his.sePublikationer
Ändra sökning
Avgränsa sökresultatet
1234567 1 - 20 av 418
RefereraExporteraLänk till träfflistan
Permanent länk
Referera
Referensformat
  • apa
  • harvard1
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
  • Annat format
Fler format
Språk
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Annat språk
Fler språk
Utmatningsformat
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf
Träffar per sida
  • 5
  • 10
  • 20
  • 50
  • 100
  • 250
Sortering
  • Standard (Relevans)
  • Författare A-Ö
  • Författare Ö-A
  • Titel A-Ö
  • Titel Ö-A
  • Publikationstyp A-Ö
  • Publikationstyp Ö-A
  • Äldst först
  • Nyast först
  • Skapad (Äldst först)
  • Skapad (Nyast först)
  • Senast uppdaterad (Äldst först)
  • Senast uppdaterad (Nyast först)
  • Disputationsdatum (tidigaste först)
  • Disputationsdatum (senaste först)
  • Standard (Relevans)
  • Författare A-Ö
  • Författare Ö-A
  • Titel A-Ö
  • Titel Ö-A
  • Publikationstyp A-Ö
  • Publikationstyp Ö-A
  • Äldst först
  • Nyast först
  • Skapad (Äldst först)
  • Skapad (Nyast först)
  • Senast uppdaterad (Äldst först)
  • Senast uppdaterad (Nyast först)
  • Disputationsdatum (tidigaste först)
  • Disputationsdatum (senaste först)
Markera
Maxantalet träffar du kan exportera från sökgränssnittet är 250. Vid större uttag använd dig av utsökningar.
  • 1.
    Laaksonen, L.
    et al.
    University of Turku, Turku, Finland / Turku University Hospital, Turku, Finland.
    Kallioinen, M.
    Turku University Hospital, Turku, Finland.
    Långsjö, J.
    Tampere University Hospital, Tampere, Finland.
    Laitio, T.
    Turku University Hospital, Turku, Finland.
    Scheinin, A.
    University of Turku. Turku, Finland / Turku University Hospital, Turku, Finland.
    Scheinin, J.
    Kuopio University Hospital, Kuopio, Finland.
    Kaisti, K.
    Oulu University Hospital, Oulu, Finland.
    Maksimow, A.
    Turku University Hospital, Turku, Finland.
    Kallionpää, R. E.
    Turku University Hospital, Turku, Finland / University of Turku, Turku, Finland.
    Rajala, V.
    Turku University Hospital, Turku, Finland.
    Johansson, J.
    University of Turku, Turku, Finland / Turku University Hospital, Turku, Finland / Umeå University, Umeå, Sweden.
    Kantonen, O.
    University of Turku, Turku, Finland / Turku University Hospital, Turku, Finland / University of California, Irvine, CA, USA.
    Nyman, M.
    Turku University Hospital, Turku, Finland.
    Sirén, S.
    Turku University Hospital, Turku, Finland.
    Valli, Katja
    Högskolan i Skövde, Institutionen för biovetenskap. Högskolan i Skövde, Forskningscentrum för Systembiologi. Turku University Hospital, Turku, Finland / University of Turku, Turku, Finland.
    Revonsuo, Antti
    Högskolan i Skövde, Institutionen för biovetenskap. Högskolan i Skövde, Forskningscentrum för Systembiologi. University of Turku, Turku, Finland.
    Solin, O.
    University of Turku, Turku, Finland / Turku University Hospital, Turku, Finland.
    Vahlberg, T.
    University of Turku, Turku, Finland / Turku University Hospital, Turku, Finland.
    Alkire, M.
    University of California, Irvine, CA, USA.
    Scheinin, Harry
    University of Turku, Turku, Finland / Turku University Hospital, Turku, Finland.
    Comparative effects of dexmedetomidine, propofol, sevoflurane, and S-ketamine on regional cerebral glucose metabolism in humans: a positron emission tomography study2018Ingår i: British Journal of Anaesthesia, ISSN 0007-0912, E-ISSN 1471-6771, Vol. 121, nr 1, s. 281-290Artikel i tidskrift (Refereegranskat)
    Abstract [en]

    IntroductionThe highly selective α2-agonist dexmedetomidine has become a popular sedative for neurointensive care patients. However, earlier studies have raised concern that dexmedetomidine might reduce cerebral blood flow without a concomitant decrease in metabolism. Here, we compared the effects of dexmedetomidine on the regional cerebral metabolic rate of glucose (CMRglu) with three commonly used anaesthetic drugs at equi-sedative doses.

    MethodsOne hundred and sixty healthy male subjects were randomised to EC50 for verbal command of dexmedetomidine (1.5 ng ml−1n=40), propofol (1.7 μg ml−1n=40), sevoflurane (0.9% end-tidal; n=40) or S-ketamine (0.75 μg ml−1n=20) or placebo (n=20). Anaesthetics were administered using target-controlled infusion or vapouriser with end-tidal monitoring. 18F-labelled fluorodeoxyglucose was administered 20 min after commencement of anaesthetic administration, and high-resolution positron emission tomography with arterial blood activity samples was used to quantify absolute CMRglu for whole brain and 15 brain regions.

    ResultsAt the time of [F18]fluorodeoxyglucose injection, 55% of dexmedetomidine, 45% of propofol, 85% of sevoflurane, 45% of S-ketamine, and 0% of placebo subjects were unresponsive. Whole brain CMRglu was 63%, 71%, 71%, and 96% of placebo in the dexmedetomidine, propofol, sevoflurane, and S-ketamine groups, respectively (P<0.001 between the groups). The lowest CMRglu was observed in nearly all brain regions with dexmedetomidine (P<0.05 compared with all other groups). With S-ketamine, CMRgludid not differ from placebo.

    ConclusionsAt equi-sedative doses in humans, potency in reducing CMRglu was dexmedetomidine>propofol>ketamine=placebo. These findings alleviate concerns for dexmedetomidine-induced vasoconstriction and cerebral ischaemia.

  • 2.
    Wallner, Fredrik K.
    et al.
    Högskolan i Skövde, Institutionen för biovetenskap. Högskolan i Skövde, Forskningscentrum för Systembiologi. Redoxis AB/ProNoxis AB, Lund, Sweden / Wallner Medicinal Chemistry AB, Göteborg, Sweden.
    Hultquist Hopkins, Malin
    Redoxis AB/ProNoxis AB, Lund, Sweden.
    Woodworth, Nina
    Redoxis AB/ProNoxis AB, Lund, Sweden.
    Lindvall Bark, Therese
    Redoxis AB/ProNoxis AB, Lund, Sweden.
    Olofsson, Peter
    Redoxis AB/ProNoxis AB, Lund, Sweden.
    Tilevik, Andreas
    Högskolan i Skövde, Institutionen för biovetenskap. Högskolan i Skövde, Forskningscentrum för Systembiologi.
    Correlation and cluster analysis of immunomodulatory drugs based on cytokine profiles2018Ingår i: Pharmacological Research, ISSN 1043-6618, E-ISSN 1096-1186, Vol. 128, s. 244-251Artikel i tidskrift (Refereegranskat)
    Abstract [en]

    Drug discovery is a constant struggle to overcome hurdles posed by the complexity of biological systems. One of these hurdles is to find and understand the molecular target and the biological mechanism of action. Although the molecular target has been determined, the true biological effect may be unforeseen also for well-established drugs. Hence, there is a need for novel ways to increase the knowledge of the biological effects of drugs in the developmental process. In this study, we have determined cytokine profiles for 26 non-biological immunomodulatory drugs or drug candidates and used these profiles to cluster the compounds according to their effect in a preclinical ex vivo culture model of arthritis. This allows for prediction of functions and drug target of a novel drug candidate based on profiles obtained in this study. Results from the study showed that the JAK inhibitors tofacitinib and ruxolitinib formed a robust cluster and were found to have a distinct cytokine profile compared to the other drugs. Another robust cluster included the calcineurin inhibitors cyclosporine A and tacrolimus and the protein kinase inhibitors fostamatinib disodium and sotrastaurin acetate, which caused a strong overall inhibition of the cytokine production. The results of this methodology indicate that cytokine profiles can be used to provide a fingerprint-like identification of a drug as a tool to benchmark novel drugs and to improve descriptions of mode of action.

  • 3.
    Synnergren, Jane
    et al.
    Högskolan i Skövde, Institutionen för biovetenskap. Högskolan i Skövde, Forskningscentrum för Systembiologi.
    Dönnes, Pierre
    SciCross AB, Skövde, Sweden.
    Current Perspectives on Multi-Omics Data Integration With Application on Toxicity Biomarkers Discovery2018Ingår i: Open Access journal of Toxicology, ISSN 2474-7599, Vol. 2, nr 5, s. 1-2, artikel-id OAJT.MS.ID.555597Artikel, forskningsöversikt (Refereegranskat)
  • 4.
    Scheinin, Annalotta
    et al.
    University of Turku, Finland / Hospital District of Southwest Finland, Turku, Finland / Turku University Hospital, Finland.
    Kallionpää, Roosa E.
    Turku University Hospital, Finland / University of Turku, Finland.
    Li, Duan
    University of Michigan Medical School, Ann Arbor, Michigan.
    Kallioinen, Minna
    Turku University Hospital, Finland.
    Kaisti, Kaike
    University of Turku, Finland / Hospital District of Southwest Finland, Turku, Finland / Oulu University Hospital, Finland.
    Långsjö, Jaakko
    University of Turku, Finland / Hospital District of Southwest Finland, Turku, Finland / Tampere University Hospital, Finland.
    Maksimow, Anu
    University of Turku, Finland / Hospital District of Southwest Finland, Turku, Finland / Turku University Hospital, Finland.
    Vahlberg, Tero
    University of Turku, Finland / Turku University Hospital, Finland.
    Valli, Katja
    Högskolan i Skövde, Institutionen för biovetenskap. Högskolan i Skövde, Forskningscentrum för Systembiologi. University of Turku, Finland.
    Mashour, George A.
    University of Michigan Medical School, Ann Arbor, Michigan.
    Revonsuo, Antti
    Högskolan i Skövde, Institutionen för biovetenskap. Högskolan i Skövde, Forskningscentrum för Systembiologi. University of Turku, Finland.
    Scheinin, Harry
    University of Turku, Finland / Hospital District of Southwest Finland, Turku, Finland / Turku University Hospital, Finland.
    Differentiating Drug-related and State-related Effects of Dexmedetomidine and Propofol on the Electroencephalogram2018Ingår i: Anesthesiology, ISSN 0003-3022, E-ISSN 1528-1175, Vol. 129, nr 1, s. 22-36Artikel i tidskrift (Refereegranskat)
    Abstract [en]

    BACKGROUND

    Differentiating drug-related changes and state-related changes on the electroencephalogram during anesthetic-induced unconsciousness has remained a challenge. To distinguish these, we designed a rigorous experimental protocol with two drugs known to have distinct molecular mechanisms of action. We hypothesized that drug- and state-related changes can be separated.

    METHODS: 

    Forty-seven healthy participants were randomized to receive dexmedetomidine (n = 23) or propofol (n = 24) as target-controlled infusions until loss of responsiveness. Then, an attempt was made to arouse the participant to regain responsiveness while keeping the drug infusion constant. Finally, the concentration was increased 1.5-fold to achieve presumable loss of consciousness. We conducted statistical comparisons between the drugs and different states of consciousness for spectral bandwidths, and observed how drug-induced electroencephalogram patterns reversed upon awakening. Cross-frequency coupling was also analyzed between slow-wave phase and alpha power.

    RESULTS: 

    Eighteen (78%) and 10 (42%) subjects were arousable during the constant drug infusion in the dexmedetomidine and propofol groups, respectively (P = 0.011 between the drugs). Corresponding with deepening anesthetic level, slow-wave power increased, and a state-dependent alpha anteriorization was detected with both drugs, especially with propofol. Negative phase-amplitude coupling before and during loss of responsiveness frontally and positive coupling during the highest drug concentration posteriorly were observed in the propofol but not in the dexmedetomidine group.

    CONCLUSIONS: 

    Electroencephalogram effects of dexmedetomidine and propofol are strongly drug- and state-dependent. Changes in slow-wave and alpha activity seemed to best detect different states of consciousness.

  • 5.
    Sikka, Pilleriin
    et al.
    Högskolan i Skövde, Institutionen för biovetenskap. Högskolan i Skövde, Forskningscentrum för Systembiologi. Centre for Cognitive Neuroscience, Department of Psychology, University of Turku, Finland.
    Revonsuo, Antti
    Högskolan i Skövde, Institutionen för biovetenskap. Högskolan i Skövde, Forskningscentrum för Systembiologi. Centre for Cognitive Neuroscience, Department of Psychology, University of Turku, Finland.
    Sandman, Nils
    Centre for Cognitive Neuroscience, Department of Psychology, University of Turku, Finland / The Genomics and Biomarkers Unit, National Institute for Health and Welfare, Finland.
    Tuominen, Jarno
    Centre for Cognitive Neuroscience, Department of Psychology, University of Turku, Finland.
    Valli, Katja
    Högskolan i Skövde, Institutionen för biovetenskap. Högskolan i Skövde, Forskningscentrum för Systembiologi. Centre for Cognitive Neuroscience, Department of Psychology, University of Turku, Finland.
    Dream emotions: a comparison of home dream reports with laboratory early and late REM dream reports2018Ingår i: Journal of Sleep Research, ISSN 0962-1105, E-ISSN 1365-2869, Vol. 27, nr 2, s. 206-214Artikel i tidskrift (Refereegranskat)
    Abstract [en]

    The aim of this study was to compare the emotional content of dream reports collected at home upon morning awakenings with those collectedin the laboratory upon early and late rapid eye movement (REM) sleep awakenings. Eighteen adults (11 women, seven men; mean age = 25.89 ± 4.85) wrote down their home dreams every morning immediately upon awakening during a 7-day period. Participants also spent two non-consecutive nights in the sleep laboratory where they were awoken 5 min into each continuous REM sleep stage, upon which they gave a verbal dream report. The content of a total of 151 home and 120 laboratory dream reports was analysed by two blind judges using the modified Differential Emotions Scale. It was found that: (1) home dream reports were more emotional than laboratory early REM dream reports, but not more emotional than laboratory late REM dream reports; (2) home dream reports contained a higher density of emotions than laboratory (early or late REM) dream reports; and (3) home dream reports were more negative than laboratory dream reports, but differences between home and early REM reports were larger than those between home and late REM reports. The results suggest that differences between home and laboratory dream reports in overall emotionality may be due to the time of night effect. Whether differences in the density of emotions and negative emotionality are due to sleep environment or due to different reporting procedures and time spent in a sleep stage, respectively, remains to be determined in future studies.

  • 6.
    Radek, L.
    et al.
    Turku PET Centre, University of Turku and Turku University Hospital, Turku, Finland.
    Kallionpää, R. E.
    Department of Psychology and Speech-Language Pathology, and Turku Brain and Mind Center, University of Turku, Turku,Finland / Department of Perioperative Services, Intensive Care and Pain Medicine, Turku University Hospital, Turku, Finland.
    Karvonen, M.
    Department of Psychology and Speech-Language Pathology, and Turku Brain and Mind Center, University of Turku, Turku,Finland.
    Scheinin, A.
    Turku PET Centre, University of Turku and Turku University Hospital, Turku, Finland / Department of Perioperative Services, Intensive Care and Pain Medicine, Turku University Hospital, Turku, Finland.
    Maksimow, A.
    Department of Perioperative Services, Intensive Care and Pain Medicine, Turku University Hospital, Turku, Finland.
    Långsjö, J.
    Turku PET Centre, University of Turku and Turku University Hospital, Turku, Finland / Department of Intensive Care, Tampere University Hospital, Tampere,Finland.
    Kaisti, K.
    Turku PET Centre, University of Turku and Turku University Hospital, Turku, Finland.
    Vahlberg, T.
    Department of Clinical Medicine, Biostatistics, University of Turku and Turku University Hospital,Turku, Finland.
    Revonsuo, Antti
    Högskolan i Skövde, Institutionen för biovetenskap. Högskolan i Skövde, Forskningscentrum för Systembiologi. Department of Psychology and Speech-Language Pathology, and Turku Brain and Mind Center, University of Turku, Turku, Finland.
    Scheinin, H.
    Turku PET Centre, University of Turku and Turku University Hospital, Turku, Finland / Department of Perioperative Services, Intensive Care and Pain Medicine, Turku University Hospital, Turku, Finland / Integrative Physiology and Pharmacology, Institute of Biomedicine, University of Turku, Turku, Finland.
    Valli, Katja
    Högskolan i Skövde, Institutionen för biovetenskap. Högskolan i Skövde, Forskningscentrum för Systembiologi. Department of Psychology and Speech-Language Pathology, and Turku Brain and Mind Center, University of Turku, Turku,Finland / Department of Perioperative Services, Intensive Care and Pain Medicine, Turku University Hospital, Turku, Finland.
    Dreaming and awareness during dexmedetomidine- and propofol-induced unresponsiveness2018Ingår i: British Journal of Anaesthesia, ISSN 0007-0912, E-ISSN 1471-6771, Vol. 121, nr 1, s. 260-269Artikel i tidskrift (Refereegranskat)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: Experiences during anaesthetic-induced unresponsiveness have previously been investigated by interviews after recovery. To explore whether experiences occur during drug administration, we interviewed participants during target-controlled infusion (TCI) of dexmedetomidine or propofol and after recovery. Methods: Healthy participants received dexmedetomidine (n = 23) or propofol (n = 24) in stepwise increments until loss of responsiveness (LOR1). During TCI we attempted to arouse them for interview (return of responsiveness, ROR1). After the interview, if unresponsiveness ensued with the same dose (LOR2), the procedure was repeated (ROR2). Finally, the concentration was increased 1.5-fold to achieve presumable loss of consciousness (LOC), infusion terminated, and the participants interviewed upon recovery (ROR3). An emotional sound stimulus was presented during LORs and LOC, and memory for stimuli was assessed with recognition task after recovery. Interview transcripts were content analysed. Results: Of participants receiving dexmedetomidine, 18/23 were arousable from LOR1 and LOR2. Of participants receiving propofol, 10/24 were arousable from LOR1 and two of four were arousable from LOR2. Of 93 interviews performed, 84% included experiences from periods of unresponsiveness (dexmedetomidine 90%, propofol 74%). Internally generated experiences (dreaming) were present in 86% of reports from unresponsive periods, while externally generated experiences (awareness) were rare and linked to brief arousals. No within drug differences in the prevalence or content of experiences during infusion vs after recovery were observed, but participants receiving dexmedetomidine reported dreaming and awareness more often. Participants receiving dexmedetomidine recognised the emotional sounds better than participants receiving propofol (42% vs 15%), but none reported references to sounds spontaneously. Conclusion: Anaesthetic-induced unresponsiveness does not induce unconsciousness or necessarily even disconnectedness.

  • 7.
    Junnarkara, Manisha V.
    et al.
    Dr. D. Y. Patil Biotechnology and Bioinformatics Institute, Dr. D. Y. Patil Vidyapeeth, Pune, India.
    Thakarea, Prasad M.
    Dr. D. Y. Patil Biotechnology and Bioinformatics Institute, Dr. D. Y. Patil Vidyapeeth, Pune, India.
    Yewalea, Priti P.
    Dr. D. Y. Patil Biotechnology and Bioinformatics Institute, Dr. D. Y. Patil Vidyapeeth, Pune, India.
    Rahman, Aminur
    Högskolan i Skövde, Institutionen för biovetenskap. Högskolan i Skövde, Forskningscentrum för Systembiologi.
    Jass, Jana
    Örebro University, Sweden.
    Mandal, Abul
    Högskolan i Skövde, Institutionen för biovetenskap. Högskolan i Skövde, Forskningscentrum för Systembiologi.
    Nawani, Neelu N.
    Dr. D. Y. Patil Biotechnology and Bioinformatics Institute, Dr. D. Y. Patil Vidyapeeth, Pune, India.
    Evaluation of Probiotic Potential of Lactic Acid Bacteria Isolated from Different Sources in Western India2018Ingår i: Food biotechnology, ISSN 0890-5436, E-ISSN 1532-4249, Vol. 32, nr 2, s. 112-129Artikel i tidskrift (Refereegranskat)
    Abstract [en]

    Lactic acid bacteria isolated from unconventional sources are often attractive targets in the quest for obtaining better probiotics. In the present study, 16 members of the genus Lactobacillus, isolated from 3 different sources in western India, viz., plants, fermented foods and beverages, and human feces, were evaluated for their probiotic and bioactive properties. The isolates were closely related to Lactobacillus fermentum, Lactobacillus pentosus, and mainly Lactobacillus plantarum. The isolates were tolerant to bile salt, acidic pH and pancreatin, although pancreatin tolerance was generally low. Cellular extracts of several isolates displayed antioxidant activity, while cell-free supernatants displayed antibacterial activity against human pathogens. Antioxidant activity of Lactobacilli of human origin was higher than those from vegetables or fermented foods and beverages. L. plantarum AG40V prevented spoilage of fresh-cut fruits, vegetables and sprouted mung-beans. Lactobacilli from all sources displayed equal probiotic potential and those of human origin displayed superior antioxidant activity over others.

  • 8.
    Holmgren, Gustav
    et al.
    Högskolan i Skövde, Institutionen för biovetenskap. Högskolan i Skövde, Forskningscentrum för Systembiologi. Department of Clinical Chemistry and Transfusion Medicine, Institute of Biomedicine, University of Gothenburg, Sahlgrenska University Hospital, Gothenburg, Sweden / Takara Bio Europe AB, Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Sartipy, Peter
    Högskolan i Skövde, Institutionen för biovetenskap. Högskolan i Skövde, Forskningscentrum för Systembiologi. AstraZeneca Gothenburg, CVMD GMed, GMD, Mölndal, Sweden.
    Andersson, Christian X.
    Takara Bio Europe AB, Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Lindahl, Anders
    Department of Clinical Chemistry and Transfusion Medicine, Institute of Biomedicine, University of Gothenburg, Sahlgrenska University Hospital, Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Synnergren, Jane
    Högskolan i Skövde, Institutionen för biovetenskap. Högskolan i Skövde, Forskningscentrum för Systembiologi.
    Expression profiling of human pluripotent stem cell-derived cardiomyocytes exposed to doxorubicin - integration and visualization of multi omics data2018Ingår i: Toxicological Sciences, ISSN 1096-6080, E-ISSN 1096-0929, Vol. 163, nr 1, s. 182-195Artikel i tidskrift (Refereegranskat)
    Abstract [en]

    Anthracyclines, such as doxorubicin, are highly efficient chemotherapeutic agents against a variety of cancers. However, anthracyclines are also among the most cardiotoxic therapeutic drugs presently on the market. Chemotherapeutic-induced cardiomyopathy is one of the leading causes of disease and mortality in cancer survivors. The exact mechanisms responsible for doxorubicin-induced cardiomyopathy are not completely known, but the fact that the cardiotoxicity is dose-dependent and that there is a variation in time-to-onset of toxicity, and gender- and age differences suggests that several mechanisms may be involved.In the present study, we investigated doxorubicin-induced cardiotoxicity in human pluripotent stem cell-derived cardiomyocytes using proteomics. In addition, different sources of omics data (protein, mRNA, and microRNA) from the same experimental setup were further combined and analyzed using newly developed methods to identify differential expression in data of various origin and types. Subsequently, the results were integrated in order to generate a combined visualization of the findings.In our experimental model system, we exposed cardiomyocytes derived from human pluripotent stem cells to doxorubicin for up to two days, followed by a wash-out period of additionally 12 days. Besides an effect on the cell morphology and cardiomyocyte functionality, the data show a strong effect of doxorubicin on all molecular levels investigated. Differential expression patterns that show a linkage between the proteome, transcriptome, and the regulatory microRNA network, were identified. These findings help to increase the understanding of the mechanisms behind anthracycline-induced cardiotoxicity and suggest putative biomarkers for this condition.

  • 9.
    Revonsuo, Antti
    Högskolan i Skövde, Institutionen för biovetenskap. Högskolan i Skövde, Forskningscentrum för Systembiologi. University of Turku, Finland.
    Foundations of Consciousness2018Bok (Refereegranskat)
  • 10.
    Axelsson, Kristian F.
    et al.
    Skaraborg Hospital, Skövde, Sweden / University of Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Werling, Malin
    Sahlgrenska Academy, University of Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Eliasson, Björn
    Sahlgrenska Academy, University of Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Szabo, Eva
    Örebro University, Sweden.
    Näslund, Ingmar
    Örebro University, Sweden.
    Wedel, Hans
    Sahlgrenska Academy, University of Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Lundh, Dan
    Högskolan i Skövde, Institutionen för biovetenskap. Högskolan i Skövde, Forskningscentrum för Systembiologi.
    Lorentzon, Mattias
    University of Gothenburg, Sweden / Sahlgrenska University Hospital, Mölndal, Sweden.
    Fracture risk after gastric bypass surgery – a retrospective cohort study2018Ingår i: Journal of Bone and Mineral Research, ISSN 0884-0431, E-ISSN 1523-4681Artikel i tidskrift (Refereegranskat)
    Abstract [en]

    Gastric bypass surgery constitutes the most common and effective bariatric surgery to treat obesity. Gastric bypass leads to bone loss, but fracture risk following surgery has been insufficiently studied. Furthermore, the association between gastric bypass and fracture risk has not been studied in patients with diabetes, which is a risk factor for fracture and affected by surgery. In this retrospective cohort study using Swedish national databases, 38 971 obese patients undergoing gastric bypass were identified, 7758 with diabetes and 31 213 without. An equal amount of well-balanced controls were identified through multivariable 1:1 propensity score matching. The risk of fracture and fall injury was investigated using Cox proportional hazards and flexible parameter models. Fracture risk according to weight loss and degree of calcium and vitamin D supplementation one-year post- surgery was investigated. During a median follow-up time of 3.1 (IQR 1.7-4.6) years, gastric bypass was associated with increased risk of any fracture, in patients with and without diabetes using a multivariable Cox model (HR 1.26, 95% CI 1.05- 1.53 and HR 1.32, 95% CI 1.18-1.47, respectively). Using flexible parameter models, the fracture risk appeared to increase with time. The risk of fall injury without fracture was also increased after gastric bypass. Larger weight loss or poor calcium and vitamin D supplementation after surgery were not associated with increased fracture risk. In conclusion, gastric bypass surgery is associated with an increased fracture risk, which appears to be increasing with time and not associated with degree of weight loss or calcium and vitamin D supplementation following surgery. An increased risk of fall injury was seen after surgery, which could contribute to the increased fracture risk. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved.

  • 11.
    Roubinet, Eve
    et al.
    Department of Ecology, Swedish University of Agricultural Sciences, Uppsala, Sweden.
    Jonsson, Tomas
    Högskolan i Skövde, Institutionen för biovetenskap. Högskolan i Skövde, Forskningscentrum för Systembiologi. Department of Ecology, Swedish University of Agricultural Sciences, Uppsala, Sweden.
    Malsher, Gerard
    Department of Ecology, Swedish University of Agricultural Sciences, Uppsala, Sweden.
    Staudacher, Karin
    Mountain Agriculture Research Unit, Institute of Ecology, University of Innsbruck, Innsbruck, Austria.
    Traugott, Michael
    Mountain Agriculture Research Unit, Institute of Ecology, University of Innsbruck, Innsbruck, Austria.
    Ekbom, Barbara
    Department of Ecology, Swedish University of Agricultural Sciences, Uppsala, Sweden.
    Jonsson, Mattias
    Department of Ecology, Swedish University of Agricultural Sciences, Uppsala, Sweden.
    High Redundancy as well as Complementary Prey Choice Characterize Generalist Predator Food Webs in Agroecosystems2018Ingår i: Scientific Reports, ISSN 2045-2322, E-ISSN 2045-2322, Vol. 8, artikel-id 8054Artikel i tidskrift (Refereegranskat)
    Abstract [en]

    Food web structure influences ecosystem functioning and the strength and stability of associated ecosystem services. With their broad diet, generalist predators represent key nodes in the structure of many food webs and they contribute substantially to ecosystem services such as biological pest control. However, until recently it has been difficult to empirically assess food web structure with generalist predators. We utilized DNA-based molecular gut-content analyses to assess the prey use of a set of generalist invertebrate predator species common in temperate agricultural fields. We investigated the degree of specialization of predator-prey food webs at two key stages of the cropping season and analysed the link temperature of different trophic links, to identify non-random predation. We found a low level of specialization in our food webs, and identified warm and cool links which may result from active prey choice or avoidance. We also found a within-season variation in interaction strength between predators and aphid pests which differed among predator species. Our results show a high time-specific functional redundancy of the predator community, but also suggest temporally complementary prey choice due to within-season succession of some predator species.

  • 12.
    Lundin, Anders
    et al.
    Discovery Sciences, IMED Biotech Unit, AstraZeneca, Mölndal, Sweden / Department of Neuroscience, Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Delsing, Louise
    Högskolan i Skövde, Institutionen för biovetenskap. Högskolan i Skövde, Forskningscentrum för Systembiologi. Discovery Sciences, IMED Biotech Unit, AstraZeneca, Mölndal, Sweden / Institute of Neuroscience and Physiology, Department of Neurochemistry, the Sahlgrenska Academy at the University of Gothenburg, Mölndal, Sweden.
    Clausen, Maryam
    Discovery Sciences, IMED Biotech Unit, AstraZeneca, Mölndal, Sweden.
    Ricchiuto, Piero
    Discovery Sciences, IMED Biotech Unit, AstraZeneca, Mölndal, Sweden.
    Sanchez, José
    Discovery Sciences, IMED Biotech Unit, AstraZeneca, Mölndal, Sweden.
    Sabirsh, Alan
    Pharmaceutical Sciences, IMED Biotech Unit, AstraZeneca, Mölndal, Sweden.
    Ding, Mei
    Discovery Sciences, IMED Biotech Unit, AstraZeneca, Mölndal, Sweden.
    Synnergren, Jane
    Högskolan i Skövde, Institutionen för biovetenskap. Högskolan i Skövde, Forskningscentrum för Systembiologi.
    Zetterberg, Henrik
    Institute of Neuroscience and Physiology, Department of Neurochemistry, the Sahlgrenska Academy at the University of Gothenburg, Mölndal, Sweden / Clinical Neurochemistry Laboratory, Sahlgrenska University Hospital, Mölndal, Sweden / Department of Molecular Neuroscience, UCL Institute of Neurology, London, UK / UK Dementia Research Institute at UCL, London, UK.
    Brolén, Gabriella
    Discovery Sciences, IMED Biotech Unit, AstraZeneca, Mölndal, Sweden.
    Hicks, Ryan
    Discovery Sciences, IMED Biotech Unit, AstraZeneca, Mölndal, Sweden.
    Herland, Anna
    Department of Micro and Nanosystems KTH Royal Institute of Technology, Stockholm, Sweden / Department of Physiology and Pharmacology, Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Falk, Anna
    Department of Neuroscience, Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Human iPS-Derived Astroglia from a Stable Neural Precursor State Show Improved Functionality Compared with Conventional Astrocytic Models2018Ingår i: Stem Cell Reports, ISSN 2213-6711, Vol. 10, nr 3, s. 1030-1045Artikel i tidskrift (Refereegranskat)
    Abstract [en]

    In vivo studies of human brain cellular function face challenging ethical and practical difficulties. Animal models are typically used but display distinct cellular differences. One specific example is astrocytes, recently recognized for contribution to neurological diseases and a link to the genetic risk factor apolipoprotein E (APOE). Current astrocytic in vitro models are questioned for lack of biological characterization. Here, we report human induced pluripotent stem cell (hiPSC)-derived astroglia (NES-Astro) developed under defined conditions through long-term neuroepithelial-like stem (ltNES) cells. We characterized NES-Astro and astrocytic models from primary sources, astrocytoma (CCF-STTG1), and hiPSCs through transcriptomics, proteomics, glutamate uptake, inflammatory competence, calcium signaling response, and APOE secretion. Finally, we assess modulation of astrocyte biology using APOE-annotated compounds, confirming hits of the cholesterol biosynthesis pathway in adult and hiPSC-derived astrocytes. Our data show large diversity among astrocytic models and emphasize a cellular context when studying astrocyte biology.

  • 13.
    Synnergren, Jane
    et al.
    Högskolan i Skövde, Institutionen för biovetenskap. Högskolan i Skövde, Forskningscentrum för Systembiologi.
    Ghosheh, Nidal
    Högskolan i Skövde, Institutionen för biovetenskap. Högskolan i Skövde, Forskningscentrum för Systembiologi.
    Dönnes, Pierre
    SciCross AB.
    Integration of Biomedical Big Data Requires Efficient Batch Effect Reduction2018Ingår i: 10th International Conference on Bioinformatics and Computational Biology (BICOB): Las Vegas, Nevada, USA 19 – 21 March 2018 / [ed] Hisham Al-Mubaid, Qin Ding, Oliver Eulenstein, 2018, s. 76-82Konferensbidrag (Refereegranskat)
    Abstract [en]

     Efficiency in dealing with batch effects will be the next frontier in large-scale biological data analysis, particularly when involving the integration of different types of datasets. Large-scale omics techniques have quickly developed during the last decade and huge amounts of data are now generated, which has started to revolutionize the area of medical research. With the increase in the volume of data across the whole spectrum of biology, problems related to data analytics are continuously increasing as analysis and interpretation of these large volumes of molecular data has become a real challenge. Tremendous efforts have been made to obtain data from various molecular levels and the most recent trends show that more and more researchers now are trying to integrate data of various molecular types to inform hypotheses and biological questions. Tightly connected to this work are the batch-related biases that commonly are apparent between different datasets, but these problems are often not tackled. In present study the ComBat algorithm was applied and evaluated on two different data integration problems. Results show that the batch effects present in the integrated datasets efficiently could be removed by applying the ComBat algorithm.

  • 14.
    Howell, Daniel
    et al.
    Institute of Marine Research, Nordnes, Norway.
    Kempf, Alexander
    Thuenen Institute of Sea Fisheries, Hamburg, Germany.
    Belgrano, Andrea
    Swedish University of Agricultural Sciences, Dept. Aquatic Resources, Lysekil, Sweden.
    Thorpe, Robert
    Centre for Environment, Fisheries and Aquaculture Science, Suffolk, United Kingdom.
    Vinther, Morten
    DTU-Aqua, Charlottenlund, Denmark.
    Bartolino, Valerio
    Swedish University of Agricultural Sciences, Dept. Aquatic Resources, Lysekil, Sweden.
    Pope, John
    NRC (Europe) Ltd.
    Perez Rodriguez, Alfonso
    Wageningen Marine Research.
    Gaichas, Sarah
    NOAA Northeast Fisheries Science Center, Woods Hole, MA, USA.
    Cerviño, Santiago
    Instituto Españo de Oceanografia, Spain.
    Norrström, Niclas
    Högskolan i Skövde, Institutionen för biovetenskap. Högskolan i Skövde, Forskningscentrum för Systembiologi.
    Spence, Michael
    Centre for Environment, Fisheries and Aquaculture Science, Suffolk, United Kingdom.
    Villanueva, Ching
    French Institute of Research for the Exploitation of the sea, Plouzané, France.
    Kulatska, Nataliia
    Swedish University of Agricultural Sciences, Dept. of Aquatic Resources, Lysekil, Sweden.
    Sturludottir, Erla
    Science Institution, University of Iceland, Iceland.
    Trijoulet, Vanessa
    Northeast Fisheries Science Center, Woods Hole, MA, USA.
    Rindorf, Anna
    DTU-Aqua, Charlottenlund, Denmark.
    Andonegi, Eider
    AZTI, Pasaia, Spain.
    Altuna, Miren
    AZTI, Pasaia, Spain.
    Sánchez Maroño, Sonia
    AZTI, Pasaia, Spain.
    Urtizberea, Agurtzane
    AZTI, Pasaia, Spain.
    Interim Report of the Working Group on Multispecies Assessment Methods (WGSAM)2018Rapport (Övrigt vetenskapligt)
    Abstract [en]

    The pan-regional Working Group on Multispecies Assessment Methods (WGSAM) met in San Sebastian, Spain, 16–20 October 2017. In this eleventh report of the group, work focused on three of the multi-annual ToRs (B, C, D). Based on their knowledge, participants provided an updated inventory of progress of multispecies models in ICES Ecoregions (ToR A), noting those regions where no information was available. A Key Run (ToR B) of the North Sea Stochastic Multispecies Model (SMS) was presented and reviewed in detail by 4 WGSAM experts, and approved by the group following implementation of changes agreed in plenary at the meeting and verified by a subset of experts post-meeting. The Key Run is documented in detail in Annex for ToR B, with key outputs summarised in Section 5 and data files made available on the WGSAM webpage and the ICES expert group Github (https://github.com/iceseg/wg_WGSAM). Since the M2 values are used for the assessment of important North Sea stocks, it is recommended to publish the annex also on the official stock annex website. In addition, WGSAM does not recommend updating existing data series of natural mortality by simply adding the latest three new years. The timeseries as a whole shows patterns which are not retained by this procedure. Multispecies model skill assessment (ToR C) and multi-model ensemble methods (ToR D) were emphasized this year. Considerable progress has been made towards advancing both aspects of multispecies modelling. Investigation of skill assessment and ensemble methods and case studies is critical to ensure that outputs of multispecies assessment models are reliable for use in operational assessment and to inform management decisions. Progress was also made on investigations of top predator impacts on managed fish across several regions (ToR F), including the North Sea where new information was included in the SMS key run. Further progress was also made on multispecies and ecosystem level reference points and harvest control rules in mixed fisheries (ToR G).

  • 15.
    Garcia, Danilo
    et al.
    Blekinge Center of Competence, Blekinge County Council, Karlskrona, Sweden / Department of Psychology, University of Gothenburg, Gothenburg, Sweden / Network for Empowerment and Well-Being, Sweden.
    Persson, Björn
    Högskolan i Skövde, Institutionen för biovetenskap. Högskolan i Skövde, Forskningscentrum för Systembiologi. Network for Empowerment and Well-Being, Sweden / Department of Psychology, University of Turku, Finland.
    Al Nima, Ali
    Blekinge Center of Competence, Blekinge County Council, Karlskrona, Sweden / Network for Empowerment and Well-Being, Sweden.
    Gruneau Brulin, Joel
    Department of Psychology, Stockholm University, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Rapp-Ricciardia, Max
    Blekinge Center of Competence, Blekinge County Council, Karlskrona, Sweden / Department of Psychology, University of Gothenburg, Gothenburg, Sweden / Network for Empowerment and Well-Being, Sweden.
    Kajonius, Petri J.
    Högskolan i Skövde, Institutionen för biovetenskap. Högskolan i Skövde, Forskningscentrum för Systembiologi. Department of Psychology, University of Gothenburg, Gothenburg, Sweden / Network for Empowerment and Well-Being, Sweden / Department of Behavioral Sciences, University West, Sweden.
    IRT analyses of the Swedish Dark Triad Dirty Dozen2018Ingår i: Heliyon, ISSN 2405-8440, Vol. 4, nr 3, artikel-id e00569Artikel i tidskrift (Refereegranskat)
  • 16.
    Kristensson, Lisbeth
    et al.
    AstraZeneca, Mölndal, Sweden.
    Lundin, Anders
    AstraZeneca, Mölndal, Sweden / Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Gustafsson, David
    Emeriti Bio, AZ Bioventure Hub, Mölndal, Sweden.
    Fryklund, Jan
    Emeriti Bio, AZ Bioventure Hub, Mölndal, Sweden.
    Fex, Tomas
    Emeriti Bio, AZ Bioventure Hub, Mölndal, Sweden.
    Delsing, Louise
    Högskolan i Skövde, Institutionen för biovetenskap. Högskolan i Skövde, Forskningscentrum för Systembiologi. AstraZeneca, Mölndal, Sweden / the Sahlgrenska Academy at the University of Gothenburg, Mölndal, Sweden.
    Ryberg, Erik
    AstraZeneca, Mölndal, Sweden.
    Plasminogen binding inhibitors demonstrate unwanted activities on GABAA and glycine receptors in human iPSC derived neurons2018Ingår i: Neuroscience Letters, ISSN 0304-3940, E-ISSN 1872-7972, Vol. 681, s. 37-43, artikel-id S0304-3940(18)30351-3Artikel i tidskrift (Refereegranskat)
    Abstract [en]

    receptor agonist.

  • 17.
    Jonsson, Tomas
    et al.
    Högskolan i Skövde, Institutionen för biovetenskap. Högskolan i Skövde, Forskningscentrum för Systembiologi. Department of Ecology, Swedish University of Agricultural Sciences, Uppsala, Sweden.
    Kaartinen, Riikka
    Department of Ecology, Swedish University of Agricultural Sciences, Uppsala, Sweden.
    Jonsson, Mattias
    Department of Ecology, Swedish University of Agricultural Sciences, Uppsala, Sweden.
    Bommarco, Riccardo
    Department of Ecology, Swedish University of Agricultural Sciences, Uppsala, Sweden.
    Predictive power of food web models based on body size decreases with trophic complexity2018Ingår i: Ecology Letters, ISSN 1461-023X, E-ISSN 1461-0248, Vol. 21, nr 5, s. 702-712Artikel i tidskrift (Refereegranskat)
    Abstract [en]

    Food web models parameterised using body size show promise to predict trophic interaction strengths (IS) and abundance dynamics. However, this remains to be rigorously tested in food webs beyond simple trophic modules, where indirect and intraguild interactions could be important and driven by traits other than body size. We systematically varied predator body size, guild composition and richness in microcosm insect webs and compared experimental outcomes with predictions of IS from models with allometrically scaled parameters. Body size was a strong predictor of IS in simple modules (r(2)=0.92), but with increasing complexity the predictive power decreased, with model IS being consistently overestimated. We quantify the strength of observed trophic interaction modifications, partition this into density-mediated vs. behaviour-mediated indirect effects and show that model shortcomings in predicting IS is related to the size of behaviour-mediated effects. Our findings encourage development of dynamical food web models explicitly including and exploring indirect mechanisms.

  • 18.
    Nushair, Ali Mohammad
    et al.
    University of Rajshahi, Bangladesh.
    Saha, Ananda Kumar
    University of Rajshahi, Bangladesh.
    Mandal, Abul
    Högskolan i Skövde, Institutionen för biovetenskap. Högskolan i Skövde, Forskningscentrum för Systembiologi.
    Rahman, Md. Anisur Rahman
    University of Rajshahi, Bangladesh.
    Moni Krishno, Mohanta
    University of Rajshahi, Bangladesh.
    Hasan, Md. Ariful
    University of Rajshahi, Bangladesh.
    Haque, Md Fazlul
    University of Rajshahi, Bangladesh.
    Rhizobium sp.CCNWYC119: a single strain highly effective as biofertilizer for three different peas (Pigeon pea, Sweet pea and Chick pea)2018Ingår i: Legume Research An International Journal, ISSN 0250-5371, s. 01-07, artikel-id LR-389Artikel i tidskrift (Refereegranskat)
    Abstract [en]

    Rhizobium spp. was isolated from root nodules of Pigeon pea (Cajanus cajan L.), Sweet pea (Lathyrus sativus L.), Chickpea (Cicer arietinum L.). The isolates ware rod shaped, aerobic, gram negative, motile and non-spore forming. Isolates were positive to Catalase, Citrate utilization, Urea hydrolysis, Congored, Nitrification, Oxidase, Triple sugar iron and MacConkey agar test. The isolates can ferment all nine sugars. Then, the isolates identified as Rhizobium spp. Depending on above results were subjected to 16S rRNA sequencing for further confirmation and identification. Surprisingly, theisolates were same strain or member of same cluster of Rhizobium and identified as Rhizobium sp.CCNWYC119 strain based on 16S rRNA sequence (98% similarity). Then, different parameters of soil quality enrichment and plant growth viz.plant height; weight of pods and seeds; number, fresh and dry weight of nodules were studied to test the efficacy of the isolate as biofertilizer. Here, inoculant of Rhizobium sp. isolated from Pigeon pea was used as biofertilizer. The results showed the significant increase of nodulation, enrichment of soil of rhizosphere, plant growth and yield for all three types of inoculated peas as compared with non-inoculated control peas indicating that the isolated strain could be used as a common efficient biofertilizer for Pigeon pea, Sweet pea and Chick pea. It was also found that the isolate grew optimally at temperature 28°C and pH 7.0.Moreover, the isolate was sensitive to the higher concentration of NaCl (>1%) and to antibiotics- Mecillinam, Ciprofloxacin,Cotrimoxazole, Pefloxacin, Ceftazidime and Tetracycline.

  • 19.
    Frisk, Mikael
    et al.
    Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology (IFM), Linköping University, Linköping, Sweden .
    Jonsson, Annie
    Högskolan i Skövde, Institutionen för biovetenskap. Högskolan i Skövde, Forskningscentrum för Systembiologi.
    Sellman, Stefan
    Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology (IFM), Linköping University, Linköping, Sweden .
    Flisberg, Patrik
    The Forestry Research Institute of Sweden, Uppsala, Sweden .
    Rönnqvist, Mikael
    Département de génie mécanique, Université Laval, Québec, Canada .
    Wennergren, Uno
    Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology (IFM), Linköping University, Linköping, Sweden .
    Route optimization as an instrument to improve animal welfare and economics in pre-slaughter logistics2018Ingår i: PLoS ONE, ISSN 1932-6203, E-ISSN 1932-6203, Vol. 13, nr 3, artikel-id e0193223Artikel i tidskrift (Refereegranskat)
    Abstract [en]

    Each year, more than three million animals are transported from farms to abattoirs in Sweden. Animal transport is related to economic and environmental costs and a negative impact on animal welfare. Time and the number of pick-up stops between farms and abattoirs are two key parameters for animal welfare. Both are highly dependent on efficient and qualitative transportation planning, which may be difficult if done manually. We have examined the benefits of using route optimization in cattle transportation planning. To simulate the effects of various planning time windows and transportation time regulations and number of pick-up stops along each route, we have used data that represent one year of cattle transport. Our optimization model is a development of a model used in forestry transport that solves a general pick-up and delivery vehicle routing problem. The objective is to minimize transportation costs. We have shown that the length of the planning time window has a significant impact on the animal transport time, the total driving time and the total distance driven; these parameters that will not only affect animal welfare but also affect the economy and environment in the pre-slaughter logistic chain. In addition, we have shown that changes in animal transportation regulations, such as minimizing the number of allowed pick-up stops on each route or minimizing animal transportation time, will have positive effects on animal welfare measured in transportation hours and number of pick-up stops. However, this leads to an increase in working time and driven distances, leading to higher transportation costs for the transport and negative environmental impact.

  • 20.
    Kajonius, Petri
    et al.
    Högskolan i Skövde, Forskningscentrum för Systembiologi. Högskolan i Skövde, Institutionen för biovetenskap. University West, Sweden / University of Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Johnson, John
    Pennsylvania State University, United States.
    Sex differences in 30 facets of the five factor model of personality in the large public (N = 320,128)2018Ingår i: Personality and Individual Differences, ISSN 0191-8869, E-ISSN 1873-3549, Vol. 129, s. 126-130Artikel i tidskrift (Refereegranskat)
    Abstract [en]

    The present study reports on the scope and size of sex differences in 30 personality facet traits, using one of the largest US samples to date (N = 320,128). The study was one of the first to utilize the open access version of the Five-Factor Model of personality (IPIP-NEO-120) in the large public. Overall, across age-groups 19–69 years old, women scored notably higher than men in Agreeableness (d = 0.58) and Neuroticism (d = 0.40). Specifically, women scored d > 0.50 in facet traits Anxiety, Vulnerability, Openness to Emotions, Altruism, and Sympathy, while men only scored slightly higher (d > 0.20) than women in facet traits Excitement-seeking and Openness to Intellect. Sex gaps in the five trait domains were fairly constant across all age-groups, with the exception for age-group 19–29 years old. The discussion centers on how to interpret effects sizes in sex differences in personality traits, and tentative consequences. 

1234567 1 - 20 av 418
RefereraExporteraLänk till träfflistan
Permanent länk
Referera
Referensformat
  • apa
  • harvard1
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
  • Annat format
Fler format
Språk
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Annat språk
Fler språk
Utmatningsformat
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf