Högskolan i Skövde

his.sePublications
Change search
Refine search result
1 - 31 of 31
CiteExportLink to result list
Permanent link
Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • apa-cv
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf
Rows per page
  • 5
  • 10
  • 20
  • 50
  • 100
  • 250
Sort
  • Standard (Relevance)
  • Author A-Ö
  • Author Ö-A
  • Title A-Ö
  • Title Ö-A
  • Publication type A-Ö
  • Publication type Ö-A
  • Issued (Oldest first)
  • Issued (Newest first)
  • Created (Oldest first)
  • Created (Newest first)
  • Last updated (Oldest first)
  • Last updated (Newest first)
  • Disputation date (earliest first)
  • Disputation date (latest first)
  • Standard (Relevance)
  • Author A-Ö
  • Author Ö-A
  • Title A-Ö
  • Title Ö-A
  • Publication type A-Ö
  • Publication type Ö-A
  • Issued (Oldest first)
  • Issued (Newest first)
  • Created (Oldest first)
  • Created (Newest first)
  • Last updated (Oldest first)
  • Last updated (Newest first)
  • Disputation date (earliest first)
  • Disputation date (latest first)
Select
The maximal number of hits you can export is 250. When you want to export more records please use the Create feeds function.
  • 1.
    Jansson, Magnus
    et al.
    University of Skövde, School of Health Sciences. University of Skövde, Digital Health Research (DHEAR). School of Business, Economics and Law, University of Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Roos, John Magnus
    University of Skövde, School of Health Sciences. University of Skövde, Digital Health Research (DHEAR). School of Business, Economics and Law, University of Gothenburg, Sweden ; University of Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Gärling, Tommy
    University of Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Banks' risk taking in credit decisions: influences of loan officers' personality traits and financial risk preference versus bank-contextual factors2023In: Managerial Finance, ISSN 0307-4358, E-ISSN 1758-7743, Vol. 49, no 8, p. 1297-1313Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Purpose: This paper aims to investigate whether loan officers' risk taking in credit decisions are associated with their personal financial risk preference and personality traits or solely with bank-contextual and loan-relevant factors. Design/methodology/approach: An online survey administered in six large Swedish banks to 163 loan officers responsible for assessing credit risk and approval of loan applications. The loan officers rated their likelihood of approving fictitious loan applications from business companies. Findings: The loan officers' credit risk taking is associated with bank-contextual factors, directly with perceived organizational credit risk norms and indirectly with self-confidence in assessing credit risks through attitude to credit risk taking. A direct association is also found with personal financial risk preference but not with personality traits. Research limitations/implications: Increased awareness of that loan officers' personal financial risk preference is associated with their credit risk taking in loan decisions but that the banks' risk policy has a stronger association. Banks' managements and boards should therefore assure that their credit risk policy is implemented, followed and being aligned with their performance incentives. Practical implications: Increased awareness of that loan officers' credit risk taking is associated with personal financial risk preference but more strongly with the banks' risk policy that motivate banks' managements and boards to assure that their credit risk policy is implemented, followed and being aligned with their performance incentives. Originality/value: The first study which directly compare the associations of loan officers' risk taking in credit approvals with personal risk preference and personality traits versus bank-contextual factors and loan-relevant information. 

    Download full text (pdf)
    fulltext
  • 2.
    Kajonius, Petri J.
    et al.
    University of Skövde, School of Health and Education. University of Skövde, Health and Education. University West, Sweden.
    Roos, Magnus
    University of Skövde, School of Health and Education. University of Skövde, Health and Education.
    The American Dream in a Swedish Representative Sample: Personality Traits Predict Life Outcomes Better than Childhood Background2016Conference paper (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    The American Dream is that any individual, not regarding family background, can achieve what they desire, in terms of life, economic liberty, and happiness. An indication of the American dream would be if individual adult personality traits predicted life outcomes better than childhood background.

    A sample of the Swedish population, representative in age, sex, and occupation (N = 5,280) was 2012 measured on adult personality traits, childhood socioeconomic status (SES), and 3 life outcomes – education, income, and life outcome satisfaction.

    Childhood SES accounted for almost twice the disattenuated variance (22%) compared to personality (12%) in educational attainment, while personality accounted for almost twice the variance (12%) compared to childhood SES (7%) in annual income. Life outcome satisfaction was only predicted by personality (37%) and not by childhood SES (0%). Moreover, particularly the traits extraversion and neuroticism showed a full compensating catch-up effect on high childhood SES in annual income.

    Expressions of personality may be growing in predictive importance and constitute a societal trademark of the American dream being present. Sweden is a renowned progressive, individualistic, and egalitarian country, which could make the results of wide-reaching interest. 

    Download full text (pdf)
    fulltext
  • 3.
    Roos, John Magnus
    Centrum för konsumtionsvetenskap, CFK, Handelshögskolan vid Göteborgs universitet.
    Basfakta2010In: Konsumtionsrapporten 2010 / [ed] John Magnus Roos, Göteborg: Centrum för konsumtionsvetenskap, CFK, Handelshögskolan vid Göteborgs universitet , 2010, p. 13-26Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 4. Roos, John Magnus
    Democracy and Design in Swedish Personal Assistance2016In: Service Design Geographies: Proceedings of the ServDes.2016 Conference / [ed] Nicola Morelli; Amalia de Götzen; Francesco Grani, Linköping: Linköping University Electronic Press, 2016, p. 415-428, article id 34Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The present study investigated the role of personal assistance service providers for people with disabilities from the users’ point of view. Interviews with 12 users resulted in five value categories: (1) Interact with the user in a service-minded way (2) Have a proper ideology of personal assistance, (3) Mediate between users and personal assistants, (4) Provide good work conditions for personal assistants and (5) Represent the user politically. This study illustrates that classical theoretical models of customer service might be less suitable to explain the role of service providers for Swedish users of personal assistance. In order to provide successful service and support, service providers might need to consider interactions beyond the provider and the end-users, and also include issues such as political lobbying, working conditions for social workers and sustainability in terms of guaranteeing the service in the future. The findings are discussed in relation to service management theories and the service design society.

  • 5.
    Roos, John Magnus
    University of Gothenburg, Centre for Consumer Science, Sweden.
    Expert validity of a non-verbal personality assessment2016In: International Journal of Psychology, ISSN 0020-7594, E-ISSN 1464-066X, Vol. 51, no S1, p. 946-946Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This paper describes a non-verbal personality assessment that consists of 10 cartoon-like portrayals, one for each factor in the five-factor model of personality and their counterparts. The assessment is co-created with graphic designers at an international top-ranking design and innovation agency, Veryday. The aim of the present study is to validate the assessment through experts in the field of Psychological Assessment. Twenty-seven experts at the EAPA Conference 2015 evaluated the ability of each portrayal to express the personality factors. On a 5-point Likert scale, varying from "very low" (i.e. 1.00) to "very high" (i.e. 5.00), the mean values are as following: · Openness: Closed-minded (M=1.99), Open-minded (M=4.24). · Conscientiousness: Impulsive (M=2.46), Conscientious (M=3.48). · Agreeableness: Antagonistic (M=1.69), Agreeable (M=4.25). · Extraversion: Introvert (M=1.77), Extravert (M=4.69). · Neuroticism: Emotionally stable (M=1.76), Neurotic (M=4.15). The non-verbal assessment seems to be accurate to measure four of the five factors. The problem is conscientiousness.

  • 6.
    Roos, John Magnus
    University of Skövde, School of Health and Education. University of Skövde, Health and Education. Centre for Consumer Science, University of Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Five Factor Model of Personality and the Use of Multiple Internet Functions2017In: Open Journal of Social Sciences, E-ISSN 2327-5960, Vol. 5, no 10, p. 109-116Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The purpose of this study is to explore how the Five Factor Model of Personality relates to the use of multiple internet functions. The personality traits included in the Five Factor Model of Personality are Openness to Experiences, Conscientiousness, Extraversion, Agreeableness and Neuroticism. This study builds on survey data from a sample that is representative of the Swedish population. In total, 3400 surveys were distributed with a response rate of 50 percentages (N = 1694). Our results indicate that use of multiple internet functions are positively related to Openness to Experiences and Extraversion, and nega-tively related to Neuroticism.

    Download full text (pdf)
    fulltext
  • 7.
    Roos, John Magnus
    Centrum för konsumtionsvetenskap, CFK, Handelshögskolan vid Göteborgs universitet.
    Konsumtionsrapporten 20102010Collection (editor) (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    10 konsumtionsrapporten

    In the Consumption Report 2010 (Konsumtionsrapporten 2010) Swedish households’ expenditures in 2008 are summarized and analysed. It is based on statistics from Statistics Sweden and from the SOM institute at the University of Gothenburg. The report is published by Centre for Consumer Science at School of Business, Economics and Law, University of Gothenburg.

     

    Basic facts• The Swedish households had expenditures of SEK 1477 billions in 2009.• The households’ expenditures decreased with 0.6 percent compared to 2008 and increased 24 percent compared to 1999.• For the first time since 1993 the total consumption in Sweden decreased between two years, from 2008 to 2009.• During the period 2005- 2009 the households’ expenditures for electricity and consumables/con-sumer goods (e.g. toilet paper and hygiene articles) increased by more than 20%.• During the period 2005-2009 total expenditures for Swedish households related to phone calls and telephone subscriptions decreased.• Prices decreased with 0.6 percent from 2008 to 2009.1999-2009 prices increased with 15,9 per-cent.• Expenditure groups that increased the most compared to 2008 were:- Health and hospital services, 5.7 percent- Alcohol and tobacco, 5.1 percent- Purchases by non-resident households in Sweden, 4.9 percent• Expenditure groups that had high increases between 1999 and 2009:- Communication services, 132 percent- Purchases by non-resident households in Sweden, 104 percent- Furnishings, household equipment and routine maintenance of the house, 76 percent-Leisure time and culture, 66 percent- Clothing and footwear, 53 percent• The expenditure group that decreased the most compared to 2008:- Purchases by non-resident households in Sweden, -13.8 percent• Single persons with children had the lowest total expenditures. They consume less than other housekeeping units regarding alcoholic beverages, dinner out, furniture, transports and leisure ac-tivities.• Cohabiting without children had the highest total expenditures. They consume more than other housekeeping units regarding alcoholic beverages, dinner out, transports and leisure activities.• Men spent more money than women on alcoholic beverages, tobacco, sport and hobby. • Men spent less money than women on personal hygiene, underwear, footwear, other services.• In 2009, more Swedish people than ever were very satisfied with their life. The increase from 2008 to 2009 was especially large among women. • The share of consumption of ecological and environmental goods was 3.5 percent.  

    In-depth articles• The Swedish consumption of alcohol decreases despite the fact that the Swedish Alcohol Retailing Monopoly sells more. The reason is that legal and illegal direct purchases abroad by Swedish residents have decreased.• From 2007 to 2009 the Swedish household ́s expenditures for consumables/consumer goods in-creased. One reason is that consumers in a recession consume less durable goods and high-risk investments and instead use their money for more short term expenditures.• Men become more and more interested in beauty articles and cosmetics which also explain the increases in consumption related to consumables/consumer goods.• The Swedish households’ expenditures of electricity have increased. The main reason is in-creases in the price of electricity. Another reason is increases in number of devices that needs electricity. 

  • 8.
    Roos, John Magnus
    Centrum för konsumtionsvetenskap, CFK, Handelshögskolan vid Göteborgs universitet.
    Konsumtionsrapporten 20112011Collection (editor) (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    In the Consumption Report 2011 (Konsumtionsrapporten 2011) Swedish households’ expenditures in 2010 are summarized and analysed. It is based on statistics from Statistics Sweden and from the SOM institute at the University of Gothenburg. The report is published by Centre for Consumer Science at School of Business, Economics and Law, University of Gothenburg.

  • 9.
    Roos, John Magnus
    Centrum för konsumtionsvetenskap, CFK, Handelshögskolan vid Göteborgs universitet.
    Konsumtionsrapporten 20122012Collection (editor) (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    In the Consumption Report 2012 (Konsumtionsrapporten 2012) Swedish households’ expenditures in 2011 are summarized and analyzed. The report consists of two parts. The first part, “Basic facts”, gives an overview of households’ expenditures based on public statistics from Statistics Sweden and of consumer’s life satisfaction based on statistics from the SOM Institute. The second part, “In-depth articles”, highlights some consumption areas of certain interest. Detailed statistics are presented in appendixes. The report is published by Centre for Consumer Science at School of Business, Economics and Law, University of Gothenburg.

  • 10.
    Roos, John Magnus
    Centrum för konsumtionsvetenskap, CFK, Handelshögskolan vid Göteborgs universitet.
    Konsumtionsrapporten 20132013Collection (editor) (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    In the Consumption Report 2013 (Konsumtionsrapporten 2013) Swedish households’ expenditures in 2012 are summarized and analyzed. The report consists of two parts. The first part, “Basic facts”, gives an overview of households’ expenditures based on public statistics from Sta-tistics Sweden and of consumer’s life satisfaction based on statistics from the SOM Institute. The second part, “In-depth articles”, highlights some consumption areas of certain interest. Detailed statistics are presented in appendixes. The report is published by Centre for Consumer Science at School of Business, Economics and Law, University of Gothenburg.

  • 11.
    Roos, John Magnus
    Centrum för konsumtionsvetenskap, CFK, Handelshögskolan vid Göteborgs universitet.
    Konsumtionsrapporten 20142014Collection (editor) (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    In the Consumption Report 2013 (Konsumtionsrapporten 2013) Swedish households’ expenditures in 2012 are summarized and analyzed. The report consists of two parts. The first part, “Basic facts”, gives an overview of households’ expenditures based on public statistics from Statistics Sweden and of consumer’s life satisfaction based on statistics from the SOM Institute. The second part, “In-depth articles”, highlights some consumption areas of certain interest. Detailed statistics are presented in appendixes. The report is published by Centre for Consumer Science at School of Business, Economics and Law, University of Gothenburg.

  • 12.
    Roos, John Magnus
    Centrum för konsumtionsvetenskap, CFK, Handelshögskolan vid Göteborgs universitet.
    Konsumtionsrapporten 20152015Collection (editor) (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    The Consumption Report 2015 (Konsumtionsrapporten 2015) provides an overview of the con­sumption of Swedish households and how it has evolved over the past decade. The report con­sists of two parts. The first part, “Basic facts”, gives an overview of households’ expenditures based on statistics from Statistics Sweden, the Swedish Consumer Agency and the SOM-insti­tute at University of Gothenburg. The first part analyzes national consumption patterns, the functionality of different markets and consumer ́s life satisfaction. The second part, “In­depth articles”, highlights some consumption areas of certain interest. Detailed statistics are presented in appendixes. The report is published by Centre for Consumer Science at School of Business, Economics and Law, University of Gothenburg.

  • 13.
    Roos, John Magnus
    Centrum för konsumtionsvetenskap, CFK, Handelshögskolan vid Göteborgs universitet.
    Konsumtionsrapporten 2016: Hållbarhetens illusion2016Collection (editor) (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    The Consumption Report 2016 (Konsumtionsrapporten 2016) provides an overview of the consumption of Swedish households and how it has evolved over the past decade. The report consists of two parts. The first part, “Basic facts”, gives an overview of households’ expenditures based on statistics from Statistics Sweden, the Swedish Consumer Agency and the SOM-institute at University of Gothenburg. The first part analyzes national consumption patterns, the functionality of different markets and consumer ́s life satisfaction. The second part, “Indepth articles”, highlights some consumption areas of certain interest. Detailed statistics are presented in appendixes. The report is published by Centre for Consumer Science at School of Business, Economics and Law, University of Gothenburg.

    Download full text (pdf)
    fulltext
  • 14.
    Roos, John Magnus
    Centrum för konsumtionsvetenskap, CFK, Handelshögskolan vid Göteborgs universitet.
    Konsumtionsrapporten 2017: Inga bekymmer?2017Collection (editor) (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    The Consumption Report 2017 (Konsumtionsrapporten 2017) provides an overview of the consumption of Swedish households and how it has evolved over the past decade. The report consists of two parts. The first part, “Basic facts”, gives an overview of households’ expenditures based on statistics from Postnord, HUI-Research, Statistics Sweden, the Swedish Consumer Agency and the SOM-institute at University of Gothenburg. The first part analyzes national consumption patterns of housholds, Swedish retailing, Swedish consumption trends, the functionality of different markets and consumer ́s life satisfaction. The second part highlights some consumption areas of certain interest. Detailed statistics are presented in appendixes. The report is published by Centre for Consumer Research at School of Business, Economics and Law, University of Gothenburg.

    Download full text (pdf)
    fulltext
  • 15.
    Roos, John Magnus
    Centrum för konsumtionsvetenskap, CFK, Handelshögskolan vid Göteborgs universitet.
    Konsumtionsrapporten 2018: Under ytan2018Collection (editor) (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    The Consumption Report 2018 (Konsumtionsrapporten 2018) provides an overview of the con­sumption of Swedish households and how it has evolved over the past decade. The report consists of two parts. The first part, “Basic facts”, gives an overview of households’ expenditures based on statistics from Postnord, HUI­Research, Statistics Sweden, the SOM­institute at University of Gothenburg. The first part analyzes national consumption patterns of the Swedish housholds, Swedish retailing, Swedish consumption trends, and consumer ́s life satisfaction in relation to con­sumption. Following basic facts are three “indepth articles” which highlights some consumption areas of certain interest. Detailed statistics are presented in appendixes. The report is published by Centre for Consumer Science at the School of Business, Economics and Law, University of Gothenburg.

    Download full text (pdf)
    fulltext
  • 16.
    Roos, John Magnus
    Centrum för konsumtionsvetenskap, CFK, Handelshögskolan vid Göteborgs universitet.
    Konsumtionsrapporten 2019: Orosmoln2019Collection (editor) (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    The Consumption Report 2018 (Konsumtionsrapporten 2019) provides an overview of the consumption among Swedish households and how this has evolved over the past decade. The report consists of two parts. The first part, “Basic facts”, gives an overview of households’ expenses based on statistics from Postnord, HUI-Research, Statistics Sweden, and the SOM-institute at University of Gothenburg. The first part analyzes private consumption expenses, retail sales, Swedish consumption trends, and consumers’ life satisfaction in relation to consumption. Following basic facts are two “in-depth articles” which highlight some consumption areas of certain interest. Detailed statistics are presented in appendixes. The report is published by the Centre for Consumer Science at the School of Business, Economics and Law, University of Gothenburg.

    Download full text (pdf)
    fulltext
  • 17.
    Roos, John Magnus
    Centrum för konsumtionsforskning, CFK, Handelshögskolan vid Göteborgs universitet.
    Konsumtionsrapporten 2020: Acceleration2020Collection (editor) (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    The Consumption Report 2020 (Konsumtionsrapporten 2020) provides an overview of the con-sumption among Swedish households in 2019 and 2020 and how this has evolved over the past decade. The report consists of two parts. The first part, “Basic facts”, gives an overview of the households’ expenses based on statistics primarily from Statistics Sweden and the SOM-institute at University of Gothenburg (but also from other government agencies and research institutes (e.g. Postnord and HUI-Research). The first part analyzes private consumption expenses for 2019, private consumption expenses for 2020, changes in retail sales, Swedish consumption trends before and after the covid-19 outbreak, and consumption and well-being. Following basic facts are two “in-depth articles” which highlight some consumption areas of certain interest: this year’s challenges for the clothing industry and the consumer behavior hoarding. Detailed statistics are presented in appendices. The report was published by the Centre for Consumption Research at the School of Business, Economics and Law, University of Gothenburg.

    Download full text (pdf)
    fulltext
  • 18.
    Roos, John Magnus
    University of Skövde, School of Health Sciences. University of Skövde, Digital Health Research (DHEAR). School of Business, Economics and Law, University of Gothenburg, Sweden / Faculty of Textiles, Engineering and Business, University of Borås, Sweden / Department of Space, Earth and Environment, Chalmers University of Technology, Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Mapping the Relationship Between Hedonic Capacity and Online Shopping2021In: Proceedings of Fifth International Congress on Information and Communication Technology: ICICT 2020, London, Volume 1 / [ed] Xin-She Yang; R. Simon; Sherratt Nilanjan; Dey Amit Joshi, Singapore: Springer Singapore , 2021, p. 604-611Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In the present study, the relationship between hedonic capacity and online shopping is explored through a Swedish nationally representative sample. A survey was distributed to 3000 citizens. The number of respondents was 1591 (response rate: 53%). Ordinal regression analyses were conducted in order to test the association between hedonic capacity and online shopping. The dependent variable was online shopping frequencies. Gender, age, and individual income were control variables. Our findings indicated that hedonic capacity was positively associated with online shopping (p < 0.001). The findings propose that online shopping primarily is triggered by emotions and affect rather than reasoning and cognition. Such insights can be used in strategical marketing and technological decisions by academy and industry, as well as in Web site design and communication.

  • 19.
    Roos, John Magnus
    Centre for Consumer Science, University of Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Personal marketing appeals: How personality dimensions influence feelings toward emotional images2014In: International Journal of Economic Practices and Theories, E-ISSN 2247-7225, Vol. 4, no 5, p. 526-533Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The aim of this study is to explore how the five-factor model of personality (openness, conscientiousness, extraversion, agreeableness and neuroticism) influences emotional responses to visual stimuli. An experimental design was used where 148 students completed a personality test and reported their emotional response to fourteen visual images. The key-findings are (1) high degree of extraversion influences pleasant affect (i.e. happiness), (2) high degree of neuroticism influences unpleasant affect (i.e. fear and disgust), (3) low degree of openness, extraversion and/or neuroticism influences the absence of emotions (i.e. neutral response). Our results demonstrate that consumers´ immediate perceptions of visual images as stimuli at least partly depend on their personality dimensions, which are shaped by nature and nurture.

  • 20.
    Roos, John Magnus
    University of Skövde, School of Health Sciences. University of Skövde, Digital Health Research (DHEAR). Division of Physical Resource Theory, Chalmers University of Technology, Gothenburg / Centre for Consumer Research, School of Business, Economics and Law, University of Gothenburg, Sweden / Department of Business Administration and Textile Management, University of Borås, Sweden.
    Personality and E-shopping: Insights from a Nationally Representative Study2019In: Digital Transformation and Global Society: 4th International Conference, DTGS 2019, St. Petersburg, Russia, June 19–21, 2019, Revised Selected Papers / [ed] Daniel A. Alexandrov; Alexander V. Boukhanovsky; Andrei V. Chugunov; Yury Kabanov; Olessia Koltsova; Ilya Musabirov, Cham: Springer, 2019, p. 257-267Chapter in book (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    According to previous research, a high degree of Openness and Neuroticism, and a low degree of Agreeableness are personality determinants of e-shopping. This study aims to explore the relationship between the Five-factor model of personality (i.e. Openness, Conscientiousness, Extraversion, Agreeableness, and Neuroticism) and e-shopping in a Swedish context. In a nationally representative sample, a questionnaire was distributed to 3400 citizens. The response rate was 53 percentage (N = 1812). The questionnaire included measures of the Five-factor model of personality (BFI-ten) and e-shopping. Multiple regression analyses were conducted to test if the Five-factor model of personality predicted e-shopping. The dependent variable was self-reported frequencies of e-shopping during the last 12 months. The first analysis showed that Openness is predicting e-shopping. However, this effect disappeared, when age, educational attainment and income were controlled for. Our conclusion is that the Five-factor model of personality is a poor predictor of e-shopping and that e-shopping frequencies are unrelated to the personality of internet users. Methodological limitations are discussed, for instance the use of a single-item for measuring e-shopping and a short-scale for measuring personality. There are difficulties comparing our findings with previous findings, since the concepts personality and e-shopping have not been defined uniformly. The analyses revealed significant variation in definitions, measurements and methodologies. Caution should also be taken in generalizing the present results to other countries and other time periods. © 2019, Springer Nature Switzerland AG.

  • 21.
    Roos, John Magnus
    University of Skövde, School of Health and Education. University of Skövde, Health and Education. University of Gothenburg, Sweden.
    The winner takes IT all: Swedish digital divides in global internet usage2018In: Digital Transformation and Global Society: Third International Conference, DTGS 2018, St. Petersburg, Russia, May 30 – June 2, 2018, Revised Selected Papers, Part II / [ed] Daniel A. Alexandrov; Alexander V. Boukhanovsky; Andrei V. Chugunov; Yury Kabanov; Olessia Koltsova, Cham: Springer Nature Switzerland AG , 2018, 1, Vol. 859, p. 3-18Chapter in book (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In the present study, we examined the influence of personality factors and demographic factors on Internet usage. Personality was defined from the Five Factor Model of personality in terms of Openness, Conscientiousness, Extraversion, Agreeableness, and Neuroticism, while demographic factors were defined as gender, age and socioeconomic status (e.g. income and educational attainment). The results from a large, representative Swedish sample (N = 1,694) show that global Internet usage can be explained by a high degree of Extraversion, young age and high socioeconomic status. Our findings are consistent with some previous studies, but in contrast with others. We discuss contrasting results in terms of different study designs, cultures and time periods of Internet development. The results are discussed in terms of the “rich get richer model” and digital divides, and what broader implication our findings might have for society. The study may help facilitate our understanding regarding future challenges in the Internet design. 

  • 22.
    Roos, John Magnus
    et al.
    Center of Consumer Science, Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Ferreira, Aimee
    The "Big Five" personified2012In: International Journal of Psychology, ISSN 0020-7594, E-ISSN 1464-066X, Vol. 47, no S1, p. 611-612Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This study aims to explore the potential of transforming a verbal personality scale, the HP5 (Gustavsson, Jönsson, Linder & Weinryb, 2008), to a non-verbal (visual) personality scale. Instead of relying on the use of words, we give the respondents an opportunity to report personality traits (i.e. neuroticism, openness, conscientiousness, agreeableness and extraversion) using cartoons. According to Desmet (2006), nonverbal scales increase the pleasure of participating and allows researchers to uncover aspects that people are unwilling and/or unable to verbally express. We validate our non-verbal scale versus verbal items in HP5 in order to investigate to what degree the five different cartoons (e.g. extreme personalities) correspond to the verbal meaning we would like them to express. Each cartoon is measured by 15 items; three items for each factor. The scale used for each item was a four-level scale: completely agree (coded as 1), partly agree (coded as 2), partly disagree (coded as 3), completely disagree (coded as 4). The validation criteria were as following: (i) the three items measuring a particular factor must in average have an average of 1.33; (ii) every item must correspond more to the factor it is supposed to measure than to other factors. The study discusses problems, challenges and opportunities with visualising a verbal scale. The study also discusses cultural differences in body language and facial expressions. The cartoons are developed with designers at Ergonomidesign in Sweden and validated using 300 international students. The study is financed by the central bank of Sweden.

  • 23.
    Roos, John Magnus
    et al.
    University of Skövde, School of Health Sciences. University of Skövde, Digital Health Research (DHEAR). School of Business Economics and Law, Centre for Consumer Research, University of Gothenburg, Sweden ; Department of Business Administration and Textile Management, University of Borås, Sweden.
    Jansson, Magnus
    Gothenburg School of Business, Economics and Law, Gothenburg Research Institue, Sweden.
    Gärling, Tommy
    Department of Psychology, University of Gothenburg, Sweden.
    A three-level analysis of values related to socially responsible retirement investments2022In: Journal of Sustainable Finance & Investment, ISSN 2043-0795, E-ISSN 2043-0809, p. 1-17Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The aim is to investigate the value basis of Socially Responsible Retirement Investments (SRRI) in a study of Swedish pension investors in the age range 18 to 65 years (N=1005). Logistic regression analyses were performed with self-reported SRRI choice as dependent variable and different levels of values as independent variables. On a higher level of analyses, self-transcendent values, especially universalism (e.g., equality, protecting the environment, and social justice), have the most important influences on SRRI choice. In contrast, on a lower-level analysis, SRRI choice is influenced by self-enhancement values with high priority for authoritarian power and low priority for wealth. The three-level analysis of values (self-transcendence vs self-enhancement value orientation, motivational domain, and value) questions the contradiction between dimension poles of values and the structuring of values in interrelated motivational domains. The results thereby clarify some previous findings and increase the understanding of the value basis of SRR

    Download full text (pdf)
    fulltext
  • 24.
    Roos, John Magnus
    et al.
    University of Skövde, School of Health and Education. University of Skövde, Health and Education. Veryday, Sweden / University of Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Kajonius, Petri
    University of Skövde, School of Health and Education. University of Skövde, Health and Education. University College West, Sweden / University of Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Non-verbal personality assessment with 10 cartoon-like portrayals2015In: ECPA 13th European Conference on Psychological Assessment, Zurich, July 22-25, 2015: Book of abstracts / [ed] Willibald Ruch, 2015, p. 78-79Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This paper describes a non-verbal personality assessment that consists of 10 cartoon-like portrayals, one for each factor in the five-factor model of personality and their counterparts (i.e. open-minded, conscientious, extravert, agreeable, and neurotic; versus close-minded, impulsive, introvert, antagonistic, and emotionally stable). The assessment has been constructed in collaboration with graphic designers at an international top-ranking design and innovation agency, Veryday. Unlike existing personality assessments, this assessment is developed for interviews and combines the respondent´s perceived self and ideal self rather than only focusing on the ECPA13 Zurich 79 Paper Sessions respondent´s self-reported perceived self. The aim of the assessment is to provide insight into gaps that reside in incongruity between the respondent´s perceived self and ideal self and thereafter focusing the interview on how to bridge the gap(s). The portrayals have been validated through 156 undergraduate students at Stockholm University. The content validity was verified via tag clouds of top-of-mind words and the criterion validity was verified via the verbal assessment criterion, HP5i. The preliminary analyses are promising in terms of reshaping and adjusting established personality assessments into non-verbal tools for interview settings in therapy and user-studies. However, the assessment need to be further validated and discussed with experts in the field of psychological assessments.

  • 25.
    Roos, John Magnus
    et al.
    University of Skövde, School of Health and Education. University of Skövde, Health and Education. Centre for Consumer Science, University of Gothenburg, Sweden / Department of Business Administration and Textile Management, University of Borås, Sweden.
    Kajonius, Petri J.
    Department of Social and Behavioural Studies, University West, Sweden.
    Expert validity on non-verbal personality characters2017In: 14th Conference on Psychological Assessment, July 5-8, 2017, Lisbon, Portugal: Book of Abstracts / [ed] Paula Ferreira, Aristides Ferreira, Inês Afonso, & Ana Margarida Veiga Simão, Lisbon: Faculty of Psychology of the University of Lisbon , 2017, p. 81-Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 26.
    Roos, John Magnus
    et al.
    University of Skövde, School of Health and Education. University of Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Kajonius, Petri J.
    University of Skövde, School of Health and Education. University of Gothenburg, Sweden / University West, Sweden.
    The Personality Map of Sweden2016Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Research indicates that personality traits are unevenly distributed geographically, with some traits being more prevalent in certain places than in others. The majority of research in this field has focused on cross-national comparisons, while less attention has been given to variations in personality traits within countries (Rentfrow, Kokela & Lamb, 2015).

    More recently, regional personality differences have been mapped in both United States and Great Britain (Rentfrow, Gosling, Jokela, Stillwell, Kosinki & Potter, 2013; Rentfrow, Kokela & Lamb, 2015). The aim of the present study is to map regional personality differences in Sweden.

    Using a representative sample of Swedish residents (N = 6154), we mapped the geographical distribution of the Big Five Personality traits across eight national areas (e.g. Stockholm, East Middle Sweden, South Småland and the Islands, South Sweden, West Sweden, North Middle Sweden, Middle Norrland and Upper Norrland).

    The result revealed statistically significant associations on national areas and the degree of agreeableness [F (7, 6154) = 4.63, p < .01, partial ƞ² =.005]. Employing the Bonferroni post-hoc test, significant differences (p < .01) were found between South Sweden (M = 2.74) and the Upper Norrland (M = 2.93), and between South Sweden and North Middle Sweden (M = 2.88). Descriptive statistics illustrate a stepwise change toward higher degree of agreeableness, from the South of Sweden to the North of Sweden (Figure 1).

    The result revealed statistically significant associations on national areas and the degree of conscientiousness (F (7, 6164) = 2,51, p < .05, partial ƞ² =.003). Employing the Bonferroni post-hoc test, significant (p < .05) differences were found only between Stockholm (M = 2.94) and the Upper Norrland (M = 3.06). 

    Insights about regional personality differences within a nation are useful, because such differences are associated with political, economic, social and health outcomes and thereby linked to a regions history, culture and ability to change.

    Download full text (pdf)
    fulltext
  • 27.
    Roos, John Magnus
    et al.
    University of Skövde, School of Health and Education. University of Skövde, Health and Education. Centre for Consumer Research, University of Gothenburg, Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Kazemi, Ali
    University of Skövde, School of Health and Education. University of Skövde, Health and Education.
    Personality traits and Internet usage across generation cohorts: Insights from a nationally representative study2021In: Current Psychology, ISSN 1046-1310, E-ISSN 1936-4733, Vol. 40, no 3, p. 1287-1297Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Studies examining the relationship between personality and Internet usage have usually used small and non-representative samples. In the present study, we examine the relationship between the Five Factor Model of Personality and Internet usage in a large nationally representative Swedish sample (N = 1694). Neuroticism was negatively associated with overall Internet usage, whereas extraversion and openness to experience were shown to be positively associated with overall Internet usage. However, exploring these associations across categories of Internet usage and generation cohorts revealed some other interesting patterns. Specifically, neuroticism was negatively associated with using the Internet for activities relating to information and duties but not for leisure and social activities. Extraversion was positively associated with using the Internet for leisure and social activities among DotNets (born 1977–1999), whereas among Dutifuls (born 1910–1945) and Baby Boomers (born 1946–1964) extraversion was positively associated with using the Internet for information and duty activities. Openness to experience was positively associated with Internet usage but only among Baby Boomers. Conscientiousness was a significant predictor of Internet usage only for DotNets and GenXers (born 1965–1976). In these cohorts, conscientiousness was positively associated with using the Internet for information and duty activities but negatively associated with using the Internet for leisure and social activities. Apparently, understanding the relationship between personality and Internet usage is not possible without considering the modifying role of categories of Internet usage and generation cohorts. The implications of the results for theory and practice are discussed in detail.

    Download full text (pdf)
    fulltext
  • 28.
    Roos, John Magnus
    et al.
    University of Skövde, School of Health Sciences. University of Skövde, Digital Health Research (DHEAR). Centre for Consumer Research at the School of Business, Economics and Commercial Law, University of Gothenburg, Sweden ; University of Borås, Sweden ; Department of Physical Resource Theory, Chalmers University of Technology, Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Kazemi, Ali
    University West, Trollhättan, Sweden.
    The five factor model of personality as predictor of online shopping: Analyzing data from a large representative sample of Swedish internet users2022In: Cogent Psychology, E-ISSN 2331-1908, Vol. 9, no 1, article id 2024640Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Using a large representative sample of the Swedish population, the present study aimed to explore the relationship between the Five Factor Model (FFM) of personality and frequency of online shopping. On three different occasions, surveys were sent out to 9,000 Swedish residents using a systematic random sampling procedure. In total, 5,238 individuals responded to the survey which, inter alia, included measures of the FFM of personality (i.e., HP5i, 15 items) and online shopping. A confirmatory factor analysis confirmed the construct validity of the HP5i. To examine whether and to what extent the FFM predicted self-reported frequency of online shopping, a hierarchical regression analysis was conducted in which gender and age were used as control variables. Our findings indicated that online shopping was positively associated with Openness to experience (i.e., openness to feelings) and Extraversion (i.e., hedonic capacity), and negatively associated with Conscientiousness (i.e., a high degree of impulsiveness). These results suggest that online shoppers are affective, hedonic, and impulsive; that is, characteristics that contrast with the classical view of online shoppers as cognitive, utilitarian, and goal-directed. We argue that these results, alongside the use of a large representative sample and frequency of online purchase, are a needed addition to previous research as previous research studies mainly have focused on the intention or motivation to online shopping using smaller non-representative samples. Implications for online retailers and society as well as directions for future research are discussed.

    Download full text (pdf)
    fulltext
  • 29.
    Roos, John Magnus
    et al.
    University of Skövde, School of Health Sciences. University of Skövde, Digital Health Research (DHEAR). Division of Psychical Resource Theory, Chalmers University of Technology, Gothenburg, Sweden / Centre for Consumer Research, School of Business, Economics and Law, University of Gothenburg, Sweden / Department of Business Administration and Textile Management, University of Borås, Sweden.
    Sprei, Frances
    Division of Psychical Resource Theory, Chalmers University of Technology, Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Holmberg, Ulrika
    Centre for Consumer Research, School of Business, Economics and Law, University of Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Sociodemography, Geography, and Personality as Determinants of Car Driving and Use of Public Transportation2020In: Behavioral Sciences, E-ISSN 2076-328X, Vol. 10, no 6, article id 93Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    To address the sustainability challenges related to travel behavior, technological innovations will not be enough. Behavioral changes are also called for. The aim of the present study is to examine the influence of sociodemography, geography, and personality on car driving and use of public transportation. Sociodemographic factors have been defined by age, gender, income, and education. Geographic factors have been studied through residential area (e.g., rural and urban areas). Personality has been studied through the Five-Factor-Model of personality-degree of Openness, Conscientiousness, Extraversion, Agreeableness, and Neuroticism. The analysis is based on a survey with 1812 respondents, representative for the Swedish population. Regarding sociodemographic factors, car driving is explained by being male, higher age, higher income, while use of public transportation is explained by lower age and higher education. The user profile of a car driver is the opposite to that of a public transport passenger when it comes to geographic factors; urban residential area explains public transportation while rural area explains car driving. Some personality factors are also opposites; a low degree of Openness and a high degree of Extraversion explain car driving, while a high degree of Openness and a low degree of Extraversion explain use of public transportation. Moreover, car driving is explained by a low degree of Neuroticism, while use of public transportation is explained by a low degree of Conscientiousness and a high degree of Agreeableness. Since sociodemography, geography, and personality influence how people process information and evaluate market propositions (e.g., products and services), the findings presented here are useful for policymakers and transportations planners who would like to change behavior from car driving to public transportation use. Caution should be taken in interpreting the relationship between personality traits and transportation modes, since the personality traits are measured by a short scale (i.e., Big Five Inventory (BFI)-10), with limitations in the factor structure for a representative sample of the Swedish population.

    Download full text (pdf)
    fulltext
  • 30.
    Roos, John Magnus
    et al.
    University of Skövde, School of Health Sciences. University of Skövde, Digital Health Research (DHEAR). Centre for Consumption Research, School of Business, Economic and Law, University of Gothenburg, Sweden ; Division of Physical Resource Theory, Chalmers University of Technology, Göteborg, Sweden ; Department of Business Administration and Textile Management, University of Borås, Sweden.
    Sprei, Frances
    Division of Physical Resource Theory, Chalmers University of Technology, Göteborg, Sweden.
    Holmberg, Ulrika
    Centre for Consumption Research, School of Business, Economic and Law, University of Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Traits and Transports: The Effects of Personality on the Choice of Urban Transport Modes2022In: Applied Sciences, E-ISSN 2076-3417, Vol. 12, no 3, article id 1467Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    We examine the influence of personality on car driving, usage of public transport and cycling. Personality is measured through the Big Five personality traits (i.e., Openness, Conscientiousness, Extraversion, Agreeableness and Neuroticism) and Environmental personality. Data were collected through a Web-based panel of adult citizen in the city of Gothenburg, Sweden (N = 1068). Age, gender, income, children at home and residential area were used as control variables. Car driving is influenced by low degree of Openness, high degree of Conscientiousness, and low degree of Environmental personality. Usage of public transport is influenced by low degree of Conscientiousness, high degree of Agreeableness, and high degree of Environmental personality. Cycling is foremost influenced by a high degree of Environmental personality. 

    Download full text (pdf)
    fulltext
  • 31.
    Roos, Magnus
    et al.
    University of Skövde, School of Health and Education. University of Skövde, Health and Education.
    Kazemi, Ali
    University of Skövde, School of Health and Education. University of Skövde, Health and Education.
    Mapping the Relationship between Personality and Electronic Commerce in a Representative Swedish sample2017Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Purpose: According to previous research, a high degree of Openness and Neuroticism, and a low degree of Agreeableness are personality determinants of online shopping. This study aims to explore the relationship between the five factor model of personality and online shopping in a Swedish context.

    Methods: 5238 individuals in a representative sample of the Swedish population responded to a survey including measures of the five personality factors (HP5i, 15 items) and online shopping. (3686 individuals were included in the analysis).

    Results: A logistic regression analysis was conducted to test if personality factors (ranging from 1 = completely disagree to 4 = completely agree) predicted online shopping. The dependent variable was buying online at least one time per month. Gender, age and monthly income were control variables. Our findings indicated that online shopping was significantly (p < .05) associated with a high degree of Openness (e.g. open to feelings/emotions) and high degree of Extraversion (e.g. positive emotional experiences).

    Discussion and Conclusion: People high on Openness might like to shop online because online shopping offers them an adventure, variety and new ideas. People high on extraversion might be motivated to purchase online for their need of excitability. The findings propose that online shopping primarily is triggered by emotions and affect rather than reasoning and cognition.

1 - 31 of 31
CiteExportLink to result list
Permanent link
Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • apa-cv
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf