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  • 1.
    Berg Marklund, Björn
    et al.
    University of Skövde, School of Informatics. University of Skövde, Informatics Research Environment.
    Rouse, Rebecca
    University of Skövde, School of Informatics. University of Skövde, Informatics Research Environment.
    Holloway-Attaway, Lissa
    University of Skövde, School of Informatics. University of Skövde, Informatics Research Environment.
    Contextualizing Game Literacy: A transhistorical approach to understanding Game-Based Learning environments2020In: Proceedings of the 15th International Conference on the Foundations of Digital Games: FDG 2020 / [ed] Georgios N. Yannakakis, Antonios Liapis, Penny Kyburz, Vanessa Volz, Foaad Khosmood, Phil Lopes, New York: Association for Computing Machinery (ACM), 2020, article id 108Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The nature of ‘reading’ different types of texts, across all media, is fundamentally beholden to the concept of ‘literacy’. The concept of literacy is well established in media studies – from books, to film, and visual, performing and interactive arts – and as such it has a wide range of applicability. All forms of media constitute a semiotic milieu in which signifiers and codes mean different things depending on the form’s unique language and the contexts and manner in which individual participants, or “readers”, approach them. In the field of digital games research, literacy is commonly defined as a narrower concept that refers to the ability to identify affordances and interact with game components with a high degree of confidence. This focus on capability is understandable to a degree: the unique aspect of games as a medium is often considered to specifically be its interactability, and thus being able to interact becomes synonymous with being ‘game literate’. In this paper, however, we will both describe how literacy in games would benefit from a more nuanced, transhistorical view of interactability, as well as provide examples from many kinds of media beyond games to demonstrate that interaction literacy is neither novel nor unique to the medium of games. Understanding this rich history would provide a broader foundation of referential literature for game scholars to use when discussing the concept of game literacy and the interactability of media in general.

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  • 2.
    Holloway-Attaway, Lissa
    University of Skövde, School of Informatics. University of Skövde, The Informatics Research Centre.
    Embodying the posthuman subject: Digital humanities and permeable material practice2018In: A Feminist Companion to the Posthumanities / [ed] Cecilia Åsberg, Rosi Braidotti, Cham: Springer, 2018, p. 91-101Chapter in book (Refereed)
  • 3.
    Holloway-Attaway, Lissa
    et al.
    University of Skövde, School of Informatics. University of Skövde, Informatics Research Environment.
    Berg Marklund, Björn
    University of Skövde, School of Informatics. University of Skövde, Informatics Research Environment.
    Performing Heritage and Creating Community Through Digital Games, Narrative Agency and Critical Play2020Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Interactive digital media, and in particular digital games, are an increasingly prevalent component of museums and other public cultural spaces to help engage visitors. However, despite their growing presence, they remain under-explored in the ways they mediate a wide variety of cultural expressions and interactions through their differing and unique narrative affordances. Such storytelling differences must be accounted for in order to understand how they may be facilitated and curated with visitors/players in mind. The medium is defined by diminished authorial control in favor of free play and individual agency of expression for players. As such games for heritage present interesting challenges for those who may want to develop, facilitate, and curate them in cultural contexts and with historically accurate content. In fact, the lack of control over content once it becomes interactive and playful can present significant challenges to museum curators, pedagogues and guides. As facilitators of cultural knowledge, they often need to strike a balance between informing visitors/players about cultural heritage and history through deliberately crafted narratives - something museums are well equipped to do - while also providing players with more agency to individually express themselves and to re-write cultural heritage stories and histories through narrative play. In this paper, we present three case studies that exemplify how digital games can be used to give children a less restrictive narrative framework in which they can perform and express history and cultural heritage, rather than by merely re-enacting it. Through these three cases, we describe the processes involved in using digital games as a collaborative stage, or performative platform, on which participants can craft their own narratives to experience and express their own histories and build connections to others in a shared community of play.

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  • 4.
    Holloway-Attaway, Lissa
    et al.
    University of Skövde, School of Informatics. University of Skövde, Informatics Research Environment.
    Fawcus, Jamie
    University of Skövde, School of Informatics. University of Skövde, Informatics Research Environment.
    Composing New Audio Worlds: transcription and transgression2021Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In Composing New Audio Worlds: transcription and transgression, Lissa Holloway-Attaway and Jamie Fawcus examine how in Insect Media, Jussi Parikka frames his discussion of ‘media as insect’ as a way to foreground media as more-than-technology and more-than-mediation. Insect media do not exist as a site between the natural world and the constructed, built, or human world. They are in/out of both at once.

    In their paper, which Holloway-Attaway and Fawcus have submitted in the form of an audio walk, they explore/perform what it means to inhabit, discover, and become such an insect body, an effective mediator transcribing experience from a place of distributed non-human identity. Their focus is to explore alternative modes for engaging with critical theoretical models such as posthumanism, new materialism, non-humanism, and experimental electroacoustic music composition. These perspectives resist stable, cognitive subject identities for processing the world and its natural orders and rhythms, and create new conceptual spaces for composition and creation. The embodied design-states they imagine are formulated through generation of distributed agencies/embodiments, fragmentation (literary and sonic), affective acoustic space-making, and psychoacoustic manipulation.

    Their audio content includes narrative voice but also incorporates psychoacoustic phenomena such as auditory brainwave entrainment, binaural beats, and the fragmentation/granulation of sound materials that decentralise and deconstruct the sounding world. They work to create resonant and reflective acoustic space, meant to be engaged by a single listener using headphones in solitude while in motion. Their aim is to ‘discuss’ the theoretical material focused on embodied non-human sites for mediation, while also helping to create emergent and resonant sound-space that re-orients the listener to experience the world in novel ways. They also hope to find new ways to consider academic engagement with complex theoretical models via creative, performative practice. How, they ask, can we be more-than when we compose and create? And how can the ear offer unique affordances to support novel engagement?

  • 5.
    Holloway-Attaway, Lissa
    et al.
    University of Skövde, School of Informatics. University of Skövde, Informatics Research Environment.
    Fawcus, Jamie
    University of Skövde, School of Informatics. University of Skövde, Informatics Research Environment.
    Designing Sisters: Creating Audio-Based Narratives to Generate Affective Connections and Material Story Worlds2023In: Interactive Storytelling: 16th International Conference on Interactive Digital Storytelling, ICIDS 2023, Kobe, Japan, November 11–15, 2023, Proceedings, Part I / [ed] Lissa Holloway-Attaway; John T. Murray, Cham: Springer, 2023, p. 291-308Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In this paper, we reflect on the design of an interactive audio-based digital narrative experience called Sisters. This work is designed for a single interactor, constructed as a mobile AR experience using graphic illustrations on a deck of player cards in connection with abstract audio activated by trigger images on the cards. An interactor is asked to cluster series of cards together into different abstract environments, based on sounds associated with each card, meant to represent spaces in an interior/exterior domestic site, a house and its immediate surroundings. The work conveys experiences of 4 family members in a complex abusive household, mediating between scenes of normalcy, love, companionship, and violence. The core focus of the work is to explore fragmented and very personal states of being and memories derived from an outsider’s perspective (the interactor), who co-experiences the complexities of the domestic spaces at a ‘safe’ distance, while also gaining empathy and affective connections to the characters. Connecting the content of the work and its fragmentary and elusive material audio and narrative design to our design model, the New Material/Spectral Morphology Model, we share how it may be used for aesthetic composition. Our model is based on feminist new material perspectives and foundational work from electroacoustic production and audio experimentation. Sisters extends our previous work with sound-based narrative, and we demonstrate how this work affirms our design strategies for novel interactive audio experiences. 

  • 6.
    Holloway-Attaway, Lissa
    et al.
    University of Skövde, School of Informatics. University of Skövde, Informatics Research Environment.
    Fawcus, Jamie
    University of Skövde, School of Informatics. University of Skövde, Informatics Research Environment.
    Making COVID dis-connections: designing intra-active and transdisciplinary sound-based narratives for phenomenal new material worlds2022In: New Review of Hypermedia and Multimedia, ISSN 1361-4568, E-ISSN 1740-7842, Vol. 28, no 3-4, p. 112-142Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In this article, we reflect on the design and implementation of an interactive transhistorical and transmedial web-based digital narrative audio experience, PATTER(n)INGS: Apt 3B, 2020 that we developed in 2020. This work is an immersive audio-only application, and it focuses on the complex, material living conditions during the COVID-19 pandemic. Drawing inspiration from PATTER(n)INGS and its complex, material audio and narrative design, we propose a model for creating the content and delivery for similar sound-based interactive digital narratives. Our proposed model focuses primarily on the creative process for designing such sound-based work. To construct our analytical model, the New Material/Spectral Morphology Design Model (or NM/SM Design Model), we draw on theoretical influences from critical posthumanism, feminist new materialism and non-human narrative that critique notions of stable subjectivity as sites for power and authority over semiotic meaning-making. We combine these views with foundational theoretical research in electroacoustic musical composition notation, and audio experimentation that complicate notions of sound, sound making, spatial perception, psychoacoustic phenomena, and listening practices. Together, this theoretical/compositional framework provides a unique method to consider how one can sustain and maximize sonic agents as core phenomena to create anti-cognitive worlds and stories.

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  • 7.
    Holloway-Attaway, Lissa
    et al.
    University of Skövde, School of Informatics. University of Skövde, Informatics Research Environment.
    Fawcus, Jamie
    University of Skövde, School of Informatics. University of Skövde, Informatics Research Environment.
    PATTER(N)INGS, Apt. 3B, 2020: sound as affective space for world-building2021In: Texts of discomfort: Interactive Storytelling Art / [ed] María Cecilia Reyes; James Pope, Pittsburgh, PA USA: ETC Press, 2021, p. 282-312Chapter in book (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In our chapter, we reflect on our design of PATTER(N)INGS: Apt 3B, 2020, an interactive audio experience expressing some of the anxieties and challenges of living in and through 2020+ during a global pandemic in lockdown state. Our web-based audio application simulates a domestic space and its embodied inhabitants (human, non-human, and other) as encountered by a single user (or “eavesdropper”). The pandemic world we evoke is both specific and timeless, located and transhi- storical, in its remixing of literary materials and other sonic agents that destabilize fixed subject identities and rational cognitive states in favor of affective, ontological ones. We draw on theore- tical influences from critical posthumanism, feminist new materialism and non-human narrative as well work in electroacoustic musical composition and audio experimentation. We document our process of generative dynamic world-building and interactive digital storytelling as formulated though distributed agencies/embodiments, fragmentation (literary and sonic), affective acoustic space-making, and psychoacoustic manipulation.

  • 8.
    Holloway-Attaway, Lissa
    et al.
    University of Skövde, School of Informatics. University of Skövde, Informatics Research Environment.
    Fawcus, Jamie
    University of Skövde, School of Informatics. University of Skövde, Informatics Research Environment.
    Trans-Missions and Resonant Encounters: composing the non-human body2020Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In Insect Media, Jussi Parikka frames his discussion of ‘media as insect’ as a way to foreground media as more-than-technology and more-than-mediation. Insect media do not exist as a site between the natural world and the constructed, built, or human world. They do not negotiate duality. Instead such ill-conceived binary spaces converge in embodied forms of bestial, non-human, interconnectedness within living/lived spaces. Insect media do not interpret, describe, or represent realities for us (that is us humans). For Parikka, insect media are “a contraction of forces of the world, specific resonating milieus: internal milieus with their resonation, external milieus affording their rhythms as part of that resonation. ”What does it mean then to inhabit, discover, and become such an insect media body? How might such intensive states of being be revealed in the act of encountering, resonating with, and moving through embodied spaces? How might one be both inside and outside bodies, subject and other? In an age where transmission and infection bring fear of the ‘foreign body ’and its impacts, and where human bodies inscribe their devastating impact on the geological and atmospheric forces of the earth, what can we learn from becoming with such non-human, inhumane, bodies? What are their fluid, multimodal methods of cross-disciplinary trans-mission and how might we receive them? In our audio paper/audio walk, we explore what it is to inhabit these resonant spaces. Reflecting on theoretical models from posthuman, non-human, and more-than-human perspectives, we design a narrated audio experience that incorporates psychoacoustic phenomena such as auditory brainwave entrainment, binaural beats, and fragmentation/granulation of sound materials that de-centralize and deconstruct the sounding world. The boundaries between music, field recording, sound art and sound assembly are blurred and reinterpreted in the listening/explorative space. Spaces convolve, disperse and digitally re-order through patterns and rules evolving simultaneously through the sounding expanse, developed and mediated by the sounding, resonating space that emerges.

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  • 9.
    Holloway-Attaway, Lissa
    et al.
    University of Skövde, School of Informatics. University of Skövde, Informatics Research Environment.
    Murray, John T.University of Central Florida, USA.
    Interactive Storytelling: 16th International Conference on Interactive Digital Storytelling, ICIDS 2023, Kobe, Japan, November 11–15, 2023, Proceedings, Part I2023Conference proceedings (editor) (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This two-volume set LNCS 14383 and LNCS 14384 constitutes the refereed proceedings of the 16th International Conference on Interactive Digital Storytelling, ICIDS 2023, held in Kobe, Japan, during November 11–15, 2023.

    The 30 full papers presented in this book together with 11 short papers were carefully reviewed and selected from 101 submissions. Additionally, the proceedings includes 22 Late Breaking Works. 

    The papers focus on topics such as: theory, history and foundations; social and cultural contexts; tools and systems; interactive narrative design; virtual worlds, performance, games and play; applications and case studies; and late breaking works.

  • 10.
    Holloway-Attaway, Lissa
    et al.
    University of Skövde, School of Informatics. University of Skövde, Informatics Research Environment.
    Murray, John T.University of Central Florida, USA.
    Interactive Storytelling: 16th International Conference on Interactive Digital Storytelling, ICIDS 2023, Kobe, Japan, November 11–15, 2023, Proceedings, Part II2023Conference proceedings (editor) (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This two-volume set LNCS 14383 and LNCS 14384 constitutes the refereed proceedings of the 16th International Conference on Interactive Digital Storytelling, ICIDS 2023, held in Kobe, Japan, during November 11–15, 2023.

    The 30 full papers presented in this book together with 11 short papers were carefully reviewed and selected from 101 submissions. Additionally, the proceedings includes 22 Late Breaking Works. 

    The papers focus on topics such as: theory, history and foundations; social and cultural contexts; tools and systems; interactive narrative design; virtual worlds, performance, games and play; applications and case studies; and late breaking works.

  • 11.
    Holloway-Attaway, Lissa
    et al.
    University of Skövde, School of Informatics. University of Skövde, Informatics Research Environment.
    Rouse, Rebecca
    University of Skövde, School of Informatics. University of Skövde, Informatics Research Environment.
    Augmenting Affect: Interaction, Materiality and Mimetic Communication in Augmented Reality Books2020In: The Expression of Emotion In Humans and Technology: The Art Exhibit at ICIDS 2019 Art Book / [ed] Ryan Bown, Brian Salisbury, Pittsburgh, PA: ETC Press, 2020, p. 69-78Chapter in book (Refereed)
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  • 12.
    Holloway-Attaway, Lissa
    et al.
    University of Skövde, School of Informatics. University of Skövde, The Informatics Research Centre.
    Rouse, Rebecca
    Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute, Troy, NY, United States.
    Designing Postdigital Curators: Establishing an Interdisciplinary Games and Mixed Reality Cultural Heritage Network2018In: Advances in Digital Cultural Heritage: International Workshop, Funchal, Madeira, Portugal, June 28, 2017, Revised Selected Papers / [ed] Marinos Ioannides, João Martins, Roko Žarnić, Veranika Lim, Springer-Verlag New York, 2018, Vol. 10754, p. 162-173Chapter in book (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    As digital technologies have become more integrated in museum and cultural heritage contexts over the past decade, digital museums enter a new phase of coming into their own. This opens up opportunities for the incorporation of cutting-edge multiplayer gaming technologies and immersive mixed reality (MR) systems. To support nuanced and original engagement with the newly pervasive nature of the digital in museums, an interdisciplinary group of international researchers, designers, and museum professionals have established a new network: the Designing Digital Heritage Network (DDHN). The network operates to support research, design production, interdisciplinary collaboration, and the development of innovative new pedagogies and programs to ‘design’ the postdigital curators of the future. This paper outlines the mission and vision of the DDHN, and suggests initial directions for future research in the postdigital heritage field focused on interdisciplinary, performative, and game design approaches to production and exhibition. © 2018, Springer International Publishing AG, part of Springer Nature.

  • 13.
    Holloway-Attaway, Lissa
    et al.
    University of Skövde, School of Informatics. University of Skövde, Informatics Research Environment.
    Rouse, Rebecca
    University of Skövde, School of Informatics. University of Skövde, Informatics Research Environment.
    When You Hear the Chime: Movable Books and the Dramaturgical Functions of Sound in Mixed Reality Interactive Narrative Design2022In: Interactive Storytelling: 15th International Conference on Interactive Digital Storytelling, ICIDS 2022, Santa Cruz, CA, USA, December 4–7, 2022, Proceedings / [ed] Mirjam Vosmeer; Lissa Holloway Attaway, Cham: Springer Nature Switzerland AG , 2022, p. 427-440Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In this paper we outline the pre-digital histories of recorded and synthesized sound, exploring their entanglements with both the literal codex and larger literary imaginary. In particular, we focus on intersections of sound and movable books, offering the rich genealogy of the movable book as a fertile addition to the IDN (interactive digital narrative) family tree, as an example of pre-computational interactive narrative with a long history. Drawing on this intermedial history, along with our own experience designing an MR (mixed reality) movable book, we offer a taxonomy of dramaturgical functions of sound in MR IDN. We demonstrate the use of this taxonomy in analysis of our own work, and suggest opportunities for expanding the taxonomy in support of future speculative research and design imaginaries for IDNs. 

  • 14.
    Holloway-Attaway, Lissa
    et al.
    University of Skövde, School of Informatics. University of Skövde, Informatics Research Environment.
    Vipsjö, Lars
    University of Skövde, School of Informatics. University of Skövde, Informatics Research Environment.
    Using augmented reality, gaming technologies, and transmedial storytelling to develop and co-design local cultural heritage experiences2020In: Visual Computing for Cultural Heritage / [ed] Fotis Liarokapis, Athanasios Voulodimos, Nikolaos Doulamis, Anastasios Doulamis, Cham: Springer, 2020, p. 177-204Chapter in book (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    As technologies are integrated in museum and cultural heritage contexts, digital heritage design increasingly depends on innovative, embodied and experimental storytelling features focused on users. These developments create opportunities to incorporate gaming technologies that may include immersive, affective mixed reality (MR) systems with narrative innovation at the core. To support such engagements, researchers in the Division of Game Development at the University of Skövde have developed a number of projects, educational programs, interdisciplinary research practices and collaborations. In our chapter we will foreground the KLUB project, a sub-project in the KASTiS project (in English, the “Cultural Heritage and Game Technologies in Skaraborg” project), a funded regional development initiative in western Sweden focused on engaging citizens in local cultural heritage at a number of municipalities. KLUB uses transmedial storytelling techniques and gaming elements within an Augmented Reality enhanced children’s book series and related media (board games, locative experiences) that have been co-designed with a number of stakeholders to tell and play the local micro-histories of the Skaraborg region in Sweden. We contextualize our research in humanistic interventions and practices for co-designing transmedial game/stories and outline some of our related intra-disciplinary activities and impacts in research. 

  • 15.
    Koenitz, Hartmut
    et al.
    Department of Media Technology, Södertörn University, Huddinge, Sweden ; Informatics Institute, University of Amsterdam, Netherlands ; School of Computer Science and Statistics, Trinity College Dublin, Ireland.
    Holloway-Attaway, Lissa
    University of Skövde, School of Informatics. University of Skövde, Informatics Research Environment.
    Perkis, Andrew
    Department of Electronic Systems, Norwegian University of Science and Technology, Trondheim, Norway.
    Editorial: Interactive digital narratives representing complexity2023In: Frontiers in Virtual Reality, E-ISSN 2673-4192, Vol. 4, article id 1132785Article in journal (Refereed)
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  • 16.
    Rouse, Rebecca
    et al.
    University of Skövde, School of Informatics. University of Skövde, Informatics Research Environment.
    Holloway-Attaway, Lissa
    University of Skövde, School of Informatics. University of Skövde, Informatics Research Environment.
    A prehistory of the interactive reader and design principles for storytelling in postdigital culture2020In: Book 2.0, ISSN 2042-8022, Vol. 10, no 1, p. 7-42Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This article examines historical examples to illuminate a prehistory of the interac- tive reader in analogue media, tracing a rich genealogy that is helpful for under- standing and designing current works such as augmented reality (AR) books. In addition, a set of generative design strategies to help shape current practice are discussed, based both on formal qualities and characteristics of historical exam- ples and the authors’ own experiences as designers working in mixed reality over many years. Theoretical framing is provided to persuasively make the case for the relevance of historical works for designers today. From medieval manuscripts, to Renaissance medical texts, to seventeenth, eighteenth and nineteenth century movable books, to the elaborate paper engineering of twentieth century and contemporary pop-up books, the history of the active reader and interactive book design is long and fascinating, and is presented here as an important and direct source of inspiration for digital designers today. Finally, recent interactive book projects designed by the authors are discussed and analyzed for both continuities and disruptions of historical interactive book design strategies, and a framework is presented for conceptualizing the postdigital interactive reader today.

  • 17.
    Rouse, Rebecca
    et al.
    University of Skövde, School of Informatics. University of Skövde, Informatics Research Environment.
    Holloway-Attaway, Lissa
    University of Skövde, School of Informatics. University of Skövde, Informatics Research Environment.
    Behind the Page: Historical Connections and the Making of Simmer, a Mixed Reality Movable Book2022In: Movable Stationery, ISSN 1097-1270, Vol. 30, no 1, p. 20-25Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In this article we share Simmer (2019), an entirely handmade two-sided artist book and MR (mixed reality) application created in collaboration with composer Brendan Padgett, and excerpts from our related scholarship on movable books, active readership, digital media, and design. Simmer explores and expands John Cheever’s classic short story, “The Swimmer” (1964), and won the Excellence in Innovation jury award at the International Conference for Interactive Digital Storytelling (ICIDS) Art Exhibition inSalt Lake City, Utah in November 2019. While Cheever’s landmark story crafts an expert portrayal of its narcissistic protagonist Ned Merrill, Ned’s wife (Lucinda) and four unnamed daughters are left unexplored. This untold fe- male side of the story was the focus of Simmer, where we bring to life a host of underdeveloped characters and engage the reader through both interactive paper and digital structures that work in combination to tell a new side of the story. 

  • 18.
    Rouse, Rebecca
    et al.
    University of Skövde, School of Informatics. University of Skövde, Informatics Research Environment.
    Holloway-Attaway, Lissa
    University of Skövde, School of Informatics. University of Skövde, Informatics Research Environment.
    Playing at the Page: Designing to Support Creative Readership Practices2022In: JIB: Journal of Interactive Books, ISSN 2785-6569, Vol. 1, no 1, p. 147-166Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In this paper we look at examples of creative, emergent and performative practices in readership. Starting with the history of the book, and including a discussion of a range of reader practices we make connections with our own creative practice as designers of interactive mixed reality movable books today. A theoretical frame for characterizing the reader today as postdigital is presented to push back against commonly held beliefs about the act of reading as passive or somehow less creative or enacted compared with digital technologies. Finally, our own interactive movable book project Simmer is discussed as a means to bridge historical methods and materials with the digital, and a set of design strategies are provided in support of postdigital readership.

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  • 19.
    Rouse, Rebecca
    et al.
    Department of the Arts, Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute, Troy NY, USA.
    Holloway-Attaway, Lissa
    University of Skövde, School of Informatics. University of Skövde, Informatics Research Environment.
    Re-Engineering Computational Curricula with Postdigital Heritage, Critical Humanities, and Community Engagement2018Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The field of Digital Heritage is ideal for re-engineering computational curricula by integrating critical humanities and community engagement approaches with computer science practices to address the deep entanglement of digital technologies and culture in tension today. This paper will present a series of brief case studies to share lessons learned from the development of Digital Heritage curriculum design. In analyzing these case studies, we identify a set of best practices in Digital Heritage curricular design.

  • 20.
    Rouse, Rebecca
    et al.
    University of Skövde, School of Informatics. University of Skövde, Informatics Research Environment.
    Holloway-Attaway, Lissa
    University of Skövde, School of Informatics. University of Skövde, Informatics Research Environment.
    Troubling games: Materials, histories, and speculative future worlds for games pedagogy2022In: Convergence. The International Journal of Research into New Media Technologies, ISSN 1354-8565, E-ISSN 1748-7382, Vol. 28, no 2, p. 539-560Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Games are trouble. As faculty members in a Game Development program we are aware of the troubles. As inside–outsiders, given our status as queer women in the male-dominated Games field, both with interdisciplinary art-tech-humanities backgrounds as opposed to STEM, we are the ones commonly tasked with ‘fixing’ these troubles. This tasking comes to us in the form of both assumptions and requests about our providing particular types of education to others, both faculty and students, as fixes to Game-troubles: teaching the gender module; sitting on an LGBTQ+ committee; advising a particular student who is also outside the more comfortable purview of Games; and so forth. While our labor is often assumed, it is not fully valued, evidenced by the ways in which it is chronically under-resourced. And, given this lack of sustainability, our labor is not effective in the ways we intend. Often, our fixes only serve to a fix ourselves, further cementing us as outsiders. Our fixes are diluted until they become performative gestures, absolving others of the need to act, but changing little else. Acting ‘in a fix’ is something we no longer wish to do. Instead we untangle and re-tangle in a new way, drawing on the work of Feminist New Materialists (Ahmed, 2008; Alaimo, 2016; Alaimo and Hekman, 2008; Barad, 2011; Bennett, 2010; Braidotti, 2013; Coole and Frost, 2010; Dolphijn and Tuin, 2012; Grosz, 1994; Kirby, 1997) to develop imaginative new models for a more just and joyful future Games pedagogy. We share not only our research on this topic, but also invite you into our own intimate experiences of play-making, foregrounding this as knowledge-making too. We offer these crossings between text and context, history and future Ahmed, 2008, memory and fiction as a speculative fabulation for future Games pedagogies.

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    fulltext
  • 21.
    Svensson, Torbjörn
    et al.
    University of Skövde, School of Informatics. University of Skövde, Informatics Research Environment.
    Holloway-Attaway, Lissa
    University of Skövde, School of Informatics. University of Skövde, Informatics Research Environment.
    Etienne, Beroldy
    École d`Ingénieurs de l´université de Nantes, Nantes, France.
    Leaving the Small Screen: Telling News Stories in a VR Simulation of an AR News Service2018In: Interactive Storytelling: 11th International Conference on Interactive Digital Storytelling, ICIDS 2018, Dublin, Ireland, December 5–8, 2018, Proceedings / [ed] Rebecca Rouse, Hartmut Koenitz, Mads Haahr, Cham: Springer, 2018, p. 352-355Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This paper describes a demo of a Virtual Reality simulation of an AQ1 interactable news service for Augmented Reality. The aim of the prototype is to implement it for user testing of new forms of news-interaction, leaving the small screen of mobile applications and entering into a ‘virtual’ world instead. This system can potentially be used for subjects other than news interactions and would be suitable as a test-platform for other kinds of AR-based digital story- telling. An advantage for a VR simulation is that current AR technology in the form of AR headsets/glasses are still in technical infancy, and therefore they are quite limited, both when it comes to field of view and for handling dynamic outdoor environments.

  • 22.
    Vosmeer, Mirjam
    et al.
    Amsterdam University of Applied Sciences, The Netherlands.
    Holloway-Attaway, LissaUniversity of Skövde, School of Informatics. University of Skövde, Informatics Research Environment.
    Interactive Storytelling: 15th International Conference on Interactive Digital Storytelling, ICIDS 2022, Santa Cruz, CA, USA, December 4–7, 2022, Proceedings2022Conference proceedings (editor) (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This volume constitutes the proceedings of the 15th International Conference on Interactive Digital Storytelling (ICIDS 2022). ICIDS is the premier conference for researchers and practitioners concerned with studying digital interactive forms of narrative from avariety of perspectives, including theoretical, technological, and applied design lenses.The annual conference is an interdisciplinary gathering that combines technology focused approaches with humanities-inspired theoretical inquiry, empirical research, and artistic expression. This year’s conference was built around the central theme of ‘Speculative Horizons’. With this theme we were motivated to consider the future and its relationship to interactive digital storytelling.

  • 23.
    Holloway-Attaway, Lissa (Artist, Creator)
    University of Skövde, School of Informatics. University of Skövde, Informatics Research Environment.
    Fawcus, Jamie (Artist, Creator)
    University of Skövde, School of Informatics. University of Skövde, Informatics Research Environment.
    PATTER(n)INGS: Apt. 3B2020Artistic output (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This is a web-based audio experience documenting our troubled times. Here, routines and intimate space-time proximities are tested.Constructed as a web-based interface, but with no identifiable graphics, other than a black square, the eavesdropper wears headphones (and ideally a face mask and blindfold) and may only move a computer mouse blindly across the flat surface of a desk in front of the blackened computer monitor. Hidden sound files, which also move and shift, must be discovered by the eavesdropper-user, who accesses them through a further limited sense of human touch, mediated through the technology of the mouse, a necessary prosthetic arbitrating social intimacy. The sound files shift and are layered to create the manifold and multiplicitous spaces of Apartment 3B. A restriction of visual stimulus gives the ear space to paint its own pictures, to distort, illuminate, and amplify. Paranoia and the imagination creep forward into daily life as the usually ignored sounds of our two-metre sphere become ever alive, deeply present in new configurations, patterns of recognition. 

  • 24.
    Holloway-Attaway, Lissa (Artist, Creator)
    University of Skövde, School of Informatics. University of Skövde, Informatics Research Environment.
    Fawcus, Jamie (Artist, Creator)
    University of Skövde, School of Informatics. University of Skövde, Informatics Research Environment.
    PATTER(n)INGS: Apt. 3B: live transmissions from the plague years2021Artistic output (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In our performance, we re-create a live version of an interactive web-based audio experience we previously designed to explore being(s) suspended in the emerging “new normal” spaces, patterns and troubled times of 2020 COVID existence: “PATTER(n)INGS: APT 3B.” In our original web-based piece, users/listeners were encouraged to explore the many rooms of a virtual domestic space, that is Apt. 3B, in order to eavesdrop on personal and global responses to pandemics and lockdown scenarios, new and old. With no identifiable graphics, other than a full-screen black square, the eavesdropper-user was asked to wear headphones and could only move a computer mouse blindly across the flat surface of a desk in front of a blackened computer monitor. Hidden sound files moved and shifted and had to be discovered by the eavesdropper-user to participate in the experience. Our aim in the performance is to consider how to re-create this experience in a new kind of live platform.

    In both our designs (web-based and live) we incorporate voice narration, psychoacoustic phenomena such as auditory brainwave entrainment, binaural beats, and fragmentation/granulation of sound materials that de-centralize and deconstruct the sounding world. The boundaries between music, field recording, sound art, sound assembly and live-ness are blurred, requiring them to be reinterpreted by listeners and performers alike. We draw creative inspiration from personal historical accounts of plague and disease narratives, combined with original texts, recordings and contemporary (2020) news reporting focused on global destruction, recovery, resistance, and homage. 

    Our live sound spaces, a reflection of our web-based ones, are re-created through two performers, Holloway-Attaway (voice acting/text production) and Fawcus (live electronics and signal processing) and a COVID-compliant interactor moving through the performance space, replaying the role of the eavesdropper. Narrative voice, psychoacoustic sound, and electroacoustic music will be dispersed and digitally re-ordered through patterns and rules evolving simultaneously through the mutual configurations of the performers and from the interactor, who will be cued to respond independently. In this way we hope to move listeners between listening and making states, while exploring cross-references and viral connections across platforms in the plague years.

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