific evaluation methods. Both the  review  of current  DHM  tools and  the  interviews  confirmed that  there is  an  evident need  for  more  time-dependant  evaluation  methods.  The  results  are  used  to  present  a conceptual DHM module dealing with time-dependant ergonomics assessment. 

  • 108.
    Thorvald, Peter
    et al.
    University of Skövde, The Virtual Systems Research Centre. University of Skövde, School of Technology and Society.
    Brolin, Anna
    University of Skövde, The Virtual Systems Research Centre. University of Skövde, School of Technology and Society.
    Högberg, Dan
    University of Skövde, The Virtual Systems Research Centre. University of Skövde, School of Technology and Society.
    Case, Keith
    Mechanical and Manufacturing Engineering, Loughborough University.
    Using Mobile Information Sources to Increase Productivity and Quality2010In: Proceedings of the 3rd Applied Human Factors and Ergonomics (AHFE) International Conference / [ed] Gavriel Salvendy, Waldemar Karwowski, Louisville: AHFE International , 2010Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This paper presents an experimental study made on the use of different kinds of information sources in manual assembly. The general idea is that only the necessary information should be presented to the worker and it should be presented where and when the worker needs it as this is believed to both save time and unload cognitive strain. To account for the latter two aspects of this thought, where and when, this paper investigates the use of a handheld unit as an information source in manual assembly. Having a mobile information system, such as a Personal Digital Assistant (PDA), that can be carried with you at all times, as opposed to a stationary one, such as a computer terminal, is hypothesized to greatly improve productivity and quality. Experimental results show that the use of a PDA significantly improves quality whereas productivity does not significantly improve.

  • 109.
    Thorvald, Peter
    et al.
    University of Skövde, The Virtual Systems Research Centre. University of Skövde, School of Technology and Society.
    Bäckstrand, Gunnar
    University of Skövde, The Virtual Systems Research Centre. University of Skövde, School of Technology and Society.
    Högberg, Dan
    University of Skövde, The Virtual Systems Research Centre. University of Skövde, School of Technology and Society.
    Case, Keith
    Loughborough University, Loughborough, UK.
    Syntax and Sequencing of Assembly Instructions2012In: Advances in Usability Evaluation: Part II / [ed] Francesco Rebelo & Marcelo M. Soares, CRC Press, 2012, p. 266-275Chapter in book (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Minimalism of design is a concept often found in Human-computer interaction (HCI). It is a concept that emphasizes the presentation of as little information as possible to reduce the perceptual strain and visual search of the subject. However, in a manufacturing context, such as in manual assembly, state of the art information presentation is rarely minimalistic. Rather, organizations tend to push out as much information as possible without necessarily concerning themselves with how this information is presented to, or perceived by, the worker. This leads to a situation that is far from ideal from an HCI perspective, likely to reduce human performance and wellbeing, in turn negatively affecting overall production system performance. Obviously, there are several potential ways of addressing this issue. Perhaps the most evident way is to simply reduce the amount of information that is presented and only present the essentials. This paper will investigate and discuss how information presentation can be minimized without reducing the information content through information syntax and layout.

  • 110.
    Thorvald, Peter
    et al.
    University of Skövde, School of Technology and Society.
    Bäckstrand, Gunnar
    University of Skövde, School of Technology and Society.
    Högberg, Dan
    University of Skövde, School of Technology and Society.
    de Vin, Leo
    University of Skövde, School of Technology and Society.
    Case, Keith
    University of Skövde, School of Technology and Society.
    Demands on technology from a human automatism perspective in manual assembly2008In: Proceedings of the 18th International Conference on Flexible Automation and Intelligent Manufacturing, FAIM2008, Skövde, Sweden, June 30 - July 2 / [ed] Leo J. De Vin, Amos H. C. Ng, Peter Thorvald, W. G. Sullivan & M. M. Ahmad, Skövde: University of Skövde , 2008, p. 632-638Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 111.
    Thorvald, Peter
    et al.
    University of Skövde, School of Technology and Society.
    Bäckstrand, Gunnar
    University of Skövde, School of Technology and Society.
    Högberg, Dan
    University of Skövde, School of Technology and Society.
    de Vin, Leo
    Case, Keith
    University of Skövde, School of Technology and Society.
    Information Presentation in Manual Assembly – A Cognitive Ergonomics Analysis2008In: Ergonomics is a lifestyle = Vinnuvistfræði er lífstíll: NES 2008 : abstracts, Kópavogur: Vinnuvistfræðifélag Íslands , 2008Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In current practice, information is often presented to the operators under the false belief that more information leads to better quality. However, one must consider the cognitive capacity limitations of the human operator and design information systems based on these constraints. Important questions include what medium to use; audio, visual, paper based or computer screen systems? Also the syntax in terms of symbols and text, together with information content and the formatting of the system are important factors that will require much focus to result in a good information system. The paper describes a case where paper-based assembly instructions of a major automotive company have been studied, focusing on information design and cognitive ergonomics in information seeking behaviour. Within the case study, the paper-based information system has been evaluated with two focuses: automatic information behaviour (automatism) and consistency of information presentation in the operator graphical user interface (GUI). It is suggested that systems that do not offer clear and easy-to-find entry points to information will eventually cause quality issues in production.

  • 112.
    Thorvald, Peter
    et al.
    University of Skövde, School of Technology and Society. University of Skövde, The Virtual Systems Research Centre.
    Högberg, Dan
    University of Skövde, School of Technology and Society. University of Skövde, The Virtual Systems Research Centre.
    Case, Keith
    University of Skövde, The Virtual Systems Research Centre. Mechanical and Manufacturing Technology, Loughborough University, Loughborough, Leicestershire, LE11 3TU, UK.
    Applying cognitive science to digital human modelling for user centred design2012In: International Journal of Human Factors Modelling and Simulation, ISSN 1742-5549, Vol. 3, no 1, p. 90-106Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    To build software which, at the press of a button, can tell you what cognition-related hazards there are within an environment or a task, is probably well into the future if it is possible at all. However, incorporating existing tools such as task analysis tools, interface design guidelines and information about general cognitive limitations in humans, could allow for greater evaluative options for cognitive ergonomics. The paper discusses previous approaches to the subject and suggests adding design and evaluative guiding in digital human modelling that will help a user with little or no knowledge of cognitive science to design and evaluate a human-product interaction scenario.

  • 113.
    Thorvald, Peter
    et al.
    University of Skövde, The Virtual Systems Research Centre. University of Skövde, School of Technology and Society. Loughborough University, Loughborough, United Kingdom.
    Högberg, Dan
    University of Skövde, The Virtual Systems Research Centre. University of Skövde, School of Technology and Society.
    Case, Keith
    University of Skövde, The Virtual Systems Research Centre. University of Skövde, School of Technology and Society. Loughborough University, Loughborough, United Kingdom.
    Incorporating Cognitive Aspects in Digital Human Modeling2009In: Digital Human Modeling: Second International Conference, ICDHM 2009, Held as Part of HCI International 2009, San Diego, CA, USA, July 19-24, 2009. Proceedings / [ed] Vincent G. Duffy, Berlin Heidelberg: Springer Berlin/Heidelberg, 2009, p. 323-332Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    To build software which, at the press of a button, can tell you what cognition related hazards there are within an environment or a task, is probably well into the future if it is possible at all. However, incorporating existing tools such as task analysis tools, interface design guidelines and information about general cognitive limitations in humans, could allow for greater evaluative options for cognitive ergonomics. The paper will discuss previous approaches on the subject and suggest adding design and evaluative guiding in DHM that will help a user with little to no knowledge of cognitive science, design and evaluate a human-product interaction scenario.

  • 114.
    Thorvald, Peter
    et al.
    University of Skövde, The Virtual Systems Research Centre. University of Skövde, School of Engineering Science.
    Högberg, Dan
    University of Skövde, The Virtual Systems Research Centre. University of Skövde, School of Engineering Science.
    Case, Keith
    University of Skövde, The Virtual Systems Research Centre. University of Skövde, School of Engineering Science. Mechanical and Manufacturing Engineering, Loughborough University, Loughborough, United Kingdom.
    The effect of information mobility on production quality2014In: International journal of computer integrated manufacturing (Print), ISSN 0951-192X, E-ISSN 1362-3052, Vol. 27, no 2, p. 120-128Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This article investigates the use of a hand-held unit as an information source in manual assembly. Having a mobile information system, such as a Personal Digital Assistant (PDA), that can be brought at all times, as opposed to a stationary one, such as a computer terminal, is hypothesised to increase the information range and thus improves assembly performance. The increased information range is argued to be due to assembly workers employing a cost-benefit strategy, where the cost of gathering information is compared with the assumed benefit of it. This article reports empirical data comparing the use of a mobile information carrier with a traditional stationary computer, and results show that the use of a PDA significantly improves quality, whereas productivity does not significantly improve quality. © 2013 Copyright Taylor & Francis.

123 101 - 114 of 114
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