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  • 1.
    Kallionpää, R. E.
    et al.
    Department of Psychology and Speech-Language Pathology, and Turku Brain and Mind Center, University of Turku, Turku, Finland / Department of Perioperative Services, Intensive Care and Pain Medicine, Turku University Hospital, Turku, Finland.
    Scheinin, A.
    Department of Perioperative Services, Intensive Care and Pain Medicine, Turku University Hospital, Turku, Finland / Turku PET Centre, University of Turku and Turku University Hospital,Turku, Finland.
    Kallionpää, R. A.
    Institute of Biomedicine, University of Turku, Turku, Finland.
    Sandman, N.
    Department of Psychology and Speech-Language Pathology, and Turku Brain and Mind Center, Universityof Turku, Turku, Finland.
    Kallioinen, M.
    Department of Perioperative Services, Intensive Care and Pain Medicine, Turku University Hospital, Turku, Finland.
    Laitio, R.
    Turku PET Centre, University of Turku and Turku University Hospital,Turku, Finland.
    Laitio, T.
    Turku PET Centre, University of Turku and Turku University Hospital,Turku, Finland.
    Kaskinoro, K.
    Turku PET Centre, University of Turku and Turku University Hospital,Turku, Finland.
    Kuusela, T.
    Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Turku, Turku, Finland.
    Revonsuo, Antti
    Högskolan i Skövde, Institutionen för biovetenskap. Högskolan i Skövde, Forskningscentrum för Systembiologi. Department of Psychology and Speech-Language Pathology, and Turku Brain and Mind Center, University of Turku, Turku, Finland.
    Scheinin, H.
    Department of Perioperative Services, Intensive Care and Pain Medicine, Turku University Hospital, Turku, Finland / Turku PET Centre, University of Turku and Turku University Hospital,Turku, Finland / Integrative Physiology and Pharmacology,Institute of Biomedicine, University of Turku, Turku, Finland.
    Valli, Katja
    Högskolan i Skövde, Institutionen för biovetenskap. Högskolan i Skövde, Forskningscentrum för Systembiologi. Department of Psychology and Speech-Language Pathology, and Turku Brain and Mind Center, University of Turku, Turku, Finland / Department of Perioperative Services, Intensive Care and Pain Medicine, Turku University Hospital, Turku, Finland.
    Spoken words are processed during dexmedetomidine-induced unresponsiveness2018Ingår i: British Journal of Anaesthesia, ISSN 0007-0912, E-ISSN 1471-6771, Vol. 121, nr 1, s. 270-280Artikel i tidskrift (Refereegranskat)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: Studying the effects of anaesthetic drugs on the processing of semantic stimuli could yield insights into how brain functions change in the transition from wakefulness to unresponsiveness. Here, we explored the N400 event-related potential during dexmedetomidine- and propofol-induced unresponsiveness. Methods: Forty-seven healthy subjects were randomised to receive either dexmedetomidine (n = 23) or propofol (n = 24) in this open-label parallel-group study. Loss of responsiveness was achieved by stepwise increments of pseudo-steady-state plasma concentrations, and presumed loss of consciousness was induced using 1.5 times the concentration required for loss of responsiveness. Pre-recorded spoken sentences ending either with an expected (congruous) or an unexpected (incongruous) word were presented during unresponsiveness. The resulting electroencephalogram data were analysed for the presence of the N400 component, and for the N400 effect defined as the difference between the N400 components elicited by congruous and incongruous stimuli, in the time window 300-600 ms post-stimulus. Recognition of the presented stimuli was tested after recovery of responsiveness. Results: The N400 effect was not observed during dexmedetomidine- or propofol-induced unresponsiveness. The N400 component, however, persisted during dexmedetomidine administration. The N400 component elicited by congruous stimuli during unresponsiveness in the dexmedetomidine group resembled the large component evoked by incongruous stimuli at the awake baseline. After recovery, no recognition of the stimuli heard during unresponsiveness occurred. Conclusions: Dexmedetomidine and propofol disrupt the discrimination of congruous and incongruous spoken sentences, and recognition memory at loss of responsiveness. However, the processing of words is partially preserved during dexmedetomidine-induced unresponsiveness.

  • 2.
    Laaksonen, L.
    et al.
    University of Turku, Turku, Finland / Turku University Hospital, Turku, Finland.
    Kallioinen, M.
    Turku University Hospital, Turku, Finland.
    Långsjö, J.
    Tampere University Hospital, Tampere, Finland.
    Laitio, T.
    Turku University Hospital, Turku, Finland.
    Scheinin, A.
    University of Turku. Turku, Finland / Turku University Hospital, Turku, Finland.
    Scheinin, J.
    Kuopio University Hospital, Kuopio, Finland.
    Kaisti, K.
    Oulu University Hospital, Oulu, Finland.
    Maksimow, A.
    Turku University Hospital, Turku, Finland.
    Kallionpää, R. E.
    Turku University Hospital, Turku, Finland / University of Turku, Turku, Finland.
    Rajala, V.
    Turku University Hospital, Turku, Finland.
    Johansson, J.
    University of Turku, Turku, Finland / Turku University Hospital, Turku, Finland / Umeå University, Umeå, Sweden.
    Kantonen, O.
    University of Turku, Turku, Finland / Turku University Hospital, Turku, Finland / University of California, Irvine, CA, USA.
    Nyman, M.
    Turku University Hospital, Turku, Finland.
    Sirén, S.
    Turku University Hospital, Turku, Finland.
    Valli, Katja
    Högskolan i Skövde, Institutionen för biovetenskap. Högskolan i Skövde, Forskningscentrum för Systembiologi. Turku University Hospital, Turku, Finland / University of Turku, Turku, Finland.
    Revonsuo, Antti
    Högskolan i Skövde, Institutionen för biovetenskap. Högskolan i Skövde, Forskningscentrum för Systembiologi. University of Turku, Turku, Finland.
    Solin, O.
    University of Turku, Turku, Finland / Turku University Hospital, Turku, Finland.
    Vahlberg, T.
    University of Turku, Turku, Finland / Turku University Hospital, Turku, Finland.
    Alkire, M.
    University of California, Irvine, CA, USA.
    Scheinin, Harry
    University of Turku, Turku, Finland / Turku University Hospital, Turku, Finland.
    Comparative effects of dexmedetomidine, propofol, sevoflurane, and S-ketamine on regional cerebral glucose metabolism in humans: a positron emission tomography study2018Ingår i: British Journal of Anaesthesia, ISSN 0007-0912, E-ISSN 1471-6771, Vol. 121, nr 1, s. 281-290Artikel i tidskrift (Refereegranskat)
    Abstract [en]

    IntroductionThe highly selective α2-agonist dexmedetomidine has become a popular sedative for neurointensive care patients. However, earlier studies have raised concern that dexmedetomidine might reduce cerebral blood flow without a concomitant decrease in metabolism. Here, we compared the effects of dexmedetomidine on the regional cerebral metabolic rate of glucose (CMRglu) with three commonly used anaesthetic drugs at equi-sedative doses.

    MethodsOne hundred and sixty healthy male subjects were randomised to EC50 for verbal command of dexmedetomidine (1.5 ng ml−1n=40), propofol (1.7 μg ml−1n=40), sevoflurane (0.9% end-tidal; n=40) or S-ketamine (0.75 μg ml−1n=20) or placebo (n=20). Anaesthetics were administered using target-controlled infusion or vapouriser with end-tidal monitoring. 18F-labelled fluorodeoxyglucose was administered 20 min after commencement of anaesthetic administration, and high-resolution positron emission tomography with arterial blood activity samples was used to quantify absolute CMRglu for whole brain and 15 brain regions.

    ResultsAt the time of [F18]fluorodeoxyglucose injection, 55% of dexmedetomidine, 45% of propofol, 85% of sevoflurane, 45% of S-ketamine, and 0% of placebo subjects were unresponsive. Whole brain CMRglu was 63%, 71%, 71%, and 96% of placebo in the dexmedetomidine, propofol, sevoflurane, and S-ketamine groups, respectively (P<0.001 between the groups). The lowest CMRglu was observed in nearly all brain regions with dexmedetomidine (P<0.05 compared with all other groups). With S-ketamine, CMRgludid not differ from placebo.

    ConclusionsAt equi-sedative doses in humans, potency in reducing CMRglu was dexmedetomidine>propofol>ketamine=placebo. These findings alleviate concerns for dexmedetomidine-induced vasoconstriction and cerebral ischaemia.

  • 3.
    Radek, L.
    et al.
    Turku PET Centre, University of Turku and Turku University Hospital, Turku, Finland.
    Kallionpää, R. E.
    Department of Psychology and Speech-Language Pathology, and Turku Brain and Mind Center, University of Turku, Turku,Finland / Department of Perioperative Services, Intensive Care and Pain Medicine, Turku University Hospital, Turku, Finland.
    Karvonen, M.
    Department of Psychology and Speech-Language Pathology, and Turku Brain and Mind Center, University of Turku, Turku,Finland.
    Scheinin, A.
    Turku PET Centre, University of Turku and Turku University Hospital, Turku, Finland / Department of Perioperative Services, Intensive Care and Pain Medicine, Turku University Hospital, Turku, Finland.
    Maksimow, A.
    Department of Perioperative Services, Intensive Care and Pain Medicine, Turku University Hospital, Turku, Finland.
    Långsjö, J.
    Turku PET Centre, University of Turku and Turku University Hospital, Turku, Finland / Department of Intensive Care, Tampere University Hospital, Tampere,Finland.
    Kaisti, K.
    Turku PET Centre, University of Turku and Turku University Hospital, Turku, Finland.
    Vahlberg, T.
    Department of Clinical Medicine, Biostatistics, University of Turku and Turku University Hospital,Turku, Finland.
    Revonsuo, Antti
    Högskolan i Skövde, Institutionen för biovetenskap. Högskolan i Skövde, Forskningscentrum för Systembiologi. Department of Psychology and Speech-Language Pathology, and Turku Brain and Mind Center, University of Turku, Turku, Finland.
    Scheinin, H.
    Turku PET Centre, University of Turku and Turku University Hospital, Turku, Finland / Department of Perioperative Services, Intensive Care and Pain Medicine, Turku University Hospital, Turku, Finland / Integrative Physiology and Pharmacology, Institute of Biomedicine, University of Turku, Turku, Finland.
    Valli, Katja
    Högskolan i Skövde, Institutionen för biovetenskap. Högskolan i Skövde, Forskningscentrum för Systembiologi. Department of Psychology and Speech-Language Pathology, and Turku Brain and Mind Center, University of Turku, Turku,Finland / Department of Perioperative Services, Intensive Care and Pain Medicine, Turku University Hospital, Turku, Finland.
    Dreaming and awareness during dexmedetomidine- and propofol-induced unresponsiveness2018Ingår i: British Journal of Anaesthesia, ISSN 0007-0912, E-ISSN 1471-6771, Vol. 121, nr 1, s. 260-269Artikel i tidskrift (Refereegranskat)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: Experiences during anaesthetic-induced unresponsiveness have previously been investigated by interviews after recovery. To explore whether experiences occur during drug administration, we interviewed participants during target-controlled infusion (TCI) of dexmedetomidine or propofol and after recovery. Methods: Healthy participants received dexmedetomidine (n = 23) or propofol (n = 24) in stepwise increments until loss of responsiveness (LOR1). During TCI we attempted to arouse them for interview (return of responsiveness, ROR1). After the interview, if unresponsiveness ensued with the same dose (LOR2), the procedure was repeated (ROR2). Finally, the concentration was increased 1.5-fold to achieve presumable loss of consciousness (LOC), infusion terminated, and the participants interviewed upon recovery (ROR3). An emotional sound stimulus was presented during LORs and LOC, and memory for stimuli was assessed with recognition task after recovery. Interview transcripts were content analysed. Results: Of participants receiving dexmedetomidine, 18/23 were arousable from LOR1 and LOR2. Of participants receiving propofol, 10/24 were arousable from LOR1 and two of four were arousable from LOR2. Of 93 interviews performed, 84% included experiences from periods of unresponsiveness (dexmedetomidine 90%, propofol 74%). Internally generated experiences (dreaming) were present in 86% of reports from unresponsive periods, while externally generated experiences (awareness) were rare and linked to brief arousals. No within drug differences in the prevalence or content of experiences during infusion vs after recovery were observed, but participants receiving dexmedetomidine reported dreaming and awareness more often. Participants receiving dexmedetomidine recognised the emotional sounds better than participants receiving propofol (42% vs 15%), but none reported references to sounds spontaneously. Conclusion: Anaesthetic-induced unresponsiveness does not induce unconsciousness or necessarily even disconnectedness.

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