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  • 1.
    Brolin, Erik
    et al.
    University of Skövde, School of Engineering Science. University of Skövde, The Virtual Systems Research Centre.
    Mahdavian, Nafise
    University of Skövde, School of Engineering Science. University of Skövde, The Virtual Systems Research Centre.
    Högberg, Dan
    University of Skövde, School of Engineering Science. University of Skövde, The Virtual Systems Research Centre.
    Hanson, Lars
    University of Skövde, School of Engineering Science. University of Skövde, The Virtual Systems Research Centre. Industrial Development, Scania CV, Södertälje.
    Johansson, Joakim
    Bombardier Transportation Sweden AB, Västerås.
    Possibilities and challenges for proactive manufacturing ergonomics2019In: Proceedings of the 20th Congress of the International Ergonomics Association (IEA 2018): Volume VIII: Ergonomics and Human Factors in Manufacturing, Agriculture, Building and Construction, Sustainable Development and Mining / [ed] Sebastiano Bagnara, Riccardo Tartaglia, Sara Albolino, Thomas Alexander, Yushi Fujita, Cham: Springer, 2019, Vol. 825, p. 11-20Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This paper identifies and describes product development activities where ergonomics issues could be considered and illustrates how that could be done through a number of different approaches. The study is divided into two parts where an interview study is done to identify where in a product development process consideration of ergonomics issues are or could be done. The second part of the study includes an observation, motion capture and simulation study of current manufacturing operations to evaluate and compare three different assessment approaches; observational based ergonomics evaluation, usages of motion capture data and DHM simulation and evaluation. The results shows the importance of consideration of ergonomics in early development phases and that the ergonomics assessment process is integrated in the overall product and production development process.

  • 2.
    Iriondo Pascual, Aitor
    et al.
    University of Skövde, School of Engineering Science. University of Skövde, The Virtual Systems Research Centre.
    Högberg, Dan
    University of Skövde, School of Engineering Science. University of Skövde, The Virtual Systems Research Centre.
    Kolbeinsson, Ari
    University of Skövde, School of Engineering Science. University of Skövde, The Virtual Systems Research Centre.
    Ruiz Castro, Pamela
    University of Skövde, School of Engineering Science. University of Skövde, The Virtual Systems Research Centre.
    Mahdavian, Nafise
    University of Skövde, School of Engineering Science. University of Skövde, The Virtual Systems Research Centre.
    Hanson, Lars
    University of Skövde, School of Engineering Science. University of Skövde, The Virtual Systems Research Centre. Scania CV, Södertalje, Sweden.
    Proposal of an Intuitive Interface Structure for Ergonomics Evaluation Software2018In: Proceedings of the 20th Congress of the International Ergonomics Association (IEA 2018): Volume VIII: Ergonomics and Human Factors in Manufacturing, Agriculture, Building and Construction, Sustainable Development and Mining / [ed] Sebastiano Bagnara, Riccardo Tartaglia, Sara Albolino, Thomas Alexander, Yushi Fujita, Cham: Springer, 2018, Vol. 825, p. 289-300Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Nowadays, different technologies and software for ergonomics evaluations are gaining greater relevance in the field of ergonomics and production development. The tools allow users such as ergonomists and engineers to perform assessments of ergonomic conditions of work, both related to work simulated in digital human modelling (DHM) tools or based on recordings of work performed by real operators. Regardless of approach, there are many dimensions of data that needs to be processed and presented to the users.

    The users may have a range of different expectations and purposes from reading the data. Examples of situations are to: judge and compare different design solutions; analyse data in relation to anthropometric differences among subjects; investigate different body regions; assess data based on different time perspectives; and to perform assessments according to different types of ergonomics evaluation methods. The range of different expectations and purposes from reading the data increases the complexity of creating an interface that considers all the necessary tools and functions that the users require, while at the same time offer high usability.

    This paper focuses on the structural design of a flexible and intuitive interface for an ergonomics evaluation software that possesses the required tools and functions to analyse work situations from different perspectives, where the data input can be either from DHM tools or from real operators while performing work. 

  • 3.
    Lind, Carl Mikael
    et al.
    Unit of Occupational Medicine, Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden / Division of Ergonomics, KTH Royal Institute of Technology, Huddinge, Sweden.
    Sandsjö, Leif
    Faculty of Caring Science, Work Life and Social Welfare, University of Borås, Sweden / Design & Human Factors, Department of Industrial and Materials Science, Chalmers University of Technology, Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Mahdavian, Nafise
    University of Skövde, School of Engineering Science. University of Skövde, The Virtual Systems Research Centre.
    Högberg, Dan
    University of Skövde, School of Engineering Science. University of Skövde, The Virtual Systems Research Centre.
    Hanson, Lars
    University of Skövde, School of Engineering Science. University of Skövde, The Virtual Systems Research Centre. Scania CV, Södertälje, Sweden.
    Olivares, Jozé Antonio Diaz
    Division of Ergonomics, KTH Royal Institute of Technology, Huddinge, Sweden.
    Yang, Liyun
    Unit of Occupational Medicine, Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden / Division of Ergonomics, KTH Royal Institute of Technology, Huddinge, Sweden.
    Forsman, Mikael
    Unit of Occupational Medicine, Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden / Division of Ergonomics, KTH Royal Institute of Technology, Huddinge, Sweden.
    Prevention of Work: Related Musculoskeletal Disorders Using Smart Workwear – The Smart Workwear Consortium2019In: Human Systems Engineering and Design: Proceedings of the 1st International Conference on Human Systems Engineering and Design (IHSED2018): Future Trends and Applications, October 25-27, 2018, CHU-Université de Reims Champagne-Ardenne, France / [ed] Tareq Ahram, Waldemar Karwowski, Redha Taiar, Springer, 2019, Vol. 876, p. 477-483Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Adverse work-related physical exposures such as repetitive movements and awkward postures have negative health effects and lead to large financial costs. To address these problems, a multi-disciplinary consortium was formed with the aim of developing an ambulatory system for recording and analyzing risks for musculoskeletal disorders utilizing textile integrated sensors as part of the regular workwear. This paper presents the consortium, the Smart Workwear System, and a case study illustrating its potential to decrease adverse biomechanical exposure by promoting improved work technique. 

  • 4.
    Mahdavian, Nafise
    University of Skövde, School of Engineering Science. University of Skövde, The Virtual Systems Research Centre.
    Development and Evaluation of Digital Ergonomics Tools to Assess Human Work in Real and Virtual Environments: Based on case studies of manual assembly in Swedish automotive companies2018Report (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    ‘Digital ergonomics tools’ is a term used in this research proposal to refer to tools that are used to assess human work in real and virtual environments, where ‘digital’ refers to the use of technology such as computers, sensors, simulation, and data processing, to achieve desired functionality and usability. Digital ergonomics tools are considered as part of the ‘digital factory’. In essence the digital factory is an advanced computer model that either represents a non-yet existing factory, or an existing factory. When the factory is realised, there is an information flow between the real and the digital factory. The digital factory can be used to be informed about status of running production, and to support product and manufacturing development activities to test different design scenarios in the digital model before realising the selected solutions in the real factory. Hence, the digital factory approach assists designers, engineers, ergonomists, and managers to get a better understanding of the current status of the factory, and offers a digital model for testing and deciding upon different design alternatives. In an ergonomics context, such status checks can be related to assessing current ergonomics loads of the work force, or related to ensuring appropriate ergonomics when workstations are introduced or modified due to new product type introductions. However, there is a need to develop and evaluate digital ergonomics tools that has the desired functionality and usability to be integrated in to the digital factory concept. This proposed research addresses those needs.

    The research contributes to advance knowledge about technology and methods for the assessment of human work in real and virtual environments. The research will be carried out in association with development and evaluation research projects in the area of digital ergonomics tools, such as digital human modelling (DHM) tools and smart workwear. Simulation and experiment based strategies will be used to gather data and extract new knowledge. The studies will be carried out both in simulation and laboratory environments at the University, as well as in case studies in manual assembly in Swedish automotive companies.

  • 5.
    Mahdavian, Nafise
    et al.
    University of Skövde, School of Engineering Science. University of Skövde, The Virtual Systems Research Centre.
    Lind, Carl Mikael
    Unit of Occupational medicine, Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden / Division of Ergonomics, KTH Royal Institute of Technology, Huddinge, Sweden.
    Diaz Olivares, Jose Antonio
    Division of Ergonomics, KTH Royal Institute of Technology, Huddinge, Sweden.
    Iriondo Pascual, Aitor
    University of Skövde, School of Engineering Science. University of Skövde, The Virtual Systems Research Centre.
    Högberg, Dan
    University of Skövde, School of Engineering Science. University of Skövde, The Virtual Systems Research Centre.
    Brolin, Erik
    University of Skövde, School of Engineering Science. University of Skövde, The Virtual Systems Research Centre.
    Yang, Liyun
    Unit of Occupational medicine, Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden / Division of Ergonomics, KTH Royal Institute of Technology, Huddinge, Sweden.
    Forsman, Mikael
    Unit of Occupational medicine, Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden / Division of Ergonomics, KTH Royal Institute of Technology, Huddinge, Sweden.
    Hanson, Lars
    University of Skövde, School of Engineering Science. University of Skövde, The Virtual Systems Research Centre. Scania CV, Södertälje, Sweden.
    Effect of Giving Feedback on Postural Working Techniques2018In: Advances in Manufacturing Technology XXXII: Proceedings of the 16th International Conference on Manufacturing Research, incorporating the 33rd National Conference on Manufacturing Research, September 11–13, 2018, University of Skövde, Sweden / [ed] Peter Thorvald, Keith Case, Amsterdam, Netherlands: IOS Press, 2018, p. 247-252Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Working postures and movements affect work efficiency and musculoskeletal health. To reduce the biomechanical exposure in physically demanding settings, working techniques may be improved by giving instant ergonomic feedback to the operator. This study investigates if feedback can be used to decrease adverse postures and movements in assembly work. A prototype solution of a smart textile workwear was used on a trainee assembly line. Posture and movement signals of 24 trainee operators were sampled via the workwear, transferred to a tablet for analyses and used to provide feedback suggesting improvements of work technique. Two modes of feedback were tested. Every participant’s work technique was measured before and after receiving the feedback and the results were compared. For upper arm elevation angle ≥60, behaviour change is indicated, supporting a positive work technique change, and indicated a future usefulness of technical automatic feedback for operators.

  • 6.
    Mahdavian, Nafise
    et al.
    University of Skövde, School of Engineering Science. University of Skövde, The Virtual Systems Research Centre.
    Ruiz Castro, Pamela
    University of Skövde, School of Engineering Science. University of Skövde, The Virtual Systems Research Centre.
    Brolin, Erik
    University of Skövde, School of Engineering Science. University of Skövde, The Virtual Systems Research Centre.
    Högberg, Dan
    University of Skövde, School of Engineering Science. University of Skövde, The Virtual Systems Research Centre.
    Hanson, Lars
    University of Skövde, School of Engineering Science. University of Skövde, The Virtual Systems Research Centre. Industrial Development, Scania, Södertälje, Sweden.
    Digital human modelling in a virtual environment of CAD parts and a point cloud2017In: Proceedings of the 5th International Digital Human Modeling Symposium / [ed] Sascha Wischniewski & Thomas Alexander, Federal Institute for Occupational Safety and Health , 2017, p. 283-291Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Manual assembly is a time and cost consuming phase of production. It is crucial to design the assembly process so that overall system efficiency, quality output and human well-being meet desired levels. Since manual assembly involve humans, one support in the production design process is to use digital human modelling (DHM) tools to model and assess different design scenarios prior to the actual production process. In the traditional way, various CAD tools are used by engineers to model the production layout and the workstations. Then, these models typically are imported into a DHM tool to simulate human work, and to apply ergonomic evaluation methods on the simulated work tasks. This work, supported by CAD and DHM, can be a time consuming and iterative process as precise information and measurements of the actual assembly environment are needed, e.g. related to actual geometries of factory premises or of facilities surrounding the workstations. However, introducing point cloud scanning technology can provide the user with a more correct and realistic virtual representation of the environment, which allows for a faster and more precise design process.The aim of this paper is to present the developments and capabilities of the DHM tool IPS IMMA (Intelligently Moving Manikins) in an assembly process and in a virtual environment provided by point cloud scanning.

  • 7.
    Ruiz Castro, Pamela
    et al.
    University of Skövde, School of Engineering Science. University of Skövde, The Virtual Systems Research Centre.
    Mahdavian, Nafise
    University of Skövde, School of Engineering Science. University of Skövde, The Virtual Systems Research Centre.
    Brolin, Erik
    University of Skövde, School of Engineering Science. University of Skövde, The Virtual Systems Research Centre.
    Högberg, Dan
    University of Skövde, School of Engineering Science. University of Skövde, The Virtual Systems Research Centre.
    Hanson, Lars
    University of Skövde, School of Engineering Science. University of Skövde, The Virtual Systems Research Centre. Industrial Development, Scania, Södertälje, Sweden.
    IPS IMMA for designing human-robot collaboration workstations2017In: Proceedings of the 5th International Digital Human Modeling Symposium / [ed] Sascha Wischniewski & Thomas Alexander, Federal Institute for Occupational Safety and Health , 2017, p. 263-273Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The global competition has forced manufacturing companies to further increase their productivity. This, together with technology development and changes in regulations, have led to the introduction of new types of workstations in production lines, where human operators collaborate with industrial robots to perform work tasks. As any type of product, these workstations need to be designed in the most optimal way to deliver the expected value. In the design process of these collaborative workstations, separate virtual simulations of industrial robots and human operators can be made with multiple commercial software. Separate simulations reduce the efficiency of the design process and makes it harder to identify successful design solutions. Hence, there is a need for software tools that are capable of simultaneous simulation of the human-robot collaboration in a workstation. Providing engineers with such tools will assist their tasks to optimize the human and robot workflow, while proactively ensuring proper ergonomic conditions for operators.This paper describes and illustrates how the digital human modelling (DHM) tool IPS IMMA can aid in the design of human-robot collaboration workstations. A use case where the human operator collaborates with a robot to produce a section of a pedal car in a virtual scenario is described. The use case illustrates the current capabilities and limitations of the software to simulate human-robot collaborations in workstations. Hence, the use case aims to provide input for further development of DHM tools aimed to assist the design of human-robot collaboration workstations.

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