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  • 1.
    Gaston-Johansson, Fannie
    et al.
    Johns Hopkins University, Department of Acute and Chronic Care, School of Nursing, Baltimore, MD, USA.
    Fall-Dickson, Jane M.
    National Institute of Health, Symptom Management Branch, National Institute of Nursing, Research, Bethesda, MD, USA.
    Nanda, Joy P.
    Johns Hopkins Medical Institutions, Baltimore, MD, USA.
    Kenne Sarenmalm, Elisabeth
    Skaraborg Hospital, Department of Research and Development Centre, Skövde, Sweden.
    Browall, Maria
    Högskolan i Skövde, Institutionen för vård och natur.
    Goldstein, Nancy
    Johns Hopkins University, Department of Acute and Chronic Care, School of Nursing, Baltimore, MD, USA.
    Long-term effect of the self-management comprehensive coping strategy program on quality of life in patients with breast cancer treated with high-dose chemotherapy2012Inngår i: Psycho-Oncology, ISSN 1057-9249, E-ISSN 1099-1611, Vol. 22, nr 3, s. 530-539Artikkel i tidsskrift (Fagfellevurdert)
    Abstract [en]

    BACKGROUND: This study aims to examine the effectiveness of a self-management multimodal comprehensive coping strategy program (CCSP) on quality of life (QOL) among breast cancer patients 1 year after treatment.

    METHODS: Patients (n = 110) with stage II, III, or IV breast cancer scheduled to receive high dose chemotherapy and autologous hematopoietic stem cell transplantation were randomized to either CCSP treatment or control group. The CCSP intervention was taught 2 week before hospital admission with reinforcement at specified times during treatment and 3 months after discharge. The CCSP components included educational information, cognitive restructuring, coping skills enhancement, and relaxation with guided imagery. Instruments administered at baseline included the following: Quality of Life Index-Cancer Version (QOLI-CV), State-Trait Anxiety Inventory, Beck Depression Inventory, and Coping Strategies Questionnaire. At 1-year follow-up, patients (n = 73) completed and returned the follow-up QOLI-CV.

    RESULTS: Patients were mainly ≥40 years of age, married, Caucasian, and diagnosed with advanced breast cancer. A model measuring effectiveness of CCSP on QOL (total and subscale) at 1-year follow-up showed that the CCSP group (n = 38) had significant improvement in overall QOL (p < 0.01), health and functioning (p < 0.05), and socioeconomic (p < 0.05) and psychological/spiritual well-being (p < 0.01) compared with the control group (n = 35). The CCSP patients frequently used the CCSP to manage psychological (51%) and sleep problems (60%).

    CONCLUSIONS: The CCSP improved QOL for patients at 1-year follow-up. Patients overwhelmingly reported that CCSP was beneficial. The CCSP as an effective coping intervention has potential as a self-management program for breast cancer survivors.

  • 2.
    Kenne Sarenmalm, Elisabeth
    et al.
    Research and Development Centre, Skaraborg Hospital, Skövde, Sweden / Institute of Health and Caring Sciences, Sahlgrenska Academy at Gothenburg University, Gothenburg, Sweden / Johns Hopkins School of Nursing, Baltimore, MD, USA.
    Browall, Maria
    Högskolan i Skövde, Institutionen för vård och natur. Johns Hopkins School of Nursing, Baltimore, MD, USA / Department of Oncology, Sahlgrenska University Hospital, Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Persson, L.-O.
    Institute of Health and Caring Sciences, Sahlgrenska Academy at Gothenburg University, Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Fall-Dickson, Jane M.
    National Institute of Nursing Research, National Institutes of Health, Bethesda, MD, USA.
    Gaston-Johansson, Fanny
    Johns Hopkins School of Nursing, Baltimore, MD, USA.
    Relationship of sense of coherence to stressful events, coping strategies, health status, and quality of life in women with breast cancer2013Inngår i: Psycho-Oncology, ISSN 1057-9249, E-ISSN 1099-1611, Vol. 22, nr 1, s. 20-27Artikkel i tidsskrift (Fagfellevurdert)
    Abstract [en]

    Objective: To test the hypothesis that Antonovsky's concept of sense of coherence (SOC) predicts stressful events, coping strategies, health status, and quality of life (QoL) in a cohort of postmenopausal women (n = 131) with newly diagnosed primary or recurrent breast cancer.

    Methods: Regression analyses of longitudinal data at baseline through 6 months following breast cancer diagnosis examined the relationships between SOC (13-item version), daily assessment of coping with stressful events, health status, and QoL (EORTC QLQ-30).

    Results: The findings support Antonovsky's concept of SOC. Women with strong SOC reported fewer stressful events and more days without stressful events. They used more coping strategies and more frequently used distraction, situation redefinition, direct action, and relaxation, but seldom religion, to cope with stressful events, and reported better health status and QoL. Women with weak SOC experienced more distress and used fewer coping strategies, and they more frequently used coping strategies such as catharsis and seeking social and spiritual support, but seldom acceptance of the situation. They reported worse health status and QoL, regardless of disease stage or treatment. The relationships between SOC and health status and QoL were linear.

    Conclusions: Sense of coherence significantly predicts distress, number and type of coping strategies such as direct action and relaxation, health status, and QoL in women with breast cancer. Our data suggest that the SOC scale may be a useful screening tool to identify individuals particularly vulnerable to distress and unable to cope adequately. Assessing SOC strength may assist health care providers to provide individualized patient interventions.

  • 3.
    Strang, Susann
    et al.
    Sahlgrenska Academy, Institute of Health and Care Sciences, University of Gothenburg, Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Henoch, Ingela
    Sahlgrenska Academy, Institute of Health and Care Sciences, University of Gothenburg, Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Danielson, Ella
    Sahlgrenska Academy, Institute of Health and Care Sciences, University of Gothenburg, Gothenburg, Sweden / Department of Health Sciences, Mid Sweden University, Östersund, Sweden.
    Browall, Maria
    Högskolan i Skövde, Institutionen för hälsa och lärande. Högskolan i Skövde, Forskningsspecialiseringen Hälsa och Lärande. Department of Neurobiology, Care Science and Society, Division of Nursing, Karolinska Institute, Solna, Sweden.
    Melin-Johansson, Christina
    Department of Health Sciences, Mid Sweden University, Östersund, Sweden.
    Communication about existential issues with patients close to death—nurses' reflections on content, process and meaning2014Inngår i: Psycho-Oncology, ISSN 1057-9249, E-ISSN 1099-1611, Vol. 23, nr 5, s. 562-568Artikkel i tidsskrift (Fagfellevurdert)
    Abstract [en]

    Objective: Encountering dying patients with implicit existential questions requires the nurses to have positive and comfortable attitude to talking about existential issues. This paper describes the nurses' reflections on existential issues in their communication with patients close to death. Methods: Nurses (n=98) were recruited from a hospital, hospices and homecare teams. Each nurse participated in five group reflection sessions that were recorded, transcribed and analysed using qualitative content analysis. Results: Three domains and nine themes emerged. The content domain of the existential conversation covered living, dying and relationships. The process domain dealt with using conversation techniques to open up conversations, being present and confirming. The third domain was about the meaning of existential conversation for nurses. The group reflections revealed a distinct awareness of the value of sensitivity and supportive conversations. Conclusion: This study supports the assertion that experience of talking about existential issues and supporting environment make nurses comfortable when counselling patients close to death. It was obvious from this study that having the courage to be present and confirming, having time and not trying to 'solve' every existential problem were the most important factors in conversations with the patients close to death. © 2013 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

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