his.sePublications
Change search
Refine search result
1234567 101 - 150 of 316
CiteExportLink to result list
Permanent link
Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf
Rows per page
  • 5
  • 10
  • 20
  • 50
  • 100
  • 250
Sort
  • Standard (Relevance)
  • Author A-Ö
  • Author Ö-A
  • Title A-Ö
  • Title Ö-A
  • Publication type A-Ö
  • Publication type Ö-A
  • Issued (Oldest first)
  • Issued (Newest first)
  • Created (Oldest first)
  • Created (Newest first)
  • Last updated (Oldest first)
  • Last updated (Newest first)
  • Disputation date (earliest first)
  • Disputation date (latest first)
  • Standard (Relevance)
  • Author A-Ö
  • Author Ö-A
  • Title A-Ö
  • Title Ö-A
  • Publication type A-Ö
  • Publication type Ö-A
  • Issued (Oldest first)
  • Issued (Newest first)
  • Created (Oldest first)
  • Created (Newest first)
  • Last updated (Oldest first)
  • Last updated (Newest first)
  • Disputation date (earliest first)
  • Disputation date (latest first)
Select
The maximal number of hits you can export is 250. When you want to export more records please use the Create feeds function.
  • 101.
    Götesson, Idamari
    University of Skövde, School of Health and Education. i.gotesson@gmail.com.
    Hälsa hos föräldrar till barn med särskilda behov: En litteraturöversikt2018Independent thesis Basic level (university diploma), 5 credits / 7,5 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [en]

    Background: As a parent of a child with special needs, parents are exposed to many factors that affect their health negatively. They place high demands on themselves, which results in stress and guilt in an already difficult life situation.

    Purpose: The purpose of this literature review is to study the health of parents of children with some kind of special needs, as well as to evaluate the parents attitude to their situation.

    Method: Literature overview where both qualitative and quantitative studies have been used.

    Results: Parents of children with special needs are automatically at higher risk of both physical and psychological issues. Mothers are generally at greater risk than the fathers. However, they share the same risk factors, as well as health factors.

    Conclusion: Early diagnosis of the child's needs, good KASAM, well-functioning coping strategies, and social support helps to promote the overall health of parents of children with special needs.

  • 102.
    Haerens, L.
    et al.
    Univ Ghent, Res Fdn Flanders, Dept Movement & Sports Sci, B-9000 Ghent, Belgium.
    De Bourdeaudhuij, I.
    Univ Ghent, Res Fdn Flanders, Dept Movement & Sports Sci, B-9000 Ghent, Belgium.
    Barba, G.
    CNR, Inst Food Sci, Unit Epidemiol & Populat Genet, I-83100 Avellino, Italy.
    Eiben, Gabriele
    Univ Gothenburg, Dept Publ Hlth & Community Med, S-40530 Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Fernandez, J.
    Univ Zaragoza, Univ Sch Hlth Sci, E-50009 Zaragoza, Spain.
    Hebestreit, A.
    Univ Bremen, Bremen Inst Prevent Res & Social Med, D-28359 Bremen, Germany.
    Kovacs, E.
    Univ Pecs, Dept Paediat, Fac Med, H-7633 Pecs, Hungary.
    Lasn, H.
    Natl Inst Hlth Dev, EE-50410 Tallinn, Estonia.
    Regber, S.
    Sahlgrens Univ Hosp, Dept Pediat, S-40530 Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Shiakou, M.
    Res & Educ Inst Child Hlth, CY-2015 Strovolos, Cyprus.
    De Henauw, S.
    Univ Ghent, Dept Publ Hlth, B-9000 Ghent, Belgium.
    Developing the IDEFICS community-based intervention program to enhance eating behaviors in 2-to 8-year-old children: findings from focus groups with children and parents2009In: Health Education Research, ISSN 0268-1153, E-ISSN 1465-3648, Vol. 24, no 3, p. 381-393Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    One purpose of 'identification and prevention of dietary- and lifestyle-induced health effects in children and infants' (IDEFICS) is to implement a standardized community-based multi-component healthy eating intervention for younger children in eight different countries. The present study describes important influencing factors for dietary behaviors among children aged 2-8 years old in order to determine the best approaches for developing the dietary components of the standardized intervention. Twenty focus groups with children (74 boys, 81 girls) and 36 focus groups with 189 parents (28 men, 161 women) were conducted. Only in two countries, children mentioned receiving nutrition education at school. Rules at home and at school ranged from not allowing the consumption of unhealthy products to allowing everything. The same diversity was found for availability of (un)healthy products at home and school. Parents mentioned personal (lack of time, financial constraints, preferences), socio-environmental (family, peer influences), institutional (school policies) and physical-environmental (availability of unhealthy products, price, season) barriers for healthy eating. This focus group research provided valuable information to guide the first phase in the IDEFICS intervention development. There was a large variability in findings within countries. Interventions should be tailored at the personal and environmental level to increase the likelihood of behavioral change.

  • 103.
    Haerens, Leen
    et al.
    Univ Ghent, Res Fdn Flanders, Dept Movement & Sports Sci, B-9000 Ghent, Belgium.
    De Bourdeaudhuij, Ilse
    Univ Ghent, Res Fdn Flanders, Dept Movement & Sports Sci, B-9000 Ghent, Belgium.
    Eiben, Gabriele
    Univ Gothenburg, Dept Publ Hlth & Community Med, Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Lauria, Fabio
    CNR, Inst Food Sci, Dept Epidemiol & Populat Genet, Avellino, Italy.
    Bel, Silvia
    Univ Zaragoza, Univ Sch Hlth Sci, Zaragoza, Spain.
    Keimer, Katharina
    Univ Bremen, Inst Prevent Res & Social Med, Bremen, Germany.
    Kovacs, Eva
    Univ Pecs, Dept Pediat, Pecs, Hungary.
    Lasn, Helen
    TAI, Natl Inst Hlth Dev, Tallinn, Estonia.
    Regber, Susann
    Nordic Sch Publ Hlth, Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Shiakou, Monica
    Res & Educ Inst Child Hlth, Nicosia, Cyprus.
    Maes, Lea
    Univ Ghent, Dept Publ Hlth, B-9000 Ghent, Belgium.
    Formative Research to Develop the IDEFICS Physical Activity Intervention Component: Findings From Focus Groups With Children and Parents2010In: Journal of Physical Activity and Health, ISSN 1543-3080, E-ISSN 1543-5474, Vol. 7, no 2, p. 246-256Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: The current study aimed at describing influencing factors for physical activity among young children to determine the best approaches for developing the IDEFICS community based intervention. Methods: In 8 European sites a trained moderator conducted a minimum of 4 focus groups using standardized questioning guides. A total of 56 focus groups were conducted including 36 focus groups with parents and 20 focus groups with children, of which 74 were boys and 81 girls. Key findings were identified through independent reviews of focus group summary reports using content analysis methods. Findings: Findings were generally consistent across countries. The greatest emphasis was on environmental physical (eg, seasonal influences, availability of facilities and safety), institutional (eg, length of breaks at school), and social factors (eg, role modeling of parents). Most cited personal factors by parents were age, social economical status, and perceived barriers. Both children and parents mentioned the importance of children's preferences. Conclusions: To increase physical activity levels of young children the intervention should aim at creating an environment (physical, institutional, social) supportive of physical activity. On the other hand strategies should take into account personal factors like age and social economical status and should consider personal barriers too.

  • 104.
    Hagquist, Curt
    et al.
    Centre for Research on Child and Adolescent Mental Health, Karlstad University, Karlstad, Sweden.
    Välimaa, Raili
    Department of Health Sciences, University of Jyväskylä, Jyväskylä, Finland.
    Simonsen, Nina
    Department of Public Health, University of Helsinki, Helsinki, Finland / Folkhälsan Research Center, Helsinki, Finland.
    Suominen, Sakari
    University of Skövde, School of Health and Education. University of Skövde, Health and Education. University of Turku, Turku, Finland.
    Differential Item Functioning in Trend Analyses of Adolescent Mental Health: Illustrative Examples Using HBSC-Data from Finland2017In: Child Indicators Research, ISSN 1874-897X, E-ISSN 1874-8988, Vol. 10, no 3, p. 673-691Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Although there is an increasing focus on trend analyses of adolescent mental health, yet too little attention is paid to the methodological challenges and pitfalls inherent in this type of analyses. The purpose of the study is to analyse the psychometric properties of a Finnish instrument on psychosomatic problems, with a major focus on Differential Item Functioning (DIF) across time. Questionnaire data collected in 1994, 1998, 2006 and 2014 among Finnish schoolchildren in grade 9 (15-year-olds) as part of the Health Behaviour in School-aged Children (HBSC) study were utilised. The polytomous Rasch model was used to examine the psychometric properties of a composite measure of psychosomatic problems. The results clearly indicate that the composite measure on psychosomatic problems consisting of nine items does not work invariantly over time. In particular, the item depressed shows DIF across years of investigations. This item works quite differently at the first year of investigation compared to the last year showing higher expected values 2014 (=less frequent problems) than 1994. This DIF affects the person measure of change in psychosomatic problems between 1994 and 2014. Resolving the item depressed for year of investigation DIF, or removing it, increases the difference in person mean values between the two years, implying increasing psychosomatic problems over time. Since the DIF affects the trend results, different options to address the problems need to be considered. Removing the item depressed would bring the Finnish measure of psychosomatic problems in better accordance with the content of the questions on psychosomatic problems in the international HBSC protocol in which the item depressed is not included.

  • 105.
    Hall, Ingela
    University of Skövde, School of Health and Education.
    Prevalens och uppföljning av latent tuberkulos bland migranter i Region Jönköpings Län2018Independent thesis Advanced level (degree of Master (One Year)), 10 credits / 15 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [en]

    Introduction: Tuberculosis is one of the world's most widespread infectious diseases. One third of the world’s population is expected to carry the bacterium without being ill (latent tuberculosis, LTBI). Nearly ten percent of the carriers develop active tuberculosis sometime during their lifetime. Europe has a comparatively low incidence of tuberculosis and in Sweden the number of cases of tuberculosis has decreased since the mid-40s. In Sweden, the increased number of immigrants in recent years is seen as an explanation for a temporarily increased prevalence of tuberculosis. Early diagnosis and treatment of tuberculosis are key factors in preventing the spread of infection and giving the individual the opportunity to manage their health, which is important from a public health perspective. The county councils/regions have chosen different strategies for whom to be included in screening for tuberculosis in health surveys of immigrants.

    Aim: The aim of the study was to investigate the prevalence and follow-up of latent tuberculosis among immigrants who have undergone a health examination at health centers in the County of Jönköping.

    Method: The study was a retrospective observation study based on quantitative approach. Data was collected through journal review and 361 records were included in the analysis. The presence of latent and active tuberculosis was correlated with gender, age and country of origin.

    Results: The results of the study showed that the prevalence of LTBI in the study population was 9.4%. The results showed that LTBI was more common in men and individuals > 35 years. However, no differences were seen by country of origin.

    Conclusion: The study is of limited size and thus generalisability. LTBI is relatively common among immigrants. Further studies are needed to identify optimal routines for screening and preventive measures in the immigrant group.

  • 106.
    Hallberg, Julia
    et al.
    University of Skövde, School of Health and Education.
    Hansson, Malena
    University of Skövde, School of Health and Education.
    Fetma - riskfaktor att utveckla graviditetsdiabetes: konsekvenser för mor och barn: En litteraturöversikt2017Independent thesis Basic level (university diploma), 5 credits / 7,5 HE creditsStudent thesis
  • 107.
    Hallberg, Linda
    University of Skövde, School of Health and Education.
    Vårdrelaterade urinvägsinfektioner: Incidens före och efter validering av infektionsverktyget2018Independent thesis Advanced level (degree of Master (One Year)), 10 credits / 15 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [en]

    Introduction: Health care associated infections (HCAIs) have a negative impact on public health, with an impact on mortality, morbidity and quality of life. The most common HCAIs in Sweden are health care associated urinary tract infections (UTI). One important component in preventing HCAIs are regular measurements and feedback to these. Instruments that are currently used for measuring HCAIs at a local and national level in Sweden are marker-based journal review and the Anti-Infection Tool (AIT). Aim:  The aim of this study was to validate the AIT and compare the incidence of health care associated UTI measured with the AIT against both manual journal review and marker-based journal review. The aim was also to study the presence of urinary catheters in conjunction with a healthcare associated UTI. Methods: In 2017, data was collected from 143 records from a random sample of patients admitted to somatic wards at Södra Älvsborg's Hospital. From the AIT, diagnosed health care associated UTI and community-acquired UTI were studied and validated against manual journal review. Also, the incidence of health care associated UTI in the AIT was compared with that found in marker-based journal review. Results: Incidence of health care associated UTI before the validation was 1.5% while the estimated incidence after manual journal review and validation was 3.6%. Marker-based journal review showed an incidence of 1.1%. In 65.6 % of the cases with health care associated UTI, the patient was equipped with urinary catheter. The most common cause of incorrect registration of health care associated UTI was that patients with urinary catheters were assessed as community-acquired UTI.

     

    Conclusion:  The reported incidence of health care associated UTI differs greatly between these instruments. The incidence is probably much higher than what is currently reported using these instruments. To obtain good quality of monitoring data, knowledge and journal reviews of high quality are required. However, the generalizability of the result of this study is limited, due to the relatively small study sample.

  • 108.
    Hamari, Lotta
    et al.
    Department of Nursing Science, University of Turku, Finland / Turku University Hospital, Turku, Finland.
    Heinonen, Olli J.
    Paavo Nurmi Centre & Department of Physical Activity and Health, University of Turku, Turku, Finland / Turku University Hospital, Turku, Finland.
    Aromaa, Minna
    Children and Adolescents Out-patient Clinic, Turku, Finland / Department of Public Health, University of Turku, Finland.
    Asanti, Riitta
    Department of Teacher Education, University of Turku, Finland.
    Koivusilta, Leena
    University Consortium of Seinajoki, School of Health Sciences, University of Tampere, Seinäjoki, Finland.
    Koski, Pasi
    Department of Teacher Education, Rauma Unit, University of Turku, Rauma, Finland.
    Laaksonen, Camilla
    Turku University of Applied Sciences, Health and Well-being, Turku, Finland.
    Matomäki, Jaakko
    Turku University Hospital, Clinical Research Centre, Turku, Finland.
    Pahkala, Katja
    Paavo Nurmi Centre & Department of Health and Physical Activity, University of Turku, Finland / Research Centre of Applied and Preventive Cardiovascular Medicine, University of Turku, Turku, Finland.
    Pakarinen, Anni
    Department of Nursing Science, University of Turku, Finland / Turku University Hospital, Turku, Finland.
    Suominen, Sakari
    University of Skövde, School of Health and Education. University of Skövde, Health and Education. Department of Public Health, University of Turku, Finland.
    Salanterä, Sanna
    Department of Nursing Science, University of Turku, Finland / Turku University Hospital, Turku, Finland.
    Association of Self-Perceived Physical Competence and Leisure-Time Physical Activity in Childhood: A Follow-Up Study2017In: Journal of School Health, ISSN 0022-4391, E-ISSN 1746-1561, Vol. 87, no 4, p. 236-243Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    BACKGROUNDThe basis of self-perceived physical competence is built in childhood and school personnel have an important role in this developmental process. We investigated the association between initial self-perceived physical competence and reported leisure-time physical activity (LTPA) longitudinally in 10-, 12-, and 15-year-old children.

    METHODSThis longitudinal follow-up study comprises pupils from an elementary school cohort (N = 1346) in the city of Turku, Finland (175,000 inhabitants). The self-perceived physical competence (fitness and appearance) and LTPA data were collected with questionnaires. The full longitudinal data were available from 571 pupils based on repeated studies at the ages of 10, 12, and 15 years in 2004, 2006, and 2010. We analyzed the association of self-perceived physical competence and LTPA using regression models.

    RESULTSSelf-perceived physical competence was positively associated with LTPA at all ages (10 years p < .05, 12 years p < .0001, 15 years p < .0001). Increase in the self-perceived physical fitness scores was likely to associate with higher LTPA at each age point (10 years [odds ratio, OR] = 1.18, 95% confidence interval, CI: 1.09-1.27; 12 years [OR] = 1.27, 95% CI: 1.18-1.37; and 15 years [OR] = 1.28, 95% CI: 1.19-1.38).

    CONCLUSIONSSelf-perceived physical competence is associated with LTPA in children and adolescents, and the association is strengthened with age.

  • 109.
    Hammad, Yassert A.
    et al.
    Department of Anesthesiology, Hamad General Hospital, Doha, Qatar / Weill Cornell Medicine Qatar, Doha, Qatar.
    El Ansari, Walid
    University of Skövde, School of Health and Education. University of Skövde, Health and Education. Department of Surgery, Hamad General Hospital, Doha, Qatar / College of Medicine, Qatar University, Doha, Qatar.
    Shallik, Nabil A.
    Department of Anesthesiology, Hamad General Hospital, Doha, Qatar / Weill Cornell Medicine Qatar, Doha, Qatar.
    Bali, Souad
    Department of Anesthesiology, Hamad General Hospital, Doha, Qatar.
    Feki, Abdellatif M.
    Department of Anesthesiology, Hamad General Hospital, Doha, Qatar.
    Quality, safety and efficiency in practice: Risk assessment and standardisation of anesthesia equipment and supplies in operating theaters of high-volume tertiary-care academic medical center2019In: Middle East Journal of Anesthesiology, ISSN 0544-0440, Vol. 26, no 1, p. 3-9Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: Operating theatres (OTs) are valuable and costly resources that need to be appropriately designed and stocked for efficient, quality and safe patient care. We assessed the logistic inefficiency including the availability and location layout of necessary supplies across OTs of a high-volume tertiary-care academic medical center. Methods: A blinded observer (anesthesia technologist) was allocated to 10 OTs. For each OT, the availability, quantity and time spent to locate and obtain a set of required items were recorded (baseline values). We then developed an OT mapping plan to determine the specific item/s to be stocked in specific locations, and one OT was standardized to this configuration map. A blinded observer was then allocated to this standardized OT and time spent to obtain the same set of items was again recorded. Six of our regular OTs were then standardized to the same configuration, and the time to obtain the items by a blinded observer were again recorded for each OT. T tests compared the time required to locate items in the standardized OT vs. regular OTs; paired t tests compared the time required in each OT vs. itself before and after standardization. Results: The observer required significantly more time in each of the 10 regular OTs compared to the standardized OT. The time spent by the observer to obtain the required items significantly and considerably decreased in each of 6 OTs after their standardization, compared to the time required before their standardization. Conclusion: This quality improvement project successfully reduced the time required to identify and locate different supplies, which impacts on the efficiency and quality of patient care. For anesthesia staff moving from one anesthetizing location to another within the institution, consistencies in location and number of anesthesia equipment and supplies create higher levels of safety and professionalism.

  • 110.
    Hammerin, Zofia
    et al.
    University of Skövde, School of Health and Education.
    Andersson, Erik
    Örebro University, School of Humanities, Education and Social Sciences, Örebro, Sweden.
    Maivorsdotter, Ninitha
    University of Skövde, School of Health and Education. University of Skövde, Health and Education.
    Exploring student participation in teaching: An aspect of student health in school2018In: International Journal of Educational Research, ISSN 0883-0355, E-ISSN 1873-538X, Vol. 92, p. 63-74Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The aim of the article is to contribute knowledge about student participation in teaching as an aspect of student health in school. Teaching is approached as an everyday democratic process that affects individual health, the health of a democratic society and young people's experiences and attitudes towards democracy. Interviews conducted with high-achieving girls experiencing school-related stress in a Swedish upper secondary school are analysed using the Student Participation in Teaching Model as a methodological framework. The results indicate that the students mainly experience participation as being informed and suggest other dimensions of participation, such as reciprocal responsibility and communication. It is concluded that the teaching itself is a vital dimension of individual and societal democratic health and that this should be emphasised more in teaching practice. © 2018 Elsevier Ltd

  • 111.
    Handlin, Linda
    et al.
    University of Skövde, School of Health and Education. University of Skövde, Health and Education.
    Muller, Jasmin
    University of Skövde, School of Health and Education. University of Skövde, Health and Education.
    Ekström, Anette
    University of Skövde, School of Health and Education. University of Skövde, Health and Education.
    Promoting health of Swedish workers by complementary methods: example of a study design of a longitudinal randomized controlled intervention study2017In: Medical Research Archives, ISSN 2375-1916, Vol. 5, no 8, p. 1-13Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: When designing, implementing, and evaluating a work site health promotion program, it is necessary to ensure that the program is evidence based. The present article aims to present in-depth information on the design of a longitudinal randomized controlled complementary intervention pilot study that follows the Consort recommendations to evaluate possible effects of a health promotive intervention in healthy workers.

    Methods: Employees from four different workplaces were randomly assigned to one of the following groups: i) Massage and mental training (sitting in the armchair and receiving mechanical massage while listening to mental training programs, n=19), ii) Massage (sitting in the armchair and receiving mechanical massage only, n=19), iii) Mental training (sitting in the armchair and listening to mental training programs only, n=19), iv) Pause (sitting in the armchair but not receiving mechanical massage or listening to mental training programs, n=19), v) Control (not sitting in the armchair at all, n=17). The study lasted for eight weeks. Immediately before the randomization, after four weeks and after eight weeks the participants responded to statements from the Swedish Scale of Personality and had their heart rate, blood pressure and fingertip temperature measured.

    Results: Receiving mechanical massage and listening to mental training programs, either separately or in combination, during working hours had some positive effects on the employees’ own evaluation of their health, as well as their heart rate, blood pressure and fingertip temperature. However, the intervention need to be evaluated further.

    Conclusion: The approach described makes it possible to design, implement and evaluate a work site health promotion program, also on pilot-study level and these results should be seen as a first step towards larger randomized studies. This types of studies need to focus on healthy participants and special care should be taken to guarantee adequately powered study groups and their homogeneity.

  • 112.
    Hansen, Susann
    et al.
    University of Skövde, School of Life Sciences.
    Karagianis, Alexandra
    University of Skövde, School of Life Sciences.
    Sociala stödets inverkan på barn och ungdomars idrottsutövande: En litteraturstudie2012Independent thesis Basic level (university diploma), 5 credits / 7,5 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [en]

    Background: The influence of social support on sports for children and adolescent is a major factor for the purpose of achieving not only good sport results but also an overall positive improvement of physical, psychological, social and cultural wellbeing. Objectives: The purpose of this study was to examine the influence of social supports on sports for children and adolescents.

    Design: Literature review. Methods: The authors used databases and electronic journals in order to collect scientific papers published in English. Ultimately eleven articles were selected.

    Result: The authors of this literature review found three main themes in children and adolescents social support: parents, friends and coaches. Further sub-themes were found for social support, such as instrumental support, emotional support, autonomy and role models. Conclusion: Social support leading to instrinct motivation is the momentum giving positive attitudes for sports and promotes physical activity over time for children and adolescents.

  • 113.
    Hebestreit, A.
    et al.
    BIPS GmbH, Leibniz Inst Prevent Res & Epidemiol, Dept Epidemiol Methods & Etiol Res, D-28359 Bremen, Germany.
    Boernhorst, C.
    BIPS GmbH, Leibniz Inst Prevent Res & Epidemiol, Dept Epidemiol Methods & Etiol Res, D-28359 Bremen, Germany.
    Barba, G.
    CNR, Inst Food Sci, Avellino, Italy.
    Siani, A.
    CNR, Inst Food Sci, Avellino, Italy.
    Huybrechts, I.
    Univ Ghent, Dept Publ Hlth, B-9000 Ghent, Belgium / Int Agcy Res Canc, Dietary Exposure Assessment Grp, F-69372 Lyon, France.
    Tognon, G.
    Univ Gothenburg, Dept Publ Hlth & Community Med, Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Eiben, Gabriele
    Univ Gothenburg, Dept Publ Hlth & Community Med, Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Moreno, L. A.
    Univ Zaragoza, Sch Hlth Sci, GENUD Growth Exercise Nutr & Dev Res Grp, Zaragoza, Spain.
    Fernandez Alvira, J. M.
    Univ Zaragoza, Sch Hlth Sci, GENUD Growth Exercise Nutr & Dev Res Grp, Zaragoza, Spain.
    Loit, H. M.
    Natl Inst Hlth Dev, Dept Chron Dis, Tallinn, Estonia.
    Kovacs, E.
    Univ Pecs, Dept Pediat, Pecs, Hungary.
    Tornaritis, M.
    Res & Educ Inst Child Hlth, Strovolos, Cyprus.
    Krogh, V.
    Fdn IRCCS Ist Nazl Tumori, Dept Prevent & Predict Med, Milan, Italy.
    Associations between energy intake, daily food intake and energy density of foods and BMI z-score in 2-9-year-old European children2014In: European Journal of Nutrition, ISSN 1436-6207, E-ISSN 1436-6215, Vol. 53, no 2, p. 673-681Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The aim of this study was to investigate the associations between proxy-reported energy intake, daily food intake and energy density of foods and body mass index (BMI) z-score in 2-9-year-old European children. From 16,225 children who participated in the identification and prevention of dietary- and lifestyle-induced health effects in children and infants (IDEFICS) baseline examination, 9,782 children with 24-h proxy dietary information and complete covariate information were included in the analysis. Participating children were classified according to adapted Goldberg cutoffs: underreports, plausible energy reports and overreports. Energy intake, daily food intake and energy density of foods excluding noncaloric beverages were calculated for all eating occasions. Effect of energy intake, daily food intake and energy density of foods on BMI z-score was investigated using multilevel regression models in the full sample and subsample of plausible energy reports. Exposure variables were included separately; daily food intake and energy intake were addressed in a combined model to check for interactions. In the group of plausible energy reports (N = 8,544), energy intake and daily food intake were significantly positively associated with BMI z-score. Energy density of foods was not associated with BMI z-score. In the model including energy intake, food intake and an interaction term, only energy intake showed a significantly positive effect on BMI z-score. In the full sample (N = 9,782), only energy intake was significantly but negatively associated with BMI z-score. Proxy-reporters are subject to misreporting, especially for children in the higher BMI levels. Energy intake is a more important predictor of unhealthy weight development in children than daily food intake.

  • 114.
    Hebestreit, A.
    et al.
    Leibniz Inst Prevent Res & Epidemiol BIPS, D-28359 Bremen, Germany.
    Boernhorst, C.
    Leibniz Inst Prevent Res & Epidemiol BIPS, D-28359 Bremen, Germany.
    Pala, V.
    Fdn IRCCS Ist Nazl Tumori, Dept Prevent & Predict Med, Epidemiol & Prevent Unit, Milan, Italy.
    Barba, G.
    CNR, Inst Food Sci, Epidemol & Populat Genet, Avellino, Italy.
    Eiben, Gabriele
    Univ Gothenburg, Dept Publ Hlth & Community Med, Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Veidebaum, T.
    Natl Inst Hlth Dev, Dept Chron Dis, Tallinn, Estonia.
    Hadjigergiou, C.
    Res & Educ Inst Child Hlth, Strovolos, Cyprus.
    Molnar, D.
    Univ Pecs, Dept Pediat, Pecs, Hungary.
    Claessens, M.
    Univ Ghent, Dept Publ Hlth, B-9000 Ghent, Belgium.
    Fernandez-Alvira, J. M.
    Univ Zaragoza, Fac Hlth Sci, GENUD Growth Exercise Nutr & Dev Res Grp, Zaragoza, Spain.
    Pigeot, I.
    Leibniz Inst Prevent Res & Epidemiol BIPS, D-28359 Bremen, Germany.;Univ Bremen, Dept Math & Comp Sci, D-28359 Bremen, Germany.
    Dietary energy density in young children across Europe2014In: International Journal of Obesity, ISSN 0307-0565, E-ISSN 1476-5497, Vol. 38, p. S124-S134Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    OBJECTIVES: To describe energy density (ED; kcal g(-1)) of dietary intake of European children. METHODS: From 16 228 children who participated in the IDEFICS (Identification and prevention of Dietary- and lifestyle-induced health EFfects In Children and infantS) baseline examination, 8551 children with 24-h dietary recalls (24-HDR), with plausible reported energy intakes and complete covariate information were included in the present analysis. ED was calculated using two methods: (1) ED including solid foods (EDF) and (2) ED including solid foods and energy-containing beverages (EDF&B). Beverage energy was calculated in kcal per day. Dietary characteristics and body mass index (BMI) z-score of children aged 2 to <6 years and 6 to <10 years were compared between children with an overall EDF below the <25th percentile, between the 25th and 75th percentile as well as above the >75th percentile. Standardised regression coefficients were estimated to assess the association between dietary characteristics, BMI z-score and ED of the diet. RESULTS: Children with low EDF and EDF&B diets consumed less energy but higher quantity of food and beverages than children with high EDF and EDF&B diets. Consumption of caloric beverages decreased with increasing EDF&B of the diet owing to the relatively low ED of the beverages, in relation to solid foods. Generally, children with low EDF and EDF&B diets showed healthier food choices than peers with higher EDF and EDF&B diets. In this sample, EDF and EDF&B were not associated with BMI z-score. CONCLUSION: Health promotion strategies should proclaim lower ED diets by means of foods with high water and low fat content and mainly fruit and vegetable components. Excluding caloric beverages from EDF calculation is a useful method to avoid misinterpretation of true exposure to a high energy dense diet. We recommend excluding caloric beverages from EDF calculation when investigating the effect of ED on a certain (health) outcome.

  • 115.
    Hebestreit, Antje
    et al.
    BIPS GmbH, Leibniz Inst Prevent Res & Epidemiol, Achterstr 30, D-28359 Bremen, Germany.
    Barba, Gianvincenzo
    CNR, Inst Food Sci, Avellino, Italy.
    De Henauw, Stefaan
    Univ Ghent, Dept Publ Hlth, B-9000 Ghent, Belgium.
    Eiben, Gabriele
    Univ Gothenburg, Dept Publ Hlth & Community Med, Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Hadjigeorgiou, Charalampos
    Res & Educ Inst Child Hlth, Strovolos, Cyprus.
    Kovacs, Eva
    Univ Pecs, Dept Pediat, Pecs, Hungary / Univ Munich, Inst Med Informat Proc Biometr & Epidemiol, Munich, Germany.;Univ Munich, German Ctr Vertigo & Balance Disorders, Munich, Germany.
    Krogh, Vittorio
    Fdn IRCCS Ist Nazl Tumori, Dept Prevent & Predict Med, Milan, Italy.
    Moreno, Luis A.
    Univ Zaragoza, Fac Hlth Sci, GENUD Growth Exercise Nutr & Dev Res Grp, Zaragoza, Spain.
    Pala, Valeria
    Fdn IRCCS Ist Nazl Tumori, Dept Prevent & Predict Med, Milan, Italy.
    Veidebaum, Toomas
    Natl Inst Hlth Dev, Dept Chron Dis, Tallinn, Estonia.
    Wolters, Maike
    BIPS GmbH, Leibniz Inst Prevent Res & Epidemiol, Achterstr 30, D-28359 Bremen, Germany.
    Boernhorst, Claudia
    BIPS GmbH, Leibniz Inst Prevent Res & Epidemiol, Achterstr 30, D-28359 Bremen, Germany.
    Cross-sectional and longitudinal associations between energy intake and BMI z-score in European children2016In: International Journal of Behavioral Nutrition and Physical Activity, ISSN 1479-5868, E-ISSN 1479-5868, Vol. 13, article id 23Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: Evidence for the effect of dietary energy on BMI z-scores in young children is limited. We aim to investigate cross-sectional and longitudinal effects of daily energy intake (EI) on BMI z-scores of European boys and girls considering growth-related height dependencies of EI using residual EI. Methods: To investigate cross-sectional and longitudinal effects of daily energy intake (EI) on BMI z-scores of European boys and girls considering growth-related height dependencies of EI using residual EI. Methods: Subjects were children aged 2-< 10 y old (N = 2753, 48.2 % girls) participating in the IDEFICS (Identification and prevention of Dietary-and lifestyle-induced health EFfects In Children and infantS) baseline and follow-up examination. Usual EI (kcal/day) was calculated based on the National Cancer Institute-method excluding subjects with implausible reported EI. Effect of age, height and sex-adjusted residuals of EI on BMI z-score was investigated stratified by baseline age-group (2-< 4 y, 4-< 6 y, 6-< 8 y and 8-< 10 y) cross-sectionally using linear regression models adjusted for relevant confounders (crude model: age, sex, country; fully adjusted model: plus parental ISCED level, parental BMI, screen time; subgroup analysis: plus objectively measured physical activity). Longitudinal associations were estimated between changes in (Delta) residual EI per year and Delta BMI z-score per year with adjustments analogously to the cross-sectional models but with additional adjustment for residual EI at baseline. Results: Cross-sectionally, positive associations were observed between residual EI and BMI z-score for the full study sample, for boys and in older (>= 6 years) but not in younger children in the crude and fully adjusted model. Longitudinally, small positive associations were observed between Delta residual EI per y on Delta BMI z-score per y for the full study sample and in 4-< 6 y olds in the crude and fully adjusted model. Conclusion: In conclusion, EI above the average intakes for a certain sex, age and height are weakly associated with BMI z-scores in European children. Residual EI may be considered as a useful exposure measure in children as it accounts for growth-related changes in usual EI during childhood.

  • 116.
    Hebestreit, Antje
    et al.
    Leibniz Inst Prevent Res & Epidemiol BIPS, D-28359 Bremen, Germany.
    Intemann, Timm
    Leibniz Inst Prevent Res & Epidemiol BIPS, D-28359 Bremen, Germany.
    Siani, Alfonso
    CNR, Inst Food Sci, I-83100 Avellino, Italy.
    De Henauw, Stefaan
    Univ Ghent, Dept Publ Hlth, B-9000 Ghent, Belgium.
    Eiben, Gabriele
    Univ Gothenburg, Dept Publ Hlth & Commun Med, S-40530 Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Kourides, Yiannis A.
    Res & Educ Inst Child Hlth, CY-2035 Strovolos, Cyprus.
    Kovacs, Eva
    Ludwig Maximilians Univ Munchen, Inst Med Informat Proc & Epidemiol, Inst Biometr & Epidemiol, D-81377 Munich, Germany / Ludwig Maximilians Univ Munchen, German Ctr Vertigo & Balance Disorders, D-81377 Munich, Germany.
    Moreno, Luis A.
    Univ Zaragoza, Ctr Investigac Biomed Red Fisiopatol Obesidad & N, IIS Aragon, Inst Agroalimentario Aragon IA2,GENUD, E-50009 Zaragoza, Spain.
    Veidebaum, Toomas
    Natl Inst Hlth Dev, Dept Chron Dis, EE-11619 Tallinn, Estonia.
    Krogh, Vittorio
    Fdn IRCCS, IRCCS Ist Nazl Tumori, Dept Prevent & Predict Med, I-20133 Milan, Italy.
    Pala, Valeria
    Fdn IRCCS, IRCCS Ist Nazl Tumori, Dept Prevent & Predict Med, I-20133 Milan, Italy.
    Bogl, Leonie H.
    Leibniz Inst Prevent Res & Epidemiol BIPS, D-28359 Bremen, Germany / Univ Helsinki, Dept Publ Hlth, FIN-00014 Helsinki, Finland / Univ Helsinki, Finnish Inst Mol Med, FIN-00014 Helsinki, Finland.
    Hunsberger, Monica
    Univ Gothenburg, Dept Publ Hlth & Commun Med, S-40530 Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Boernhorst, Claudia
    Leibniz Inst Prevent Res & Epidemiol BIPS, D-28359 Bremen, Germany.
    Pigeot, Iris
    Leibniz Inst Prevent Res & Epidemiol BIPS, D-28359 Bremen, Germany.
    Dietary Patterns of European Children and Their Parents in Association with Family Food Environment: Results from the I.Family Study2017In: Nutrients, ISSN 2072-6643, E-ISSN 2072-6643, Vol. 9, no 2, article id 126Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The aim of this study was to determine whether an association exists between children's and parental dietary patterns (DP), and whether the number of shared meals or soft drink availability during meals strengthens this association. In 2013/2014 the I. Family study cross-sectionally assessed the dietary intakes of families from eight European countries using 24-h dietary recalls. Usual energy and food intakes from six-to 16-year-old children and their parents were estimated based on the NCI Method. A total of 1662 child-mother and 789 child-father dyads were included; DP were derived using cluster analysis. We investigated the association between children's and parental DP and whether the number of shared meals or soft drink availability moderated this association using mixed effects logistic regression models. Three DP comparable in children and parents were obtained: Sweet & Fat, Refined Cereals, and Animal Products. Children were more likely to be allocated to the Sweet & Fat DP when their fathers were allocated to the Sweet & Fat DP and when they shared at least one meal per day (OR 3.18; 95% CI 1.84; 5.47). Being allocated to the Sweet & Fat DP increased when the mother or the father was allocated to the Sweet & Fat DP and when soft drinks were available (OR 2.78; 95% CI 1.80; 4.28 or OR 4.26; 95% CI 2.16; 8.41, respectively). Availability of soft drinks and negative parental role modeling are important predictors of children's dietary patterns.

  • 117.
    Hector, Johanna
    et al.
    University of Skövde, School of Health and Education.
    Persson, Marie
    University of Skövde, School of Health and Education.
    Hur påverkar kosten symptom hos barn med ADHD?2016Independent thesis Basic level (university diploma), 5 credits / 7,5 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [en]

    Introduction: About 5% of all children in Sweden are diagnosed with Attention Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder (ADHD) and about 75 % get medication do reduce symptoms. Hyperactivity, difficulties to focus and concentrate and impulsive behavior are typical characteristics for children with ADHD. Aim: The aim with this literature review is to see if complementary treatments based on diet can assist to reduce symptoms of ADHD for children. Method: A literature review that analyses ten original articles which are divided into four different topics. Result: An elimination diet that excludes certain foods, reduced intake of food additives and preservatives or increased intake of omega-3 showed positive effects for a group of children with ADHD as symptoms minimized especially for hyperactivity. Discussion: Even though results of the studies show positive effects for certain children with ADHD, more research is needed that further investigates the effects of elimination diet, food additives and omega-3. The studies were mainly based on questionnaires, filled in by parents, which can lead to subjective results. The positive effects suggest that alternative treatments by changed diet might assist children with ADHD, improving life quality and reducing medication side effects together with reduced costs for society.

  • 118.
    Hedenrud, Tove
    et al.
    Department of Public Health and Community Medicine, Institute of Medicine, University of Gothenburg, Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Babic, Naida
    Apoteket Hjärtat, Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Jonsson, Pernilla
    Department of Public Health and Community Medicine, Institute of Medicine, University of Gothenburg, Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Medication overuse headache: self-perceived and actual knowledge among pharmacy staff2014In: Headache, ISSN 0017-8748, E-ISSN 1526-4610, Vol. 54, no 6, p. 1019-1025Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    OBJECTIVE: The aim of this study was to investigate knowledge about medication overuse headache (MOH) among pharmacy staff.

    BACKGROUND: MOH is a public health problem both in Sweden and in many other countries. Persons with MOH have limited contact with health care, and medications used are to large extent over-the-counter (OTC) medications. Therefore, pharmacists have an important role in, eg, advising these individuals about their medication use. Little is, however, known about the actual level of knowledge about MOH among pharmacy staff, which determines the quality of their advice to MOH sufferers.

    METHODS: A total of 326 questionnaires were distributed to 44 pharmacies in Gothenburg, Sweden. The questionnaire included background questions, questions about advice on headache treatment, source of knowledge about MOH, and questions on self-perceived and actual knowledge on MOH.

    RESULTS: The response rate was 70%. A majority of the pharmacy staff (90.6%) considered themselves to have knowledge about MOH to some or a greater extent. Almost half had learned about MOH through their university/vocational education. Only 8.6% knew that all 5 headache medications listed in the questionnaire can cause development of MOH, but 40% responded correctly on which treatment advice one can give a person with MOH. Actual knowledge on treatment advice differed significantly between groups of self-perceived knowledge.

    CONCLUSION: The knowledge on MOH is insufficient among pharmacy staff, but with the proper knowledge, pharmacy staff is well positioned to effect both primary and secondary prevention of MOH. We suggest not only increasing educational efforts about MOH within pharmacy programs but also continuing education at the pharmacies for all staff. Further, it is also important to increase knowledge among pharmacy customers.

  • 119.
    Hedenrud, Tove
    et al.
    Department of Social Medicine, The Sahlgrenska Academy at Göteborg University, Göteborg, Sweden.
    Jonsson, Pernilla
    Department of Social Medicine, The Sahlgrenska Academy at Göteborg University, Göteborg, Sweden.
    Linde, Mattias
    Cephalea Headache Centre, Göteborg, and Institute of Neuroscience and Physiology, The Sahlgrenska Academy at Göteborg University, Göteborg, Sweden.
    Beliefs about medicines and adherence among Swedish migraineurs2008In: The Annals of Pharmacotherapy, ISSN 1060-0280, E-ISSN 1542-6270, Vol. 42, no 1, p. 39-45Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    BACKGROUND: The problem of low adherence to drug therapy is as prevalent in migraine as in any other disorder, with important consequences for the patient, such as impaired quality of life and absence from work. Beliefs about medicines have been identified as one of the most significant factors for adherence.

    OBJECTIVE: To analyze whether beliefs about medicines and medication-related factors are associated with adherence to prophylactic drug therapy among migraineurs at a Swedish tertiary care clinic.

    METHODS: A questionnaire was distributed to migraineurs visiting a tertiary care clinic in Sweden. All participants had recently been prescribed prophylactic medicine. The questionnaire was comprised of background questions, questions about disease characteristics, perceived effects, and adverse effects of migraine medications used, the Beliefs about Medicines questionnaire, and the Medication Adherence Report Scale. Medication-related variables, collected from patients' records with consent, were also included. Logistic regression analysis was performed to analyze the association between beliefs about medicines, medication-related variables, and adherence to prophylactic drugs.

    RESULTS: Of the 174 participants in the study, 64% were considered to be adherent to their prescribed prophylactic medicine. Users of beta-blockers were significantly more adherent compared with patients using other drugs (eg, tricyclic antidepressants [TCAs] or antiepileptics); the reverse was true for patients taking TCAs. Respondents with the lowest level of education (<or=9 y) expressed less concern about drugs and had a higher necessity-concerns differential compared with respondents with a higher educational level. In the final regression model, no variable was significantly associated with adherence.

    CONCLUSIONS: About one-third of the migraineurs did not adhere to their prophylactic drugs. Beliefs about medicines and medication-related factors could not predict nonadherence. We recommend further research on medication-related variables in relation to adherence among migraineurs.

  • 120.
    Hell, Anna
    et al.
    University of Skövde, School of Health and Education. c16annhe@student.his.se.
    Karlsson, Krizty-Li
    University of Skövde, School of Health and Education. a15krika@student.his.se.
    Riskfaktorer för mäns våld mot kvinnor i nära relationer: Utifrån ett ekologiskt perspektiv2018Independent thesis Basic level (degree of Bachelor), 10 credits / 15 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [en]

    Introduction: Men’s perpetration of intimate partner violence against women is a widespread public health problem that prevents the development of an equal society and contributes to serious health problems for many women in terms of both short and long term physical and mental health. The violence also affects the victimized women's opportunity for participation and influence in the society, which further makes it an important public health issue.

    Aim: The aim of the literature review was to describe risk factors for men’s perpetration of intimate partner violence against women.

    Methods: Based on twenty-five scientific articles analyzed by a thematic analysis method, five main themes were identified: "Conditions during childhood”, "Individual factors of the man", "Relationship context", "Socio-economic and Demographic factors" and "Standards." Four sub-themes were also identified: "Personality traits", "Alcohol and drugs", "Conflicts" and "Pregnancy and children".

    Results: The key findings of the results were negative childhood experiences, impulse control, alcohol impact, financial resources and masculinity standards.

    Discussion: The results have been discussed partly based on an ecological model and concluded with implications and suggestions on the development of the subject. The literature study highlights the importance of developing prevention and treatment strategies at several levels to counter men’s perpetration of intimate partner violence against women

  • 121.
    Hense, Sabrina
    et al.
    Department of Epidemiological Methods and Etiologic Research, Bremen Institute for Prevention Research and Social Medicine (BIPS), Germany.
    Pohlabeln, Hermann
    Bremen Inst Prevent Res & Social Med BIPS, Dept Epidemiol Methods & Etiol Res, D-28359 Bremen, Germany.;Bremen Inst Prevent Res & Social Med BIPS, Dept Biometry & Data Management, D-28359 Bremen, Germany.
    De Henauw, Stefaan
    Univ Ghent, Dept Publ Health, Dept Movement & Sport Sci, Fac Med & Hlth Sci, B-9000 Ghent, Belgium.
    Eiben, Gabriele
    Univ Goteborg, Sahlgranska Sch Publ Hlth & Community Med, Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Molnar, Denes
    Department of Pediatrics, Medical Faculty, University of Pécs, Hungary.
    Moreno, Luis A.
    Univ Zaragoza, EU Ciencas Salud, GENUD Res Grp, E-50009 Zaragoza, Spain.
    Barba, Gianvincenzo
    CNR, Inst Food Sci, Unit Epidemiol & Populat Genet, Pavia, Italy.
    Hadjigeorgiou, Charalampos
    Res & Educ Inst Child Hlth, Strovolos, Cyprus.
    Veidebaum, Toomas
    Natl Inst Hlth Dev, Tallinn, Estonia.
    Ahrens, Wolfgang
    Bremen Inst Prevent Res & Social Med BIPS, Dept Epidemiol Methods & Etiol Res, D-28359 Bremen, Germany.
    Sleep Duration and Overweight in European Children: Is the Association Modified by Geographic Region?2011In: Sleep, ISSN 0161-8105, E-ISSN 1550-9109, Vol. 34, no 7, p. 885-890Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Study Objectives: To investigate differences and a possible effect modification by geographical region in the association between sleep duration and overweight. Design: Cross-sectional. Setting: Primary schools and preschools in 8 European countries. Participants: 7867 children aged 2 to 9 years. Interventions: Not applicable. Measurements: Nocturnal sleep duration was assessed as part of a parental 24-h recall. Height and weight were measured by standardized procedures across centers. Data on personal, social, environmental and behavioral factors were collected using a standardized parental questionnaire. Results: Sleep duration differed (P < 0.001) between European regions and normal vs. overweight children. A dose-dependent inverse association between sleep duration and overweight could be seen, with crude odds ratios ranging from 1.73 (99% CI 1.33; 2.25) for sleeping between 10 and 11 h to 3.81 (99% CI 2.85; 5.09) for sleeping less than 9 h (reference category > 11 h). This persisted after adjustment, but remained significant only for sleeping less than 9 h per night (north: OR = 1.70; 99% CI 1.13; 2.58 vs. south: OR = 2.84; 99% CI 1.57; 5.12) if stratified by region. No effect modification by region could be found, but adjustment for region accounted for changes in the effect estimate for sleeping less than 9 h (OR = 2.22; 99% CI 1.64; 3.02). The association was stronger in school children than in preschool children. Conclusion: Geographic region and related aspects-even if they do not seem to modify the association between sleep and overweight-should in any case be taken in consideration as a confounding factor on this association.

  • 122.
    Herrmann, D.
    et al.
    Univ Bremen, Inst Prevent Res & Social Med, Dept Epidemiol Methods & Etiol Res, D-28359 Bremen, Germany.
    Suling, M.
    Univ Bremen, Bremen Inst Prevent Res & Social Med, Dept Biometry & Data Management, Bremen, Germany.
    Reisch, L.
    Copenhagen Business Sch, Dept Intercultural Commun & Management, Frederiksberg, Denmark.
    Siani, A.
    Inst Food Sci, Unit Epidemiol & Populat Genet, Avellino, Italy.
    De Bourdeaudhuij, I.
    Univ Ghent, Dept Movement & Sports Sci, B-9000 Ghent, Belgium.
    Maes, L.
    Univ Ghent, Dept Publ Hlth, B-9000 Ghent, Belgium.
    Santaliestra-Pasias, A. M.
    Univ Zaragoza, Sch Hlth Sci, Zaragoza, Spain.
    Veidebaum, T.
    Natl Inst Hlth Dev, Dept Chron Dis, Tallinn, Estonia.
    Molnar, D.
    Univ Pecs, Dept Paediat, Pecs, Hungary.
    Pala, V.
    Fdn IRCCS, Dept Prevent & Predict Med, Nutrit Epidemiol Unit, Ist Nazl Tumori, Milan, Italy.
    Kourides, Y.
    Res & Educ Inst Child Hlth, Strovolos, Cyprus.
    Eiben, Gabriele
    Univ Gothenburg, Dept Publ Hlth & Community Med, Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Bammann, K.
    Univ Bremen, Bremen Inst Prevent Res & Social Med, Dept Biometry & Data Management, Bremen, Germany.
    Repeatability of maternal report on prenatal, perinatal and early postnatal factors: findings from the IDEFICS parental questionnaire2011In: International Journal of Obesity, ISSN 0307-0565, E-ISSN 1476-5497, Vol. 35, p. S52-S60Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Objective: To investigate the repeatability of maternal self-reported prenatal, perinatal and early postnatal factors within the IDEFICS (Identification and prevention of dietary-and lifestyle-induced health effects in children and infants) study. Design: Data are from the baseline survey of the longitudinal cohort study IDEFICS in eight European countries. Subjects: A total of 420 parents from eight countries (43-61 per country) were asked to complete the parental questionnaire (PQ) twice at least 1 month apart. Measurements: The PQ assesses prenatal (maternal weight gain), perinatal (child's birth weight and length, Caesarean (C)-section, week of delivery) and early postnatal factors (exclusive breastfeeding, breastfeeding, introduction of solid food). Intra-class correlation coefficients (ICCs) were calculated to compare maternal reports on prenatal, perinatal and early postnatal factors between the first and second PQ. Results: In total, 249 data sets were considered for the analyses. Overall, maternal reports for prenatal and perinatal factors showed higher repeatability (ICC = 0.81-1.00, P <= 0.05 for all) than those for early infant nutrition (ICC = 0.33-0.88, P <= 0.05 for all). Perfect agreement was found for parental reports on C-section (ICCall = 1.00, P <= 0.05). There was stronger agreement for duration of breastfeeding (ICC = 0.71, P <= 0.05) compared with exclusive breastfeeding (ICC = 0.33, P <= 0.05). Maternal reports showed moderate correlation for the introduction of several types of food (cereals ICC = 0.64, P <= 0.05; fruits ICC = 0.70, P <= 0.05; meat ICC = 0.83, P <= 0.05; vegetables ICC = 0.75, P <= 0.05), and high correlation (ICC = 0.88, P <= 0.05) for cow's milk. Conclusion: Maternal reports on pregnancy and birth were highly reproducible, but parental recall of early infant nutrition was weaker and should be interpreted more cautiously. International Journal of Obesity (2011) 35, S52-S60; doi:10.1038/ijo.2011.35

  • 123.
    Horoz, Nil
    et al.
    Department of Clinical, Neuro and Developmental Psychology, VU University Amsterdam, Amsterdam, The Netherlands.
    Huizink, Anja
    University of Skövde, School of Health and Education. University of Skövde, Health and Education. Department of Clinical, Neuro and Developmental Psychology, VU University Amsterdam, Amsterdam, The Netherlands.
    Delforterie, Monique J.
    Department of Clinical, Neuro and Developmental Psychology, VU University Amsterdam, Amsterdam, Netherlands / Trajectum, Zwolle, The Netherlands.
    Creemers, Hanneke E.
    Forensic Child and Youth Care Sciences, University of Amsterdam, The Netherlands.
    Well-Being of Turkish and Moroccan Youth in the Netherlands: Parental Control, Parental Solicitation, and Acculturation to the Dutch Culture2019In: Zeitschrift fur Psychologie mit Zeitschrift fur angewandte Psychologie, ISSN 2190-8370, E-ISSN 2151-2604, Vol. 227, no 2, p. 144-148Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This study examined whether parental control, parental solicitation, and acculturation to the Dutch culture were related to the well-being of Dutch adolescents with Turkish and Moroccan backgrounds. Additionally, moderation by gender and ethnic background was tested. Cross-sectional data from 76 adolescents were used (Mage = 16.7 years, female = 50%, Turkish background = 35.5%). Hierarchical regression analyses showed that parental solicitation was positively associated with well-being, whereas parental control and acculturation were not associated with well-being. Associations were similar between genders and ethnic backgrounds. Positive links between parental solicitation and well-being should not be overlooked, as well-being is critical for positive youth development, integration, and social cohesion. 

  • 124.
    Huang, Christina Y.
    et al.
    Pardee Rand Grad Sch, Santa Monica, CA 90407 USA / RAND Corp, Santa Monica, CA 90407 USA.
    Reisch, Lucia A.
    Copenhagen Business Sch, Dept Intercultural Commun & Management, Frederiksberg, Denmark.
    Gwozdz, Wencke
    Copenhagen Business Sch, Dept Intercultural Commun & Management, Frederiksberg, Denmark.
    Molnar, Denes
    Univ Pecs, Fac Med, Dept Paediat, Budapest, Hungary.
    Konstabel, Kenn
    Natl Inst Hlth Dev, Tallinn, Estonia.
    Michels, Nathalie
    Univ Ghent, Dept Publ Hlth, Ghent, Belgium.
    Tornaritis, Michalis
    Res & Educ Inst Child Hlth, Strovolos, Cyprus.
    Eiben, Gabriele
    Univ Gothenburg, Sect Epidemiol & Social Med, POB 453, SE-40530 Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Siani, Alfonso
    CNR, Inst Food Sci, Unit Epidemiol & Populat Genet, Avellino, Italy.
    Fernandez-Alvira, Juan M.
    Univ Zaragoza, Growth Exercise Nutr & Dev GENUD Res Grp, Zaragoza, Spain.
    Ahrens, Wolfgang
    Leibniz Inst Prevent Res & Epidemiol BIPS GmbH, Bremen, Germany / Univ Bremen, Fac Math & Comp Sci, Bremen, Germany.
    Pigeot, Iris
    Leibniz Inst Prevent Res & Epidemiol BIPS GmbH, Bremen, Germany / Univ Bremen, Fac Math & Comp Sci, Bremen, Germany.
    Lissner, Lauren
    Univ Gothenburg, Sect Epidemiol & Social Med, POB 453, SE-40530 Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Pester power and its consequences: do European children's food purchasing requests relate to diet and weight outcomes?2016In: Public Health Nutrition, ISSN 1368-9800, E-ISSN 1475-2727, Vol. 19, no 13, p. 2393-2403Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Objective Children may influence household spending through pester power'. The present study examined pestering through parent-child food shopping behaviours in relation to children's diet and weight status. Design Cross-sectional and prospective analyses drawn from the IDEFICS study, a cohort study of parents and their children. Children's height and weight were measured and their recent diets were reported by parental proxy based on the Children's Eating Habits Questionnaire-FFQ at baseline and 2-year follow-up. Parents also completed questionnaires at both time points about pestering, including whether the child goes grocery shopping with them, asks for items seen on television and is bought requested food items. Setting Participants were recruited from eight European countries for the IDEFICS study (non-nationally representative sample). Subjects Study participants were children aged 2-9 years at enrolment and their parents. A total of 13 217 parent-child dyads were included at baseline. Two years later, 7820 of the children were re-examined. Results Most parents (63 %) at baseline reported sometimes' acquiescing to their children's requests to purchase specific foods. Pestering was modestly associated with weight and diet. At baseline, children whose parents often' complied consumed more high-sugar and high-fat foods. Children who often' asked for items seen on television were likely to become overweight after 2 years (OR=1<bold></bold>31), whereas never' asking protected against overweight (OR=0<bold></bold>72). Conclusions Pestering was modestly related to diet and weight in cross-sectional, but not longitudinal analyses. Asking for items seen on television had the most robust relationships across child outcomes and over time.

  • 125.
    Hungefält, Laura
    et al.
    University of Skövde, School of Health and Education.
    Lager, Cecilia
    University of Skövde, School of Health and Education.
    Associationen mellan socioekonomiska faktorer och övervikt/fetma bland barn mellan 0 - 12 år: En litteraturöversikt2018Independent thesis Basic level (university diploma), 5 credits / 7,5 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [en]

    Introduction: Overweight and obesity among children have increased worldwide over the last 30 years. The fact that children develop overweight and obesity isn’t only related to lifestyle, but an underlying cause can be linked to parents’ socioeconomic status, SES (Folkhälsomyndigheten, 2017). SES can be described as a collective term for educational and occupational level as well as income. The purpose of this thesis was to map the relationship between socioeconomic factors and overweight/obesity among children between 0 – 12 years old.

    Method: Ten scientific articles were selected for this literature review. From these articles, five themes emerged which outlined the base for this literature review.

    Results: The studies showed that a connection between SES and overweight/obesity in children exists. The parents’ educational level, the weight of the mother, access to physical activity and also TV viewing habits can be linked to SES and considered as risk factors for overweight and obesity.

    Discussion: The results from the articles show that the existence of societal, economic and environmental determinants affect lifestyle. Society’s decision makers have a responsibility to facilitate individuals’ decision-making processes regarding health choices, therefore it’s important that society’s various actors are involved in the overall endeavor to promote health.

  • 126.
    Hunsberger, Monica
    et al.
    Univ Gothenburg, Sahlgrenska Acad, Dept Publ Hlth & Community Med, Publ Hlth Epidemiol Unit, SE-40530 Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Lanfer, Anne
    Bremen Inst Prevent Res & Social Med, Bremen, Germany.
    Reeske, Anna
    Bremen Inst Prevent Res & Social Med, Bremen, Germany.
    Veidebaum, Toomas
    Natl Inst Hlth Dev, Tallinn, Estonia.
    Russo, Paola
    CNR, Inst Food Sci, Unit Epidemiol & Populat Genet, Avellino, Italy.
    Hadjigeorgiou, Charalampos
    Res & Educ Inst Child Hlth, Strovolos, Cyprus.
    Moreno, Luis A.
    Univ Zaragoza, Growth Exercise Nutr & Dev GENUD Res Grp, Zaragoza, Spain.
    Molnar, Denes
    Univ Pecs, Fac Med, Dept Pediat, Budapest, Hungary.
    De Henauw, Stefaan
    Univ Ghent, Dept Publ Hlth, B-9000 Ghent, Belgium / Univ Coll Ghent, Fac Hlth Care Vesalius, Dept Nutr & Dietet, Ghent, Belgium.
    Lissner, Lauren
    Univ Gothenburg, Sahlgrenska Acad, Dept Publ Hlth & Community Med, Publ Hlth Epidemiol Unit, SE-40530 Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Eiben, Gabriele
    Univ Gothenburg, Sahlgrenska Acad, Dept Publ Hlth & Community Med, Publ Hlth Epidemiol Unit, SE-40530 Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Infant feeding practices and prevalence of obesity in eight European countries - the IDEFICS study2013In: Public Health Nutrition, ISSN 1368-9800, E-ISSN 1475-2727, Vol. 16, no 2, p. 219-227Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Objective: To assess the association between exclusive breast-feeding and childhood overweight. Design: Cross-sectional data are from the baseline survey of the longitudinal cohort study IDEFICS. Exclusive rather than partial breast-feeding is the focus of the study due to the theoretical relationship between exclusive breast-feeding and development of dietary self-regulation. Children's measured heights and weights were used to calculate weight status, while waist-to-height ratio (WtHR) and skinfold measures were examined as alternative indicators of adiposity and fat patterning. Setting: Examination centres in eight European countries (Italy, Estonia, Cyprus, Belgium, Sweden, Hungary, Germany and Spain). Subjects: The analysis included 14 726 children aged 2-9 years for whom early feeding practices were reported by parents in standardized questionnaires. Results: After controlling for education, income and other potential confounders, breast-feeding exclusively for 4-6 months was protective of overweight (including obesity) when compared with children never exclusively breast-fed (OR=0.73; 95% CI 0.63, 0.85) across all measures of overweight. Exclusively breast-feeding for 6 months offered slightly more protection than for 4 and 5 months combined (OR=0.71; 95% CI 0.58, 0.85). The associations could not be explained by socio-economic characteristics or maternal overweight. Conclusions: This multi-country investigation indicated that exclusive breast-feeding for 4-6 months may confer protection against overweight in addition to other known benefits. There was no demonstrated benefit of exclusive breast-feeding for more than 6 months or combination feeding for any duration across all measures of overweight examined.

  • 127.
    Hunsberger, Monica
    et al.
    Univ Gothenburg, Dept Publ Hlth & Community Med, S-40530 Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Pena, Pablo
    Univ Gothenburg, Dept Publ Hlth & Community Med, S-40530 Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Lissner, Lauren
    Univ Gothenburg, Dept Publ Hlth & Community Med, S-40530 Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Grafstrom, Lisen
    Grafstroms Mat & Med HB, S-43994 Onsala, Sweden.
    Vanaelst, Barbara
    Univ Ghent, Dept Publ Hlth, B-9000 Ghent, Belgium.
    Boernhorst, Claudia
    Leibniz Inst Prevent Res & Epidemiol BIPS GmbH, Dept Stat Methods Epidemiol, Bremen, Germany.
    Pala, Valeria
    Fdn IRCCS Ist Nazl Tumori, Epidemiol & Prevent Unit, I-20133 Milan, Italy.
    Eiben, Gabriele
    Univ Gothenburg, Dept Publ Hlth & Community Med, S-40530 Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Validity of self-reported lunch recalls in Swedish school children aged 6-8 years2013In: Nutrition Journal, ISSN 1475-2891, E-ISSN 1475-2891, Vol. 12, article id 129Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: Previous studies have suggested that young children are inaccurate reporters of dietary intake. The purpose of this study was to validate a single recall of the previous day's school lunch reported by 6-8 year old Swedish children and to assess teacher-recorded intake of the same meal in a standardized food journal. An additional research question was whether parents could report their child's intake of the previous day's lunch. Subjects constituted a convenience sample from the large, multi-country study Identification and prevention of Dietary-and lifestyle-induced health EFfects In Children and infantS (IDEFICS). Validations of both children's recalls and teachers' records were made by comparing results with the duplicate plate reference method. Findings: Twenty-five children (12 boys/13 girls) aged 6-8 years participated in the validation study at one school in western Sweden. Children were accurate self-reporters of their dietary intake at lunch, with no significant difference between reported and weighed intake (Mean difference (SD): 7(50) kcals, p=0.49). Teachers significantly over-reported intake (Mean difference (SD): 65(79) kcals, p=0.01). For both methods, child-reported and teacher-recorded, correlations with weighed intake were strong (Pearson's correlations r=0.92, p<0.001 and r=0.83, p<0.001 respectively). Bland-Altman plots showed strong agreement between child-reported and weighed intakes but confirmed systematic differences between teacher-records and weighed intakes. Foods were recalled by children with a food-match rate of 90%. In all cases parents themselves were unable to report on quantities consumed and only four of 25 children had parents with knowledge regarding food items consumed. Conclusions: Children 6-8 years of age accurately recalled their school lunch intake for one occasion while teachers recorded with less accuracy. Our findings suggest that children as young as six years of age may be better able to report on their dietary intake than previously suggested, at least for one main meal at school. Teacher-recorded intake provides a satisfactory estimate but with greater systematic deviation from the weighed intake. Parents were not able to report on their children's school lunches consumed on the previous day.

  • 128.
    Hussain, A. H. M. Enayet
    et al.
    Directorate General of Health Services, Dhaka, Bangladesh.
    Ferdoush, Junnatul
    Centre for Injury Prevention and Research Bangladesh, Dhaka, Bangladesh.
    Mashreky, Saidur Rahman
    Centre for Injury Prevention and Research Bangladesh, Dhaka, Bangladesh / Bangladesh University of Health Sciences, Dhaka, Bangladesh / National Institute of Ophthalmology, Dhaka, Bangladesh.
    Rahman, A. K. M. Fazlur
    Centre for Injury Prevention and Research Bangladesh, Dhaka, Bangladesh / Bangladesh University of Health Sciences, Dhaka, Bangladesh / National Institute of Ophthalmology, Dhaka, Bangladesh.
    Ferdausi, Nahid
    National Institute of Ophthalm ology, Dhaka, Bangladesh.
    Dalal, Koustuv
    University of Skövde, School of Health and Education. University of Skövde, Health and Education. Higher School of Public Health, Al-Farabi Kazakh National University, Almaty, Kazakhstan.
    Epidemiology of childhood blindness: A community-based study in Bangladesh2019In: PLoS ONE, ISSN 1932-6203, E-ISSN 1932-6203, Vol. 14, no 6, article id e0211991Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This study aimed to investigate the prevalence and causes of childhood blindness in a rural area of Bangladesh. We adopted a cross-sectional quantitative study design for this study, which was performed in three unions (sub-districts) located in Raiganj Upazila of the Sirajganj district in Bangladesh. Using a validated tool, a screening program was conducted at the household level. After initial screening, a team of ophthalmologists confirmed the diagnoses by clinical examinations. The prevalence of childhood blindness was observed to be 6.3 per 10,000 children, whereas the rate of uniocular blindness was 4.8 per 10,000 children. Congenital problems were the major causes of both uniocular and binocular blindness (uniocular blindness: 84% and binocular blindness: 92%). The whole globe was the site responsible for binocular blindness (28.0%, 95% confidence interval [CI]: 13.1, 47.7), whereas the cornea was responsible for uniocular blindness (57.8%, 95% CI: 35.3, 78.1). Childhood blindness is a public health problem in Bangladesh and is highly prevalent, regardless of sex. The major causes of childhood blindness are congenital.

  • 129.
    Härgestam, Julia
    University of Skövde, School of Health and Education.
    Aktivitetsnivå och kostvanor bland barn och ungdomar: En enkätstudie i Västsverige2018Independent thesis Basic level (degree of Bachelor), 10 credits / 15 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [en]

    Introduction: Children in Sweden have, in general, good health (Heinemans et al., 2013). There is a concern, however, that children and adolescents are becoming less physically active (Berg, 2008). On average, children and adolescents have higher intakes of energy-rich, less nutritional food and lower intakes of fruits and vegetables than is recommended (Warensjö Lemming et al., 2018). Aim: To chart the activity level and dietary habits of children and adolescents in grades 6-9. Method: The study design is a Cross-sectional study, measuring aspect of health and nutrition through a survey. A school in Västra Götaland County with grades 6 to 9 (n = 492) was the study setting, and two classes in each year were chosen to participate in the survey (n = 187). Results: Respondents' activity patterns show that 83.3 percent participated regularly in physical activity classes and were physically active during recesses. Eating breakfast every day was a habit of 58.7 percent of respondents, while 78.7 percent reported eating lunch and 69.3 percent reported eating for dinner / supper each day. Conclusion: This study has identified multiple areas where health improvements can be made, which are described in this report. 

  • 130.
    Iguacel, Isabel
    et al.
    Univ Zaragoza, Fac Hlth Sci, GENUD Growth Exercise Nutr & Dev Res Grp, Edificio SAI,C Pedro Cerbuna S-N, E-50009 Zaragoza, Spain / Inst Agroalimentario Aragon IA2, C Miguel Servet 177, Zaragoza 50013, Spain.;Inst Invest Sanitaria Aragon IIS Aragon, Avda San Juan Bosco 13, Zaragoza 50009, Spain.
    Fernandez-Alvira, Juan M.
    Univ Zaragoza, Fac Hlth Sci, GENUD Growth Exercise Nutr & Dev Res Grp, Edificio SAI,C Pedro Cerbuna S-N, E-50009 Zaragoza, Spain / Fdn Ctr Nacl Invest Cardiovasc Carlos III CNIC, C Melchor Fernandez Almagro 3, Madrid 28029, Spain.
    Bammann, Karin
    Univ Bremen, Inst Publ Hlth & Nursing Sci IPP, Grazer Str 2, D-28359 Bremen, Germany / Leibniz Inst Prevent Res & Epidemiol BIPS, Achterstr 30, D-28359 Bremen, Germany.
    De Clercq, Bart
    Univ Ghent, Univ Hosp, Dept Publ Hlth, Block 4K3,De Pintelaan 185, B-9000 Ghent, Belgium.
    Eiben, Gabriele
    Univ Gothenburg, Sahlgrenska Acad, Dept Publ Hlth & Community Med, Publ Hlth Epidemiol Unit EPI, Medicinaregatan 16a,Van 2, S-41390 Gothenburg, Sweden..
    Gwozdz, Wencke
    Copenhagen Business Sch, Solbjerg Pl 3, DK-2000 Copenhagen, Denmark.
    Molnar, Denes
    Univ Pecs, Dept Paediat, Szigeti Str 12, H-7624 Pecs, Hungary.
    Pala, Valeria
    Fdn IRCCS Ist Nazl Tumori, Dept Prevent & Predict Med, Via Venezian 1, I-20133 Milan, Italy.
    Papoutsou, Stalo
    Res & Educ Inst Child Hlth, 138 Limassol Ave, CY-2015 Strovolos, Cyprus.
    Russo, Paola
    CNR, Inst Food Sci, Unit Epidemiol & Populat Genet, I-83100 Avellino, Italy.
    Veidebaum, Toomas
    Natl Inst Hlth Dev, Dept Chron Dis, Hiiu 42, EE-11619 Tallinn, Estonia.
    Wolters, Maike
    Leibniz Inst Prevent Res & Epidemiol BIPS, Achterstr 30, D-28359 Bremen, Germany.
    Boernhorst, Claudia
    Leibniz Inst Prevent Res & Epidemiol BIPS, Achterstr 30, D-28359 Bremen, Germany.
    Moreno, Luis A.
    Univ Zaragoza, Fac Hlth Sci, GENUD Growth Exercise Nutr & Dev Res Grp, Edificio SAI,C Pedro Cerbuna S-N, E-50009 Zaragoza, Spain.;Inst Agroalimentario Aragon IA2, C Miguel Servet 177, Zaragoza 50013, Spain.;Inst Invest Sanitaria Aragon IIS Aragon, Avda San Juan Bosco 13, Zaragoza 50009, Spain.;Ctr Invest Biomed Red Fisiopatol Obesidad & Nutr, C Sinesio Delgado 4, Madrid 28029, Spain.
    Associations between social vulnerabilities and dietary patterns in European children: the Identification and prevention of Dietary- and lifestyle-induced health EFfects In Children and infantS (IDEFICS) study2016In: British Journal of Nutrition, ISSN 0007-1145, E-ISSN 1475-2662, Vol. 116, no 7, p. 1288-1297Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Socio-economic inequalities in childhood can determine dietary patterns, and therefore future health. This study aimed to explore associations between social vulnerabilities and dietary patterns assessed at two time points, and to investigate the association between accumulation of vulnerabilities and dietary patterns. A total of 9301 children aged 2-9 years participated at baseline and 2-year follow-up examinations of the Identification and prevention of Dietary-and lifestyle-induced health EFfects In Children and infantS study. In all, three dietary patterns were identified at baseline and follow-up by applying the K-means clustering algorithm based on a higher frequency of consumption of snacks and fast food (processed), sweet foods and drinks (sweet), and fruits and vegetables (healthy). Vulnerable groups were defined at baseline as follows: children whose parents lacked a social network, children from single-parent families, children of migrant origin and children with unemployed parents. Multinomial mixed models were used to assess the associations between social vulnerabilities and children's dietary patterns at baseline and follow-up. Children whose parents lacked a social network (OR 1.31; 99% CI 1.01, 1.70) and migrants (OR 1.45; 99% CI 1.15, 1.83) were more likely to be in the processed cluster at baseline and follow-up. Children whose parents were homemakers (OR 0.74; 99% CI 0.60, 0.92) were less likely to be in the processed cluster at baseline. A higher number of vulnerabilities was associated with a higher probability of children being in the processed cluster (OR 1.78; 99% CI 1.21, 2.62). Therefore, special attention should be paid to children of vulnerable groups as they present unhealthier dietary patterns.

  • 131.
    Iguacel, Isabel
    et al.
    GENUD (Growth, Exercise, NUtrition and Development) Research Group, Faculty of Health Sciences, University of Zaragoza, Edificio del SAI, C/Pedro Cerbuna s/n, 50009 Zaragoza, Spain / Instituto Agroalimentario de Aragón (IA2), Zaragoza, Spain / Instituto de Investigación Sanitaria Aragón (IIS Aragón), Zaragoza, Spain / Centro de Investigación Biomédica en Red de Fisiopatología de la Obesidad y Nutrición (CIBERObn), Zaragoza, Spain.
    Michels, Nathalie
    Department of Public Health, Ghent University, Ghent, Belgium.
    Ahrens, Wolfgang
    Leibniz Institute for Prevention Research and Epidemiology – BIPS, Bremen, Germany / Institute of Statistics, University of Bremen, Bremen, Germany.
    Bammann, Karin
    Leibniz Institute for Prevention Research and Epidemiology – BIPS, Bremen, Germany / Institute for Public Health and Nursing Sciences (IPP), University of Bremen, Bremen, Germany.
    Eiben, Gabriele
    University of Skövde, School of Health and Education. University of Skövde, Health and Education. Section for Epidemiology and Social Medicine (EPSO), Sahlgrenska Academy, University of Gothenburg, Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Fernández-Alvira, Juan M.
    GENUD (Growth, Exercise, NUtrition and Development) Research Group, Faculty of Health Sciences, University of Zaragoza, Edificio del SAI, C/Pedro Cerbuna s/n, 50009 Zaragoza, Spain / Fundación Centro Nacional de Investigaciones Cardiovasculares Carlos III (CNIC), Madrid, Spain.
    Mårild, Staffan
    Section for Epidemiology and Social Medicine (EPSO), Sahlgrenska Academy, University of Gothenburg, Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Molnár, Dénes
    Department of Paediatrics, University of Pécs, Pécs, Hungary.
    Reisch, Lucia
    Copenhagen Business School, Copenhagen, Denmark.
    Russo, Paola
    Institute of Food Sciences, National Research Council, Avellino, Italy.
    Tornaritis, Michael
    Research and Education Institute of Child Health, Strovolos, Cyprus.
    Veidebaum, Toomas
    Department of Chronic Diseases, National Institute for Health Development, Tallinn, Estonia.
    Wolters, Maike
    Leibniz Institute for Prevention Research and Epidemiology – BIPS, Bremen, Germany.
    Moreno, Luis A.
    GENUD (Growth, Exercise, NUtrition and Development) Research Group, Faculty of Health Sciences, University of Zaragoza, Edificio del SAI, C/Pedro Cerbuna s/n, 50009 Zaragoza, Spain / Instituto Agroalimentario de Aragón (IA2), Zaragoza, Spain / Instituto de Investigación Sanitaria Aragón (IIS Aragón), Zaragoza, Spain / Centro de Investigación Biomédica en Red de Fisiopatología de la Obesidad y Nutrición (CIBERObn), Zaragoza, Spain.
    Börnhorst, Claudia
    Leibniz Institute for Prevention Research and Epidemiology – BIPS, Bremen, Germany.
    Prospective associations between socioeconomically disadvantaged groups and metabolic syndrome risk in European children: Results from the IDEFICS study2018In: International Journal of Cardiology, ISSN 0167-5273, E-ISSN 1874-1754, Vol. 272, p. 333-340Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    OBJECTIVE: Socioeconomic disadvantages during childhood are hypothesised to have negative implications for health. We aimed to investigate the association between socioeconomic disadvantages and children's total metabolic syndrome (MetS) score at baseline and follow-up and the extent to which socioeconomic disadvantages over time and the accumulation of these socioeconomic disadvantages can affect children's MetS risk.

    METHODS: The two-year longitudinal IDEFICS study included 2401 European children (aged 2.0-9.9) with complete information of the 16,229 participating at baseline. Sociodemographic variables, psychosocial factors and lifestyle were proxy-reported via questionnaires. Socioeconomically disadvantaged groups included children from families with low income, low education, migrant origin, unemployed parents, parents who lacked a social network, and from non-traditional families. MetS risk score was calculated as the sum of z-scores of waist circumference, blood pressure, lipids and insulin resistance. Linear mixed-effects models were used to study the association between social disadvantages and MetS risk. Models were adjusted for sex, age, well-being and lifestyle (fruit and vegetables consumption, physical activity, screen time).

    RESULTS: At both time points, children from low-income families (0.20 [0.03-0.37]); (β estimate and 99% confidence interval), children from non-traditional families (0.14 [0.02-0.26]), children whose parents were unemployed (0.31 [0.05-0.57]) and children who accumulated >3 disadvantages (0.21 [0.04-0.37]) showed a higher MetS score compared to non-socioeconomically disadvantaged groups.

    CONCLUSION: Children from socioeconomically disadvantaged families are at high metabolic risk independently of diet, physical activity, sedentary behaviours and well-being. Interventions focusing on these socioeconomically disadvantaged groups should be developed to tackle health disparities.

  • 132.
    Iguacel, Isabel
    et al.
    GENUD (Growth, Exercise, NUtrition and Development) Research Group, Faculty of Health Sciences, University of Zaragoza, Edificio del SAI, Zaragoza, Spain; Instituto Agroalimentario de Aragón (IA2), Zaragoza, Spain; Instituto de Investigación Sanitaria Aragón (IIS Aragón), Zaragoza, Spain; Centro de Investigación Biomédica en Red de Fisiopatología de la Obesidad y Nutrición (CIBERObn), Zaragoza, Spain.
    Michels, Nathalie
    Department of Public Health, Ghent University, Ghent, Belgium.
    Ahrens, Wolfgang
    Leibniz Institute for Prevention Research and Epidemiology - BIPS, Bremen, Germany; Institute of Statistics, University of Bremen, Bremen, Germany.
    Bammann, Karin
    Leibniz Institute for Prevention Research and Epidemiology - BIPS, Bremen, Germany; Institute for Public Health and Nursing Sciences (IPP), University of Bremen, Bremen, Germany.
    Eiben, Gabriele
    University of Skövde, School of Health and Education. Section for Epidemiology and Social Medicine (EPSO), Sahlgrenska Academy, University of Gothenburg, Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Fernández-Alvira, Juan M.
    GENUD (Growth, Exercise, NUtrition and Development) Research Group, Faculty of Health Sciences, University of Zaragoza, Edificio del SAI, Zaragoza, Spain; Fundación Centro Nacional de Investigaciones Cardiovasculares Carlos III (CNIC), Madrid, Spain.
    Mårild, Staffan
    Section for Epidemiology and Social Medicine (EPSO), Sahlgrenska Academy, University of Gothenburg, Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Molnár, Dénes
    Department of Paediatrics, University of Pécs, Pécs, Hungary.
    Reisch, Lucia
    Copenhagen Business School, Copenhagen, Denmark.
    Russo, Paola
    Institute of Food Sciences, National Research Council, Avellino, Italy.
    Tornaritis, Michael
    Research and Education Institute of Child Health, Strovolos, Cyprus.
    Veidebaum, Toomas
    Department of Chronic Diseases, National Institute for Health Development, Tallinn, Estonia.
    Wolters, Maike
    Leibniz Institute for Prevention Research and Epidemiology - BIPS, Bremen, Germany.
    Moreno, Luis A.
    GENUD (Growth, Exercise, NUtrition and Development) Research Group, Faculty of Health Sciences, University of Zaragoza, Edificio del SAI, Zaragoza, Spain; Instituto Agroalimentario de Aragón (IA2), Zaragoza, Spain; Instituto de Investigación Sanitaria Aragón (IIS Aragón), Zaragoza, Spain; Centro de Investigación Biomédica en Red de Fisiopatología de la Obesidad y Nutrición (CIBERObn), Zaragoza, Spain.
    Börnhorst, Claudia
    Leibniz Institute for Prevention Research and Epidemiology - BIPS, Bremen, Germany.
    consortium, IDEFICS
    Reply to the letter to the editor: “Socioeconomic status and childhood metabolic syndrome”2019In: International Journal of Cardiology, ISSN 0167-5273, E-ISSN 1874-1754, Vol. 283, p. 190-191Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 133.
    Illerbrand, Marie
    University of Skövde, School of Health and Education.
    Faktorer som kan öka och främja digital hälsolitteracitet ur ett folkhälsovetenskapligt perspektiv: En systematisk litteraturstudie2019Independent thesis Basic level (degree of Bachelor), 10 credits / 15 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [en]

    Introduction: In the digital era, digital health literacy has become one of the most important health indicators. As individuals are expected to be more involved in their own health, a certain level of digital health literacy is required. Digital health literacy is the ability to find and use digital health information and manage digital tools. Research shows that low digital health literacy leads to poorer health outcomes and high costs for the society and indicates demographic and socio-economic differences in the population. Aim: To investigate and describe factors that can increase and promote people's digital health literacy from a public health science perspective, based on research published in the last five years. Methods: A systematic literature review was conducted. Searches were made in PubMed and Cinhal and 14 scientific original articles were analyzed thematically. Results: Five themes were identified; Motivation, Lifestyle behaviour, Social factors, Practical experience and Usability. There were sassociations between digital health literacy and positive expectations, interest in seeking health information, health awareness, and healthy life style. Social interaction and support as well as the amount of time spent on digital tools motivated and contributed to practical experience and promoted digital health literacy. Conclusion: As the articles reviewed represent both qualitative and quantitative research from several parts of the world and study populations of varying ages and sex, it is likely that the results of this literature study may help increase the understanding of what promotes and increases digital health literacy in the population and also constitutes a means for individuals to achieve better health.

  • 134.
    Intemann, Timm
    et al.
    Leibniz Institute for Prevention Research and Epidemiology-BIPS, Bremen, Germany / Institute of Statistics, Bremen University, Germany.
    Pigeot, Iris
    Leibniz Institute for Prevention Research and Epidemiology-BIPS, Bremen, Germany / Institute of Statistics, Bremen University, Germany.
    De Henauw, Stefaan
    Department of Public Health, Ghent University, Belgium.
    Eiben, Gabriele
    University of Skövde, School of Health and Education. University of Skövde, Health and Education. Section for Epidemiology and Social Medicine, Sahlgrenska Academy, University of Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Lissner, Lauren
    Section for Epidemiology and Social Medicine, Sahlgrenska Academy, University of Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Krogh, Vittorio
    Epidemiology and Prevention Unit, Fondazione IRCSS Istituto Nazionale dei Tumori, Milan, Italy.
    Dereń, Katarzyna
    Institute of Nursing and Health Sciences, Medical Faculty, University of Rzeszow, Poland.
    Molnár, Dénes
    Department of Paediatrics, University of Pécs, Hungary.
    Moreno, Luis A
    Universidad de Zaragoza, Instituto Agroalimentario de Aragón (IA2), Instituto de Investigación Sanitaria de Aragón (IIS Aragón) and Centro de Investigación Biomédica en Red de Fisiopatología de la Nutrición y la Obesidad (CIBEROBN), Zaragoza, Spain.
    Russo, Paola
    Institute of Food Sciences, National Research Council, Avellino, Italy.
    Siani, Alfonso
    Institute of Food Sciences, National Research Council, Avellino, Italy.
    Sirangelo, Ivana
    University of Campania "L. Vanvitelli", Naples, Italy.
    Tornaritis, Michael
    Research and Education Institute of Child Health, Strovolos, Cyprus.
    Veidebaum, Toomas
    National Institute for Health Development, Tallinn, Estonia.
    Pala, Valeria
    Epidemiology and Prevention Unit, Fondazione IRCSS Istituto Nazionale dei Tumori, Milan, Italy.
    Urinary sucrose and fructose to validate self-reported sugar intake in children and adolescents: results from the I.Family study2019In: European Journal of Nutrition, ISSN 1436-6207, E-ISSN 1436-6215, Vol. 58, no 3, p. 1247-1258Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    PURPOSE: Excessive consumption of free sugar increases the risk for non-communicable diseases where a proper assessment of this intake is necessary to correctly estimate its association with certain diseases. Urinary sugars have been suggested as objective biomarkers for total and free sugar intake in adults but less is known about this marker in children and adolescents. Therefore, the aim of this exploratory study is to evaluate the relative validity of self-reported intake using urinary sugars in children and adolescents.

    METHODS: The study was conducted in a convenience subsample of 228 participants aged 5-18 years of the I.Family study that investigates the determinants of food choices, lifestyle and health in European families. Total, free and intrinsic sugar intake (g/day) and sugar density (g/1000 kcal) were assessed using 24-h dietary recalls (24HDRs). Urinary sucrose (USUC) and urinary fructose (UFRU) were measured in morning urine samples and corrected for creatinine excretion (USUC/Cr, UFRU/Cr). Correlation coefficients, the method of triads and linear regression models were used to investigate the relationship between intake of different types of sugar and urinary sugars.

    RESULTS: The correlation between usual sugar density calculated from multiple 24HDRs and the sum of USUC/Cr and UFRU/Cr (USUC/Cr + UFRU/Cr) was 0.38 (p < 0.001). The method of triads revealed validity coefficients for the 24HDR from 0.64 to 0.87. Linear regression models showed statistically significant positive associations between USUC/Cr + UFRU/Cr and the intake of total and free sugar.

    CONCLUSIONS: These findings support the relative validity of total and free sugar intake assessed by self-reported 24HDRs in children and adolescents.

  • 135.
    Jilani, Hannah S.
    et al.
    Leibniz Institute for Prevention Research and Epidemiology - BIPS, Bremen, Germany / Institute for Public Health and Nursing Research, University of Bremen and Health Sciences Bremen, University of Bremen, Bremen, Germany.
    Pohlabeln, Hermann
    Leibniz Institute for Prevention Research and Epidemiology - BIPS, Bremen, Germany.
    Buchecker, Kirsten
    Department of Food Science, TTZ, Bremerhaven, Germany.
    Gwozdz, Wencke
    Department of Management, Society and Communication, Copenhagen Business School, Frederiksberg, Denmark.
    De Henauw, Stefaan
    Department of Public Health, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences, Ghent University, Ghent, Belgium.
    Eiben, Gabriele
    University of Skövde, School of Health and Education. University of Skövde, Health and Education. Department of Public Health and Community Medicine, University of Gothenburg, Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Molnar, Dénes
    Department of Pediatrics, University of Pécs, Medical School, Pécs, Hungary.
    Moreno, Luis A.
    GENUD (Growth, Exercise, Nutrition and Development) Research Group, Faculty of Health Sciences, University of Zaragoza, Zaragoza, Spain.
    Pala, Valeria
    Department of Preventive and Predictive Medicine, Fondazione IRCCS Istituto Nazionale dei Tumori, Milan, Italy.
    Reisch, Lucia
    Department of Management, Society and Communication, Copenhagen Business School, Frederiksberg, Denmark.
    Russo, Paola
    Epidemiology and Population Genetics, Institute of Food Sciences, National Research Council, Avellino, Italy.
    Veidebaum, Toomas
    Department of Chronic Diseases, National Institute for Health Development, Tallinn, Estonia.
    Ahrens, Wolfgang
    Leibniz Institute for Prevention Research and Epidemiology - BIPS, Bremen, Germany / Institute of Statistics, Faculty of Mathematics and Computer Science, University of Bremen, Bremen, Germany.
    Hebestreit, Antje
    Leibniz Institute for Prevention Research and Epidemiology - BIPS, Bremen, Germany.
    Association between parental consumer attitudes with their children's sensory taste preferences as well as their food choice2018In: PLoS ONE, ISSN 1932-6203, E-ISSN 1932-6203, Vol. 13, no 8, article id e0200413Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background We investigated the association between the consumer attitudes of European parents and their children's taste preferences and food choice. Furthermore, we studied whether the parental consumer attitudes were related to education level.

    Methods This analysis included 1,407 IDEFICS study children aged 6.0 to 11.8 years and from 7 European countries, who participated in the sensory taste perception module between 2007 and 2010. Parental consumer attitude was operationalized as 'trusting in foods known from advertisements' (trusting advertisements) and as 'not avoiding additives in food' (not avoiding additives). Parents reported their educational attainment and completed a food frequency questionnaire for their children. Consumption frequencies of sweet, fatty and processed foods as well as a healthy diet adherence score were calculated. Children performed fat, sweet and umami taste preference tests. Multivariable logistic models were used to analyse the association between parental consumer attitudes and their children's taste preference frequencies as well as parental education. Linear regression models were used to analyse the association between parental consumer attitudes and their children's food consumption.

    Results Parental consumer attitudes were not associated with children's fat, sweet and umami taste preferences. Children of parents trusting advertisements consumed more frequently processed foods (beta = 1.21, 95% CI: 0.49; 1.93). Children of parents not avoiding additives consumed more often sweet, fatty and processed foods and had a lower healthy diet adherence score (beta = 2.37, 95% CI: 1.03; 3.70; beta = 2.27, 95% CI: 1.12; 3.43; beta = 0.91, 95% CI: 0.22; 1.59; beta = -2.87, 95% CI: -3.89; -1.85, respectively). Unfavourable parental consumer attitudes were associated with a lower parental education level across Europe (Compared to high education: Odds Ratio (OR) of trusting advertisements with medium education: 1.04, 95% CI: 0.77; 1.40; OR with low education: 2.01, 95% CI: 1.15; 3.54; OR of not avoiding additives with medium education: 1.91, 95% CI: 1.44; 2.54; OR with low education: 1.76, 95% CI: 0.96; 3.24).

    Conclusions Across Europe, unfavourable parental consumer attitudes are associated with a lower diet quality of their children. Parental consumer attitudes in turn were associated with their own level of education. This has implications for policy makers, interventions and health promotion programmes that aim to promote healthy eating.

  • 136.
    Johansson, Frida
    University of Skövde, School of Life Sciences.
    Påverkande faktorer av arbetet på tjejjourerna: En kvalitativ litteraturstudie2012Independent thesis Basic level (degree of Bachelor), 10 credits / 15 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [en]

    In Sweden there is about 60 organisations that works voluntary to support and empower young woman whose mental illness continues to increase. The purpose of this study was to describe factors that affect the volunteer work at these organisations by the active members. A qualitative interview was used as method. Seven interviews conducted on the active members in different organisations and analyzed by a content analysis. The results are based on two themes,- organisation activities and external activities as well as five categories, organisation structure, support seekers, resources, prevention and interact. The girls voluntary organisations are affected to wich extent they are able to work preventively by the support contributions, employees and active members. Self-help and to support and strengthen was the priority in the organisations although there is a need in the external prevention activities. The study shows that there are more and more responsibility on the girls organisations from other authorities. The cooperation in the municipality between the voluntary organisations and others needs to be improved. The most important preventive work is done at school and the municipality should be aware that girls voluntary organisations can be seen as complementary in this forum. 

  • 137.
    Johansson, Linda
    University of Skövde, School of Health and Education.
    Hälsofrämjande ledarskap- villkor och förutsättningar för chefer inom vård och omsorg: En litteraturstudie ur ett folkhälsovetenskapligt perspektiv2019Independent thesis Basic level (degree of Bachelor), 10 credits / 15 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [en]

    Abstract

    Background: Managers in health and social care has a very tough work situation with high workload and large staff groups. Many managers say that they are mentally exhausted and sick leave linked to mental illness, has increased by 50 percent since 2014. In order being able to, having the energy and the will to be a leader, it ́s essential that the right conditions exist at both the organization - and the individual level in the form of various support resources.

    Aim: The purpose with this literature study was to describe what conditions may be needed and which may affect the possibility of exercising a health-promoting leadership for managers in health and social care.

    Method: 10 articles were included and in this literature study and were sought in the databases PubMed, CINAHL and SveMed+.at Högskolan in Skövde The data was analyzed and then classified into two categories, Organizational conditions for health- promoting leadership and Individual approach for health- promoting leadership.

    Results: The result of this literature study shows that if managers are to succeed with their assignment, they need clear directives on what work they are expected to do and with which support resources. The organizational trust also has to correspond to responsibility of the role of the manager. Changes made to organizational conditions and reinforcements of the individual approach contribute to improving managers' opportunities for a health-promoting leadership.

    Conclusion: Changes in organizational conditions and reinforcements of individual conditions contribute to improve managers opportunities for health- promoting leadership. 

  • 138.
    Johansson, Marie
    University of Skövde, School of Life Sciences.
    Beskrivning av interventioner mot barnfetma: En litteraturstudie2013Independent thesis Basic level (university diploma), 5 credits / 7,5 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [en]

    Background: Obesity is a public health disease that affects many children. Children who are overweight and obese, is usually also as adults. Obesity can cause complications such as diabetes and cardiovascular disease. Efforts towards that prevalence will increase must be done. Schools are considered a good forum to identify and help children with, or at risk for, obesity. Objective: Identify interventions and studies of interest to prevent childhood obesity, for children aged 2-16 years, with positive results in weight reduction or other lifestyle changes. Methods: The study is a literature review where ten scientific papers were selected to be analyzed and then generated in a result that presents the interventions' effect against childhood obesity. Results: Interventions were made in schools together with students and teachers, and interventions involving children and parents, they showed all the significant reductions in BMI or increased knowledge about nutrition and exercise. Conclusions: Schools should be better to use the schools playgrounds for physical activity and authority of the teachers to provide children with enough knowledge to make good healthy choices. Parents should observe their own behavior to food and physical activity for children to have a reduced risk of becoming overweight or obese.

  • 139.
    Johansson, Åsa
    University of Skövde, School of Health and Education.
    "No action today, no cure tomorrow": Riskfaktorer associerade med samhällsförvärvad meticillinresistent staphylococcus aureus – en litteraturstudie2018Independent thesis Basic level (degree of Bachelor), 10 credits / 15 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [en]

    Introduction: Antibiotic resistance a threat to global public health. Methicillin resistant staphylococcus aureus, previously primarily associated with hospital care, is now being transmitted in the community (community acquired methicillin resistant staphylococcus aureus). Identifying risk factors is central to enable effective preventive efforts against transmission of community acquired methicillin resistant staphylococcus aureus.  

    Aim: The aim of this essay was to identify and describe risk factors associated with occurrence of community acquired methicillin resistant staphylococcus aureus.   

    Methods: Literature study based on 20 international studies. The main results from the articles were categorized into themes.

    Results: Risk factors at community-, household- and individual level could be identified, for instance concerning climate, previous antibiotic treatment and comorbidity.

    Discussion: A few easily affectable risk factors could be identified. Perhaps not all of the identified risk factors are generalizable to a Swedish context. Previous research demonstrates that community acquired methicillin resistant staphylococcus aureus usually affects healthy individuals, which the findings in this essay partly contradict: comorbidity, for instance with HIV, diabetes or obesity, is a risk factor associated with community acquired methicillin resistant staphylococcus aureus.

  • 140.
    Jonsson, Pernilla
    et al.
    University of Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Hedenrud, Tove
    University of Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Linde, Mattias
    University of Gothenburg, Sweden / Norwegian University of Science and Technology, Norway / St. Olavs University Hospital, Norway.
    Epidemiology of medication overuse headache in the general Swedish population2011In: Cephalalgia, ISSN 0333-1024, E-ISSN 1468-2982, Vol. 31, no 9, p. 1015-1022Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    AIMS: The aim was to estimate the prevalence of medication overuse headache (MOH) in Sweden and to analyze the occurrence of this disorder in different population groups.

    METHODS: A total of 44,300 randomly selected individuals (55% women), aged 15 years and above, were interviewed in a national telephone survey, using a standardized questionnaire including the International Headache Society criteria for MOH and questions about sociodemographic factors, headache history and medication use.

    RESULTS: In Sweden, 3.2% (95% confidence interval (CI) 3.1-3.4), n = 1428) suffer from chronic daily headache (CDH) and out of those, 56% (n = 799) have MOH. The prevalence of MOH is 1.8% (95% CI 1.7-1.9). The mean age of onset was higher among men than women as well as among those with tension-type headache as primary headache compared to those who originally had migraine. A multivariate analysis showed that socioeconomic factors such as having a low level of education and/or a low household income were associated with MOH.

    CONCLUSIONS: This is the first Swedish population-based study of MOH and we conclude that MOH is a significant public health problem in Sweden, as it is in other parts of the world.

  • 141.
    Jonsson, Pernilla
    et al.
    Institute of Medicine, Sahlgrenska Academy, University of Gothenburg, Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Linde, Mattias
    Department of Neuroscience, Norwegian University of Science and Technology, Trondheim, Norway / Norwegian National Headache Centre, St. Olav’s University Hospital, Trondheim, Norway / Institute of Neuroscience and Physiology, Sahlgrenska Academy, University of Gothenburg, Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Hensing, Gunnel
    Institute of Medicine, Sahlgrenska Academy, University of Gothenburg, Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Hedenrud, Tove
    Institute of Medicine, Sahlgrenska Academy, University of Gothenburg, Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Sociodemographic differences in medication use, health-care contacts and sickness absence among individuals with medication-overuse headache2012In: Journal of Headache and Pain, ISSN 1129-2369, E-ISSN 1129-2377, Vol. 13, no 4, p. 281-290Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The objective of this study was to analyse sociodemographic differences in medication use, health-care contacts and sickness absence among individuals with medication-overuse headache (MOH). A cross-sectional, population survey was conducted, in which 44,300 Swedes (≥15 years old) were interviewed over telephone. In total, 799 individuals had MOH. Of these, 47 % (n = 370) only used over-the-counter medications. During the last year, 46 % (n = 343) had made a headache-related visit to their physician and 14 % (n = 102) had visited a neurologist. Among individuals aged <30 years, the number of days/month with headache was greater than the number of days with medication use, whereas the opposite was true for those ≥30 years. Both the proportion using prophylactic medication and the proportion having consulted a neurologist were smaller among those who only had elementary school education than among those with higher education (p = 0.021 and p = 0.046). Those with a lower level of education also had a higher number of days/month with headache and with medication use than those with a higher educational level (p = 0.011 and p = 0.018). The MOH-sufferers have limited contacts with health-care and preventive measures thus need to include other actors as well. Particular efforts should be directed towards those with low educational levels, and more research on medication use in relation to age is required.

  • 142.
    Jukkala, Tanya
    et al.
    University of Skövde, School of Health and Education. University of Skövde, Health and Education. Södertörn University, Stockholm Centre on Health of Societies in Transition (SCOHOST), Huddinge, Sweden.
    Makinen, Ilkka Henrik
    Södertörn University, Stockholm Centre on Health of Societies in Transition (SCOHOST), Huddinge, Sweden / Uppsala University, Department of Sociology, Sweden.
    Stickley, Andrew
    Södertörn University, Stockholm Centre on Health of Societies in Transition (SCOHOST), Huddinge, Sweden / University of Tokyo, The Department of Human Ecology, Graduate School of Medicine, Japan / London School of Hygiene and Tropical Medicine, European Centre on Health of Societies in Transition (ECOHOST), London, United Kingdom.
    The Historical Development of Suicide Mortality in Russia, 1870-20072015In: Archives of Suicide Research, ISSN 1381-1118, E-ISSN 1573-8159, Vol. 19, no 1, p. 117-130Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Russia has one of the highest suicide mortality rates in the world. This study investigates the development of Russian suicide mortality over a longer time period in order to provide a context within which the contemporary high level might be better understood. Annual sex- and age-specific suicide-mortality data for Russia for the period 1870-2007 were studied, where available. Russian suicide mortality increased 11-fold over the period. Trends in male and female suicide developed similarly, although male suicide rates were consistently much higher. From the 1990s suicide has increased in a relative sense among the young (15-34), while the high suicide mortality among middle-aged males has reduced. Changes in Russian suicide mortality over the study period may be attributable to modernization processes.

  • 143.
    Kampe, Karina
    University of Skövde, School of Health and Education.
    Kostens hälsomässiga effekter hos kvinnor i fertil ålder: En litteraturöversikt2018Independent thesis Basic level (university diploma), 5 credits / 7,5 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [en]

    Introduction

    General diet and health guidelines have historically been designed based on research on men, with the result that women of childbearing age have often been misunderstood, misinterpreted and mistreated. Low-grade inflammation, fast food and modern lifestyle, is thought to be the basis of several diseases predominantly afflicted by women. The purpose of the study was a survey and critical review of health and ill health research in women of childbearing age related to dietary choices.

    Method

    The study is a literature review of ten articles focusing on health and ill health of women at child bearing age in relation to diet. The articles have been systematically analyzed and summarized.

    Results

    The results showed that women's fertility, the onset of menopause, premenstrual disorders and diseases appear to be related to physical imbalances and inflammation and were affected by dietary choices. Yellow and green vegetables and fruits, fiber, vegetable protein and an antiinflammatory diet displayed extra beneficial health effects.

    Discussion

    The importance of diet for fertility and health in women of childbearing age was clear and the combined effects of nutrients in diet appear to exceed individual supplements. Knowledge dissemination as well as research is essential for strengthening the group's health, promoting empowerment as well as make room for good bio-psycho-social effects.

  • 144.
    Karlsson, Anneli
    University of Skövde, School of Health and Education.
    Alkoholintag hos tonåringar: Riskfaktorer och konsekvenser för hälsan och effekter av interventioner2018Independent thesis Basic level (degree of Bachelor), 10 credits / 15 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [en]

    Introduction: In Sweden as well as in other western countries, alcohol is the most widely used intoxicant. Alcohol intake among young people at a harmful level is a high level problem in most countries. Purpose: To identify factors associated with alcohol use in teenagers, and to identify factors associated with effective alcohol use prevention programs for this group. Method: A systematic literature review, where the data consisted of 15 peer reviewed scientific articles. Result: Three themes were identified; Determinants/risk factors for high alcohol consumption, consequences of high alcohol intake and effects of prevention/interventions where risk factors such as alcohol advertising are reported and the negative health impact of alcohol consumption, and that prevention programs aimed at parents and teens can reduce alcohol consumption. Teenagers with high alcohol consumption show psychological disorder. Conclusion: The studies shows that risk factors such as parents alcohol intake results in higher alcohol intakes in teenagers. There is a need for preventive measures to reduce alcohol intake and health risks in teenagers’ health.

  • 145.
    Karlsson, Jennica
    et al.
    University of Skövde, School of Health and Education.
    Lindberg, Ann Charlotte
    University of Skövde, School of Health and Education.
    Hur påverkas folkhälsan av Artificiell Intelligens?: En litteraturstudie av hur hälsans sociala bestämningsfaktorer påverkas av AI inom området avsiktliga skador2019Independent thesis Basic level (degree of Bachelor), 10 credits / 15 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [en]

    Introduction: Public health is affected by the society in which people live. Communities characterized by violence, war and terror have a negative impact on human wellbeing. Artificial Intelligence (AI) is a powerful tool with a capability to solve problems in the society but scientists also warn that AI can induce new types of problems. Aim: The purpose of this literature study is to review which challenges and possibilities an increase in the development and implementation of AI can have on the social determinants of health within the area of deliberate injury. Methods: A systematic literature review was performed according to the method by Denyer and Tranfield (2011) and 25 technical and humanistic articles were analyzed and synthesized according to predefined research questions. Results: The articles about AI in the area of deliberate injuries were categorized as technical or humanistic. The purpose of the technical articles was to develop AI for problem solving while the humanistic articles analyzed the effects of AI implementation. The possibilities with AI included predictions, competence need, big data and models for general purposes. The challenges included theoretical grounds, bias, suitable models and algorithms, data quality and processing, validation, wrongful usage, responsibility and acceptance of the solutions. The development and implementation of AI especially affect three of the social determinants of health: healthy places healthy people, market responsibility and good global governance. Conclusion: A common global control and societal commitment is needed to secure that consequences for the public health is considered while developing AI.

  • 146.
    Kharkova, Olga A.
    et al.
    Department of Community Medicine, Faculty of Health Sciences, UiT The Arctic University of Norway,Tromsø, Norway / International School of Public Health, Northern State Medical University, Arkhangelsk, Russia.
    Grjibovski, Andrej M.
    International School of Public Health, Northern State Medical University, Arkhangelsk, Russia / Department of Public Health, North-Eastern Federal University, Yakutsk, Russia / Department of Preventive Medicine, International Kazakh-Turkish University, Turkestan, Kazakhstan.
    Krettek, Alexandra
    University of Skövde, School of Health and Education. University of Skövde, Health and Education. Department of Community Medicine, Faculty of Health Sciences, UiT The Arctic University of Norway, Tromsø, Norway / Department of Internal Medicine and Clinical Nutrition, Institute of Medicine, Sahlgrenska Academy, University of Gothenburg, Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Nieboer, Evert
    Department of Biochemistry and Biomedical Sciences, McMaster University, Hamilton, ON, Canada.
    Odland, Jon Ø.
    Department of Community Medicine, Faculty of Health Sciences, UiT The Arctic University of Norway, Tromsø, Norway / School of Health Systems and Public Health, Faculty of Health Sciences, University of Pretoria, Pretoria, South Africa.
    Effect of Smoking Behavior before and during Pregnancy on Selected Birth Outcomes among Singleton Full-Term Pregnancy: A Murmansk County Birth Registry Study2017In: International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health, ISSN 1661-7827, E-ISSN 1660-4601, Vol. 14, no 8, p. 1-11, article id E867Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The aim of our study was to assess associations between smoking behavior before and during pregnancy and selected adverse birth outcomes. This study is based on the Murmansk County Birth Registry (MCBR). Our study includes women who delivered a singleton pregnancy after 37 weeks of gestation (N = 44,486). Smoking information was self-reported and assessed at the first antenatal visit during pregnancy. We adjusted for potential confounders using logistic regression. The highest proportion of infants with low values of birth weight, birth length, head circumference, ponderal index and of the Apgar score at 5 min was observed for women who smoked both before and during pregnancy. We observed a dose-response relationship between the number of cigarettes smoked per day during pregnancy and the odds of the aforementioned adverse birth outcomes; neither were there significant differences in their occurrences among non-smokers and those who smoked before but not during pregnancy. Moreover, smoking reduction during pregnancy relative to its pre-gestation level did not influence the odds of the adverse birth outcomes. Our findings emphasize a continued need for action against tobacco smoking during pregnancy.

  • 147.
    Kharkova, Olga A.
    et al.
    UiT The Arctic University of Norway, Tromsø, Norway / International School of Public Health, Northern State Medical University, Arkhangelsk, Russia.
    Grjibovski, Andrej M.
    International School of Public Health, Northern State Medical University, Arkhangelsk, Russia / Department of International Public Health, Norwegian Institute of Public Health, Oslo, Norway / Department of Preventive Medicine, International Kazakh-Turkish University, Kazakhstan / Department of International Public Health, Norwegian Institute of Public Health, Oslo, Norway / Department of Preventive Medicine, International Kazakh-Turkish University, Turkestan, Kazakhstan.
    Krettek, Alexandra
    University of Skövde, School of Health and Education. University of Skövde, Health and Education. Department of Community Medicine, Faculty of Health Sciences, UiT The Arctic University of Norway / Department of Internal Medicine and Clinical Nutrition, Institute of Medicine, Sahlgrenska Academy at University of Gothenburg, Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Nieboer, Evert
    Department of Biochemistry and Biomedical Sciences, Hamilton, ON, Canada.
    Odland, Jon Ø.
    Department of Community Medicine, Faculty of Health Sciences, UiT The Arctic University of Norway, Tromsø, Norway / School of Health Systems and Public Health, Faculty of Health Sciences, University of Pretoria, Pretoria, South Africa.
    First-trimester smoking cessation in pregnancy did not increase the risk of preeclampsia/eclampsia: A Murmansk County Birth Registry study2017In: PLoS ONE, ISSN 1932-6203, E-ISSN 1932-6203, Vol. 12, no 8, article id e0179354Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    BACKGROUND: Although prior studies have shown that smoking reduces preeclampsia/eclampsia risk, the consequence of giving up this habit during pregnancy should be assessed. The aims of the current study were threefold: (i) describe maternal characteristics of women with preeclampsia/eclampsia; (ii) examine a possible association between the number of cigarettes smoked daily during pregnancy and the development of this affliction; and (iii) determine if first-trimester discontinuation of smoking during pregnancy influences the risk.

    METHODS: A registry-based study was conducted using data from the Murmansk County Birth Registry (MCBR). It included women without pre-existing hypertension, who delivered a singleton infant during 2006-2011 and had attended the first antenatal visit before 12 week of gestation. We adjusted for potential confounders using logistic regression.

    RESULTS: The prevalence of preeclampsia/eclampsia was 8.3% (95%CI: 8.0-8.6). Preeclampsia/eclampsia associated with maternal age, education, marital status, parity, excessive weight gain and body mass index at the first antenatal visit. There was a dose-response relationship between the number of smoked cigarettes per day during pregnancy and the risk of preeclampsia/eclampsia (adjusted OR1-5 cig/day = 0.69 with 95%CI: 0.56-0.87; OR6-10 cig/day = 0.65 with 95%CI: 0.51-0.82; and OR≥11 cig/day = 0.49 with 95%CI: 0.30-0.81). There was no difference in this risk among women who smoked before and during pregnancy and those who did so before but not during pregnancy (adjusted OR = 1.10 with 95%CI: 0.91-1.32).

    CONCLUSIONS: Preeclampsia/eclampsia was associated with maternal age, education, marital status, parity, excessive weight gain, and body mass index at the first antenatal visit. There was a negative dose-response relationship between the number of smoked cigarettes per day during pregnancy and the odds of preeclampsia/eclampsia. However, women who gave up smoking during the first trimester of gestation had the same risk of preeclampsia/eclampsia as those who smoked while pregnant. Consequently, antenatal clinic specialists are advised to take these various observations into account when counselling women on smoking cessation during pregnancy.

  • 148.
    Kharkova, Olga A.
    et al.
    Department of Community Medicine, Faculty of Health Sciences, UiT The Arctic University of Norway, Tromsø, Norway / International School of Public Health, Northern State Medical University, Arkhangelsk, Russia.
    Krettek, Alexandra
    University of Skövde, School of Health and Education. University of Skövde, Health and Education. Department of Community Medicine, Faculty of Health Sciences, UiT The Arctic University of Norway, Tromsø, Norway / Department of Internal Medicine and Clinical Nutrition, Institute of Medicine, Sahlgrenska Academy at University of Gothenburg, Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Grjibovski, Andrej M.
    International School of Public Health, Northern State Medical University, Arkhangelsk, Russia / Department of International Public Health, Norwegian Institute of Public Health, Oslo, Norway / Department of Preventive Medicine, International Kazakh-Turkish University, Turkestan, Kazakhstan / North-Easten Federal University, Yakutsk, Russia.
    Nieboer, Evert
    Department of Biochemistry and Biomedical Sciences, Hamilton, ON, Canada.
    Odland, Jon Øyvind
    Department of Community Medicine, Faculty of Health Sciences, UiT The Arctic University of Norway, Tromsø, Norway / School of Health Systems and Public Health, Faculty of Health Sciences, University of Pretoria, Pretoria, South Africa.
    Prevalence of smoking before and during pregnancy and changes in this habit during pregnancy in Northwest Russia: a Murmansk county birth registry study2016In: Reproductive Health, ISSN 1742-4755, E-ISSN 1742-4755, Vol. 13, no 1, p. 1-9, article id 18Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    BACKGROUND: Smoking during pregnancy leads to adverse maternal and birth outcomes. However, the prevalence of smoking among women in Russia has increased from < 5 % in the 1980s to > 20 % in the 2000s. We conducted a registry-based study in Murmansk County, Northwest Russia. Our aims were twofold: (i) assess the prevalence of smoking before and during pregnancy; and (ii) examine the socio-demographic factors associated with giving up smoking or reducing the number of cigarettes smoked once pregnancy was established.

    METHODS: This study employs data from the population-based Murmansk County Birth Registry (MCBR) collected during 2006-2011. We used logistic regression to investigate associations between women's socio-demographic characteristics and changes in smoking habit during pregnancy. To avoid departure from uniform risk within specific delivery departments, we employed clustered robust standard errors.

    RESULTS: Of all births registered in the MCBR, 25.2 % of the mothers were smokers before pregnancy and 18.9 % continued smoking during pregnancy. Cessation of smoking during pregnancy was associated with education, marital status and parity but not with maternal age, place of residence, and ethnicity. Women aged ≤ 20-24 years had higher odds of reducing the absolute numbers of cigarettes smoked per day during pregnancy than those aged ≥ 30-34 years. Moreover, smoking nulliparae and pregnant women who had one child were more likely to reduce the absolute numbers of cigarettes smoked per day compared to women having ≥ 2 children.

    CONCLUSIONS: About 25.0 % of smoking women in the Murmansk County in Northwest Russia quit smoking after awareness of the pregnancy, and one-third of them reduced the number cigarettes smoked during pregnancy. Our study demonstrates that women who have a higher education, husband, and are primiparous are more likely to quit smoking during pregnancy. Maternal age and number of children are indicators that influence reduction in smoking during pregnancy. Our findings are useful in identifying target groups for smoking intervention campaigns.

  • 149.
    Kivimäki, Mika
    et al.
    Department of Epidemiology and Public Health, University College London, London, United Kingdom / Faculty of Medicine, University of Helsinki, Helsinki, Finland.
    Jokela, Markus
    Institute of Behavioral Sciences, University of Helsinki, Helsinki, Finland.
    Nyberg, Solja T.
    Finnish Institute of Occupational Health, Helsinki, Tampere and Turku, Finland.
    Singh-Manoux, Archana
    Department of Epidemiology and Public Health, University College London, London, United Kingdom / Inserm U1018, Centre for Research in Epidemiology and Population Health, Villejuif, France.
    Fransson, Eleonor I.
    Institute of Environmental Medicine, Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden / School of Health Sciences, Jönköping University, Jönköping, Sweden / Stress Research Institute, Stockholm University, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Alfredsson, Lars
    Institute of Environmental Medicine, Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden / Centre for Occupational and Environmental Medicine, Stockholm County Council, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Bjorner, Jakob B.
    National Research Centre for the Working Environment, Copenhagen, Denmark.
    Borritz, Marianne
    Department of Occupational Medicine, Koege Hospital, Copenhagen, Denmark.
    Burr, Hermann
    Federal Institute for Occupational Safety and Health (BAuA), Berlin, Germany.
    Casini, Annalisa
    School of Public Health, Université libre de Bruxelles (ULB), Brussels, Belgium.
    Clays, Els
    Department of Public Health, Ghent University, Ghent, Belgium.
    De Bacquer, Dirk
    Department of Public Health, Ghent University, Ghent, Belgium.
    Dragano, Nico
    Institute for Medical Sociology, Medical Faculty, University of Düsseldorf, Düsseldorf, Germany.
    Erbel, Raimund
    Department of Cardiology, West-German Heart Center Essen, University Duisburg-Essen, Essen, Germany.
    Geuskens, Goedele A.
    TNO, Hoofddorp, Netherlands.
    Hamer, Mark
    Department of Epidemiology and Public Health, University College London, London, United Kingdom.
    Hooftman, Wendela E.
    TNO, Hoofddorp, Netherlands.
    Houtman, Irene L.
    TNO, Hoofddorp, Netherlands.
    Jöckel, Karl-Heinz
    Institute for Medical Informatics, Biometry, and Epidemiology, Faculty of Medicine, University Duisburg-Essen, Essen, Germany.
    Kittel, France
    School of Public Health, Université libre de Bruxelles (ULB), Brussels, Belgium.
    Knutsson, Anders
    Department of Health Sciences, Mid Sweden University, Sundsvall, Sweden.
    Koskenvuo, Markku
    Department of Public Health, University of Helsinki, Helsinki, Finland.
    Lunau, Thorsten
    Institute for Medical Sociology, Medical Faculty, University of Düsseldorf, Düsseldorf, Germany.
    Madsen, Ida E. H.
    National Research Centre for the Working Environment, Copenhagen, Denmark.
    Nielsen, Martin L.
    Unit of Social Medicine, Frederiksberg University Hospital, Copenhagen, Denmark.
    Nordin, Maria
    Stress Research Institute, Stockholm University, Stockholm, Sweden / Department of Psychology, Umeå University, Umeå, Sweden.
    Oksanen, Tuula
    Finnish Institute of Occupational Health, Helsinki, Tampere and Turku, Finland.
    Pejtersen, Jan H.
    The Danish National Centre for Social Research, Copenhagen, Denmark.
    Pentti, Jaana
    Finnish Institute of Occupational Health, Helsinki, Tampere and Turku, Finland.
    Rugulies, Reiner
    National Research Centre for the Working Environment, Copenhagen, Denmark / Department of Public Health and Department of Psychology, University of Copenhagen, Copenhagen, Denmark.
    Salo, Paula
    Finnish Institute of Occupational Health, Helsinki, Tampere and Turku, Finland / Department of Psychology, University of Turku, Turku, Finland.
    Shipley, Martin J.
    Department of Epidemiology and Public Health, University College London, London, United Kingdom.
    Siegrist, Johannes
    Institute for Medical Sociology, Medical Faculty, University of Düsseldorf, Düsseldorf, Germany.
    Steptoe, Andrew
    Department of Epidemiology and Public Health, University College London, London, United Kingdom.
    Suominen, Sakari B.
    University of Skövde, School of Health and Education. University of Skövde, Health and Education. Department of Public Health, University of Turku, Turku, Finland / Folkhälsan Research Center, Helsinki, Finland.
    Theorell, Töres
    Stress Research Institute, Stockholm University, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Vahtera, Jussi
    Finnish Institute of Occupational Health, Helsinki, Tampere and Turku, Finland / Department of Public Health, University of Turku, Turku, Finland / Turku University Hospital, Turku, Finland.
    Westerholm, Peter J. M.
    Occupational and Environmental Medicine, Uppsala University, Uppsala, Sweden.
    Westerlund, Hugo
    Stress Research Institute, Stockholm University, Stockholm, Sweden.
    O'Reilly, Dermot
    Centre for Public Health, Queen's University Belfast, Belfast, United Kingdom.
    Kumari, Meena
    Department of Epidemiology and Public Health, University College London, London, United Kingdom / Institute for Social and Economic Research, University of Essex, Colchester, United Kingdom.
    Batty, G. David
    Department of Epidemiology and Public Health, University College London, London, United Kingdom / Centre for Cognitive Ageing and Cognitive Epidemiology and Alzheimer Scotland Dementia Research Centre, University of Edinburgh, Edinburgh, United Kingdom.
    Ferrie, Jane E.
    Department of Epidemiology and Public Health, University College London, London, United Kingdom / School of Community and Social Medicine, University of Bristol, Bristol, United Kingdom.
    Virtanen, Marianna
    Finnish Institute of Occupational Health, Helsinki, Tampere and Turku, Finland.
    Long working hours and risk of coronary heart disease and stroke: a systematic review and meta-analysis of published and unpublished data for 603 838 individuals2015In: The Lancet, ISSN 0140-6736, E-ISSN 1474-547X, Vol. 386, no 10005, p. 1739-1746Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background Long working hours might increase the risk of cardiovascular disease, but prospective evidence is scarce, imprecise, and mostly limited to coronary heart disease. We aimed to assess long working hours as a risk factor for incident coronary heart disease and stroke. Methods We identified published studies through a systematic review of PubMed and Embase from inception to Aug 20, 2014. We obtained unpublished data for 20 cohort studies from the Individual-Participant-Data Meta-analysis in Working Populations (IPD-Work) Consortium and open-access data archives. We used cumulative random-effects meta-analysis to combine effect estimates from published and unpublished data. Findings We included 25 studies from 24 cohorts in Europe, the USA, and Australia. The meta-analysis of coronary heart disease comprised data for 603 838 men and women who were free from coronary heart disease at baseline; the meta-analysis of stroke comprised data for 528 908 men and women who were free from stroke at baseline. Follow-up for coronary heart disease was 5.1 million person-years (mean 8.5 years), in which 4768 events were recorded, and for stroke was 3.8 million person-years (mean 7.2 years), in which 1722 events were recorded. In cumulative meta-analysis adjusted for age, sex, and socioeconomic status, compared with standard hours (35-40 h per week), working long hours (>= 55 h per week) was associated with an increase in risk of incident coronary heart disease (relative risk [RR] 1.13, 95% CI 1.02-1.26; p=0.02) and incident stroke (1.33, 1.11-1.61; p=0.002). The excess risk of stroke remained unchanged in analyses that addressed reverse causation, multivariable adjustments for other risk factors, and different methods of stroke ascertainment (range of RR estimates 1.30-1.42). We recorded a dose-response association for stroke, with RR estimates of 1.10 (95% CI 0.94-1.28; p=0.24) for 41-48 working hours, 1.27 (1.03-1.56; p=0.03) for 49-54 working hours, and 1.33 (1.11-1.61; p=0.002) for 55 working hours or more per week compared with standard working hours (p(trend)<0.0001). Interpretation Employees who work long hours have a higher risk of stroke than those working standard hours; the association with coronary heart disease is weaker. These findings suggest that more attention should be paid to the management of vascular risk factors in individuals who work long hours. 

  • 150.
    Kivimäki, Mika
    et al.
    Department of Epidemiology and Public Health, University College London, London, United Kingdom / Department of Public Health, Faculty of Medicine, University of Helsinki, Helsinki, Finland / Finnish Institute of Occupational Health, Helsinki, Finland.
    Kuosma, Eeva
    Department of Public Health, Faculty of Medicine, University of Helsinki, Helsinki, Finland.
    Ferrie, Jane E.
    Department of Epidemiology and Public Health, University College London, London, United Kingdom / School of Social and Community Medicine, University of Bristol, Bristol, United Kingdom.
    Luukkonen, Ritva
    Department of Public Health, Faculty of Medicine, University of Helsinki, Helsinki, Finland .
    Nyberg, Solja T.
    Department of Public Health, Faculty of Medicine, University of Helsinki, Helsinki, Finland .
    Alfredsson, Lars
    Centre for Occupational and Environmental Medicine, Stockholm County Council, Sweden / Institute of Environmental Medicine, Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Batty, G David.
    Department of Epidemiology and Public Health, University College London, London, United Kingdom.
    Brunner, Eric J.
    Department of Epidemiology and Public Health, University College London, London, United Kingdom.
    Fransson, Eleonor
    Institute of Environmental Medicine, Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden / Stress Research Institute, Stockholm University, Stockholm, Sweden / School of Health Sciences, Jönköping University, Jönköping, Sweden.
    Goldberg, Marcel
    Inserm UMS 011, Population-Based Epidemiological Cohorts Unit, Villejuif, France.
    Knutsson, Anders
    Department of Health Sciences, Mid Sweden University, Sundsvall, Sweden.
    Koskenvuo, Markku
    Department of Public Health, University of Helsinki, Helsinki, Finland.
    Nordin, Maria
    Stress Research Institute, Stockholm University, Stockholm, Sweden / Department of Psychology, Umeå University, Umeå, Sweden.
    Oksanen, Tuula
    Finnish Institute of Occupational Health, Helsinki, Finland .
    Pentti, Jaana
    Finnish Institute of Occupational Health, Helsinki, Finland .
    Rugulies, Reiner
    Department of Public Health and Department of Psychology, University of Copenhagen, Copenhagen, Denmark / National Research Centre for the Working Environment, Copenhagen, Denmark.
    Shipley, Martin J.
    Department of Epidemiology and Public Health, University College London, London, United Kingdom.
    Singh-Manoux, Archana
    Department of Epidemiology and Public Health, University College London, London, United Kingdom / Inserm U1018, Centre for Research in Epidemiology and Population Health, Villejuif, France.
    Steptoe, Andrew
    Department of Epidemiology and Public Health, University College London, London, United Kingdom.
    Suominen, Sakari B.
    University of Skövde, School of Health and Education. University of Skövde, Health and Education. Department of Public Health, University of Turku, Turku, Finland / Folkhälsan Research Center, Helsinki, Finland.
    Theorell, Töres
    Inserm UMS 011, Population-Based Epidemiological Cohorts Unit, Villejuif, France.
    Vahtera, Jussi
    Department of Public Health, University of Turku, Turku, Finland / Turku University Hospital, Turku, Finland.
    Virtanen, Marianna
    Finnish Institute of Occupational Health, Helsinki, Finland.
    Westerholm, Peter
    Department of Medical Sciences, Uppsala University, Uppsala, Sweden.
    Westerlund, Hugo
    Stress Research Institute, Stockholm University, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Zins, Marie
    Inserm UMS 011, Population-Based Epidemiological Cohorts Unit, Villejuif, France.
    Hamer, Mark
    Department of Epidemiology and Public Health, University College London, London, United Kingdom / National Centre for Sport and Exercise Medicine, Loughborough University, Loughborough, United Kingdom.
    Bell, Joshua A.
    Department of Epidemiology and Public Health, University College London, London, United Kingdom / MRC Integrative Epidemiology Unit at the University of Bristol, Bristol, United Kingdom.
    Tabak, Adam G.
    Department of Epidemiology and Public Health, University College London, London, United Kingdom / 1st Department of Medicine, Semmelweis University Faculty of Medicine, Budapest, Hungary.
    Jokela, Markus
    Institute of Behavioral Sciences, University of Helsinki, Helsinki, Finland.
    Overweight, obesity, and risk of cardiometabolic multimorbidity: pooled analysis of individual-level data for 120 813 adults from 16 cohort studies from the USA and Europe2017In: The Lancet Public Health, ISSN 2468-3667, Vol. 2, no 6, p. e277-e285Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    BACKGROUND: Although overweight and obesity have been studied in relation to individual cardiometabolic diseases, their association with risk of cardiometabolic multimorbidity is poorly understood. Here we aimed to establish the risk of incident cardiometabolic multimorbidity (ie, at least two from: type 2 diabetes, coronary heart disease, and stroke) in adults who are overweight and obese compared with those who are a healthy weight.

    METHODS: ) to achieve sufficient case numbers for analysis. The main outcome was cardiometabolic multimorbidity (ie, developing at least two from: type 2 diabetes, coronary heart disease, and stroke). Incident cardiometabolic multimorbidity was ascertained via resurvey or linkage to electronic medical records (including hospital admissions and death). We analysed data from each cohort separately using logistic regression and then pooled cohort-specific estimates using random-effects meta-analysis.

    FINDINGS: Participants were 120  813 adults (mean age 51·4 years, range 35-103; 71 445 women) who did not have diabetes, coronary heart disease, or stroke at study baseline (1973-2012). During a mean follow-up of 10·7 years (1995-2014), we identified 1627 cases of multimorbidity. After adjustment for sociodemographic and lifestyle factors, compared with individuals with a healthy weight, the risk of developing cardiometabolic multimorbidity in overweight individuals was twice as high (odds ratio [OR] 2·0, 95% CI 1·7-2·4; p<0·0001), almost five times higher for individuals with class I obesity (4·5, 3·5-5·8; p<0·0001), and almost 15 times higher for individuals with classes II and III obesity combined (14·5, 10·1-21·0; p<0·0001). This association was noted in men and women, young and old, and white and non-white participants, and was not dependent on the method of exposure assessment or outcome ascertainment. In analyses of different combinations of cardiometabolic conditions, odds ratios associated with classes II and III obesity were 2·2 (95% CI 1·9-2·6) for vascular disease only (coronary heart disease or stroke), 12·0 (8·1-17·9) for vascular disease followed by diabetes, 18·6 (16·6-20·9) for diabetes only, and 29·8 (21·7-40·8) for diabetes followed by vascular disease.

    INTERPRETATION: The risk of cardiometabolic multimorbidity increases as BMI increases; from double in overweight people to more than ten times in severely obese people compared with individuals with a healthy BMI. Our findings highlight the need for clinicians to actively screen for diabetes in overweight and obese patients with vascular disease, and pay increased attention to prevention of vascular disease in obese individuals with diabetes.

    FUNDING: NordForsk, Medical Research Council, Cancer Research UK, Finnish Work Environment Fund, and Academy of Finland.

1234567 101 - 150 of 316
CiteExportLink to result list
Permanent link
Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf