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  • 1.
    Fast-Berglund, Åsa
    et al.
    Chalmers University of Technology, Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Thorvald, Peter
    University of Skövde, School of Engineering Science. University of Skövde, The Virtual Systems Research Centre.
    Billing, Erik
    University of Skövde, School of Informatics. University of Skövde, The Informatics Research Centre.
    Palmquist, Adam
    Insert Coin, Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Romero, David
    Tecnologico de Monterrey, Mexico.
    Weichhart, Georg
    Profactor, Studgart, Austria.
    Conceptualizing Embodied Automation to Increase Transfer of Tacit knowledge in the Learning Factory2018In: "Theory, Research and Innovation in Applications": 9th International Conference on Intelligent Systems 2018 (IS’18) / [ed] Ricardo Jardim-Gonçalves, João Pedro Mendonça, Vladimir Jotsov, Maria Marques, João Martins, Robert Bierwolf, IEEE, 2018, p. 358-364, article id 8710482Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This paper will discuss how cooperative agent-based systems, deployed with social skills and embodied automation features, can be used to interact with the operators in order to facilitate sharing of tacit knowledge and its later conversion into explicit knowledge. The proposal is to combine social software robots (softbots) with industrial collaborative robots (co-bots) to create a digital apprentice for experienced operators in human- robot collaboration workstations. This is to address the problem within industry that experienced operators have difficulties in explaining how they perform their tasks and later, how to turn this procedural knowledge (knowhow) into instructions to be shared among other operators. By using social softbots and co-bots, as cooperative agents with embodied automation features, we think we can facilitate the ‘externalization’ of procedural knowledge in human-robot interaction(s). This enabled by the capabilities of social cooperative agents with embodied automation features of continuously learning by looking over the shoulder of the operators, and documenting and collaborating with them in a non-intrusive way as they perform their daily tasks. 

  • 2.
    Palmquist, Adam
    University of Skövde, School of Informatics. University of Skövde, The Informatics Research Centre. 198311026655.
    A product to gamify other products: Implementing gamification in existing software2019In: 2019 11th International Conference on Virtual Worlds and Games for Serious Applications (VS-Games): Proceedings Vienna, Austria 4 - 6 September 2019 / [ed] Fotis Liarokapis, IEEE, 2019, Vol. 11, p. 55-63Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Gamification is the incorporation of game elements in non-game contexts. Gamified products are created by including gamification as part of the original product design. However, how is it to implement gamification in already existing products? This paper investigates gamification designers’ and developers’ attitudes and opinions on implementing gamification for already existing software products. The data consist of interviews with a team of gamification developers and designers. This study shows that the practice of designing gamification for already existing software products differs from designing gamified software products from the beginning. This outcome indicates that there might be a need for a separation between “traditional” gamification – designing gamified software products from the beginning –- and what can be referred to as generic gamification applied in existing software products

  • 3.
    Palmquist, Adam
    University of Skövde, School of Informatics. University of Skövde, The Informatics Research Centre.
    Det digitaliserade klassrummet2019 (ed. 1)Book (Other academic)
  • 4.
    Palmquist, Adam
    Magelungen Utveckling / Akademi Magelungen.
    Det spelifierade klassrummet2018 (ed. 1)Book (Other academic)
  • 5.
    Palmquist, Adam
    et al.
    University of Skövde, School of Informatics. University of Skövde, Informatics Research Environment.
    Gillberg, David
    Insert Coin, Sweden.
    Eye of the Beholder: Analyzing a Gamification Design Through a Servicescape Lens2020In: Utilizing Gamification in Servicescapes for Improved Consumer Engagement / [ed] Miralem Helmefalk, Leif Marcusson, IGI Global, 2020, p. 86-118Chapter in book (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Gamification, the idea of using game design elements to make tasks more engaging, is used in many contexts. The enthusiasm for gamification and its potential uses can be seen in different research- as well as business fields. As of this day, there exists no dominant design principle or standard on how to construct a gamified solution. However, there seem to exist generic dogmas on what a gamification solution should include, look and feel like. The theories used to explain the gamification techniques often originate from the field of game design and psychology. It is possible that more research fields could be used as a lens to magnify the effects of gamified information systems. In this report, we use the theories from environmental psychology and the servicescape methods to construct a lens to suggest improvements in gamification design for a learning management system used in higher education.

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