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  • 1.
    Behnsen, Pia
    et al.
    Department of Clinical, Neuro- and Developmental Psychology, Amsterdam Public Health Research Institute, Vrije Universiteit Amsterdam, Netherlands.
    Buil, Joanne M.
    Department of Clinical, Neuro- and Developmental Psychology, Amsterdam Public Health Research Institute, Vrije Universiteit Amsterdam, Netherlands.
    Koot, Susanne
    Department of Clinical, Neuro- and Developmental Psychology, Amsterdam Public Health Research Institute, Vrije Universiteit Amsterdam, Netherlands.
    Huizink, Anja
    Högskolan i Skövde, Institutionen för hälsa och lärande. Högskolan i Skövde, Forskningsspecialiseringen Hälsa och Lärande. Department of Clinical, Neuro- and Developmental Psychology, Amsterdam Public Health Research Institute, Vrije Universiteit Amsterdam, Netherlands.
    Van Lier, Poul
    Department of Clinical, Neuro- and Developmental Psychology, Amsterdam Public Health Research Institute, Vrije Universiteit Amsterdam, Netherlands.
    Heart rate (variability) and the association between relational peer victimization and internalizing symptoms in elementary school children2019Inngår i: Development and psychopathology (Print), ISSN 0954-5794, E-ISSN 1469-2198, s. 1-9, artikkel-id 29 aprilArtikkel i tidsskrift (Fagfellevurdert)
    Abstract [en]

    Relational victimization typically emerges first during the elementary school period, and has been associated with increased levels of internalizing symptoms in children. Individual differences in autonomic nervous system functioning have been suggested as a potential factor linking social stressors and internalizing symptoms. The aim of this study was therefore to examine whether heart rate and heart rate variability mediated the association between relational victimization and internalizing symptoms in 373 mainstream elementary school children. Children were assessed in 2015 (T 0 ; Grades 3-5, M age = 9.78 years, 51% boys) and reassessed in 2016 (T 1 ). Heart rate and heart rate variability were assessed during a regular school day at T 1 . A multi-informant (teacher and peer report) cross-time measure of relational victimization, and a multi-informant (self- and teacher report) measure of internalizing problems at T 1 was used. Results showed that heart rate variability, but not heart rate, mediated the association between relational victimization and internalizing symptoms. This study provides tentative support that in children from a general population sample, a psychobiological factor may mediate the association of relational victimization with internalizing symptoms.

  • 2.
    Evans, Brittany E.
    et al.
    Behavioural Science Institute, Radboud University, Nijmegen, Netherlands / Centre for Research on Child and Adolescent Mental Health, Karlstad University, Karlstad, Sweden.
    Huizink, Anja
    Högskolan i Skövde, Institutionen för hälsa och lärande. Högskolan i Skövde, Institutionen för hälsovetenskaper. Section of Clinical Developmental Psychology, Amsterdam Public Health Research Institute, Vrije Universiteit Amsterdam, Amsterdam, Netherlands / .
    Greaves-Lord, Kirstin
    Department of Child and Adolescent Psychiatry/Psychology, Erasmus University Medical Center, Rotterdam, Netherlands.
    Tulen, Joke H. M.
    Department of Psychiatry, Erasmus University Medical Center, Rotterdam, Netherlands.
    Roelofs, Karin
    Behavioural Science Institute, Radboud University, Nijmegen, Netherlands / Donders Institute for Brain Cognition and Behaviour, Radboud University, Nijmegen, Netherlands.
    van der Ende, Jan
    Department of Child and Adolescent Psychiatry/Psychology, Erasmus University Medical Center, Rotterdam, Netherlands.
    Urbanicity, biological stress system functioning and mental health in adolescents2020Inngår i: PLoS ONE, E-ISSN 1932-6203, Vol. 15, nr 3, artikkel-id e0228659Artikkel i tidsskrift (Fagfellevurdert)
    Abstract [en]

    Growing up in an urban area has been associated with an increased chance of mental health problems in adults, but less is known about this association in adolescents. We examined whether current urbanicity was associated with mental health problems directly and indirectly via biological stress system functioning. Participants (n = 323) were adolescents from the Dutch general population. Measures included home and laboratory assessments of autonomic nervous system and hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal axis functioning, neighborhood-level urbanicity and socioeconomic status, and mother- and adolescent self-reported mental health problems. Structural equation models showed that urbanicity was not associated with mental health problems directly. Urbanicity was associated with acute autonomic nervous system and hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal axis reactivity such that adolescents who lived in more urban areas showed blunted biological stress reactivity. Furthermore, there was some evidence for an indirect effect of urbanicity on mother-reported behavioral problems via acute autonomic nervous system reactivity. Urbanicity was not associated with overall autonomic nervous system and hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal axis reactivity or basal hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal axis functioning. Although we observed some evidence for associations between urbanicity, biological stress reactivity and mental health problems, most of the tested associations were not statistically significant. Measures of long-term biological stress system functioning may be more relevant to the study of broader environmental factors such as urbanicity. 

  • 3.
    Evans, Brittany E.
    et al.
    Behavioural Science Institute, Radboud University, Nijmegen, Netherlands / Centre for Research on Child and Adolescent Mental Health, Karlstad, Sweden.
    van der Ende, J.
    Erasmus University Medical Center, CN, Rotterdam, Netherlands.
    Greaves-Lord, Kirstin
    Erasmus University Medical Center, CN, Rotterdam, Netherlands.
    Huizink, Anja C.
    Högskolan i Skövde, Institutionen för hälsovetenskaper. Högskolan i Skövde, Forskningsmiljön hälsa, hållbarhet och digitalisering. Section of Clinical Developmental Psychology, Amsterdam Public Health Research Institute, Vrije University Amsterdam, BT, Amsterdam, Netherlands.
    Beijers, Roseriet
    Behavioural Science Institute, Radboud University, Nijmegen, Netherlands / Donders Institute for Brain, Cognition and Behaviour, Radboud University Medical Center, Nijmegen, Netherlands.
    de Weerth, Carolina
    Donders Institute for Brain, Cognition and Behaviour, Radboud University Medical Center, Nijmegen, Netherlands.
    Urbanicity, hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal axis functioning, and behavioral and emotional problems in children: A path analysis2020Inngår i: BMC Psychology, E-ISSN 2050-7283, Vol. 8, nr 1, artikkel-id 12Artikkel i tidsskrift (Fagfellevurdert)
    Abstract [en]

    BACKGROUND: Urbanization is steadily increasing worldwide. Previous research indicated a higher incidence of mental health problems in more urban areas, however, very little is known regarding potential mechanisms underlying this association. We examined whether urbanicity was associated with mental health problems in children directly, and indirectly via hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal (HPA)-axis functioning. METHODS: Utilizing data from two independent samples of children we examined the effects of current urbanicity (n = 306, ages seven to 12 years) and early childhood urbanicity (n = 141, followed from birth through age 7 years). Children's mothers reported on their mental health problems and their family's socioeconomic status. Salivary cortisol samples were collected during a psychosocial stress procedure to assess HPA axis reactivity to stress, and at home to assess basal HPA axis functioning. Neighborhood-level urbanicity and socioeconomic conditions were extracted from Statistics Netherlands. Path models were estimated using a bootstrapping procedure to detect indirect effects. RESULTS: We found no evidence for a direct effect of urbanicity on mental health problems, nor were there indirect effects of urbanicity through HPA axis functioning. Furthermore, we did not find evidence for an effect of urbanicity on HPA axis functioning or effects of HPA axis functioning on mental health problems. CONCLUSIONS: Possibly, the effects of urbanicity on HPA axis functioning and mental health do not manifest until adolescence. An alternative explanation is a buffering effect of high family socioeconomic status as the majority of children were from families with an average or high socioeconomic status. Further studies remain necessary to conclude that urbanicity does not affect children's mental health via HPA axis functioning.

  • 4.
    Horoz, Nil
    et al.
    Department of Clinical, Neuro and Developmental Psychology, VU University Amsterdam, Amsterdam, The Netherlands.
    Huizink, Anja
    Högskolan i Skövde, Institutionen för hälsa och lärande. Högskolan i Skövde, Forskningsspecialiseringen Hälsa och Lärande. Department of Clinical, Neuro and Developmental Psychology, VU University Amsterdam, Amsterdam, The Netherlands.
    Delforterie, Monique J.
    Department of Clinical, Neuro and Developmental Psychology, VU University Amsterdam, Amsterdam, Netherlands / Trajectum, Zwolle, The Netherlands.
    Creemers, Hanneke E.
    Forensic Child and Youth Care Sciences, University of Amsterdam, The Netherlands.
    Well-Being of Turkish and Moroccan Youth in the Netherlands: Parental Control, Parental Solicitation, and Acculturation to the Dutch Culture2019Inngår i: Zeitschrift fur Psychologie mit Zeitschrift fur angewandte Psychologie, ISSN 2190-8370, E-ISSN 2151-2604, Vol. 227, nr 2, s. 144-148Artikkel i tidsskrift (Fagfellevurdert)
    Abstract [en]

    This study examined whether parental control, parental solicitation, and acculturation to the Dutch culture were related to the well-being of Dutch adolescents with Turkish and Moroccan backgrounds. Additionally, moderation by gender and ethnic background was tested. Cross-sectional data from 76 adolescents were used (Mage = 16.7 years, female = 50%, Turkish background = 35.5%). Hierarchical regression analyses showed that parental solicitation was positively associated with well-being, whereas parental control and acculturation were not associated with well-being. Associations were similar between genders and ethnic backgrounds. Positive links between parental solicitation and well-being should not be overlooked, as well-being is critical for positive youth development, integration, and social cohesion. 

  • 5.
    Skalkidou, Alkistis
    et al.
    Department of Women's and Children's Health, Uppsala University, Uppsala, Sweden.
    Sundström Poromaa, Inger
    Department of Women's and Children's Health, Uppsala University, Uppsala, Sweden.
    Iliadis, Stavros I.
    Department of Women's and Children's Health, Uppsala University, Uppsala, Sweden.
    Huizink, Anja
    Högskolan i Skövde, Institutionen för hälsa och lärande. Högskolan i Skövde, Forskningsspecialiseringen Hälsa och Lärande. Section of Clinical Developmental Psychology, Vrije Universiteit Amsterdam, Netherlands.
    Hellgren, Charlotte
    Department of Women's and Children's Health, Uppsala University, Uppsala, Sweden.
    Freyhult, Eva
    Department of Medical Science, National Bioinformatics Infrastructure Sweden, Science for Life Laboratory, Uppsala University, Uppsala, Sweden.
    Comasco, Erika
    Department of Neuroscience, Science for Life Laboratory, Uppsala University, Uppsala, Sweden.
    Stress-related genetic polymorphisms in association with peripartum depression symptoms and stress hormones: A longitudinal population-based study2019Inngår i: Psychoneuroendocrinology, ISSN 0306-4530, E-ISSN 1873-3360, Vol. 103, s. 296-305Artikkel i tidsskrift (Fagfellevurdert)
    Abstract [en]

    Individual differences in the response of the stress system to hormonal changes during pregnancy and the postpartum period render some women susceptible to developing depression. The present study sought to investigate peripartum depression and stress hormones in relation to stress-related genotypes. The Edinburgh Postnatal Depression Scale was used to assess peripartum depressive symptoms in a sample of 1629 women, followed from pregnancy week seventeen to six months postpartum. Genotypes of ninety-four haplotype-tag single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in sixteen genes of the hypothalamus-pituitary-adrenal axis pathway were analyzed and data on psychosocial and demographic factors was collected. In sub-studies, salivary cortisol awakening response in gestational week 35–39, salivary evening cortisol levels in gestational week 36 and postpartum week 6, and blood cortisol and cortisone levels in gestational week 35–39 were analyzed. SNP-set kernel association tests were performed at the gene-level, considering psychosocial and demographic factors, followed by post-hoc analyses of SNPs of significant genes. Statistically significant findings at the 0.05 p-level included SNPs in the hydroxysteroid 11-beta dehydrogenase 1 (HSD11B1) gene in relation to self-rated depression scores in postpartum week six among all participants, and serpin family A member 6 (SERPINA6) gene at the same time-point among women with de novo onset of postpartum depression. SNPs in these genes also associated with stress hormone levels during pregnancy. The present study adds knowledge to the neurobiological basis of peripartum depression by systematically assessing SNPs in stress-regulatory genes and stress-hormone levels in a population-based sample of women. © 2019 Elsevier Ltd

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