his.sePublications
Change search
Refine search result
1 - 1 of 1
CiteExportLink to result list
Permanent link
Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf
Rows per page
  • 5
  • 10
  • 20
  • 50
  • 100
  • 250
Sort
  • Standard (Relevance)
  • Author A-Ö
  • Author Ö-A
  • Title A-Ö
  • Title Ö-A
  • Publication type A-Ö
  • Publication type Ö-A
  • Issued (Oldest first)
  • Issued (Newest first)
  • Created (Oldest first)
  • Created (Newest first)
  • Last updated (Oldest first)
  • Last updated (Newest first)
  • Disputation date (earliest first)
  • Disputation date (latest first)
  • Standard (Relevance)
  • Author A-Ö
  • Author Ö-A
  • Title A-Ö
  • Title Ö-A
  • Publication type A-Ö
  • Publication type Ö-A
  • Issued (Oldest first)
  • Issued (Newest first)
  • Created (Oldest first)
  • Created (Newest first)
  • Last updated (Oldest first)
  • Last updated (Newest first)
  • Disputation date (earliest first)
  • Disputation date (latest first)
Select
The maximal number of hits you can export is 250. When you want to export more records please use the Create feeds function.
  • 1.
    Malm, Eric
    University of Skövde, School of Technology and Society.
    CSR inom den svenska klädesindustrin: Problem vid revisionen av leverantörer i utvecklingsländer2012Independent thesis Basic level (degree of Bachelor), 10 credits / 15 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [en]

    Today most of the production for the Swedish clothing industry lies with suppliers in third world countries. Considerably lower labour costs are the main reason why this very labour intensive industry has been outsourcing production, primarily to Asia. For a long time the production in the developing countries could go on without much scrutiny. The respect for human rights was often poor. Working conditions in many factories were bad, with long working hours, low wages and poor safety conditions. Various NGO’s began reporting about these conditions and this got media’s attention. The increasing interest for the situation in the developing countries made the companies realize that their core business was not the only area of importance anymore. It gradually became more important for the companies together with suppliers to show social responsibility towards their stakeholders and in this way protect market reputation.

    All Swedish clothing companies interviewed are today showing social responsibility and are working with human rights protection towards their suppliers through continuous audits. They are pursuing establishing close and long-term relations through which they hope to be able to persuade their suppliers to take an increased social responsibility and to improve working conditions in their factories. The differences between the companies are, however, quite big. Some companies started with their CSR work early and some have definitely reached further than others. Company size and access to resources are important and how long the cooperation with the suppliers has been going on also plays a role in this context. Too much overtime, low wages and poor safety conditions are reported as the most serious problems in the audits. Those companies who have worked the longest time with CSR are the ones experiencing the least problems in the audits, while those companies who have been involved with CSR during a shorter time seem to have a poorer control of the situation. The audits are carried out too seldom and often not by the companies themselves. None of the interviewed companies seem to review the working conditions with their subcontractors.

    CSR has become important for the companies, not the least to maintain a good reputation in the market. Several companies are also publishing sustainability reports. CSR are, however, still far from a main issue for the clothing companies. Difficulties to define CSR and its’ effect on business also pose problems with accounting. There is a conflict between the financial goals, which are measurable and accountable, and social goals, which are much harder to include in the accounting. The main reasons for CSR reporting and auditing of suppliers in the developing countries seem to be a response to criticism and to show social commitment. For more resources to be allocated to CSR, the status of CSR must be raised and lifted to a management issue. To make this possible a simpler and more open accounting and auditing system for the CSR work is needed. Maybe some form of CSA can be introduced to include CSR in normal accounting. A simpler and less demanding accounting system ought to increase the understanding of the importance of CSR, also with suppliers and subcontractors in the developing countries, and therefore contribute to increased respect for human rights.

1 - 1 of 1
CiteExportLink to result list
Permanent link
Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf