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  • 1.
    Ervasti, Jenni
    et al.
    Finnish Inst Occupat Hlth, Helsinki, Finland / Univ Helsinki, Clinicum, Helsinki, Finland.
    Airaksinen, Jaakko
    Finnish Inst Occupat Hlth, Helsinki, Finland.
    Pentti, Jaana
    Univ Helsinki, Clinicum, Helsinki, Finland.
    Vahtera, Jussi
    Univ Turku, Dept Publ Hlth, Finland / Turku Univ Hosp, Finland.
    Suominen, Sakari
    University of Skövde, School of Health and Education. University of Skövde, Health and Education. Univ Turku, Finland.
    Virtanen, Marianna
    Finnish Inst Occupat Hlth, Helsinki, Finland / Uppsala Univ, Dept Publ Hlth & Caring Sci, Uppsala, Sweden.
    Kivimaki, Mika
    Finnish Inst Occupat Hlth, Helsinki, Finland / Univ Helsinki, Clinicum, Finland / UCL, Dept Epidemiol & Publ Hlth, London, England.
    Does increasing physical activity reduce the excess risk of work disability among overweight individuals?2019In: Scandinavian Journal of Work, Environment and Health, ISSN 0355-3140, E-ISSN 1795-990X, Vol. 45, no 4, p. 376-385Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Objectives We examined the extent to which an increase in physical activity would reduce the excess risk of work disability among overweight and obese people (body mass index >= 25kg/m(2)).

    Methods We used counterfactual modelling approaches to analyze longitudinal data from two Finnish prospective cohort studies (total N=38 744). Weight, height and physical activity were obtained from surveys and assessed twice and linked to electronic records of two indicators of long-term work disability (>= 90-day sickness absence and disability pension) for a 7-year follow-up after the latter survey. The models were adjusted for age, sex, socioeconomic status, smoking, and alcohol consumption.

    Results The confounder-adjusted hazard ratio (HR) of long-term sickness absence for overweight compared to normal-weight participants was 1.43 [95% confidence interval (CI) 1.35-1.53]. An increase in physical activity among overweight compared to normal-weight individuals was estimated to reduce this HR to 1.40 (95% CI 1.31-1.48). In pseudo-trial analysis including only the persistently overweight, initially physically inactive participants, the HR for long-term sickness absence was 0.82 (95% CI 0.70-0.94) for individuals with increased physical activity compared to those who remained physically inactive. The results for disability pension as an outcome were similar.

    Conclusions These findings suggest that the excess risk of work disability among overweight individuals would drop by 3-4% if they increased their average physical activity to the average level of normal-weight people. However, overweight individuals who are physically inactive would reduce their risk of work disability by about 20% by becoming physically active.

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  • 2.
    Virtanen, Marianna
    et al.
    Finnish Institute of Occupational Health, Helsinki, Finland / Department of Public Health and Caring Sciences, University of Uppsala, Sweden.
    Jokela, Markus
    Institute of Behavioral Sciences, University of Helsinki, Helsinki, Finland.
    Madsen, Ida E. H.
    National Research Centre for the Working Environment, Copenhagen, Denmark.
    Magnusson Hanson, Linda L.
    Stress Research Institute, Stockholm University, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Lallukka, Tea
    Finnish Institute of Occupational Health, Helsinki, Finland / Department of Public Health, University of Helsinki, Finland.
    Nyberg, Solja T.
    Department of Public Health, University of Helsinki, Finland.
    Alfredsson, Lars
    Institute of Environmental Medicine, Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden / Centre for Occupational and Environmental Medicine, Stockholm County Council, Sweden.
    Batty, G David
    Department of Epidemiology and Public Health, University College London, United Kingdom.
    Bjorner, Jakob B.
    National Research Centre for the Working Environment, Copenhagen, Denmark.
    Borritz, Marianne
    Department of Occupational Medicine, Koge Hospital, Koge, Denmark.
    Burr, Hermann
    Federal Institute for Occupational Safety and Health (BAuA), Berlin, Germany.
    Dragano, Nico
    Institute for Medical Sociology, Medical Faculty, University of Düsseldorf, Düsseldorf, Germany.
    Erbel, Raimund
    Department of Cardiology, West-German Heart Center Essen, University Duisburg-Essen, Essen, Germany.
    Ferrie, Jane E.
    Department of Epidemiology and Public Health, University College London, London, United Kingdom / School of Social and Community Medicine, University of Bristol, Bristol, United Kingdom.
    Heikkilä, Katriina
    Department of Health Services and Policy, London School of Hygiene and Tropical Medicine, London, United Kingdom.
    Knutsson, Anders
    Department of Health Sciences, Mid Sweden University, Sundsvall, Sweden.
    Koskenvuo, Markku
    Department of Public Health, University of Helsinki, Finland.
    Lahelma, Eero
    Department of Public Health, University of Helsinki, Finland.
    Nielsen, Martin L.
    Unit of Social Medicine, Frederiksberg University Hospital, Copenhagen, Denmark.
    Oksanen, Tuula
    Finnish Institute of Occupational Health, Helsinki, Finland.
    Pejtersen, Jan H.
    Danish National Centre for Social Research, Copenhagen, Denmark.
    Pentti, Jaana
    Department of Public Health, University of Helsinki, Finland.
    Rahkonen, Ossi
    Department of Public Health, University of Helsinki, Finland.
    Rugulies, Reiner
    National Research Centre for the Working Environment, Copenhagen, Denmark / Department of Public Health and Department of Psychology, University of Copenhagen, Copenhagen, Denmark.
    Salo, Paula
    Finnish Institute of Occupational Health, Helsinki, Finland / Department of Psychology, University of Turku, Turku, Finland.
    Schupp, Jürgen
    German Institute for Economic Research, Berlin, Germany / Free University of Berlin, Berlin, Germany.
    Shipley, Martin J.
    Department of Epidemiology and Public Health, University College London, London, United Kingdom.
    Siegrist, Johannes
    Institute for Medical Sociology, Medical Faculty, University of Düsseldorf, Düsseldorf, Germany.
    Singh-Manoux, Archana
    Department of Epidemiology and Public Health, University College London, London, United Kingdom / Centre for Research in Epidemiology and Population Health, Villejuif, France.
    Suominen, Sakari
    University of Skövde, School of Health and Education. University of Skövde, Health and Education. Department of Public Health, University of Turku, Turku, Finland / Folkhälsan Research Center, Helsinki, Finland.
    Theorell, Töres
    Stress Research Institute, Stockholm University, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Vahtera, Jussi
    Department of Public Health, University of Turku, Turku, Finland / Turku University Hospital, Turku, Finland.
    Wagner, Gert G.
    German Institute for Economic Research, Berlin, Germany / Max Planck Institute for Human Development, Berlin, Germany / Berlin University of Technology, Berlin, Germany.
    Wang, Jian Li
    University of Ottawa Institute of Mental Health Research, School of Epidemiology, Public Health and Preventive Medicine, University of Ottawa, Ottawa, Canada.
    Yiengprugsawan, Vasoontara
    Centre for Research on Ageing, Health and Wellbeing and the ARC Centre of Excellence on Population Ageing Research, The Australian National University, Canberra, Australia.
    Westerlund, Hugo
    Stress Research Institute, Stockholm University, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Kivimäki, Mika
    Finnish Institute of Occupational Health, Helsinki, Finland / Department of Public Health, University of Helsinki, Finland / Department of Epidemiology and Public Health, University College London, London, United Kingdom.
    Long working hours and depressive symptoms: systematic review and meta-analysis of published studies and unpublished individual participant data2018In: Scandinavian Journal of Work, Environment and Health, ISSN 0355-3140, E-ISSN 1795-990X, Vol. 44, no 3, p. 239-250, article id 3712Article, review/survey (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Objectives This systematic review and meta-analysis combined published study-level data and unpublished individual-participant data with the aim of quantifying the relation between long working hours and the onset of depressive symptoms. Methods We searched PubMed and Embase for published prospective cohort studies and included available cohorts with unpublished individual-participant data. We used a random-effects meta-analysis to calculate summary estimates across studies. Results We identified ten published cohort studies and included unpublished individual-participant data from 18 studies. In the majority of cohorts, long working hours was defined as working ≥55 hours per week. In multivariable-adjusted meta-analyses of 189 729 participants from 35 countries [96 275 men, 93 454 women, follow-up ranging from 1-5 years, 21 747 new-onset cases), there was an overall association of 1.14 (95% confidence interval (CI) 1.03-1.25] between long working hours and the onset of depressive symptoms, with significant evidence of heterogeneity (I 2=45.1%, P=0.004). A moderate association between working hours and depressive symptoms was found in Asian countries (1.50, 95% CI 1.13-2.01), a weaker association in Europe (1.11, 95% CI 1.00-1.22), and no association in North America (0.97, 95% CI 0.70-1.34) or Australia (0.95, 95% CI 0.70-1.29). Differences by other characteristics were small. Conclusions This observational evidence suggests a moderate association between long working hours and onset of depressive symptoms in Asia and a small association in Europe.

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