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  • 1.
    Adawi, Rahim
    University of Skövde, School of Engineering Science.
    Preventing fatal effects of overworking: Product design solution2018Independent thesis Basic level (university diploma), 20 credits / 30 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [en]

    “Overworking to death” is a phenomenon that has been noticeable in developing countries. The cause of death is mainly through ischemic strokes. While the victims’ occupations differed, they all shared a common characteristic, being positioned in a sedentary work, ranging from IT workers to doctors. This project’s aim was to develop a product that prevented or decreased the strokes that derived from sedentary overwork. This was mainly tackled by preventing one of the three causes of developing blood props, slowed blood flow. In order to gather rich data of the phenomenon, a qualitative study was conducted in China, during two months. By doing an extensive structured sampling, information rich data could be gathered during a short period of time. Data were derived from observations, questionnaires and an interview, which then was interpreted to customer needs and the final product specification. The final product became a trouser with an in built dynamic compression mechanic, that can compress the veins mostly during sitting activities, in order to prevent blood stasis. The compression mechanic works like the Chinese finger trap; compressing the calves while sitting and stretching the legs forward. It is made only out of polysaccharides fibres; cotton and corn.

  • 2.
    Gerafi, Joel
    et al.
    University of Skövde, School of Bioscience. University of Skövde, Systems Biology Research Environment. Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Psychology, University of Gothenburg, Sweden / Department of Clinical Neuroscience, Institute of Neuroscience and Physiology, The Sahlgrenska Academy at University of Gothenburg, Sweden / The Skaraborg Institute for Research and Development, Skövde, Sweden.
    Samuelsson, Hans
    Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Psychology, University of Gothenburg, Sweden / Department of Clinical Neuroscience, Institute of Neuroscience and Physiology, The Sahlgrenska Academy at University of Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Viken, Jo I.
    Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Psychology, University of Gothenburg, Sweden / Department of Clinical Neuroscience, Institute of Neuroscience and Physiology, The Sahlgrenska Academy at University of Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Jern, Christina
    Department of Laboratory Medicine, Institute of Biomedicine, The Sahlgrenska Academy at University of Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Blomstrand, Christian
    Department of Clinical Neuroscience, Institute of Neuroscience and Physiology, The Sahlgrenska Academy at University of Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Jood, Katarina
    Department of Clinical Neuroscience, Institute of Neuroscience and Physiology, The Sahlgrenska Academy at University of Gothenburg, Sweden / Department of Neurology, The Sahlgrenska University Hospital, Gothenburg, Sweden.
    The presence and prediction of lateralized inattention 7 years post-stroke2020In: Acta Neurologica Scandinavica, ISSN 0001-6314, E-ISSN 1600-0404Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Objective: Lateralized inattention is a typical sign of neglect and related to poor functional outcome. Knowledge of the long-term course of this phenomenon is limited. The purpose of this study was to investigate presence and predictors for signs of lateralized inattention 7 years after stroke. Methods: From a cohort of acute ischemic stroke patients, aged 18-69 years (n = 297), a consecutive series of 188 survivors without recurrent stroke at follow-up 7 years later were included. Within the first week after stroke onset, stroke severity was assessed according to the Scandinavian Stroke Scale. Target omissions, asymmetry of omissions, and perceptual speed according to Star- and Letter Cancellation Tests were also assessed. Presence of lateralized inattention at the 7-year follow-up was investigated with the Star- and Letter Cancellation Tests and with the neglect item in the National Institutes of Health Stroke Scale. Results: At the follow-up, 22 (11.7%) participants had lateralized inattention and the multivariable regression showed that independent significant baseline predictors were total omissions in target cancellations (P <.001) and inferior baseline performance on visual processing speed (P =.008). Conclusion: About one of ten individuals exhibited signs of lateralized inattention 7 years after stroke. Baseline performance in perceptual processing speed and target omissions independently predicted presence of late signs of lateralized inattention. This is the first time processing speed is recognized as a significant predictor of lateralized inattention several years after the stroke incidence, indicating that the longitudinal course of processing speed following stroke is a critical subject for future research. © 2020 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd

  • 3.
    Gustafson, Deborah R.
    et al.
    University of Skövde, School of Health and Education. University of Skövde, Health and Education.
    McFarlane, S. I.
    Obesity, cardiovascular disease risk and frailty in aging women with HIV infectionIn: Geriatrics, ISSN 2308-3417Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 4.
    Hammad, Yasser
    et al.
    Department of Anesthesiology, ICU and Perioperative Medicine, Hamad General Hospital, Box 3050, Doha, Qatar / Department Clinical Anesthesiology, Weill Cornell Medicine, Doha, Qatar.
    Elmoghazy, Walid
    Department of Transplant Surgery, Hamad General Hospital, Doha, Qatar / Department of Surgery, Sohag University, Egypt.
    El Ansari, Walid
    University of Skövde, School of Health and Education. University of Skövde, Health and Education. Department of Surgery, Hamad General Hospital, Doha, Qatar / Department of Medical Education, College of Medicine, Qatar University, Doha, Qatar.
    Lance, Marcus
    Department of Anesthesiology, ICU and Perioperative Medicine, Hamad General Hospital, Doha, Qatar / Department Clinical Anesthesiology, Weill Cornell Medicine, Doha, Qatar.
    Zaghw, Ahmed
    Department of Anesthesiology, ICU and Perioperative Medicine, Hamad General Hospital, Doha, Qatar.
    Shallik, Nabil
    Department of Anesthesiology, ICU and Perioperative Medicine, Hamad General Hospital, Doha, Qatar / Department Clinical Anesthesiology, Weill Cornell Medicine, Doha, Qatar / Department of Anesthesia, SICU, Tanta University, Egypt.
    Experimental effect of different dilutions of blood with human plasma protein fraction and large dose factor one on blood coagulation and chemistry in vitro2019In: Indian Journal of Anaesthesia, ISSN 0019-5049, Vol. 63, no 12, p. 1015-1021Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background and Aims: Human plasma protein fraction 5% (PPF5%) is an albumin-based colloid used to expand the plasma volume during volume deficiency. The current basic medical experimental study assessed in vitro coagulation of PPF5% solution and its effects on blood coagulation and chemistry. Methods: The study involved 20 volunteers, and each volunteer donated 20-50 ml of fresh blood. Three dilutions of blood with PPF5% dilutions were prepared (30, 50, and 70%). The fibrinogen dose required to correct coagulation in the 50% diluted samples was assessed (two doses used). The thromboelastogram (TEG) measured the haemostatic parameters (fibrinogen level, initiation of coagulation [R time], kinetics [K], acceleration of coagulation [α angle], maximum amplitude [MA] and coagulation index [CI]), and the ABL gas analyser measured the blood chemistry changes. Results: All dilutions showed significant TEG and blood chemistry changes when compared to controls. The two doses of fibrinogen corrected the clot formation speed with no significant difference in speed between the two doses. Acidosis measured by the strong ion gap (SID) and pH were significant for all dilutions when compared with the baseline. The 30% dilution remained within the lower normal acceptable value while 50% dilution was beyond the critical normal values. Conclusion: In vitro PPF5% to replace blood loss up to 50% dilution did not have significant coagulation and blood chemistry effects while coagulopathy should be expected in extreme dilutions (70%). Fibrinogen in a dose equivalent to 4 gm/70 kg adult improved clot strength at 50% dilution. 

  • 5.
    Malmrot, Gustav
    et al.
    University of Skövde, School of Life Sciences.
    Ulver, Erika
    University of Skövde, School of Life Sciences.
    Ett sviktande hjärta: patientupplevelser av att leva med en kronisk hjärtsvikt2010Independent thesis Basic level (degree of Bachelor), 10 credits / 15 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [en]

    As the occurrence of obesity increases amongst young people, so increases the risk of more people suffering from heart failure as early as during middle age. The aim is to describe the life experiences of middle aged persons living with chronic heart failure. The literature study is based on twelve published, qualitative, and scientifically proved articles derived from MedLine and Cinahl using queries representing the subject, as well as from manual searching in ScienceDirect and LIBRIS. These articles have been analyzed from a life world perspective. Four main themes and four sub themes were identified from the articles' results. The main themes are "The social life", "Quality of life", "Body failing", and "the Economical impact of chronic heart failure". These represent the main areas where the patients feel the greatest loss due to their condition. The discussion reveals the importance of informing the patients of the common prevalence of the feelings described in this study. Also, the nurse should function as a coach for self-care with continuous follow-ups. The result of this study will hopefully increase the understanding of the heart diseased patients' life situations.

  • 6.
    Olofsson, Peder S.
    et al.
    Center for Bioelectronic Medicine, Department of Medicine, Center for Molecular Medicine, Karolinska Institutet, Karolinska University Hospital, Stockholm, Sweden / Laboratory of Biomedical Science, The Feinstein Institute for Medical Research, Manhasset, New York, USA.
    Steinberg, Benjamin E.
    Laboratory of Biomedical Science, The Feinstein Institute for Medical Research, Manhasset, New York, USA / The Campbell Family Institute for Breast Cancer Research, University Health Network, Toronto, Ontario, Canada.
    Sobbi, Roozbeh
    Division of Cardiology, Peter Munk Cardiac Centre, University Health Network, Toronto, Ontario, Canada.
    Cox, Maureen A.
    The Campbell Family Institute for Breast Cancer Research, University Health Network, Toronto, Ontario, Canada.
    Ahmed, Mohamed N.
    Center for Heart and Lung Research, The Feinstein Institute for Medical Research, Manhasset, New York, USA.
    Oswald, Michaela
    Robert S. Boas Center for Genomics and Human Genetics, Feinstein Institute for Medical Research, Manhasset, New York, USA.
    Szekeres, Ferenc
    University of Skövde, School of Health and Education. University of Skövde, Health and Education. Department of Physiology and Pharmacology, Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Hanes, William M.
    Laboratory of Biomedical Science, The Feinstein Institute for Medical Research, Manhasset, New York, USA.
    Introini, Andrea
    Department of Medicine, Solna, Unit of Infectious Diseases, Center for Molecular Medicine, Karolinska Institutet, Karolinska University Hospital, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Liu, Shu Fang
    Center for Heart and Lung Research, The Feinstein Institute for Medical Research, Manhasset, New York, USA.
    Holodick, Nichol E.
    Center for Oncology and Cell Biology, The Feinstein Institute for Medical Research, Manhasset, New York, USA.
    Rothstein, Thomas L.
    Center for Oncology and Cell Biology, The Feinstein Institute for Medical Research, Manhasset, New York, USA.
    Lövdahl, Cecilia
    Department of Physiology and Pharmacology, Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Chavan, Sangeeta S.
    Laboratory of Biomedical Science, The Feinstein Institute for Medical Research, Manhasset, New York, USA.
    Yang, Huan
    Laboratory of Biomedical Science, The Feinstein Institute for Medical Research, Manhasset, New York, USA.
    Pavlov, Valentin A.
    Laboratory of Biomedical Science, The Feinstein Institute for Medical Research, Manhasset, New York, USA.
    Broliden, Kristina
    Department of Medicine, Solna, Unit of Infectious Diseases, Center for Molecular Medicine, Karolinska Institutet, Karolinska University Hospital, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Andersson, Ulf
    Department of Women's and Children's Health, Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Diamond, Betty
    The Center for Autoimmune and Musculoskeletal Diseases, The Feinstein Institute for Medical Research, Manhasset, New York, USA.
    Miller, Edmund J.
    Center for Heart and Lung Research, The Feinstein Institute for Medical Research, Manhasset, New York, USA.
    Arner, Anders
    Department of Physiology and Pharmacology, Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Gregersen, Peter K.
    Robert S. Boas Center for Genomics and Human Genetics, Feinstein Institute for Medical Research, Manhasset, New York, USA.
    Backx, Peter H.
    Division of Cardiology, Peter Munk Cardiac Centre, University Health Network, Toronto, Ontario, Canada / Department of Biology, York University, Toronto, Ontario, Canada.
    Mak, Tak W.
    The Campbell Family Institute for Breast Cancer Research, University Health Network, Toronto, Ontario, Canada.
    Tracey, Kevin J.
    Laboratory of Biomedical Science, The Feinstein Institute for Medical Research, Manhasset, New York, USA.
    Blood pressure regulation by CD4lymphocytes expressing choline acetyltransferase2016In: Nature Biotechnology, ISSN 1087-0156, E-ISSN 1546-1696, Vol. 34, no 10, p. 1066-1071Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Blood pressure regulation is known to be maintained by a neuro-endocrine circuit, but whether immune cells contribute to blood pressure homeostasis has not been determined. We previously showed that CD4(+) T lymphocytes that express choline acetyltransferase (ChAT), which catalyzes the synthesis of the vasorelaxant acetylcholine, relay neural signals(1). Here we show that these CD4(+)CD44(hi)CD62L(Io) T helper cells by gene expression are a distinct T-cell population defined by ChAT (CD4 T-ChAT). Mice lacking ChAT expression in CD4(+) cells have elevated arterial blood pressure, compared to littermate controls. Jurkat T cells overexpressing ChAT (JT(ChAT)) decreased blood pressure when infused into mice. Co-incubation of JT(ChAT) and endothelial cells increased endothelial cell levels of phosphorylated endothelial nitric oxide synthase, and of nitrates and nitrites in conditioned media, indicating increased release of the potent vasorelaxant nitric oxide. The isolation and characterization of CD4 T-ChAT cells will enable analysis of the role of these cells in hypotension and hypertension, and may suggest novel therapeutic strategies by targeting cell-mediated vasorelaxation.

  • 7.
    Scholtes, Rosalie A.
    et al.
    Diabetes Centre, Department of Internal Medicine, Amsterdam University Medical Centres, location VUmc, Amsterdam, Netherlands.
    van Raalte, Daniël H.
    Diabetes Centre, Department of Internal Medicine, Amsterdam University Medical Centres, location VUmc, Amsterdam, Netherlands.
    Correa-Rotter, Ricardo
    Nephrology and Mineral Metabolism, National Medical Science and Nutrition Institute Salvador Zubirán, Mexico City, Mexico.
    Toto, Robert D.
    University of Texas Southwestern Medical Center, Dallas, TX, United States.
    Heerspink, Hiddo J. L.
    Clinical Pharmacy and Pharmacology, University of Groningen, University Medical Center Groningen, Netherlands.
    Cain, Valerie
    Bogier Clinical and IT Solutions Inc., Raleigh, NC, United States.
    Sjöström, C. David
    AstraZeneca, Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Sartipy, Peter
    University of Skövde, School of Bioscience. University of Skövde, The Systems Biology Research Centre. AstraZeneca, Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Stefánsson, Bergur V.
    AstraZeneca, Gothenburg, Sweden.
    The effects of dapagliflozin on cardio-renal risk factors in patients with type 2 diabetes with or without renin-angiotensin system inhibitor treatment: a post hoc analysis2019In: Diabetes, obesity and metabolism, ISSN 1462-8902, E-ISSN 1463-1326, Vol. 22, no 4, p. 549-556Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Aims: Renin-angiotensin system inhibitors (RASi) are the most effective treatments for diabetic kidney disease but significant residual renal risk remains, possibly because of other mechanisms of kidney disease progression unrelated to RAS that may be present. Sodium-glucose co-transporter-2 inhibitors reduce albuminuria and may complement RASi by offering additional renal protection. This post hoc analysis investigated the effects of dapagliflozin on cardio-renal risk factors in patients with type 2 diabetes (T2D) with increased albuminuria treated with or without RASi at baseline. Materials and methods: We evaluated the effects of dapagliflozin 10 mg/day over 12–24 weeks across 13 placebo-controlled studies in patients with T2D with a urinary albumin-to-creatinine ratio (UACR) ≥30 mg/g at baseline. Patients were divided into two subgroups based on treatment with or without RASi at baseline. Results: Compared with patients with RASi at baseline (n = 957), patients without RASi (n = 302) were younger, had a shorter duration of diabetes (7 vs. 12 years), higher estimated glomerular filtration rate (eGFR) and lower UACR, serum uric acid (sUA), body weight and systolic blood pressure. Placebo-adjusted treatment effects of dapagliflozin on UACR, eGFR, glycated haemoglobin and haematocrit over 24 weeks were similar across groups. Mean reductions in body weight and sUA were more distinct in patients without RASi treatment at baseline. Conclusions: Treatment with dapagliflozin over 24 weeks provides similar clinically relevant improvements in metabolic and haemodynamic parameters, and similar reductions in UACR, in patients with T2D with elevated albuminuria treated with or without RASi at baseline. © 2019 The Authors. Diabetes, Obesity and Metabolism published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

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