his.sePublications
Change search
Refine search result
1 - 2 of 2
CiteExportLink to result list
Permanent link
Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • harvard1
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf
Rows per page
  • 5
  • 10
  • 20
  • 50
  • 100
  • 250
Sort
  • Standard (Relevance)
  • Author A-Ö
  • Author Ö-A
  • Title A-Ö
  • Title Ö-A
  • Publication type A-Ö
  • Publication type Ö-A
  • Issued (Oldest first)
  • Issued (Newest first)
  • Created (Oldest first)
  • Created (Newest first)
  • Last updated (Oldest first)
  • Last updated (Newest first)
  • Disputation date (earliest first)
  • Disputation date (latest first)
  • Standard (Relevance)
  • Author A-Ö
  • Author Ö-A
  • Title A-Ö
  • Title Ö-A
  • Publication type A-Ö
  • Publication type Ö-A
  • Issued (Oldest first)
  • Issued (Newest first)
  • Created (Oldest first)
  • Created (Newest first)
  • Last updated (Oldest first)
  • Last updated (Newest first)
  • Disputation date (earliest first)
  • Disputation date (latest first)
Select
The maximal number of hits you can export is 250. When you want to export more records please use the Create feeds function.
  • 1.
    Calestam, Magnus
    et al.
    University of Skövde, School of Technology and Society.
    Wedin, Johan
    University of Skövde, School of Technology and Society.
    Bucklingsanalys av spannmålssilo2013Independent thesis Basic level (degree of Bachelor), 15 credits / 22,5 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [en]

    Grains with varying humidity can be stored in square silos with wall elements consisting of corrugated sheet. When the stored grain is to be emptied from the silos it has tendency to stick to the walls, especially if humid, which means that the grain must be removed manually. To avoid this time-consuming process a flat sheet is mounted on the corrugated sheet to prevent the moist grain from sticking to the wall. If the same dimension on the corrugated sheet is used when the flat sheet is or is not mounted the walls may be subjected to buckling. This thesis is thus about how the wall elements shall be designed in order to prevent buckling. The silos that have been examined have a cross section of 3.0 x 3.0 m and 2.5 x 2.5 m respectively with wall elements consisting of only corrugated sheet or smooth sheet mounted on corrugated sheet. Furthermore, the silos got vertical walls with a height of 8.4 m consisting of ten sections. Calculations are made with wheat as the stored grain.

     

    To be able to dimension the wall elements the pressure is calculated for the different silos, using the Swedish and European standard Eurocode (2006), EN 1991-4 for pressure calculations in silos and tanks. To calculate the pressure the silos are assigned into action assessment class 1, since their capacity are less than a 100 tons, which further means that the unsymmetrical pressure can be ignored. The silos are also classified as slender. As the silos outlet consists of a square pyramidal hopper with centric outlet and a half internal angel of 45° an inner pipe flow occurs during emptying. This means according to Eurocode that the dimension shall be based on the pressure which occurs during filling. The horizontal and vertical pressure and the pressure made from the friction are calculated for the different cross sections.

     

    The CAD software Pro Engineer and the finite element extension Mechanica is used to model the current silos and perform analysis for stress and buckling. The models have four symmetry planes therefore only one eighth of the current structure is modeled, corresponding to half a wall element and half a pole. The models are created as shell models and boundary conditions are applied in all symmetrical planes and on the top and bottom of the pole. The structure of the silos is simplified since no screws or radius is modeled. The pressure calculated according to Eurocode is converted into forces and applied to the models. The whole structure is modeled in steel with yield strength of 180 MPa.

     

    The company’s older dimension standards are applied on the wall elements and analyzed. To investigate where to most critical areas for buckling occurs a buckling analysis based on a static analysis of the models is performed. The results from the buckling analysis for the silo wall element consisting of corrugated sheet with the width of 3.0 m shows that buckling occurs on the second bottom section at 72 % of the applied force. For the silo consisting of the same wall element but with the width of 2.5 m buckling occurs at the top section where the buckling force amounts to 62 % of the applied force. For the silos with wall elements consisting of plain sheet mounted on corrugated sheet buckling occurs at 3-4 % of the applied force for the two wall widths. Analysis show that the low values of buckling load on the plane sheet is a result from local buckling. In order to dimension the corrugated sheet to prevent it from buckling when the plane sheet is mounted a free body diagram is made for the corrugated sheet to obtain the acting forces. The buckling analysis of the corrugated sheet, with wall width 3.0 m, which is pressurized by the plane sheet shows that buckling occurs on the silos second bottom section. Buckling occurs at 59 % of the applied force for the silo with wall width of 2.5 m buckling occurs at 51 % of the applied force on the silo top section.

     

    Since the goal is that the corrugated sheets are not to be subject to buckling, the thickness of the sheets is iterated until the buckling force is equal to at least 110 % of the applied force. This generates an increased thickness for the lower four sections for the silo with wall element consisting of corrugated sheet with wall width of 3.0 m. For the silo with the same wall elements but with a wall width of 2.5 m, the dimensions of the top two sections need to increase. Regarding the silos with wall elements consisting of plane sheet mounted on corrugated sheet an increase in dimension is needed for the corrugated sheet for the five lowest sections for the wall width of 3.0 m.

     

    With a wall width of 2.5 m the same dimension can be used as when the silo wall elements consist of only corrugated sheet. If the plane sheet is not to be exposed for buckling the thickness of the sheets needs to be increased from between 5.5 mm and 1.5 mm. All calculations of the sheet dimensions are obtained by a conservative thinking which means that the company’s older dimensions may be correct. However, the resulting dimensions are reasonable for the corrugated sheets.

     

  • 2.
    Josefsson, Axel
    et al.
    University of Skövde, School of Engineering Science.
    Wedin, Johan
    University of Skövde, School of Engineering Science.
    Convergence properties of a continuum damage mechanics model for fatigue of adhesive joints2014Independent thesis Advanced level (degree of Master (One Year)), 20 credits / 30 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [en]

    The effect of the element length is examined in modelling crack growth in fatigue loading of an adhesive joint. This is done for a cohesive element using an expression for the damage evolution developed at the University of Skövde which is implemented using the UMAT subroutine in the FE-solver Abaqus. These analyses are done for pure mode I loading by analysing a DCB-specimen loaded by a pure moment.

    An expression is developed in which the critical element length is dependent on the geometry of the specimen (in the form of the wave number of the adhesive joint), the element length, the material properties of the adhesive (in form of the material parameters , , ), the load applied (in form of the stress in the crack tip), the time step used in the analysis and the crack growth rate.

    It is shown that the results converge by decreasing the element length and the time step used. Therefore an expression for the crack growth rate as a function of the remaining parameters can be determined. Another expression is thereafter developed for the element length needed in order to get a crack growth rate within a certain range of the critical element length. The results show a regular pattern but are not monotone. Therefor two different definitions of the critical element length are tested, either by defining the critical element length as the point where the error is greater than an arbitrary boundary of 1 % of a converged result or where a least square approximation of the error is within 1 % of the converged results. The first method shows a highly irregular result which makes it difficult to develop an expression out of these results. The second method on the other hand gives results that are predictable enough to develop a function out of them. This is done using a regression analysis with all parameters of a third order expression in order to get an expression.

1 - 2 of 2
CiteExportLink to result list
Permanent link
Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • harvard1
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf