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  • 1.
    Bourlat, Sarah J.
    et al.
    Centre for Biodiversity Monitoring, Leibniz Institute for the Analysis of Biodiversity Change/ZFMK, Museum Koenig, Bonn, Germany.
    Tschan, Georg F.
    Centre for Biodiversity Monitoring, Leibniz Institute for the Analysis of Biodiversity Change/ZFMK, Museum Koenig, Bonn, Germany.
    Martin, Sebastian
    Centre for Biodiversity Monitoring, Leibniz Institute for the Analysis of Biodiversity Change/ZFMK, Museum Koenig, Bonn, Germany.
    Iqram, Muhammad
    Biology Department, Faculty of Mathematics and Natural Sciences, Hasanuddin University, Makassar, Indonesia.
    Leidenberger, Sonja
    University of Skövde, School of Bioscience. University of Skövde, Systems Biology Research Environment.
    A red listing gap analysis of molluscs and crustaceans in Northern Europe: What has happened in the last 10 years?2023In: Biological Conservation, ISSN 0006-3207, E-ISSN 1873-2917, Vol. 286, article id 110247Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    At the current rates of species extinction on a global level, Red List assessments need to speed up to inform conservation management in a timely manner. This study analyzed the progress made over the last 10 years in red listing aquatic invertebrates in Northern Europe. A survey of 43 freshwater molluscs and 1492 marine crustaceans was carried out for their Red List status in twelve countries during a twenty year interval (2003−2022). Our survey demonstrated that many countries have no national Red List or outdated Red Lists for the freshwater molluscs and only four countries have assessed their existing crustacean species. Alarmingly, we find 13 % fewer occurrence records for the crustaceans and 48 % fewer records for the freshwater molluscs in GBIF in the last 10 years (2013−2022) than in the 10 years previously (2003−2012). A barcode gap analysis reveals more barcodes for the 16S gene (77 %) than for the COI gene (63 %) for the freshwater molluscs and even fewer barcodes for the marine crustaceans (17 % for 16S and 40 % for the COI gene). With the current methods, regular comprehensive red listing of aquatic invertebrates is unrealistic. Here we present a set of scripts that allow automated occurrence and barcode gap analyses on unrepresented species groups. Finally, we discuss ways to increase the number of occurrence records and speed up red listing under existing European frameworks through whole community screening of ecosystems using molecular and other emerging tools.

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  • 2.
    Crawford, Elizabeth
    et al.
    Foundation Nordens Ark, Åby säteri, Hunnebostrand, Sweden ; Queen’s University Belfast, School of Biological Sciences, UK.
    Leidenberger, Sonja
    University of Skövde, School of Bioscience. University of Skövde, Systems Biology Research Environment.
    Norrström, Niclas
    University of Skövde, School of Bioscience. University of Skövde, Systems Biology Research Environment.
    Niklasson, Mats
    Foundation Nordens Ark, Åby säteri, Hunnebostrand, Sweden ; Swedish University of Agricultural Sciences, Sweden.
    Using Video Footage for Observing Honey Bee Behaviour at Hive Entrances2022In: Bee world, ISSN 0005-772X, Vol. 99, no 4, p. 139-142Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Video recording is a common method to study animal behaviour. In honey bee studies, short video-recordings are often used to learn more about a behaviour, but rarely used for their quantification. Standard methods for observing bee behaviour involve behavioural assays or direct observation of a limited subset of marked bees within an observation hive. This means that behaviour at the hive entrance may be overlooked. Here we describe a 4-camera set up for the study of behaviour at hive entrances. With minimal disturbance, we were able to record and quantify all previously described behaviours (9 in total - including self-grooming in drones) on and around the hive entrance. We briefly discuss the general feasibility of video footage and the relative frequency of each observed behaviour. Our conclusion is that video footage is a useful and perhaps overlooked method for unbiased quantification and comparisons of bee behaviour at the hive entrance. With this paper we are publishing some example short video-recordings as online supplementary material for educational purposes.

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  • 3.
    Hardisty, Alex R.
    et al.
    Cardiff Univ, Sch Comp Sci & Informat, Queens Bldg,5 Parade, Cardiff CF24 3AA, S Glam, Wales, United Kingdom.
    Bacall, Finn
    Univ Manchester, Sch Comp Sci, Kilburn Bldg,Oxford Rd, Manchester M13 9PL, Lancs, England, United Kingdom.
    Beard, Niall
    Univ Manchester, Sch Comp Sci, Kilburn Bldg,Oxford Rd, Manchester M13 9PL, Lancs, England, United Kingdom.
    Balcázar-Vargas, Maria-Paula
    Univ Amsterdam, IBED, POB 94248, NL-1090 Amsterdam, Netherlands.
    Balech, Bachir
    Natl Res Council CNR, Inst Biomembranes & Bioenerget IBBE, Via Amendola 165-A, I-70126 Bari, Italy.
    Barcza, Zoltán
    Eotvos Lorand Univ, Dept Meteorol, Pazmany Setany 1-A, H-1117 Budapest, Hungary.
    Bourlat, Sarah J.
    Univ Gothenburg, Dept Marine Sci, Box 463, S-40530 Gothenburg, Sweden.
    De Giovanni, Renato
    Ctr Referencia Informacao Ambiental, Ave Dr Romeu Tortima 388, BR-13084791 Campinas, SP, Brazil.
    de Jong, Yde
    Univ Amsterdam, IBED, POB 94248, NL-1090 Amsterdam, Netherlands / Univ Eastern Finland, SIB Labs, Joensuu Sci Pk,POB 111, Joensuu 80101, Finland.
    De Leo, Francesca
    Natl Res Council CNR, Inst Biomembranes & Bioenerget IBBE, Via Amendola 165-A, I-70126 Bari, Italy.
    Dobor, Laura
    Eotvos Lorand Univ, Dept Meteorol, Pazmany Setany 1-A, H-1117 Budapest, Hungary.
    Donvito, Giacinto
    Ist Nazl Fis Nucl, Inst Nucl Phys, Via E Orabona 4, I-70125 Bari, Italy.
    Fellows, Donal
    Univ Manchester, Sch Comp Sci, Kilburn Bldg,Oxford Rd, Manchester M13 9PL, Lancs, England.
    Guerra, Antonio Fernandez
    Max Planck Inst Marine Microbiol, Celsiusstr 1, D-28359 Bremen, Germany / Jacobs Univ Bremen GmbH, Campus Ring 1, D-28359 Bremen, Germany.
    Ferreira, Nuno
    Stichting EGI Eu, Sci Pk 140, NL-1098 Amsterdam, Netherlands.
    Fetyukova, Yuliya
    Univ Eastern Finland, SIB Labs, Joensuu Sci Pk,POB 111, Joensuu 80101, Finland.
    Fosso, Bruno
    Natl Res Council CNR, Inst Biomembranes & Bioenerget IBBE, Via Amendola 165-A, I-70126 Bari, Italy.
    Giddy, Jonathan
    Cardiff Univ, Sch Comp Sci & Informat, Queens Bldg,5 Parade, Cardiff CF24 3AA, S Glam, Wales.
    Goble, Carole
    Univ Manchester, Sch Comp Sci, Kilburn Bldg,Oxford Rd, Manchester M13 9PL, Lancs, England.
    Güntsch, Anton
    Free Univ Berlin, Bot Garden & Bot Museum Berlin, Konigin Luise Str 6-8, D-14195 Berlin, Germany.
    Haines, Robert
    Univ Manchester, IT Serv, Kilburn Bldg,Oxford Rd, Manchester M13 9PL, Lancs, England, United Kingdom.
    Hernández Ernst, Vera
    Fraunhofer Inst Intelligent Anal & Informat Syst, D-53757 St Augustin, Germany.
    Hettling, Hannes
    Nat Biodivers Ctr, Postbus 9517, NL-2300 Leiden, Netherlands.
    Hidy, Dóra
    Szent Istvan Univ, MTASZIE Plant Ecol Res Grp, Pater Ku 1, H-2103 Godollo, Hungary.
    Horváth, Ferenc
    Hungarian Acad Sci, Ctr Ecol Res, Inst Ecol & Bot, Alkotmany U 2-4, H-2163 Vacratot, Hungary.
    Ittzés, Dóra
    Hungarian Acad Sci, Ctr Ecol Res, Inst Ecol & Bot, Alkotmany U 2-4, H-2163 Vacratot, Hungary.
    Ittzés, Péter
    Hungarian Acad Sci, Ctr Ecol Res, Inst Ecol & Bot, Alkotmany U 2-4, H-2163 Vacratot, Hungary.
    Jones, Andrew
    Cardiff Univ, Sch Comp Sci & Informat, Queens Bldg,5 Parade, Cardiff CF24 3AA, S Glam, Wales.
    Kottmann, Renzo
    Max Planck Inst Marine Microbiol, Celsiusstr 1, D-28359 Bremen, Germany.
    Kulawik, Robert
    Fraunhofer Inst Intelligent Anal & Informat Syst, D-53757 St Augustin, Germany.
    Leidenberger, Sonja
    Swedish Univ Agr Sci, Swedish Species Informat Ctr ArtDatabanken, Backlasavagen 10, S-75007 Uppsala, Sweden.
    Lyytikäinen-Saarenmaa, Päivi
    Univ Helsinki, Dept Forest Sci, POB 27, FIN-00014 Helsinki, Finland.
    Mathew, Cherian
    Free Univ Berlin, Bot Garden & Bot Museum Berlin, Konigin Luise Str 6-8, D-14195 Berlin, Germany.
    Morrison, Norman
    Univ Manchester, Sch Comp Sci, Kilburn Bldg,Oxford Rd, Manchester M13 9PL, Lancs, England, United Kingdom.
    Nenadic, Aleksandra
    Univ Manchester, Sch Comp Sci, Kilburn Bldg,Oxford Rd, Manchester M13 9PL, Lancs, England, United Kingdom.
    Nieva de la Hidalga, Abraham
    Cardiff Univ, Sch Comp Sci & Informat, Queens Bldg,5 Parade, Cardiff CF24 3AA, S Glam, Wales, United Kingdom.
    Obst, Matthias
    Univ Gothenburg, Dept Marine Sci, Box 463, S-40530 Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Oostermeijer, Gerard
    Institute for Biodiversity and Ecosystem Dynamics (IBED), University of Amsterdam, PO Box 94248, 1090 Amsterdam, The Netherlands.
    Paymal, Elisabeth
    FRB, 195 Rue St Jacques, F-75005 Paris, France.
    Pesole, Graziano
    Institute of Biomembranes and Bioenergetics (IBBE), National Research Council (CNR), via Amendola 165/A, 70126 Bari, Italy / Department of Biosciences, Biotechnology and Biop‑ harmaceutics, University of Bari “A. Moro”, via Orabona, 1514, 70126 Bari, Italy.
    Pinto, Salvatore
    Stichting EGI (EGI.eu), Science Park 140, 1098 Amsterdam, The Netherlands.
    Poigné, Axel
    Fraunhofer Inst Intelligent Anal & Informat Syst, D-53757 St Augustin, Germany.
    Quevedo Fernandez, Francisco
    Cardiff Univ, Sch Comp Sci & Informat, Queens Bldg,5 Parade, Cardiff CF24 3AA, S Glam, Wales, United Kingdom.
    Santamaria, Monica
    Natl Res Council CNR, Inst Biomembranes & Bioenerget IBBE, Via Amendola 165-A, I-70126 Bari, Italy.
    Saarenmaa, Hannu
    SIB Labs, Joensuu Sci‑ ence Park, University of Eastern Finland, P.O. Box 111, 80101 Joensuu, Finland.
    Sipos, Gergely
    Stichting EGI Eu, Sci Pk 140, NL-1098 Amsterdam, Netherlands.
    Sylla, Karl-Heinz
    Fraunhofer Inst Intelligent Anal & Informat Syst, D-53757 St Augustin, Germany.
    Tähtinen, Marko
    Univ Helsinki, Finnish Museum Nat Hist, POB 17, FIN-00014 Helsinki, Finland.
    Vicario, Saverio
    Natl Res Council CNR, Inst Biomed Technol ITB, Via Amendola 122-D, I-70126 Bari, Italy.
    Aldo Vos, Rutger
    Univ Amsterdam, IBED, POB 94248, NL-1090 Amsterdam, Netherlands / Nat Biodivers Ctr, Postbus 9517, NL-2300 Leiden, Netherlands.
    Williams, Alan R.
    Univ Manchester, Sch Comp Sci, Kilburn Bldg,Oxford Rd, Manchester M13 9PL, Lancs, England, United Kingdom.
    Yilmaz, Pelin
    Max Planck Inst Marine Microbiol, Celsiusstr 1, D-28359 Bremen, Germany.
    BioVeL: a virtual laboratory for data analysis and modelling in biodiversity science and ecology2016In: BMC Ecology, E-ISSN 1472-6785, Vol. 16, article id 49Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: Making forecasts about biodiversity and giving support to policy relies increasingly on large collections of data held electronically, and on substantial computational capability and capacity to analyse, model, simulate and predict using such data. However, the physically distributed nature of data resources and of expertise in advanced analytical tools creates many challenges for the modern scientist. Across the wider biological sciences, presenting such capabilities on the Internet (as "Web services") and using scientific workflow systems to compose them for particular tasks is a practical way to carry out robust "in silico" science. However, use of this approach in biodiversity science and ecology has thus far been quite limited. Results: BioVeL is a virtual laboratory for data analysis and modelling in biodiversity science and ecology, freely accessible via the Internet. BioVeL includes functions for accessing and analysing data through curated Web services; for performing complex in silico analysis through exposure of R programs, workflows, and batch processing functions; for on- line collaboration through sharing of workflows and workflow runs; for experiment documentation through reproducibility and repeatability; and for computational support via seamless connections to supporting computing infrastructures. We developed and improved more than 60 Web services with significant potential in many different kinds of data analysis and modelling tasks. We composed reusable workflows using these Web services, also incorporating R programs. Deploying these tools into an easy-to-use and accessible 'virtual laboratory', free via the Internet, we applied the workflows in several diverse case studies. We opened the virtual laboratory for public use and through a programme of external engagement we actively encouraged scientists and third party application and tool developers to try out the services and contribute to the activity. Conclusions: Our work shows we can deliver an operational, scalable and flexible Internet-based virtual laboratory to meet new demands for data processing and analysis in biodiversity science and ecology. In particular, we have successfully integrated existing and popular tools and practices from different scientific disciplines to be used in biodiversity and ecological research.

  • 4.
    Huggenberger, S.
    et al.
    Department II of Anatomy, University of Cologne, Cologne, Germany.
    Leidenberger, Sonja
    Swedish Species Information Centre/ArtDatabanken, Swedish University of Agricultural Sciences, Uppsala, Sweden.
    Oelschläger, H. H. A.
    Department of Anatomy III (Dr. Senckenbergische Anatomie), Johann Wolfgang Goethe University Frankfurt am Main, Frankfurt am Main, Germany.
    Asymmetry of the nasofacial skull in toothed whales (Odontoceti)2017In: Journal of Zoology, ISSN 0952-8369, E-ISSN 1469-7998, Vol. 302, no 1, p. 15-23Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In this study, the nasal asymmetry of odontocetes (toothed whales) was analyzed morphometrically by placing landmarks on photographed nasofacial skulls from 12 different species and genera that belong to four odontocete families. The results show that the degree of asymmetry tends to be linked with the mechanism of click sound generation in odontocetes. The narrow-banded high-frequency echolocators, such as Phocoenidae, Inia geoffrensis, Pontoporia blainvillei and Cephalorhynchus commersonii, show a more symmetric skull than the broad-banded low-frequency species (most delphinids). Exceptions to this tendency are, for example Kogia sima, with narrow-banded high-frequency clicks and a high degree of nasofacial asymmetry, and Feresa attenuata, a delphinid with broad-banded low-frequency clicks and a moderate degree of nasofacial asymmetry. Accordingly, there is no consistent functional correlation between click type and skull asymmetry probably because the nasofacial skull does not strictly reflect the anatomy of the sound generating nasal soft structures.

  • 5.
    Hupało, Kamil
    et al.
    Aquatische Ökosystemforschung, University Duisburg-Essen, Essen, Germany.
    Majaneva, Markus
    Department of Natural History, NTNU University Museum, Norwegian University of Science and Technology, Trondheim, Norway / Norwegian Institute for Nature Research (NINA), Trondheim, Norway.
    Czachur, Molly Victoria
    Evolutionary Genomics Group, Stellenbosch University, Stellenbosch, South Africa.
    Sire, Lucas
    Institut de Recherche sur la Biologie de l'Insecte, UMR 7261, CNRS Université de Tours, France.
    Marquina, Daniel
    Department of Bioinformatics and Genetics, Swedish Museum of Natural History, Stockholm, Sweden / Department of Zoology, Stockholm University, Sweden.
    Lijtmaer, Darío A.
    Museo Argentino de Ciencias Naturales “Bernardino Rivadavia” (MACN-CONICET), Buenos Aires, Argentina.
    Ivanov, Vladislav
    Department of Ecology and Genetics, University of Oulu, Finland.
    Leidenberger, Sonja
    University of Skövde, School of Bioscience. University of Skövde, Systems Biology Research Environment.
    Čiampor, Fedor, Jr
    Plant Science and Biodiversity Centre, Slovak Academy of Sciences, Bratislava, Slovakia.
    Čiamporová-Zaťovičová, Zuzana
    Plant Science and Biodiversity Centre, Slovak Academy of Sciences, Bratislava, Slovakia.
    Mendes, Izabela S.
    Departamento de Genética, Ecologia e Evolução, Universidade Federal de Minas Gerais, UFMG, Belo Horizonte, Brazil / Conservation Genetics Lab, Programa de Pós-graduação em Biologia de Vertebrados, Pontifícia Universidade Católica de Minas Gerais, PUC Minas, Belo Horizonte, Brazil.
    Desiderato, Andrea
    Departamento de Zoologia, Universidade Federal do Paraná, Curitiba, Brazil / Department of Functional Ecology, Alfred Wegener Institute & Helmholtz Centre for Polar and Marine Research, Bremerhaven, Germany.
    Topstad, Lasse
    Department of Natural History, NTNU University Museum, Norwegian University of Science and Technology, Trondheim, Norway / Tromsø Museum, University of Tromsø – The Arctic University of Norway.
    Meganck, Kenny
    Barcoding Facility for Organisms and Tissues of Policy Concern (BopCo), Royal Museum for Central Africa, Tervuren, Belgium.
    Hariz Z. A., Danial
    Centre for Global Sustainability Studies (CGSS), Hamzah Sendut Library, Universiti Sains Malaysia, Penang, Malaysia.
    Kjærstad, Gaute
    Department of Natural History, NTNU University Museum, Norwegian University of Science and Technology, Trondheim, Norway.
    Lin, Xiao‐Long
    College of Life Sciences, Nankai University, Tianjin, China.
    Price, Benjamin
    Natural History Museum, London, UK.
    Stevens, Mark
    Biological and Earth Sciences, South Australian Museum, Adelaide, Australia / School of Pharmacy and Medical Sciences, University of South Australia, Adelaide, Australia.
    Ekrem, Torbjørn
    Department of Natural History, NTNU University Museum, Norwegian University of Science and Technology, Trondheim, Norway.
    Deiner, Kristy
    Natural History Museum, London, UK / Department of Environmental Systems Science, ETH Zurich, Switzerland.
    An urban Blitz with a twist: rapid biodiversity assessment using aquatic environmental DNA2021In: Environmental DNA, ISSN 2637-4943, Vol. 3, no 1, p. 200-213Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    As global biodiversity declines, there is an increasing need to create an educated and engaged society. Having people of all ages participate in measuring biodiversity where they live helps to create awareness. Recently, the use of environmental DNA (eDNA) for biodiversity surveys has gained momentum. Here, we explore whether sampling eDNA and sequencing it can be used as a means of rapidly surveying urban biodiversity for educational purposes. We sampled 2 × 1 L of water from each of 15 locations in the city of Trondheim, Norway, including a variety of freshwater, marine, and brackish habitats. DNA was extracted, amplified in triplicate targeting the barcoding fragment of COI gene, and sequenced. The obtained data were analyzed on the novel mBRAVE platform, an online open‐access software and computing resource. The water samples were collected in 2 days by two people, and the laboratory analysis was completed in 5 days by one person. Overall, we detected the presence of 506 BINs identified as belonging to 435 taxa, representing at least 265 putative species. On average, only 5.4% of the taxa were shared among six replicates per site. Based on the observed diversity, three distinct clusters were detected and related to the geographic distribution of sites. There were some taxa shared between the habitats, with a substantial presence of terrestrial biota. Here we propose a new form of BioBlitz, where with noninvasive sampling effort combined with swift processing and straightforward online analyses, hundreds of species can be detected. Thus, using eDNA analysis of water is useful for rapid biodiversity surveys and valuable for educational purposes. We show that rapid eDNA surveys, combined with openly available services and software, can be used as an educational tool to raise awareness about the importance of biodiversity.

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  • 6.
    Jonsson, Annie
    et al.
    University of Skövde, School of Bioscience. University of Skövde, Systems Biology Research Environment. Institutionen för Biovetenskap, Högskolan i Skövde.
    Berg, Sofia
    University of Skövde, School of Bioscience. University of Skövde, Systems Biology Research Environment.
    Quttineh, Nils-Hassan
    Matematiska institutionen vid Linköpings Universitet.
    Leidenberger, Sonja
    University of Skövde, School of Bioscience. University of Skövde, Systems Biology Research Environment.
    Jonsson, Tomas
    University of Skövde, School of Bioscience. University of Skövde, Systems Biology Research Environment.
    Landskapets förmåga att hålla biologisk mångfald: – en indikator för biologisk mångfald och ett planeringsverktyg för prioritering av markanvändning2022Report (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    The report describes a new tool, developed to facilitate the planning of green infrastruc-ture at the landscape level, and provides via case studies examples of how the tool can be used. The project has been a collaboration with expertise in theoretical ecology, ecology, biodiversity informatics and applied mathematics.

    The research project has developed a model for estimating a landscape’s ability to maintain biodiversity in its various biotopes (Biotope Biodiversity Capacity Indicator, BBCI). A theoretical framework based on ecological knowledge has been developed as a basis for the model.

    The purpose of the BBCI is to be a planning tool to:

    • strengthen landscape biodiversity,
    • improve the conditions for species to use the entire landscape and
    • create better conditions for consideration of biological diversity in connection with societal development.

    To test and describe the usefulness of the tools, four case studies with different focuses have been conducted:

    1. Analysis of the fragmentation in a coniferous forest landscape that is managed with special consideration for nature in Västernorrland County.
    2. Analysis of valuable coniferous forest cores and their capacity for biological diversity within Västra Götaland County, with highlights on the importance of cross-municipal collaboration.
    3. Analysis of potential target conflicts between two biotopes, deciduous forest and open land with trees worthy of protection in Valle.
    4. Analysis of capacity for biodiversity in older deciduous trees in a mixed urban and countryside landscape, Mjölby municipality.

    Parallel to the development of BBCI, a close dialogue and collaboration has taken place with stakeholders and end users. The broad dialogue has resulted in an effective exchange of knowledge.

    The report concludes by describing challenges and development potential of the tool, both in terms of pedagogy and technology as well as how the model can further developed with additional functions.

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  • 7.
    Kotta, Jonne
    et al.
    Estonian Marine Institute, University of Tartu, Tallinn, Estonia.
    Vanhatalo, Jarno
    Department of Mathematics and Statistics and Organismal and Evolutionary Biology Research Program, University of Helsinki, Helsinki, Finland.
    Jänes, Holger
    Estonian Marine Institute, University of Tartu, Tallinn, Estonia / Centre for Integrative Ecology, Deakin University, Melbourne, Victoria, Australia.
    Orav-Kotta, Helen
    Estonian Marine Institute, University of Tartu, Tallinn, Estonia.
    Rugiu, Luca
    Department of Biology, University of Turku, Turku, Finland.
    Jormalainen, Veijo
    Department of Biology, University of Turku, Turku, Finland.
    Bobsien, Ivo
    GEOMAR Helmholtz Centre for Ocean Research Kiel, Kiel, Germany.
    Viitasalo, Markku
    Finnish Environment Institute, Helsinki, Finland.
    Virtanen, Elina
    Finnish Environment Institute, Helsinki, Finland.
    Nyström Sandman, Antonia
    AquaBiota Water Research, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Isaeus, Martin
    AquaBiota Water Research, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Leidenberger, Sonja
    University of Skövde, School of Bioscience. University of Skövde, Systems Biology Research Environment.
    Jonsson, Per R.
    Department of Marine Sciences – Tjärnö, University of Gothenburg, Tjärnö, Strömstad, Sweden.
    Johannesson, Kerstin
    Department of Marine Sciences – Tjärnö, University of Gothenburg, Tjärnö, Strömstad, Sweden.
    Integrating experimental and distribution data to predict future species patterns2019In: Scientific Reports, E-ISSN 2045-2322, Vol. 9, article id 1821Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Predictive species distribution models are mostly based on statistical dependence between environmental and distributional data and therefore may fail to account for physiological limits and biological interactions that are fundamental when modelling species distributions under future climate conditions. Here, we developed a state-of-the-art method integrating biological theory with survey and experimental data in a way that allows us to explicitly model both physical tolerance limits of species and inherent natural variability in regional conditions and thereby improve the reliability of species distribution predictions under future climate conditions. By using a macroalga-herbivore association (Fucus vesiculosus - Idotea balthica) as a case study, we illustrated how salinity reduction and temperature increase under future climate conditions may significantly reduce the occurrence and biomass of these important coastal species. Moreover, we showed that the reduction of herbivore occurrence is linked to reduction of their host macroalgae. Spatial predictive modelling and experimental biology have been traditionally seen as separate fields but stronger interlinkages between these disciplines can improve species distribution projections under climate change. Experiments enable qualitative prior knowledge to be defined and identify cause-effect relationships, and thereby better foresee alterations in ecosystem structure and functioning under future climate conditions that are not necessarily seen in projections based on non-causal statistical relationships alone.

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  • 8.
    Leidenberger, Sonja
    ArtDatabanken, Swedish Species Information Centre, SLU, Uppsala, Sweden.
    Biodling på naturligt sätt – inte omöjligt2016In: Fauna och flora : populär tidskrift för biologi, ISSN 0014-8903, Vol. 111, no 3, p. 46-47Article, book review (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
  • 9.
    Leidenberger, Sonja
    University of Skövde, School of Bioscience. University of Skövde, Systems Biology Research Environment.
    Halvvägs i INTERREG-projketet – BIstånd till Nordiska Bin – Rapport från Sverige2020In: NordBi-Aktuellt, no 2, p. 4-7Article in journal (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
  • 10.
    Leidenberger, Sonja
    et al.
    University of Skövde, School of Bioscience. University of Skövde, Systems Biology Research Environment.
    Berntsson, Ann-Charlotte
    Nordens ark.
    Niklasson, Mats
    Swedish University of Agricultural Sciences.
    Nordiskt honungsbi studeras på Nordens ark2019In: Yrfän, ISSN 2002-1151, no 3, p. 22-25Article in journal (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
  • 11.
    Leidenberger, Sonja
    et al.
    University of Skövde, School of Bioscience. University of Skövde, Systems Biology Research Environment.
    Boström, Sven
    Naturhistoriska riksmuseet.
    Diversitet hos hakmaskar – tarmparasiter hos gråsälar i Östersjön2019In: Fauna och flora : populär tidskrift för biologi, ISSN 0014-8903, Vol. 114, no 2, p. 35-39Article in journal (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
    Abstract [sv]

    Döda gråsälar i Östersjön har insamlats och undersökts genom obduktion på Naturhistoriska riksmuseet sedan 1970-talet. En relativt stor andel av de obducerade sälarna har haft sår i tarmarna,och troligen kan perforerade tarmsår vara en av orsakerna till att de har dött. Tarmsåren förorsakas av tre arter av hakmaskar i släktet Corynosoma, och dessa har blivit föremål för ingående morfologiska och ekologiska studier.

  • 12.
    Leidenberger, Sonja
    et al.
    University of Skövde, School of Bioscience. University of Skövde, Systems Biology Research Environment.
    Boström, Sven
    Swedish Museum of Natural History, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Wayland, Matthew T.
    University of Cambridge, UK.
    Data on three Baltic species of Corynosoma Lühe, 1905 (Acanthocephala: Polymorphidae) from Baltic grey (Halichoerus grypus) and ringed seals (Pusa hispida)2020Data set
    Abstract [en]

    We analyzed Baltic Corynosoma material (C. magdaleni Montreuil, 1958, C. semerme (Forssell, 1904) Lühe, 1911 and C. strumosum (Rudolphi, 1802; Lühe, 1904) from grey (Halichoerus grypus ) and ringed seals (Pusa hispida ) for the variation of hook morphology and for finding possible morphotypes, by using the proboscis profiler (Wayland 2010) and Meristogram (Wayland 2016).

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  • 13.
    Leidenberger, Sonja
    et al.
    University of Skövde, School of Bioscience. University of Skövde, The Systems Biology Research Centre.
    Boström, Sven
    Swedish Museum Nat Hist, Dept Zool, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Wayland, Matthew T.
    Univ Cambridge, Dept Zool, England.
    Morphological observations on three Baltic species of Corynosoma Lühe, 1905 (Acanthocephala, Polymorphidae)2019In: European journal of taxonomy, E-ISSN 2118-9773, Vol. 514, p. 1-19Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Necropsies of Baltic grey (Halichoerus grypus) and ringed seals (Pusa hispida) presented a rare opportunity to study their acanthocephalan fauna. Both species hosted adults of three species of the genus Corynosoma Lithe, 1904, namely C. magdaleni Montreuil, 1958, C. semerme (Forsell, 1904) Lithe 1911 and C. strumosum (Rudolphi, 1802) Lithe 1904. A comparative morphological analysis of these three species of Corynosoma, combining both light and scanning electron microscopy, was performed for the first time. Sexual dimorphism in the size and shape of the trunk was observed in both C. magdaleni and C. semerme, but there was insufficient material to investigate this phenomenon in C. strumosum. Genital spines were not observed in any of the female acanthocephalans. Three possible explanations for the presence of genital spines in some females, but not others are (i) cryptic speciation, (ii) phenotypic variation and (iii) loss by extraction or shearing when the copulatory cap is released. Copulatory caps were observed on female C. semerme. The size and morphology showed considerable variability and all caps were strongly autofluoresecent.

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  • 14.
    Leidenberger, Sonja
    et al.
    University of Skövde, School of Bioscience. University of Skövde, Systems Biology Research Environment.
    Boström, Sven
    Swedish Museum of Natural History, Department of Zoology, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Wayland, Matthew Thomas
    University of Cambridge, United Kingdom.
    Host records and geographical distribution of Corynosoma magdaleni, C. semerme and C. strumosum (Acanthocephala: Polymorphidae)2020In: Biodiversity Data Journal, ISSN 1314-2836, E-ISSN 1314-2828, Vol. 8, article id e50500Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    A literature survey was conducted to investigate the host and geographical distribution patterns of three Corynosoma species (Acanthocephala: Polymorphidae), viz. C. magdaleni, C. semerme and C. strumosum. All three species appear to be restricted to the Northern Hemisphere. Occurrence records of C. magdaleni are limited to the Northern Atlantic coasts, while C. semerme has a circumpolar distribution. The geographical range of Corynosoma strumosum encompasses the distributions of the other two species, but also extends into warmer southern regions. Some Corynosoma populations are living with their definitive hosts in very isolated locations, such as in the brackish Baltic Sea or different freshwater lakes (e.g. Lake Saimaa). All three species have a heteroxenous life cycle, comprising a peracaridan intermediate host, a fish paratenic host and a mammalian definitive host. Occasionally, an acanthocephalan may enter an accidental host, from which it is unable to complete its life cycle. The host records reported here are categorised by type, i.e. intermediate, paratenic, definitive or accidental. While most of the definitive hosts are shared amongst the three Corynosoma species, C. strumosum showed the broadest range of paratenic hosts, which reflects its more extensive geographical distribution. One aim of this study and extensive literature summary is to guide future sampling efforts therewith contribute to throw more light on the on-going species and morphotype discussion for this interesting parasite species.

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  • 15.
    Leidenberger, Sonja
    et al.
    Department of Biology and Environmental Sciences, University of Gothenburg, Sweden.
    De Giovanni, Renato
    Centro de Referência em Informaҫão Ambiental, CRIA, Brazil.
    Kulawik, Robert
    Fraunhofer IAIS Knowledge Discovery, Schloss Birlinghoven, Germany.
    Williams, Alan R.
    School of Computer Science, University of Manchester, Manchester, United Kingdom.
    Bourlat, Sarah J.
    Department of Biology and Environmental Sciences, University of Gothenburg, Göteborg, Sweden.
    Mapping present and future potential distribution patterns for a meso-grazer guild in the Baltic Sea2015In: Journal of Biogeography, ISSN 0305-0270, E-ISSN 1365-2699, Vol. 42, no 2, p. 241-254Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Aim The Baltic Sea is one of the world's largest semi-enclosed brackish water bodies characterized by many special features, including endemic species that may be particularly threatened by climate change. We mapped potential distribution patterns under present and future conditions for a community with three trophic levels. We analysed climate-induced changes in the species' distribution patterns and examined possible consequences for the chosen food web. Location Baltic Sea and northern Europe. Methods We developed two open-source workflow-based analytical tools: one for ecological niche modelling and another for raster layer comparison to compute the extent and intensity of change in species' potential distributions. Individual ecological niche models were generated under present conditions and then projected into a future climate change scenario (2050) for a food web consisting of a guild of meso-grazers (Idotea spp.), their host algae (Fucus vesiculosus and Fucus radicans) and their fish predator (Gasterosteus aculeatus). We used occurrence data from the Global Biodiversity Information Facility (GBIF), literature and museum collections, together with five environmental layers at a resolution of 5 and 30 arc-minutes. Results Habitat suitability for Idotea balthica and Idotea chelipes in the Baltic Sea seems to be mostly determined by temperature and ice cover rather than by salinity. 2050 predictions for all modelled species show a northern/northeastern shift in the Baltic Sea. The distribution ranges for Idotea granulosa and G. aculeatus are predicted to become patchier in the Baltic than in the rest of northern Europe, where the species will gain more suitable habitats. Main conclusions For the Baltic Sea, climate-induced changes resulted in a gain of suitable habitats for F. vesiculosus, I. chelipes and I. balthica, whereas lower habitat suitability was predicted for I. granulosa, F. radicans and G. aculeatus. The predicted north-eastern shift of I. balthica and I. chelipes into the distribution area of F. radicans in the Baltic Sea may result in increased grazing pressure. Such additional threats to isolated Baltic populations can lead to a higher extinction risk for the species, especially as climate changes are likely to be very rapid.

  • 16.
    Leidenberger, Sonja
    et al.
    Department of Marine Ecology, University of Gothenburg, Kristineberg (MEK), Fiskebäckskil, Sweden.
    Harding, Karin
    Department of Marine Ecology, Göteborg, Sweden.
    Jonsson, Per R.
    Department of Marine Ecology, University of Gothenburg, Tjärnö Marine Biological Laboratory, Strömstad, Sweden.
    Ecology and Distribution of the Isopod Genus Idotea in the Baltic Sea: Key Species in a Changing Environment2012In: Journal of Crustacean Biology, ISSN 0278-0372, E-ISSN 1937-240X, Vol. 32, no 3, p. 359-381Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Marine isopods of the genus Idotea [I. balthica (Pallas, 1772), I. chelipes (Pallas, 1766), and I. granulosa Rathke, 1843] are common meso-grazers that enter deep into the Baltic Sea and here appear to live at their physiological limit, determined by salinity and temperature tolerance. We review available data on distribution and community ecology to assess the functional role of Idotea in the Baltic Sea and how global change may affect essential ecological interactions. Data from the last 150 years suggest an on-going shift southward for I. chelipes and I. granulosa that may be caused by a changing climate. Several studies report local extinctions and mass abundances, which may be caused by a changing food web from over-fishing and eutrophication. The three species of Idotea have clear habitat segregation in the Baltic Sea, where salinity, temperature and vegetation are the main dimensions. Idotea spp. have a central role as grazers and in communities dominated by the perennial macrophytes Fucus spp. and Zostera marina and attain impressive feeding rates on a range of epiphytes/filamentous algae (top-down effect). Idotea can have both a direct negative grazing effect on macrophytes but also an indirect positive effect by removing epiphytes. The relative role of nutritional value and chemical defence for food preference is yet unclear for Idotea. Baltic idoteids are also important prey for several fish (bottom-up effect) and fish predation may have increased following overfishing of piscivorous fish. It is concluded that Idotea is a key taxon in the Baltic Sea food web, where guilds often contain few dominant species. Changes in population dynamics of Idotea, as a function of human generated global change, may have large-scale consequences for ecosystem functions in a future Baltic Sea, e.g. the extent of vegetation cover in the coastal zone.

  • 17.
    Leidenberger, Sonja
    et al.
    University of Skövde, School of Bioscience. University of Skövde, Systems Biology Research Environment.
    Jonsson, Annie
    University of Skövde, School of Bioscience. University of Skövde, Systems Biology Research Environment.
    Bourlat, Sarah
    Centre for Molecular Biodiversity Research, Zoological Research Museum Alexander Koenig, Bonn, Germany.
    End biodiversity loss through improved tracking of marine threatened invertebrates2019Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 18.
    Leidenberger, Sonja
    et al.
    University of Skövde, School of Bioscience. University of Skövde, Systems Biology Research Environment.
    Kilströmer, Andrea
    University of Skövde, School of Bioscience.
    Herring, Matthew
    University of Skövde, School of Bioscience. University of Skövde, Systems Biology Research Environment.
    Bergwall, Eric
    Länsstyrelsen Västra Götaland.
    Inventering av invasiva främmande arter i Vänern – Kinesisk ullhandskrabba2021Report (Other academic)
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  • 19.
    Leidenberger, Sonja
    et al.
    ArtDatabanken, Swedish Species Information Centre, SLU, Uppsala, Sweden.
    Käck, Martin
    ArtDatabanken, Swedish Species Information Centre, SLU, Uppsala, Sweden.
    Karlsson, Björn
    ArtDatabanken, Swedish Species Information Centre, SLU, Uppsala, Sweden.
    Kindvall, Oskar
    ArtDatabanken, Swedish Species Information Centre, SLU, Uppsala, Sweden.
    The Analysis Portal and the Swedish LifeWatch e-infrastructure for biodiversity research2016In: Biodiversity Data Journal, ISSN 1314-2836, E-ISSN 1314-2828, Vol. 4, article id e7644Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background During the last years, more and more online portals were generated and are now available for ecologists to run advanced models with extensive data sets. Some examples are the Biodiversity Virtual e-Laboratory (BioVel) Portal (https://portal.biovel.eu) for ecological niche modelling and the Mobyle SNAP Workbench (https://snap.hpc.ncsu.edu) for evolutionary and population genetics analysis. Such portals have the main goal to facilitate the run of advanced models, through access to large-capacity computers or servers. In this study, we present the Analysis Portal (www.analysisportal.se), which is a part of the Swedish LifeWatch e-infrastructure for biodiversity research that combines a variety of Swedish web services to perform different kinds of dataprocessing. New information For the first time, the Swedish Analysis Portal for integrated analysis of species occurrence data is described in detail. It was launched in 2013 and today, over 60 Million Swedish species observation records can be assessed, visualized and analyzed via the portal. Datasets can be assembled using sophisticated filtering tools, and combined with environmental and climatic data from a wide range of providers. Different validation tools, for example the official Swedish taxon concept database Dyntaxa, ensure high data quality. Results can be downloaded in different formats as maps, tables, diagrams and reports.

  • 20.
    Leidenberger, Sonja
    et al.
    University of Skövde, School of Bioscience. University of Skövde, Systems Biology Research Environment.
    Muhammed, Iqram
    Centre for Biodiversity Monitoring, Zoological Research Museum Alexander Koenig (ZFMK), Bonn, Germany.
    Bourlat, Sarah J.
    Centre for Biodiversity Monitoring, Zoological Research Museum Alexander Koenig (ZFMK), Bonn, Germany.
    Why are so many Northern European aquatic invertebrates missing in red-listing and how can we improve assessments for those?2021In: 1st DNAQUA International Conference 2021 / [ed] Alex Weigand, Agnès Bouchez, Florian Leese, Pensoft Publishers, 2021, article id e64822Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The biodiversity crisis is advancing rapidly. One tool to measure extinction risk is the Red List of Threatened Species which follows the IUCN evaluation criteria (International Union for Conservation of Nature). Many aquatic invertebrates in Northern Europe are completely missing a red listing process and are evaluated as Data Deficient (DD) or Not Evaluated (NE). In our project, we focus on marine crustaceans and freshwater molluscs (Bivalvia). A systematic survey of more than 440 crustacean and 44 molluscan species in 12 Northern European countries shows that while many freshwater bivalve molluscs and marine crustaceans have existing molecular barcodes as well as digital occurrence records in databases (e.g. in GBIF, the Global Biodiversity Information Facility), there exists no evaluation process or regular monitoring for those species and their population status. With such a high level of non-evaluation of species status, species action plans (for single species or multi-taxon approaches) are far away from reality.

    In general, traditional monitoring methods based on observational surveys are known to be inefficient, costly and time consuming. e-DNA allows us to detect species with a high level of sensitivity as long as those assays are well validated. Molecular occurrence records can be used to detect rare species and to collect population information. In our Swedish project, we are metabarcoding sediment and plankton samples using metazoan and taxon-specific primers to detect threatened aquatic species. During 2019 and 2020, we collected samples at 15 localities in two marine protected areas for marine crustaceans and at 15 different localities for freshwater molluscs at the Swedish west coast. At each location plankton, sediment and traditional aquatic monitoring samples were taken. The idea is to compare how the methods perform in finding rare species, which could improve the data for those groups so they can be evaluated in the next round of red listing (2025) in Sweden. During the entire project, there is an on-going dialogue with stakeholders and experts from the Swedish Species Information Centre, responsible for the red listing process in the country.

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  • 21.
    Leidenberger, Sonja
    et al.
    University of Skövde, School of Bioscience. University of Skövde, Systems Biology Research Environment.
    Niklasson, Mats
    Nordens ark.
    Berntsson, AnnCharlotte
    Nordens ark.
    BIstånd till nordiska bin – en resurs för framtidens ekosystemtjänster2019In: NordBi-Aktuellt, no 1, p. 5-6Article in journal (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
  • 22.
    Leidenberger, Sonja
    et al.
    University of Skövde, School of Bioscience. University of Skövde, Systems Biology Research Environment.
    Norrström, Niclas
    University of Skövde, School of Bioscience. University of Skövde, Systems Biology Research Environment.
    Lägesrapport inom INTERREG-projektet: BIstånd till nordiska bin2019In: NordBi-Aktuellt, no 2, p. 5-6Article in journal (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
  • 23.
    Leidenberger, Sonja
    et al.
    University of Skövde, School of Bioscience. University of Skövde, Systems Biology Research Environment.
    Norrström, Niclas
    University of Skövde, School of Bioscience. University of Skövde, Systems Biology Research Environment.
    Niklasson, Mats
    Stiftelsen Nordens Ark, Hunnebostrand.
    Nyaste rön från INTERREG projektet – Bistånd till nordiska bin – unik resurs för framtidens ekosystemtjänster2021In: NordBi-Aktuellt, no 2, p. 4-5Article in journal (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
  • 24.
    Leidenberger, Sonja
    et al.
    University of Skövde, School of Bioscience. University of Skövde, Systems Biology Research Environment.
    Norrström, Niclas
    University of Skövde, School of Bioscience. University of Skövde, Systems Biology Research Environment.
    Niklasson, Mats
    Nordens ark.
    Dahl, Åslög
    Institutionen för biologi och miljövetenskap, Göteborgs Universitet.
    Vetenskapliga studier av honungsbin2022In: Fauna och flora : populär tidskrift för biologi, ISSN 0014-8903, Vol. 117, no 2, p. 28-32Article in journal (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
  • 25.
    Leidenberger, Sonja
    et al.
    Department of Biology and Environmental Sciences – Kristineberg, University of Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Obst, Matthias
    Department of Biology and Environmental Sciences, University Gothenburg, Göteborg, Sweden.
    Kulawik, Robert
    Fraunhofer IAIS Knowledge Discovery, Schloss Birlinghoven, Sankt Augustin, Germany.
    Stelzer, Kerstin
    Brockman Consult GmbH, Geesthacht, Germany.
    Heyer, Karin
    Brockman Consult GmbH, Geesthacht, Germany.
    Hardisty, Alex
    School of Computer Science and Informatics, Cardiff University, Cardiff, United Kingdom.
    Bourlat, Sarah J.
    Department of Biology and Environmental Sciences, University Gothenburg, Göteborg, Sweden.
    Evaluating the potential of ecological niche modelling as a component in marine non-indigenous species risk assessments2015In: Marine Pollution Bulletin, ISSN 0025-326X, E-ISSN 1879-3363, Vol. 97, no 1-2, p. 470-487Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Marine biological invasions have increased with the development of global trading, causing the homogenization of communities and the decline of biodiversity. A main vector is ballast water exchange from shipping. This study evaluates the use of ecological niche modelling (ENM) to predict the spread of 18 non-indigenous species (NIS) along shipping routes and their potential habitat suitability (hot/cold spots) in the Baltic Sea and Northeast Atlantic. Results show that, contrary to current risk assessment methods, temperature and sea ice concentration determine habitat suitability for 61% of species, rather than salinity (11%). We show high habitat suitability for NIS in the Skagerrak and Kattegat, a transitional area for NIS entering or leaving the Baltic Sea. As many cases of NIS introduction in the marine environment are associated with shipping pathways, we explore how ENM can be used to provide valuable information on the potential spread of NIS for ballast water risk assessment. 

  • 26.
    Niklasson, Mats
    et al.
    Foundation Nordens Ark, Research Department, Swedish University of Agricultural Sciences, Åby säteri, Hunnebostrand, Sweden ; Southern Swedish Forest Research Centre, Swedish University of Agricultural Sciences, Lomma, Sweden ; Gothenburg Global Biodiversity Centre, Sweden.
    Svensson, Emil
    Gärsnäs, Sweden.
    Leidenberger, Sonja
    University of Skövde, School of Bioscience. University of Skövde, Systems Biology Research Environment.
    Norrström, Niclas
    University of Skövde, School of Bioscience. University of Skövde, Systems Biology Research Environment.
    Crawford, Elizabeth
    Foundation Nordens Ark, Research Department, Swedish University of Agricultural Sciences, Åby säteri, Hunnebostrand, Sweden ; Gothenburg Global Biodiversity Centre, Sweden.
    Free-living colonies of native honey bees (Apis mellifera mellifera) in 19th and early 20th century Sweden2023In: Journal of Insect Conservation, ISSN 1366-638X, E-ISSN 1572-9753Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Little information exists on the history and ecology of free-living colonies of European honey bees (Apis mellifera L.) in Europe, including its dark north-western subspecies (Apis mellifera mellifera). Our aim was to investigate the presence of colonies of free-living, native honey bees (A. m. mellifera) during the last two centuries in Sweden. For this we examined systematic interviews of beekeepers (176 answers from 158 questionnaires) performed in the years 1928–1981, with information dating back to the early 1800s. An overwhelming majority of answers (96%) confirmed the past presence of free-living colonies of honey bees in Sweden. While some stated that free-living colonies were simply absconded swarms from managed hives, the majority of interviewees (69%) believed that free-living colonies were of a truly wild origin. A decreasing trend in first-hand accounts of free-living colonies suggests that free-living populations underwent a dramatic decline at the end of the 19th century. This was also expressed in words by many interviewees, who in 14 cases stated that the loss of old forests and tree-cavity nest sites at the end of the 1800s was the primary cause of the decline. Direct accounts of perennial, free-living colonies, combined with detailed descriptions of the collection of large free-living colonies and/or wild honey, is strong evidence of free-living honey bees being well adapted to winter survival. These accounts contradict the officially supported view that the honey bee is a recently imported, domesticated, non-native species in Sweden. The results give a scientific underpinning and provide inspiration for the restoration of native forests which could facilitate populations of free-living colonies of A. m. mellifera exposed to natural selection. This could potentially lead to its return as a fully wild species. In an uncertain future, allowing for a natural lifestyle could increase resilience and reinstate characteristics that are otherwise lost in honey bees due to the increasing effects of artificial trait selection.

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  • 27.
    Norrström, Niclas
    et al.
    University of Skövde, School of Bioscience. University of Skövde, Systems Biology Research Environment.
    Niklasson, Mats
    Stiftelsen Nordens Ark, Hunnebostrand, Sweden.
    Leidenberger, Sonja
    University of Skövde, School of Bioscience. University of Skövde, Systems Biology Research Environment.
    Winter weight loss of different subspecies of honey bee Apis mellifera colonies (Linnaeus, 1758) in southwestern Sweden2021In: PLOS ONE, E-ISSN 1932-6203, Vol. 16, no 10, article id e0258398Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Honey bees are currently facing mounting pressures that have resulted in population declines in many parts of the world. In northern climates winter is a bottleneck for honey bees and a thorough understanding of the colonies’ ability to withstand the winter is needed in order to protect the bees from further decline. In this study the influence of weather variables on colony weight loss was studied over one winter (2019–2020) in two apiaries (32 colonies in total) in southwestern Sweden with weather stations recording wind and temperature at 5-min intervals. Three subspecies of honey bees and one hybrid were studied: the native Apis mellifera mellifera, the Italian A. m. ligustica, the Carniolan A. m. carnica and the hybrid Buckfast. Additionally, we recorded Varroa mite infestation. To analyze factors involved in resource consumption, three modelling approaches using weather and weight data were developed: the first links daily consumption rates with environmental variables, the second modelled the cumulative weight change over time, and the third estimated weight change over time taking light intensity and temperature into account. Weight losses were in general low (0.039 ± 0.013kg/day and colony) and comparable to southern locations, likely due to an exceptionally warm winter (average temperature 3.5°C). Weight losses differed only marginally between subspecies with indications that A. m. mellifera was having a more conservative resource consumption, but more studies are needed to confirm this. We did not find any effect of Varroa mite numbers on weight loss. Increased light intensity and temperature both triggered the resource consumption in honey bees. The temperature effect on resource consumption is in accordance with the metabolic theory of ecology. The consequences of these findings on honey bee survival under predicted climate changes, is still an open question that needs further analysis.

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  • 28.
    Panova, Marina
    et al.
    Department of Marine Sciences, Tjärnö, University of Gothenburg, Strömstad, Sweden.
    Nygren, Arne
    The Maritime Museum & Aquarium, Göteborg, Sweden.
    Jonsson, Per R.
    Department of Marine Sciences, Tjärnö, University of Gothenburg, Strömstad, Sweden.
    Leidenberger, Sonja
    Swedish Species Information Centre/ArtDatabanken, Swedish University of Agricultural Sciences, Uppsala, Sweden.
    A molecular phylogeny of the north-east Atlantic species of the genus Idotea (Isopoda) with focus on the Baltic Sea2017In: Zoologica Scripta, ISSN 0300-3256, E-ISSN 1463-6409, Vol. 46, no 2, p. 188-199Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Today, the marine isopods of the genus Idotea Fabricius, 1798 consist of 26 accepted species. Most species can be found in the Northern Hemisphere. While some species have a cosmopolitan distribution, others are endemic to a few coastlines. In the Baltic Sea, Idotea species have a key role as important meso-grazers. Only three species can be found in this brackish environment, I.balthica, I.chelipes and I.granulosa, while nine species are described from the whole European coast. The goal of the present study was to reconstruct the phylogeny of the genus Idotea and to test whether the Baltic low-salinity tolerant species represent a single lineage within the genus. The phylogeny of north-east Atlantic Idotea species was investigated based on a fragment of the nuclear gene 28S and the mitochondrial gene COI for eight Idotea species. The phylogenetic reconstructions showed that the genus Idotea might not be monophyletic. Neither I.linearis nor I.urotoma did belong to the separated and well-supported Idotea clade of I.balthica, I.chelipes, I.emarginata, I.granulosa, I.metallica and I.pelagica. The three Idotea species found in the Baltic belonged to different lineages, with estimated COI-based divergence time older than 7 Myr. This suggests that the tolerance to low salinity has likely evolved in the genus Idotea more than once.

  • 29.
    Ripple, William J.
    et al.
    Global Trophic Cascades Program in the Department of Forest Ecosystems and Society at Oregon State University, Corvallis, USA.
    Wolf, Christopher
    Global Trophic Cascades Program in the Department of Forest Ecosystems and Society at Oregon State University, Corvallis, USA.
    Newsome, Thomas M.
    Global Trophic Cascades Program in the Department of Forest Ecosystems and Society at Oregon State University, Corvallis, USA / Centre for Integrative Ecology at Deakin University, Geelong, Australia / School of Life and Environmental Sciences at The University of Sydney, Australia.
    Galetti, Mauro
    Instituto de Biociências, Universidade Estadual Paulista, Departamento de Ecologia, São Paulo, Brazil.
    Alamgir, Mohammed
    Institute of Forestry and Environmental Sciences at the University of Chittagong, Bangladesh.
    Crist, Eileen
    Department of Science and Technology in Society at Virginia Tech, Blacksburg, USA.
    Mahmoud, Mahmoud I.
    ICT/Geographic Information Systems Unit of the National Oil Spill Detection and Response Agency (NOSDRA), Abuja, Nigeria.
    Laurance, William F.
    Centre for Tropical Environmental and Sustainability Science and the College of Science and Engineering at James Cook University, Cairns, Queensland, Australia.
    World Scientists’ Warning to Humanity: A Second Notice2017In: BioScience, ISSN 0006-3568, E-ISSN 1525-3244, Vol. 67, no 12, p. 1026-1028Article in journal (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
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  • 30.
    Sromek, Ludmila
    et al.
    Department of Marine Ecosystems Functioning, Institute of Oceanography, University of Gdansk, Gdynia, Poland.
    Ylinen, Eeva
    Department of Environmental and Biological Sciences, University of Eastern Finland, Joensuu, Finland.
    Kunnasranta, Mervi
    Department of Environmental and Biological Sciences, University of Eastern Finland, Joensuu, Finland ; Natural Resources Institute Finland, Joensuu, Finland.
    Maduna, Simo N.
    Department of Ecosystem in the Barents Region, Norwegian Institute of Bioeconomy Research, Svanvik, Norway.
    Sinisalo, Tuula
    Department of Biological and Environmental Sciences, University of Jyväskylä, Finland.
    Michell, Craig T.
    Department of Environmental and Biological Sciences, University of Eastern Finland, Joensuu, Finland ; Red Sea Research Center, King Abdullah University of Science and Technology, Jeddah, Saudi Arabia.
    Kovacs, Kit M.
    Norwegian Polar Institute, Fram Centre, Tromsø, Norway.
    Lydersen, Christian
    Norwegian Polar Institute, Fram Centre, Tromsø, Norway.
    Ieshko, Evgeny
    Institute of Biology, Karelian Research Centre, Russian Academy of Sciences, Petrozavodsk, Russia.
    Andrievskaya, Elena
    The Baltic Ringed Seal Foundation, St. Petersburg, Russia.
    Alexeev, Vyacheslav
    The Baltic Ringed Seal Foundation, St. Petersburg, Russia.
    Leidenberger, Sonja
    University of Skövde, School of Bioscience. University of Skövde, Systems Biology Research Environment.
    Hagen, Snorre B.
    Department of Ecosystem in the Barents Region, Norwegian Institute of Bioeconomy Research, Svanvik, Norway.
    Nyman, Tommi
    Department of Ecosystem in the Barents Region, Norwegian Institute of Bioeconomy Research, Svanvik, Norway.
    Loss of species and genetic diversity during colonization: Insights from acanthocephalan parasites in northern European seals2023In: Ecology and Evolution, E-ISSN 2045-7758, Vol. 13, no 10, article id e10608Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Studies on host–parasite systems that have experienced distributional shifts, range fragmentation, and population declines in the past can provide information regarding how parasite community richness and genetic diversity will change as a result of anthropogenic environmental changes in the future. Here, we studied how sequential postglacial colonization, shifts in habitat, and reduced host population sizes have influenced species richness and genetic diversity of Corynosoma (Acanthocephala: Polymorphidae) parasites in northern European marine, brackish, and freshwater seal populations. We collected Corynosoma population samples from Arctic, Baltic, Ladoga, and Saimaa ringed seal subspecies and Baltic gray seals, and then applied COI barcoding and triple-enzyme restriction-site associated DNA (3RAD) sequencing to delimit species, clarify their distributions and community structures, and elucidate patterns of intraspecific gene flow and genetic diversity. Our results showed that Corynosoma species diversity reflected host colonization histories and population sizes, with four species being present in the Arctic, three in the Baltic Sea, two in Lake Ladoga, and only one in Lake Saimaa. We found statistically significant population-genetic differentiation within all three Corynosoma species that occur in more than one seal (sub)species. Genetic diversity tended to be high in Corynosoma populations originating from Arctic ringed seals and low in the landlocked populations. Our results indicate that acanthocephalan communities in landlocked seal populations are impoverished with respect to both species and intraspecific genetic diversity. Interestingly, the loss of genetic diversity within Corynosoma species seems to have been less drastic than in their seal hosts, possibly due to their large local effective population sizes resulting from high infection intensities and effective intra-host population mixing. Our study highlights the utility of genomic methods in investigations of community composition and genetic diversity of understudied parasites.

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