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  • 1.
    Ahmed, Syed Ishtiaque
    et al.
    University of Toronto, Canada.
    Amrute, Sareeta
    University of Washington and Data and Society, United States.
    Bardzell, Jeffrey
    Pennsylvania State University, United States.
    Bardzell, Shaowen
    College of Information Sciences and Technology, Penn State University, United States.
    Bidwell, Nicola
    Aalborg University, Denmark ; International University of Management, Namibia.
    Dillahunt, Tawanna
    University of Michigan, Harvard Radcliffe Fellow, United States.
    Gaytán, Sane
    Universidad de Colima, Mexico.
    Karusala, Naveena
    Harvard Center for Research on Computation and Society, United States.
    Kumar, Neha
    Georgia Institute of Technology, United States.
    Guzmán, Rigoberto Lara
    Data and Society, United States.
    Mustafa, Maryam
    Lahore University of Management Sciences, Pakistan.
    Nardi, Bonnie
    University of California, Irvine, United States.
    Nathan, Lisa
    University of British Columbia, Musqueam Territory, Canada.
    Parvin, Nassim
    Georgia Institute of Technology, United States.
    Patin, Beth
    Syracuse University's, School of Information Studies, United States.
    Reynolds-Cuéllar, Pedro
    Massachusetts Institute of Technology, United States.
    Rouse, Rebecca
    University of Skövde, School of Informatics. University of Skövde, Informatics Research Environment.
    Spiel, Katta
    Tu Wien, Vienna University of Technology, Austria.
    Prietch, Soraia Silva
    Universidade Federal de Rondonópolis, Brazil.
    Wang, Ding
    Technology and Society Collective Team, Pair Group, Google Research, United States.
    Wong-Villacrés, Marisol
    Escuela Superior Politécnica Del Litoral, Ecuador.
    Citational justice and the politics of knowledge production2022In: interactions, ISSN 1072-5520, E-ISSN 1558-3449, Vol. 29, no 5, p. 78-82Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Citation is how we acknowledge our debt to those who came before; those who helped us find our way when the way was obscured because we deviated from the paths we were told to follow. Sara Ahmed reminds us that just citational practices recognize the knowledge contributions of less dominant, routinely overlooked voices. Pursuing citational justice, then, entails moving away from individualistic views of authorship and toward a shared, reciprocal understanding of how knowledge is produced. Drawing from our experiences working within HCI, we extend an invitation for a just citational practice—one that makes space for the diversity of human experience and recognizes that human-computer interactions must be responsive to cultural and geographic differences. We outline parts of our ongoing conversations as a collective to motivate a careful citation practice across our field, interrogating how we can best honor one another’s ideas and labor without alienation or appropriation.

  • 2.
    Berg Marklund, Björn
    et al.
    University of Skövde, School of Informatics. University of Skövde, Informatics Research Environment.
    Rouse, Rebecca
    University of Skövde, School of Informatics. University of Skövde, Informatics Research Environment.
    Holloway-Attaway, Lissa
    University of Skövde, School of Informatics. University of Skövde, Informatics Research Environment.
    Contextualizing Game Literacy: A transhistorical approach to understanding Game-Based Learning environments2020In: Proceedings of the 15th International Conference on the Foundations of Digital Games: FDG 2020 / [ed] Georgios N. Yannakakis, Antonios Liapis, Penny Kyburz, Vanessa Volz, Foaad Khosmood, Phil Lopes, New York: Association for Computing Machinery (ACM), 2020, article id 108Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The nature of ‘reading’ different types of texts, across all media, is fundamentally beholden to the concept of ‘literacy’. The concept of literacy is well established in media studies – from books, to film, and visual, performing and interactive arts – and as such it has a wide range of applicability. All forms of media constitute a semiotic milieu in which signifiers and codes mean different things depending on the form’s unique language and the contexts and manner in which individual participants, or “readers”, approach them. In the field of digital games research, literacy is commonly defined as a narrower concept that refers to the ability to identify affordances and interact with game components with a high degree of confidence. This focus on capability is understandable to a degree: the unique aspect of games as a medium is often considered to specifically be its interactability, and thus being able to interact becomes synonymous with being ‘game literate’. In this paper, however, we will both describe how literacy in games would benefit from a more nuanced, transhistorical view of interactability, as well as provide examples from many kinds of media beyond games to demonstrate that interaction literacy is neither novel nor unique to the medium of games. Understanding this rich history would provide a broader foundation of referential literature for game scholars to use when discussing the concept of game literacy and the interactability of media in general.

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  • 3.
    Corron, Amy
    et al.
    Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute, Troy, New York, USA.
    Rouse, Rebecca
    University of Skövde, School of Informatics. University of Skövde, Informatics Research Environment.
    Game Over: The Perils of Framing Feminist Game Design Pedagogy as Repair versus Transformation2022In: Catalyst: Feminism, Theory, Technoscience, ISSN 2380-3312, Vol. 8, no 2, p. 1-26, article id 37709Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Drawing on the experience of a multiyear research project bringing transformative pedagogies to game design education, we provide a critical reflection on the lack of sustainability of the project. Upon examination, we see that some reasons behind this perceived failure are due to institutional systems of power that seek to neutralize transformative feminist pedagogy as performative repair, resulting in the maintenance of existing curricula. Instead of fully engaging with transformative pedagogies, these teaching and learning methods are used as tools to provide a cursory fulfillment of the deep need for social justice education in games. We examine the ways in which structures and systems continually devalue and de-resource pedagogical work, specifically pedagogies that are centered in feminist, anti-racist, and critical approaches, as well as our own complicity within these oppressive structures at times. We draw connections with relevant disciplinary perspectives on higher education, and conclude by offering a framework for understanding the pitfalls that can hamper work with transformative pedagogical aims, characterized by the types of labor used to maintain the status quo, as well as a set of recommendations for moving beyond the frame of repair to sustainably and radically disrupt dominant pedagogies in games and related disciplines. 

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  • 4.
    Hollengreen, Laura
    et al.
    College of Architecture, Planning and Landscape Architecture, The University of Arizona, USA ; School of Architecture, University of Arizona, USA.
    Rouse, Rebecca
    University of Skövde, School of Informatics. University of Skövde, Informatics Research Environment.
    Design at the Border: Liminality, the Virtual, and Interior Transformation from Antiquity to Mixed Reality2022In: Virtual Interiorities: Book One: When Worlds Collide / [ed] Gregory Turner-Rahman; Vahid Vahdat; Dave Gottwald, Pittsburgh, PA: ETC Press, 2022, p. 137-171Chapter in book (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This chapter introduces elements of “liminal design,” deuned across his- torical and contemporary works as design that provides the “participant,” “passer-by,” or “pilgrim” with the potential of transformational experi- ence via the liminal or betwixt/between. Drawing connections between theory, history, and practice in mixed realities and liminality, we are pur- suing an emergent typology of liminal design abstracted from analysis of a trans-historical group of works that illuminates aspects of the ancient and medieval heritage of contemporary mixed reality (MR) technologies. This chapter is part of a larger ongoing project comparing examples of liminal design from the Middle Ages and contemporary mixed reality, which we begin here with three examples selected for the ways they res- onate across many characteristics with the concept of the border. The works to be discussed in this text include Qal’at Sim’an, the martyrium and cult site of Saint Simeon the Stylite, and associated objects (5th cen- tury, Syria); Border Memorial: Frontera de los Muertos (2012, John Craig Freeman); and Abraham Lincoln: War Veterans Project (2012, Krzysztof Wodiczko). 

  • 5.
    Holloway-Attaway, Lissa
    et al.
    University of Skövde, School of Informatics. University of Skövde, Informatics Research Environment.
    Rouse, Rebecca
    University of Skövde, School of Informatics. University of Skövde, Informatics Research Environment.
    Augmenting Affect: Interaction, Materiality and Mimetic Communication in Augmented Reality Books2020In: The Expression of Emotion In Humans and Technology: The Art Exhibit at ICIDS 2019 Art Book / [ed] Ryan Bown, Brian Salisbury, Pittsburgh, PA: ETC Press, 2020, p. 69-78Chapter in book (Refereed)
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  • 6.
    Holloway-Attaway, Lissa
    et al.
    University of Skövde, School of Informatics. University of Skövde, The Informatics Research Centre.
    Rouse, Rebecca
    Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute, Troy, NY, United States.
    Designing Postdigital Curators: Establishing an Interdisciplinary Games and Mixed Reality Cultural Heritage Network2018In: Advances in Digital Cultural Heritage: International Workshop, Funchal, Madeira, Portugal, June 28, 2017, Revised Selected Papers / [ed] Marinos Ioannides, João Martins, Roko Žarnić, Veranika Lim, Springer-Verlag New York, 2018, Vol. 10754, p. 162-173Chapter in book (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    As digital technologies have become more integrated in museum and cultural heritage contexts over the past decade, digital museums enter a new phase of coming into their own. This opens up opportunities for the incorporation of cutting-edge multiplayer gaming technologies and immersive mixed reality (MR) systems. To support nuanced and original engagement with the newly pervasive nature of the digital in museums, an interdisciplinary group of international researchers, designers, and museum professionals have established a new network: the Designing Digital Heritage Network (DDHN). The network operates to support research, design production, interdisciplinary collaboration, and the development of innovative new pedagogies and programs to ‘design’ the postdigital curators of the future. This paper outlines the mission and vision of the DDHN, and suggests initial directions for future research in the postdigital heritage field focused on interdisciplinary, performative, and game design approaches to production and exhibition. © 2018, Springer International Publishing AG, part of Springer Nature.

  • 7.
    Holloway-Attaway, Lissa
    et al.
    University of Skövde, School of Informatics. University of Skövde, Informatics Research Environment.
    Rouse, Rebecca
    University of Skövde, School of Informatics. University of Skövde, Informatics Research Environment.
    When You Hear the Chime: Movable Books and the Dramaturgical Functions of Sound in Mixed Reality Interactive Narrative Design2022In: Interactive Storytelling: 15th International Conference on Interactive Digital Storytelling, ICIDS 2022, Santa Cruz, CA, USA, December 4–7, 2022, Proceedings / [ed] Mirjam Vosmeer; Lissa Holloway Attaway, Cham: Springer Nature Switzerland AG , 2022, p. 427-440Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In this paper we outline the pre-digital histories of recorded and synthesized sound, exploring their entanglements with both the literal codex and larger literary imaginary. In particular, we focus on intersections of sound and movable books, offering the rich genealogy of the movable book as a fertile addition to the IDN (interactive digital narrative) family tree, as an example of pre-computational interactive narrative with a long history. Drawing on this intermedial history, along with our own experience designing an MR (mixed reality) movable book, we offer a taxonomy of dramaturgical functions of sound in MR IDN. We demonstrate the use of this taxonomy in analysis of our own work, and suggest opportunities for expanding the taxonomy in support of future speculative research and design imaginaries for IDNs. 

  • 8.
    Lamb, Maurice
    et al.
    University of Skövde, School of Informatics. University of Skövde, Informatics Research Environment. University of Skövde, School of Engineering Science. University of Skövde, Virtual Engineering Research Environment.
    Rouse, Rebecca
    University of Skövde, School of Informatics. University of Skövde, Informatics Research Environment.
    Traveling Through the Dark: Using an interdisciplinary theatre and cognitive science approach to identify design strategies for human-machine shared experience in a self-driving car2021In: Proceedings of the 16th SweCog Conference / [ed] Erik Billing; Andreas Kalckert, Skövde: University of Skövde , 2021, p. 32-34Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Recent research on human-machine interaction (HMI) across a range of fields, including both cognitive science and theatre, has stressed the need to re-frame such interactions as relational and based in shared experience (Gaggioli et al., 2021; Sciutti et al., 2018). In this case, the machine, whether software or hardware based, is characterized as an interaction partner instead of a tool. Reconceiving HMI as involving reciprocity and shared experiences moves away from transactional or one-sided models of interaction and requires exploring what can be meant by reciprocation and shared experience with a non-human partner. In particular, the concept of shared experience in HMI has been relatively under-explored due to both the typical framing of trust in HMI research and technological limitations of HMI systems. Refocusing the design of HMI systems on the ethos of shared experience can be supported by interdisciplinary research with theater. 

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  • 9.
    Malazita, James
    et al.
    Department of Science & Technology Studies (STS) and Games & Simulation Arts & Sciences Program (GSAS), Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute, Troy, NY, USA.
    Rouse, Rebecca
    University of Skövde, School of Informatics. University of Skövde, Informatics Research Environment.
    Smith, Gillian
    Interactive Media & Game Development (IMGD) program and Computer Science, Worcester Polytechnic Institute, Worcester, MA, USA.
    Disciplining Games2024In: Game Studies, E-ISSN 1604-7982, Vol. 24, no 1Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    How is game research constructed and enacted as a discipline, or anti-discipline, in contemporary culture and academia? In a field often heralded for and defined by interdisciplinarity, how is identity developed? Who gets to say what counts as games scholarship, and who can participate? In this article we offer a counter-reading of game research's oft-deployed concept of interdisciplinarity, highlighting how interdisciplinary commitments can serve to support neoliberal formations of the university and undermine political scholarship as much as they can serve as a liberatory framework. As the field of game research continues to institutionalize, with undergraduate programs and new graduate programs growing in size and number, and as new junior scholars enter the academic workforce, conversation is needed about the character of the field’s interdisciplinarity. How game research can structure itself to act as a supportive and protective force for junior, marginalized and precarious scholars is not just a question of university administration, but of the epistemic underpinnings of the field itself.

  • 10.
    Parvin, Nassim
    et al.
    School of Literature, Media, and Communication, Georgia Institute of Technology, Atlanta, GA, US.
    Rouse, Rebecca
    University of Skövde, School of Informatics. University of Skövde, Informatics Research Environment.
    Feminist Philosophical Toys: Playful Companions and Live Theorization2024In: Hypatia, ISSN 0887-5367, E-ISSN 1527-2001, p. 1-27Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    What are the matters of philosophy? How do they shape how philosophy is practiced, what kinds of knowledge it produces, and who counts as a philosopher? The dominant matters of Western philosophy, or its epistemic companions, are books and journal articles even when dialogic and oral traditions are acknowledged or referenced. In this paper, we argue that alternatives would be necessary if philosophy were to be a more capacious and welcoming discipline. We introduce Feminist Philosophical Toys as one such alternative that challenges what counts as serious philosophy by being seriously playful. The toys foreground the oral and the dialogic while reflecting on and committing to engaging materiality, record-keeping, and record-making. In doing so, the toys challenge the dominant form of philosophy and its mechanics of knowledge-making as they offer an alternative way of doing philosophy that can be transformative for the next generation of feminist scholarship. The dialogic, embodied, and communal interaction with paper, with theory, and with others is meant as a practice of live theorization, opening philosophy to a new groundedness and accessibility, centered in the ethos of feminist epistemology, while at the same time pushing against fetishization of matter.

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  • 11.
    Parvin, Nassim
    et al.
    Georgia Institute of Technology, Atlanta, USA.
    Rouse, Rebecca
    University of Skövde, School of Informatics. University of Skövde, Informatics Research Environment.
    Haghani, Sanaz (Contributor)
    Rowan Cabarrus Community College, Salisbury, USA.
    Clark, Sharon (Contributor)
    University of West England, Bristol, United Kingdom.
    Gaskins, Nettrice R. (Contributor)
    Lesley University, Cambridge, USA.
    Sullivan, Anne (Contributor)
    Georgia Institute of Technology, Atlanta, USA.
    Mergil, Erin (Contributor)
    Woodland Hill Montessori School, Rensselaer, USA.
    Pelizari, Jessica (Contributor)
    Woodland Hill Montessori School, Rensselaer, USA.
    Anupam, Aditya (Contributor)
    Georgia Institute of Technology, Atlanta, USA.
    Casula, Pooja (Contributor)
    Georgia Institute of Technology, Atlanta, USA.
    Gupta, Shubhangi (Contributor)
    Georgia Institute of Technology, Atlanta, USA.
    Mess and Making Matters in Feminist Teaching2022In: Catalyst: Feminism, Theory, Technoscience, ISSN 2380-3312, Vol. 8, no 1, p. 1-45Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    How do materials and making come to matter in the messy practices of feminist 

    teaching? This Lab Meeting shares examples of interdisciplinary work in feminist making and teaching across a range of contexts (AI portraiture, printmaking, quilting, musical performance, game design, theater, storytelling, and more) to extend the discussion of materials in feminist thought, a topic of long-standing importance in the field. As a group of theorist-practitioners, the contributors to the Lab Meeting share an interest in bridging the conceptual and material via a scrappy mode of making and inquiry that does not seek to remediate chaos but rather engage it, in all its complexities. Each contributor captures multiple interpretations of mess, making, storytelling, and education from a feminist perspective. Together, they offer insights into the liberatory promise of material engagements. 

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  • 12.
    Persson, Louise
    et al.
    University of Skövde, School of Informatics. University of Skövde, Informatics Research Environment.
    Rouse, Rebecca
    University of Skövde, School of Informatics. University of Skövde, Informatics Research Environment.
    The Game Narrative Renaissance: A Call for a Dedicated Game Writing Pedagogy2020In: DiGRA ’20 – Proceedings of the 2020 DiGRA International Conference: Play Everywhere, Tampere: Digital Games Research Association (DiGRA) , 2020Conference paper (Refereed)
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  • 13.
    Rouse, Rebecca
    University of Skövde, School of Informatics. University of Skövde, Informatics Research Environment.
    Against the Instrumentalization of Empathy: Immersive Technologies and Social Change2021In: Augmented and Mixed Reality for Communities / [ed] Joshua A. Fisher, CRC Press, 2021, 1, p. 3-19Chapter in book (Refereed)
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    Publisher Sample of Book
  • 14.
    Rouse, Rebecca
    University of Skövde, School of Informatics. University of Skövde, Informatics Research Environment.
    Design Power: Four Myths about Technology, the Role of the Designer, Power, and Oppression2022In: What Happens When We Play: A Critical Approach to Games User Experience Design & Education / [ed] Rebecca Rouse; Björn Berg Marklund; Anna-Sofia Alklind Taylor, ETC Press, 2022, p. 41-64Chapter in book (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This chapter is based on my lecture from the GUX masters program Research and Development Course, and provides an overview of key issues in critical design from a Science and Technology Studies per- spective as relevant to GUX and the Games field at large. A set of design principles are also provided, bridging theory and practice. 

  • 15.
    Rouse, Rebecca
    University of Skövde, School of Informatics. University of Skövde, Informatics Research Environment.
    Transmissions: Critical Tactics for Making and Communicating Research, edited by Kat Jungnickel (MIT Press, 2020)2021In: Catalyst: Feminism, Theory, Technoscience, ISSN 2380-3312, Vol. 7, no 2, p. 1-4Article, book review (Refereed)
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  • 16.
    Rouse, Rebecca
    University of Skövde, School of Informatics. University of Skövde, Informatics Research Environment.
    Understanding a Complex Inheritance: Measurement, Game Culture, Military Technology & Computer Science Legacies in GUX2022In: What Happens When We Play: A Critical Approach to Games User Experience Design & Education / [ed] Rebecca Rouse; Björn Berg Marklund; Anna-Sofia Alklind Taylor, ETC Press, 2022, p. 83-117Chapter in book (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This chapter is based on a set of my lectures from the GUX masters program Research and Development course, and provides an historical perspective on the complex interdisciplinary inheritance that Games at large and GUX in particular have received from a range of fields including: the history of measuring people; early game culture, which was focused on hunting; the development of simulation technology for military applications; and the history of the computer science dis- cipline. These seemingly disparate threads share similar impulses in terms of positivist thinking and quantitative measurement, which have significantly influenced the field of Games today both as an academic discipline and as an industry. 

  • 17.
    Rouse, Rebecca
    University of Skövde, School of Informatics. University of Skövde, Informatics Research Environment.
    Understanding complexity in doctoral lifeworlds and impacts of advising ancestries2023In: Journal of Praxis in Higher Education, E-ISSN 2003-3605, Vol. 5, no 2, p. 53-90Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This paper shares findings from an interview study designed to open up critical conversations on complexity in advising. Using a narrative inquiry approach to centre storytelling and personal experience as valuable knowledge, I interview advisors (both academic and unofficial) who were central to my own doctoral research journey, as well as former doctoral students of mine. The interview results are put in relation with my own critical reflection on my advising practices as an ethos, as opposed to a set of tasks or functions, and put into context with larger social concepts such as positionality.This new perspective is suggested as a supplement to complexify and expand earlier research on advising styles. Advisingis characterised as deeply entangled with mentoring as well as teaching at large, and the paper concludes with identification of larger ethea, reflecting howadvising practices are co-constituted in relation with a range of other factors,such as positionality, institutional and disciplinary context, the larger student lifeworld, and perspectives on teaching and learning.

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  • 18.
    Rouse, Rebecca
    et al.
    University of Skövde, School of Informatics. University of Skövde, Informatics Research Environment.
    Berg Marklund, BjörnUniversity of Skövde, School of Informatics. University of Skövde, Informatics Research Environment.Alklind Taylor, Anna-SofiaUniversity of Skövde, School of Informatics. University of Skövde, Informatics Research Environment.
    What Happens When We Play: A Critical Approach to Games User Experience Design & Education2022Collection (editor) (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    What Happens When We Play: A Critical Approach to Games User Experience Design & Education brings together research and reflection from both faculty and graduate students involved in University of Skövde’s Games User Experience (GUX) Master’s program, launched in 2020. The collection shares insights from the new GUX curriculum, which takes a critical-making approach, combining practical projects done in collaboration with game studios, critical cultural theory and history, and design theory and hands-on work in the practice of games user experience design and analysis.

  • 19.
    Rouse, Rebecca
    et al.
    University of Skövde, School of Informatics. University of Skövde, Informatics Research Environment.
    Corron, Amy
    Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute, Troy, New York, USA.
    Levelling Up: A Critical Feminist Pedagogy for Game Design2020In: MAI: Journal of Feminism and Visual Culture, ISSN 2003-167X, no 5Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Imagine a game design classroom in which students not only hone artistic and technical design skills but also develop interpersonal awareness so that they form a commitment to address the systems of social inequalities in games. As the course progresses, students begin to take ownership of their inherent power as future game developers, reflect on their spheres of influence, and even consider where they can begin to effect change during their time in college. In this paper, we discuss our use of a feminist, dialogic approach to teaching in the games classroom. Our project is a response to the crisis of toxicity and harassment continually playing out throughout the games field. 

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  • 20.
    Rouse, Rebecca
    et al.
    University of Skövde, School of Informatics. University of Skövde, Informatics Research Environment.
    Corron, Amy
    Archer Center for Student Leadership Development at Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute, Troy, NY, USA.
    Why Video Games Education Needs Harriet Tubman2022In: Ms., no 2022-02-22Article in journal (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
    Abstract [en]

    What’s Harriet Tubman got to do with video games? While this pairing may seem strange, as game design educators we found impact in bridging these two subjects in our own classroom. Centering Tubman in our course has helped in our ongoing project to develop feminist and anti-racist game design education.  

  • 21.
    Rouse, Rebecca
    et al.
    University of Skövde, School of Informatics. University of Skövde, Informatics Research Environment.
    Corron Youmans, Amy
    Archer Center for Student Leadership Development, Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute, USA.
    When Everyone Wins: Dialogue, Play, and Black History for Critical Games Education2022In: Media and Communication, ISSN 2183-2439, Vol. 10, no 4, p. 357-368Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In this article, we reflect on the process and outcomes of using dialogue, play, and a focus on Black women’s history to support critical media literacy in game design education. Over three years we developed a dialogue-based introductory undergraduate course in the game design program at Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute intended to deepen engagement by students in game design practice. We specifically focused on critical approaches to explore the history and culture of games, utilizing dialogic pedagogy to develop transformative learning environments rooted in social justice education, and helped students develop skills for intercultural dialogue and communicating “across difference.” The dialogue experience created a powerful learning environment that resulted in higher quality and more critical student game design work. This was evident in the 2019 iteration of the course, which included two sections of students and in which we had a semester-long group project on the history of Harriet Tubman, culminating in a selection of student games being shown at a local gallery in an exhibition celebrating Tubman’s legacy. The Tubman project was liberatory not only for students, but also instructors, as we learned together how to navigate discomfort and gain a more critical understanding of the material realities of white supremacy in games, self, and each other. This article shares details from the design and methodology of our course, outcomes as evidenced by student work, survey responses, and instructor observations, and concludes with reflections on areas for further research and opportunities for other educators to incorporate new methods in design education.

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  • 22.
    Rouse, Rebecca
    et al.
    University of Skövde, School of Informatics. University of Skövde, Informatics Research Environment.
    Holloway-Attaway, Lissa
    University of Skövde, School of Informatics. University of Skövde, Informatics Research Environment.
    A prehistory of the interactive reader and design principles for storytelling in postdigital culture2020In: Book 2.0, ISSN 2042-8022, Vol. 10, no 1, p. 7-42Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This article examines historical examples to illuminate a prehistory of the interac- tive reader in analogue media, tracing a rich genealogy that is helpful for under- standing and designing current works such as augmented reality (AR) books. In addition, a set of generative design strategies to help shape current practice are discussed, based both on formal qualities and characteristics of historical exam- ples and the authors’ own experiences as designers working in mixed reality over many years. Theoretical framing is provided to persuasively make the case for the relevance of historical works for designers today. From medieval manuscripts, to Renaissance medical texts, to seventeenth, eighteenth and nineteenth century movable books, to the elaborate paper engineering of twentieth century and contemporary pop-up books, the history of the active reader and interactive book design is long and fascinating, and is presented here as an important and direct source of inspiration for digital designers today. Finally, recent interactive book projects designed by the authors are discussed and analyzed for both continuities and disruptions of historical interactive book design strategies, and a framework is presented for conceptualizing the postdigital interactive reader today.

  • 23.
    Rouse, Rebecca
    et al.
    University of Skövde, School of Informatics. University of Skövde, Informatics Research Environment.
    Holloway-Attaway, Lissa
    University of Skövde, School of Informatics. University of Skövde, Informatics Research Environment.
    Behind the Page: Historical Connections and the Making of Simmer, a Mixed Reality Movable Book2022In: Movable Stationery, ISSN 1097-1270, Vol. 30, no 1, p. 20-25Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In this article we share Simmer (2019), an entirely handmade two-sided artist book and MR (mixed reality) application created in collaboration with composer Brendan Padgett, and excerpts from our related scholarship on movable books, active readership, digital media, and design. Simmer explores and expands John Cheever’s classic short story, “The Swimmer” (1964), and won the Excellence in Innovation jury award at the International Conference for Interactive Digital Storytelling (ICIDS) Art Exhibition inSalt Lake City, Utah in November 2019. While Cheever’s landmark story crafts an expert portrayal of its narcissistic protagonist Ned Merrill, Ned’s wife (Lucinda) and four unnamed daughters are left unexplored. This untold fe- male side of the story was the focus of Simmer, where we bring to life a host of underdeveloped characters and engage the reader through both interactive paper and digital structures that work in combination to tell a new side of the story. 

  • 24.
    Rouse, Rebecca
    et al.
    University of Skövde, School of Informatics. University of Skövde, Informatics Research Environment.
    Holloway-Attaway, Lissa
    University of Skövde, School of Informatics. University of Skövde, Informatics Research Environment.
    Playing at the Page: Designing to Support Creative Readership Practices2022In: JIB: Journal of Interactive Books, ISSN 2785-6569, Vol. 1, no 1, p. 147-166Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In this paper we look at examples of creative, emergent and performative practices in readership. Starting with the history of the book, and including a discussion of a range of reader practices we make connections with our own creative practice as designers of interactive mixed reality movable books today. A theoretical frame for characterizing the reader today as postdigital is presented to push back against commonly held beliefs about the act of reading as passive or somehow less creative or enacted compared with digital technologies. Finally, our own interactive movable book project Simmer is discussed as a means to bridge historical methods and materials with the digital, and a set of design strategies are provided in support of postdigital readership.

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  • 25.
    Rouse, Rebecca
    et al.
    Department of the Arts, Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute, Troy NY, USA.
    Holloway-Attaway, Lissa
    University of Skövde, School of Informatics. University of Skövde, Informatics Research Environment.
    Re-Engineering Computational Curricula with Postdigital Heritage, Critical Humanities, and Community Engagement2018In: Proceedings of the2018 3rd Digital Heritage International Congress (DigitalHERITAGE) held jointly with the 2018 24th International Conference on Virtual Systems & Multimedia (VSMM 2018) / [ed] Alonzo C. Addison; Harold Thwaites, IEEE, 2018Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The field of Digital Heritage is ideal for re-engineering computational curricula by integrating critical humanities and community engagement approaches with computer science practices to address the deep entanglement of digital technologies and culture in tension today. This paper will present a series of brief case studies to share lessons learned from the development of Digital Heritage curriculum design. In analyzing these case studies, we identify a set of best practices in Digital Heritage curricular design.

  • 26.
    Rouse, Rebecca
    et al.
    University of Skövde, School of Informatics. University of Skövde, Informatics Research Environment.
    Holloway-Attaway, Lissa
    University of Skövde, School of Informatics. University of Skövde, Informatics Research Environment.
    Troubling games: Materials, histories, and speculative future worlds for games pedagogy2022In: Convergence. The International Journal of Research into New Media Technologies, ISSN 1354-8565, E-ISSN 1748-7382, Vol. 28, no 2, p. 539-560Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Games are trouble. As faculty members in a Game Development program we are aware of the troubles. As inside–outsiders, given our status as queer women in the male-dominated Games field, both with interdisciplinary art-tech-humanities backgrounds as opposed to STEM, we are the ones commonly tasked with ‘fixing’ these troubles. This tasking comes to us in the form of both assumptions and requests about our providing particular types of education to others, both faculty and students, as fixes to Game-troubles: teaching the gender module; sitting on an LGBTQ+ committee; advising a particular student who is also outside the more comfortable purview of Games; and so forth. While our labor is often assumed, it is not fully valued, evidenced by the ways in which it is chronically under-resourced. And, given this lack of sustainability, our labor is not effective in the ways we intend. Often, our fixes only serve to a fix ourselves, further cementing us as outsiders. Our fixes are diluted until they become performative gestures, absolving others of the need to act, but changing little else. Acting ‘in a fix’ is something we no longer wish to do. Instead we untangle and re-tangle in a new way, drawing on the work of Feminist New Materialists (Ahmed, 2008; Alaimo, 2016; Alaimo and Hekman, 2008; Barad, 2011; Bennett, 2010; Braidotti, 2013; Coole and Frost, 2010; Dolphijn and Tuin, 2012; Grosz, 1994; Kirby, 1997) to develop imaginative new models for a more just and joyful future Games pedagogy. We share not only our research on this topic, but also invite you into our own intimate experiences of play-making, foregrounding this as knowledge-making too. We offer these crossings between text and context, history and future Ahmed, 2008, memory and fiction as a speculative fabulation for future Games pedagogies.

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  • 27.
    Rouse, Rebecca
    et al.
    University of Skövde, School of Informatics. University of Skövde, Informatics Research Environment.
    Kalckert, AndreasUniversity of Skövde, School of Bioscience. University of Skövde, Systems Biology Research Environment.Mahon, Kathleenniversity of Borås, Sweden ; Institute for Teaching and Learning Innovation (ITaLI), University of Queensland, Australia.
    From a praxis perspective: Being and becoming a doctoral supervisor (JPHE Special Issue)2023Collection (editor) (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This special issue brings together a unique collection of papers on doctoral supervision, including work from researchers both outside the pedagogy discipline as well as those centred within it. The contributions include research on factors that contribute to supervisor stress, professional learning programs for supervisors, advising ancestry, gender and power in supervision, and the formation of supervisors more generally.

  • 28.
    Rouse, Rebecca
    et al.
    University of Skövde, School of Informatics. University of Skövde, Informatics Research Environment.
    Kalckert, Andreas
    University of Skövde, School of Bioscience. University of Skövde, Systems Biology Research Environment.
    Mahoon, Kathleen
    University of Borås, Sweden ; Institute for Teaching and Learning Innovation (ITaLI), University of Queensland, Australia.
    Praxis perspectives on doctoral supervision from across disciplines2023In: Journal of Praxis in Higher Education, E-ISSN 2003-3605, Vol. 5, no 2, p. 1-11Article in journal (Refereed)
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  • 29.
    Rouse, Rebecca
    et al.
    University of Skövde, School of Informatics. University of Skövde, Informatics Research Environment.
    Malazita, James
    Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute, Troy, NY, USA.
    Critical Disciplinary Thinking and Curricular Design in Games2023In: Design Issues, ISSN 0747-9360, E-ISSN 1531-4790, Vol. 39, no 1, p. 88-104Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This article details a large-scale curricular design project in creating and implementing an MS/PhD in “Critical Game Design.” Curricular design and critical scholarship in the analysis and design of games are co-constitutive. Institutional structures build individual and institutional capacity, they legitimize scholarship, define boundaries of expertise, and contribute to imaginations of disciplinary purview. We reflect on what is at stake beyond the discipline itself in wider digital culture, particularly the spread of disinformation, related growth of anti-academic sentiment, and testing of the foundations of democracy. We examine our own complicity and articulate the space of the games classroom as a site of potential transformation.

  • 30.
    Walsh, Jacqueline Reid
    et al.
    Departments of Curriculum and Instruction and Women’s, Gender and Sexuality Studies, Pennsylvania State University, State College, USA.
    Rouse, Rebecca
    University of Skövde, School of Informatics. University of Skövde, Informatics Research Environment.
    Understanding the Design Values of Baby Books: Materiality, Co-presence, and Remediation2023In: Children's Literature in Education, ISSN 0045-6713, E-ISSN 1573-1693, Vol. 54, no 3, p. 354-375Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In this article we analyze the design values of selected baby books published in England, the United States and Italy across 100 years. The examples we focus on are What is This? What is That? (1905) of the Dean’s Rag books series, Pat the Bunny (1940), I PRELIBRI (1980), and Wiggle! March! (2009) of the Indestructibles series. We group these books into two pairs of simple or complex designs, based on either a drive for durability or the aim to provide a multisensory experience: the Dean’s Rag books and the Indestructibles form one set, and Pat the Bunny and I PRELIBRI the second. We approach the books by examining the relationships among the materiality, narrative and formal design elements, the implied co-presence of a young child and adult care, issues of context and gender, and how the later examples remediate or rework the materials and beliefs of the earlier ones in a contemporary manner.

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