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  • 1.
    Enroth, Helena
    et al.
    University of Skövde, School of Bioscience. University of Skövde, The Systems Biology Research Centre. Unilabs AB.
    Engstrand, L
    Karolinska Institute and Science for Life Laboratory.
    Infectious Diseases: Helicobacter pylori2015In: Reference Module in Biomedical Sciences, Elsevier, 2015Chapter in book (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Abstract Helicobacter pylori infection is one of the most common human infections in the world. The bacteria cause peptic ulcer disease and their infection is an important factor for gastric cancer development. The bacteria are transmitted from person to person within families, with young children most often infected. The bacteria reside in the stomach for a lifetime if untreated by antimicrobial agents. Many virulence factors are known that contribute to the persistence of the bacteria in the stomach, and the bacteria harbors a pathogenicity island in its genome. The discovery of H. pylori as a cause of gastritis in the stomach led to the Nobel Prize in Physiology or Medicine 2005.

  • 2.
    Enroth, Helena
    et al.
    University of Skövde, School of Bioscience. University of Skövde, The Systems Biology Research Centre. Unilabs AB.
    Wefer, Hugo
    Clinical genomics, Science for Life Laboratories.
    Ljungström, Lars
    Dept. of Infectious Diseases, Skaraborg Hospital Skövde.
    Tilevik, Diana
    University of Skövde, The Systems Biology Research Centre. University of Skövde, School of Bioscience.
    NGS pilot study of E. coli ESBL from patients with suspected sepsis2015Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 3.
    Gustafsson, Erik
    et al.
    University of Skövde, The Systems Biology Research Centre. University of Skövde, School of Life Sciences.
    Jacobsson, Gunnar
    Department of Infectious Diseases, Skaraborg Hospital, Skövde.
    Nilsson, Patric
    University of Skövde, The Systems Biology Research Centre. University of Skövde, School of Life Sciences.
    Enroth, Helena
    Department of Clinical Microbiology, Skaraborg Hospital, Capio Diagnostic AB, Skövde.
    Beronius, Marie Kia
    Centre for General Medicine, Kungsbacka.
    Andersson, Rune
    6Research and Development Centre, Skaraborg Hospital, Skövde, Sweden.
    Arvidson, Staffan
    Department of Microbiology, Tumour and Cell Biology (MTC), Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm.
    Invasive Staphylococcus aureus strains are highly variable in PFGE patterns, agr group and exoprotein production2009In: Scandinavian Journal of Infectious Diseases, ISSN 0036-5548, E-ISSN 1651-1980, Vol. 41, no 8, 577-583 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In the present study, we have investigated 37 invasive Staphylococcus aureus strains (collected between 1997 and 2005) from 33 human episodes of septicaemia causing either endocarditis or vertebral osteomyelitis. All S. aureus strains were typed using pulsed field gel electrophoresis (PFGE), and most strains belonged to any of 4 different PFGE clusters. There was no correlation between any of the PFGE clusters with site of infection. All strains showed highly different expression patterns of extracellular proteins, i.e. we found a vast variation in the number of proteins and amount of individual proteins expressed by the different strains. There was no correlation between any cluster of exoprotein patterns with endocarditis or with vertebral osteomyelitis. We did not find any correlation between agr group and endocarditis, as previously reported. On the other hand, a correlation between some of the PFGE clusters with a certain agr group was found. Known risk factors for S. aureus infections were observed in a majority of the patients.

  • 4.
    Ljungström, Lars
    et al.
    Department of Infectious Diseases, Skaraborg Hospital, Skövde, Sweden.
    Enroth, Helena
    Department of Clinical Microbiology, Unilabs AB, Skövde, Sweden.
    Claesson, Berndt E. B.
    Department of Clinical Microbiology, Unilabs AB, Skövde, Sweden.
    Ovemyr, Ida
    University of Skövde, School of Bioscience. University of Skövde, The Systems Biology Research Centre.
    Karlsson, Jesper
    Department of Clinical Microbiology, Unilabs AB, Skövde, Sweden.
    Fröberg, Berit
    Department of Clinical Microbiology, Unilabs AB, Skövde, Sweden.
    Brodin, Anna-Karin
    Department of Clinical Microbiology, Unilabs AB, Skövde, Sweden.
    Pernestig, Anna-Karin
    University of Skövde, School of Bioscience. University of Skövde, The Systems Biology Research Centre.
    Jacobsson, Gunnar
    Department of Clinical Microbiology, Unilabs AB, Skövde, Sweden.
    Andersson, Rune
    Institute of Biomedicine, Sahlgrenska Academy, Gothenburg University, Gothenburg, Sweden..
    Karlsson, Diana
    University of Skövde, School of Bioscience. University of Skövde, The Systems Biology Research Centre.
    Clinical evaluation of commercial nucleic acid amplification tests in patients with suspected sepsis2015In: BMC Infectious Diseases, ISSN 1471-2334, E-ISSN 1471-2334, Vol. 15, no 1, 199Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    BACKGROUND: Sepsis is a serious medical condition requiring timely administered, appropriate antibiotic therapy. Blood culture is regarded as the gold standard for aetiological diagnosis of sepsis, but it suffers from low sensitivity and long turnaround time. Thus, nucleic acid amplification tests (NAATs) have emerged to shorten the time to identification of causative microbes. The aim of the present study was to evaluate the clinical utility in everyday practice in the emergency department of two commercial NAATs in patients suspected with sepsis.

    METHODS: During a six-week period, blood samples were collected consecutively from all adult patients admitted to the general emergency department for suspicion of a community-onset sepsis and treated with intravenous antibiotics. Along with conventional blood cultures, multiplex PCR (Magicplex™) was performed on whole blood specimens whereas portions from blood culture bottles were used for analysis by microarray-based assay (Prove-it™). The aetiological significance of identified organisms was determined by two infectious disease physicians based on clinical presentation and expected pathogenicity.

    RESULTS: Among 382 episodes of suspected sepsis, clinically relevant microbes were detected by blood culture in 42 episodes (11%), by multiplex PCR in 37 episodes (9.7%), and by microarray in 32 episodes (8.4%). Although moderate agreement with blood culture (kappa 0.50), the multiplex PCR added diagnostic value by timely detection of 15 clinically relevant findings in blood culture-negative specimens. Results of the microarray corresponded very well to those of blood culture (kappa 0.90), but were available just marginally prior to blood culture results.

    CONCLUSIONS: The use of NAATs on whole blood specimens in adjunct to current culture-based methods provides a clinical add-on value by allowing for detection of organisms missed by blood culture. However, the aetiological significance of findings detected by NAATs should be interpreted with caution as the high analytical sensitivity may add findings that do not necessarily corroborate with the clinical diagnosis.

  • 5.
    Ljungström, Lars R.
    et al.
    Department of Infectious Diseases, Skaraborg Hospital / CARe (Center for Antibiotic Resistance Research), Department of Infectious Diseases, Institute of Biomedicine, Sahlgrenska Academy, Gothenburg.
    Jacobsson, Gunnar
    Department of Infectious Diseases, Skaraborg Hospital, Skövde / CARe (Center for Antibiotic Resistance Research), Department of Infectious Diseases, Institute of Biomedicine, Sahlgrenska Academy, Gothenburg.
    Claesson, Berndt E. B.
    Department of Clinical Microbiology, Unilabs, Skaraborg Hospital, Skövde.
    Andersson, Rune
    CARe (Center for Antibiotic Resistance Research), Department of Infectious Diseases, Institute of Biomedicine, Sahlgrenska Academy at Gothenburg University, Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Enroth, Helena
    University of Skövde, School of Bioscience. University of Skövde, The Systems Biology Research Centre. Department of Clinical Molecular Microbiology, Unilabs, Skaraborg Hospital, Skövde.
    Respiratory viral infections are underdiagnosed in patients with suspected sepsis2017In: European Journal of Clinical Microbiology and Infectious Diseases, ISSN 0934-9723, E-ISSN 1435-4373, Vol. 36, no 10, 1767-1776 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The study aim was to investigate the prevalence and clinical relevance of viral findings by multiplex PCR from the nasopharynx of clinically septic patients during a winter season. During 11 weeks of the influenza epidemic period in January-March 2012, consecutive adult patients suspected to be septic (n = 432) were analyzed with cultures from blood and nasopharynx plus multiplex PCR for respiratory viruses on the nasopharyngeal specimen. The results were compared with those from microbiology analyses ordered as part of standard care. During the winter season, viral respiratory pathogens, mainly influenza A virus, human metapneumovirus, coronavirus, and respiratory syncytial virus were clinically underdiagnosed in 70% of patients positive by the multiplex PCR assay. During the first four weeks of the influenza epidemic, few tests for influenza were ordered by clinicians, indicating low awareness that the epidemic had started. Nasopharyngeal findings of Streptococcus pneumoniae and Haemophilus influenzae by culture correlated to pneumonia diagnosis, and in those patients laboratory signs of viral co-infections were common but rarely suspected by clinicians. The role of respiratory viral infections in patients presenting with a clinical picture of sepsis is underestimated. Specific antiviral treatment might be beneficial in some cases and may reduce spread in a hospital setting. Diagnosing viral infections may promote reduction of unnecessary antibiotic use. It can also be a tool for decisions concerning patient logistics, in order to minimize exposure of susceptible patients and personnel.

  • 6.
    Owemyr, Ida
    et al.
    University of Skövde, The Systems Biology Research Centre. University of Skövde, School of Life Sciences.
    Enroth, Helena
    Unilabs AB, Skövde, Sweden.
    Ljungström, Lars
    Skaraborg Hospital, Skövde, Sweden.
    Jacobsson, Gunnar
    Skaraborgs Sjukhus, Skövde, Sweden.
    Pernestig, Anna-Karin
    University of Skövde, The Systems Biology Research Centre. University of Skövde, School of Life Sciences.
    Karlsson, Diana
    University of Skövde, The Systems Biology Research Centre. University of Skövde, School of Life Sciences.
    Evaluation of microarray-based assay for identification of bloodstream bacteria in patients with suspected sepsis2013Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 7.
    Owemyr, Ida
    et al.
    University of Skövde, The Systems Biology Research Centre. University of Skövde, School of Life Sciences.
    Enroth, Helena
    Unilabs AB, Skövde.
    Ljungström, Lars
    Kärnsjukhuset, Skövde.
    Pernestig, Anna-Karin
    University of Skövde, School of Life Sciences. University of Skövde, The Systems Biology Research Centre.
    Karlsson, Diana
    University of Skövde, School of Life Sciences. University of Skövde, The Systems Biology Research Centre.
    Utvärdering av microarray-baserad plattform för snabb identifiering av patogener hos patienter med misstänkt sepsis2012Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 8.
    Retz, Carolina
    et al.
    University of Skövde, The Systems Biology Research Centre.
    Andersson, Sofie
    Department of Clinical Microbiology, Unilabs AB, Skövde, Sweden.
    Enroth, Helena
    Department of Clinical Microbiology, Unilabs AB, Skövde, Sweden.
    Ljungström, Lars
    Department of Infectious Diseases, Skaraborg Hospital.
    Karlsson, Diana
    University of Skövde, The Systems Biology Research Centre. University of Skövde, School of Bioscience.
    Pernestig, Anna-Karin
    University of Skövde, The Systems Biology Research Centre. University of Skövde, School of Bioscience.
    Quicker identification of Gram-positive cocci in clusters in patients with suspected sepsis2014Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Sepsis is the primary cause of death from infection. Globally, an estimated 18 million people die from sepsis annually, exceeding deaths caused by HIV/AIDS, breast cancer, and prostate cancer combined1. Early sepsis diagnosis and targeted antimicrobial (AM) therapy reduce the length of intensive care for patients and cost by 30%2. The current gold standard, using blood cultures (BC), takes 12-72 h to detect pathogens in the blood and even longer to identify the exact pathogen and its AM susceptibility for optimal therapy. The aim of this study was to determine whether the QuickFISHTMBC test (AdvanDx, Woburn, MA) could be robust, timesaving and specific in the clinical microbiology laboratory setting, for identification of the pathogens causing life-threatening bloodstream infections.

  • 9.
    Retz, Karolina
    et al.
    Department of Clinical Microbiology, Unilabs AB, Skövde.
    Andersson, Sofie
    Department of Clinical Microbiology, Unilabs AB, Skövde .
    Andersson, Carl
    University of Skövde.
    Svensson, Kristina
    Department of Clinical Microbiology, Unilabs AB, Skövde .
    Ljungström, Lars
    The Skaraborg Hospital, Skövde, Sweden .
    Enroth, Helena
    University of Skövde, School of Bioscience. University of Skövde, The Systems Biology Research Centre. Department of Clinical Microbiology, Unilabs AB, Skövde .
    Tilevik, Diana
    University of Skövde, School of Bioscience. University of Skövde, The Systems Biology Research Centre.
    Pernestig, Anna-Karin
    University of Skövde, School of Bioscience. University of Skövde, The Systems Biology Research Centre.
    Evaluation of the QuickFISH and the Sepsityper assays for early identification of etiological agents in bloodstream infection in a clinical routine setting2017Conference paper (Refereed)
1 - 9 of 9
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