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  • 1.
    Ali, Nurshad
    et al.
    Rajshahi University.
    Hoque, Ashraful
    Rajshahi University.
    Haque, Abedul
    Rajshahi University.
    Abdus Salam, Kazi
    Rajshahi University.
    Karim, Rezaul
    Rajshahi University.
    Rahman, Aminur
    Rajshahi University.
    Islam, Khairul
    Rajshahi University.
    Alam Saud, Zahangir
    Rajshahi University.
    Khalek, Abdul
    Rajshahi University.
    Azim Akhand, Anwarul
    Dhaka University.
    Hossain, Mostaque
    Rajshahi Medical College Hospital.
    Mandal, Abul
    Högskolan i Skövde, Forskningscentrum för Systembiologi. Högskolan i Skövde, Institutionen för vård och natur.
    Karim, Rezaul
    Islamic University, Kushtia.
    Miyataka, Hideki
    Tokushima Bunri University.
    Himeno, Seiichiro
    Tokushima Bunri University.
    Hossain, Khaled
    Rajshahi University.
    Association between arsenic exposure and plasma cholinesterase activity: a population based study in Bangladesh2010Ingår i: Environmental health, ISSN 1476-069X, E-ISSN 1476-069X, Vol. 9, s. 36-Artikel i tidskrift (Refereegranskat)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: Arsenic is a potent pollutant that has caused an environmental catastrophe in certain parts of the world including Bangladesh where millions of people are presently at risk due to drinking water contaminated by arsenic. Chronic arsenic exposure has been scientifically shown as a cause for liver damage, cancers, neurological disorders and several other ailments. The relationship between plasma cholinesterase (PChE) activity and arsenic exposure has not yet been clearly documented. However, decreased PChE activity has been found in patients suffering liver dysfunction, heart attack, cancer metastasis and neurotoxicity. Therefore, in this study, we evaluated the PChE activity in individuals exposed to arsenic via drinking water in Bangladesh.

    Methods: A total of 141 Bangladeshi residents living in arsenic endemic areas with the mean arsenic exposure of 14.10 ± 3.27 years were selected as study subjects and split into tertile groups based on three water arsenic concentrations: low (< 129 μg/L), medium (130-264 μg/L) and high (> 265 μg/L). Study subjects were further sub-divided into two groups (≤50 μg/L and > 50 μg/L) based on the recommended upper limit of water arsenic concentration (50 μg/L) in Bangladesh. Blood samples were collected from the study subjects by venipuncture and arsenic concentrations in drinking water, hair and nail samples were measured by Inductively Coupled Plasma Mass Spectroscopy (ICP-MS). PChE activity was assayed by spectrophotometer.

    Results: Arsenic concentrations in hair and nails were positively correlated with the arsenic levels in drinking water. Significant decreases in PChE activity were observed with increasing concentrations of arsenic in water, hair and nails. The average levels of PChE activity in low, medium and high arsenic exposure groups were also significantly different between each group. Lower levels of PChE activity were also observed in the > 50 μg/L group compared to the ≤50 μg/L group. Moreover, PChE activity was significantly decreased in the skin (+) symptoms group compared to those without (-).

    Conclusions: We found a significant inverse relationship between arsenic exposure and PChE activity in a human population in Bangladesh. This research demonstrates a novel exposure-response relationship between arsenic and PChE activity which may explain one of the biological mechanisms through which arsenic exerts its neuro-and hepatotoxicity in humans.

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  • 2.
    Islam, Khairul
    et al.
    Rajshahi Univ, Dept Biochem & Mol Biol, Rajshahi 6205, Bangladesh .
    Haque, Abedul
    Rajshahi Univ, Dept Biochem & Mol Biol, Rajshahi 6205, Bangladesh .
    Karim, Rezaul
    Rajshahi Univ, Dept Biochem & Mol Biol, Rajshahi 6205, Bangladesh / Islamic Univ, Dept Appl Nutr & Food Technol, Kushtia 7003, Bangladesh / UMP, FIST, Gambang 26300, Pahang, Malaysia .
    Fajol, Abul
    Rajshahi Univ, Dept Biochem & Mol Biol, Rajshahi 6205, Bangladesh .
    Hossain, Ekhtear
    Rajshahi Univ, Dept Biochem & Mol Biol, Rajshahi 6205, Bangladesh .
    Salam, Kazi Abdus
    Rajshahi Univ, Dept Biochem & Mol Biol, Rajshahi 6205, Bangladesh .
    Ali, Nurshad
    Rajshahi Univ, Dept Biochem & Mol Biol, Rajshahi 6205, Bangladesh .
    Saud, Zahangir Alam
    Rajshahi Univ, Dept Biochem & Mol Biol, Rajshahi 6205, Bangladesh .
    Rahman, Matiar
    Rajshahi Univ, Dept Biochem & Mol Biol, Rajshahi 6205, Bangladesh .
    Rahman, Mashiur
    Rajshahi Univ, Dept Biochem & Mol Biol, Rajshahi 6205, Bangladesh .
    Sultana, Papia
    Rajshahi Univ, Dept Stat, Rajshahi 6205, Bangladesh .
    Hossain, Mostaque
    Bangladesh Inst Res & Rehabil Diabet Endocrine &, Dept Med, Dhaka, Bangladesh .
    Akhand, Anwarul Azim
    Univ Dhaka, Dept Genet Engn & Biotechnol, Dhaka 1000, Bangladesh .
    Mandal, Abul
    Högskolan i Skövde, Institutionen för vård och natur. Högskolan i Skövde, Forskningscentrum för Systembiologi.
    Miyataka, Hideki
    Tokushima Bunri Univ, Lab Mol Nutr & Toxicol, Fac Pharmaceut Sci, Tokushima 7708514, Japan.
    Himeno, Seiichiro
    Tokushima Bunri Univ, Lab Mol Nutr & Toxicol, Fac Pharmaceut Sci, Tokushima 7708514, Japan.
    Hossain, Khaled
    Rajshahi Univ, Dept Biochem & Mol Biol, Rajshahi 6205, Bangladesh .
    Dose-response relationship between arsenic exposure and the serum enzymes for liver function tests in the individuals exposed to arsenic: a cross sectional study in Bangladesh2011Ingår i: Environmental health, ISSN 1476-069X, E-ISSN 1476-069X, Vol. 10, s. 64-Artikel i tidskrift (Refereegranskat)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: Chronic arsenic exposure has been shown to cause liver damage. However, serum hepatic enzyme activity as recognized on liver function tests (LFTs) showing a dose-response relationship with arsenic exposure has not yet been clearly documented. The aim of our study was to investigate the dose-response relationship between arsenic exposure and major serum enzyme marker activity associated with LFTs in the population living in arsenic-endemic areas in Bangladesh. Methods: A total of 200 residents living in arsenic-endemic areas in Bangladesh were selected as study subjects. Arsenic concentrations in the drinking water, hair and nails were measured by Inductively Coupled Plasma Mass Spectroscopy (ICP-MS). The study subjects were stratified into quartile groups as follows, based on concentrations of arsenic in the drinking water, as well as in subjects' hair and nails: lowest, low, medium and high. The serum hepatic enzyme activities of alkaline phosphatase (ALP), aspartate transaminase (AST) and alanine transaminase (ALT) were then assayed. Results: Arsenic concentrations in the subjects' hair and nails were positively correlated with arsenic levels in the drinking water. As regards the exposure-response relationship with arsenic in the drinking water, the respective activities of ALP, AST and ALT were found to be significantly increased in the high-exposure groups compared to the lowest-exposure groups before and after adjustments were made for different covariates. With internal exposure markers (arsenic in hair and nails), the ALP, AST and ALT activity profiles assumed a similar shape of dose-response relationship, with very few differences seen in the higher groups compared to the lowest group, most likely due to the temporalities of exposure metrics. Conclusions: The present study demonstrated that arsenic concentrations in the drinking water were strongly correlated with arsenic concentrations in the subjects' hair and nails. Further, this study revealed a novel exposure- and dose- response relationship between arsenic exposure metrics and serum hepatic enzyme activity. Elevated serum hepatic enzyme activities in the higher exposure gradients provided new insights into arsenic-induced liver toxicity that might be helpful for the early prognosis of arsenic-induced liver diseases.

  • 3.
    Islam, Md Shofikul
    et al.
    University of Rajshahi, Bangladesh / Islamic University, Kushtia-7003, Bangladesh.
    Mohanto, Nayan Chandra
    University of Rajshahi, Rajshahi-6205, Bangladesh.
    Karim, Md Rezaul
    Islamic University, Kushtia-7003, Bangladesh.
    Aktar, Sharmin
    University of Rajshahi, Rajshahi-6205, Bangladesh.
    Hoque, Md Mominul
    University of Rajshahi, Rajshahi-6205, Bangladesh.
    Rahman, Atiqur
    University of Rajshahi, Rajshahi-6205, Bangladesh.
    Jahan, Momotaj
    University of Rajshahi, Rajshahi-6205, Bangladesh.
    Khatun, Rabeya
    University of Rajshahi, Rajshahi-6205, Bangladesh.
    Aziz, Abdul
    University of Rajshahi, Rajshahi-6205, Bangladesh.
    Abdus Salam, Kazi
    University of Rajshahi, Rajshahi-6205, Bangladesh / National institutes of Health, Bethesda, USA.
    Saud, Zahangir Alam
    University of Rajshahi, Rajshahi-6205, Bangladesh.
    Hossain, Mostaque
    Kaliganj Upazila Health Complex, Gazipur, Dhaka, Bangladesh.
    Rahman, Aminur
    Högskolan i Skövde, Institutionen för biovetenskap. Högskolan i Skövde, Forskningscentrum för Systembiologi.
    Mandal, Abul
    Högskolan i Skövde, Institutionen för biovetenskap. Högskolan i Skövde, Forskningscentrum för Systembiologi.
    Haque, Azizul
    Medical University of South Carolina, Charleston, SC, USA.
    Miyataka, Hideki
    Faculty of Pharmaceutical Sciences, Tokushima Bunri University, Japan.
    Himeno, Seiichiro
    Laboratory of Molecular Nutrition and Toxicology, Faculty of Pharmaceutical Sciences, Tokushima Bunri University, Japan.
    Hossain, Khaled
    Department of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, University of Rajshahi, Bangladesh.
    Elevated concentrations of serum matrix metalloproteinase-2 and -9 and their associations with circulating markers of cardiovascular diseases in chronic arsenic-exposed individuals2015Ingår i: Environmental health, ISSN 1476-069X, E-ISSN 1476-069X, Vol. 14, nr 1, artikel-id 92Artikel i tidskrift (Refereegranskat)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: Cardiovascular diseases (CVDs) and cancers are the major causes of chronic arsenic exposure-related morbidity and mortality. Matrix metalloproteinase-2 (MMP-2) and −9 (MMP-9) are deeply involved in the pathogenesis of CVDs and cancers. This study has been designed to evaluate the interactions of arsenic exposure with serum MMP-2 and MMP-9 concentrations especially in relation to the circulating biomarkers of CVDs.

    Methods: A total of 373 human subjects, 265 from arsenic-endemic and 108 from non-endemic areas in Bangladesh were recruited for this study. Arsenic concentrations in the specimens were measured by inductively coupled plasma mass spectroscopy (ICP-MS) and serum MMPs were quantified by immunoassay kits.

    Results: Serum MMP-2 and MMP-9 concentrations in arsenic-endemic population were significantly (p < 0.001) higher than those in non-endemic population. Both MMPs showed significant positive interactions with drinking water (rs = 0.208, p < 0.001 for MMP-2; rs = 0.163, p <0.01 for MMP-9), hair (rs= 0.163, p < 0.01 for MMP-2; rs = 0.173, p < 0.01 for MMP-9) and nail (rs= 0.160, p < 0.01 for MMP-2; rs = 0.182, p < 0.001 for MMP-9) arsenic of the study subjects. MMP-2 concentrations were 1.02, 1.03 and 1.05 times, and MMP-9 concentrations were 1.03, 1.06 and 1.07 times greater for 1 unit increase in log-transformed water, hair and nail arsenic concentrations, respectively, after adjusting for covariates (age, sex, BMI, smoking habit and hypertension). Furthermore, both MMPs were increased dose-dependently when the study subjects were split into three (≤10, 10.1-50 and > 50 μg/L) groups based on the regulatory upper limit of water arsenic concentration set by WHO and Bangladesh Government. MMPs were also found to be significantly (p < 0.05) associated with each other. Finally, the concentrations of both MMPs were correlated with several circulating markers related to CVDs.

    Conclusions: This study showed the significant positive associations and dose–response relationships of arsenic exposure with serum MMP-2 and MMP-9 concentrations. This study also showed the interactions of MMP-2 and MMP-9 concentrations with the circulating markers of CVDs suggesting the MMP-2 and MMP-9 -mediated mechanism of arsenic-induced CVDs.

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