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  • 1.
    Lissner, Lauren
    et al.
    Univ Gothenburg, Publ Hlth Epidemiol Unit, Dept Community Med & Publ Hlth, Sahlgrenska Acad, S-40530 Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Lanfer, Anne
    BIPS Inst Epidemiol & Prevent Res, Bremen, Germany.
    Gwozdz, Wencke
    Copenhagen Business Sch, Copenhagen, Denmark.
    Olafsdottir, Steingerdur
    Univ Gothenburg, Dept Food & Nutr, S-40530 Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Eiben, Gabriele
    Univ Gothenburg, Publ Hlth Epidemiol Unit, Dept Community Med & Publ Hlth, Sahlgrenska Acad, S-40530 Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Moreno, Luis A.
    Univ Zaragoza, GENUD Growth Exercise Nutr & Dev Res Grp, Sch Hlth Sci, E-50009 Zaragoza, Spain.
    Santaliestra-Pasias, Alba M.
    Univ Zaragoza, GENUD Growth Exercise Nutr & Dev Res Grp, Sch Hlth Sci, E-50009 Zaragoza, Spain.
    Kovacs, Eva
    Univ Pecs, Pecs, Hungary.
    Barba, Gianvincenzo
    CNR, Inst Food Sci, Avellino, Italy.
    Loit, Helle-Mai
    Natl Inst Hlth Dev, Tallinn, Estonia.
    Kourides, Yiannis
    Res & Educ Inst Child Hlth, Strovolos, Cyprus.
    Pala, Valeria
    Fdn IRCCS Ist Nazl Tumori, Epidemiol & Prevent Unit, Dept Prevent & Predict Med, Milan, Italy.
    Pohlabeln, Hermann
    BIPS Inst Epidemiol & Prevent Res, Bremen, Germany.
    De Henauw, Stefaan
    Univ Ghent, Dept Publ Hlth, B-9000 Ghent, Belgium.
    Buchecker, Kirsten
    TTZ, Dept Food Sci, Bremerhaven, Germany.
    Ahrens, Wolfgang
    BIPS Inst Epidemiol & Prevent Res, Bremen, Germany.
    Reisch, Lucia
    Copenhagen Business Sch, Copenhagen, Denmark.
    Television habits in relation to overweight, diet and taste preferences in European children: the IDEFICS study2012In: European Journal of Epidemiology, ISSN 0393-2990, E-ISSN 1573-7284, Vol. 27, no 9, p. 705-715Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Early television exposure has been associated with various health outcomes including childhood obesity. This paper describes associations between patterns of television viewing, on one hand, and diet, taste preference and weight status, on the other, in European preschoolers and schoolchildren. The IDEFICS baseline survey was conducted at examination centers in Italy, Estonia, Cyprus, Belgium, Sweden, Germany, Hungary, and Spain. 15,144 children aged 2-9 completed the basic protocol, including anthropometry and parental questionnaires on their diets and television habits. A subsample of 1,696 schoolchildren underwent further sensory testing for fat and sweet taste preferences. Three dichotomous indicators described: children's habitual television exposure time; television viewing during meals; and having televisions in their bedrooms. Based on these variables we investigated television habits in relation to overweight (IOTF) and usual consumption of foods high in fat and sugar. A possible role of taste preference in the latter association was tested in the sensory subgroup. All television indicators were significantly associated with increased risk of overweight, with odds ratios ranging from 1.21 to 1.30, in fully adjusted models. Children's propensities to consume high-fat and high-sugar foods were positively and, in most analyses, monotonically associated with high-risk television behaviors. The associations between television and diet propensities were not explained by preference for added fat or sugar in test foods. To summarize, in addition to being more overweight, children with high-risk television behaviors may, independent of objectively measured taste preferences for fat and sugar, passively overconsume higher-fat and particularly higher-sugar diets.

  • 2.
    Olafsdottir, Steingerdur
    et al.
    Univ Gothenburg, Dept Food & Nutr & Sport Sci, S-40530 Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Eiben, Gabriele
    Univ Gothenburg, Sahlgrenska Acad, Inst Med, Dept Publ Hlth & Community Med, S-40530 Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Prell, Hillevi
    Univ Gothenburg, Dept Food & Nutr & Sport Sci, S-40530 Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Hense, Sabrina
    BIPS GmbH, Leibniz Inst Prevent Res & Epidemiol, Dept Epidemiol Methods & Etiol Res, Bremen, Germany.
    Lissner, Lauren
    Univ Gothenburg, Sahlgrenska Acad, Inst Med, Dept Publ Hlth & Community Med, S-40530 Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Marild, Staffan
    Univ Gothenburg, Sahlgrenska Acad, Inst Med, Dept Publ Hlth & Community Med, S-40530 Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Reisch, Lucia
    Copenhagen Business Sch, DK-2000 Frederiksberg, Denmark.
    Berg, Christina
    Univ Gothenburg, Dept Food & Nutr & Sport Sci, S-40530 Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Young children's screen habits are associated with consumption of sweetened beverages independently of parental norms2014In: International Journal of Public Health, ISSN 1661-8556, E-ISSN 1661-8564, Vol. 59, no 1, p. 67-75Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This study investigated the associations between children's screen habits and their consumption of sweetened beverages. Because parents might be disposed to regulate their child's screen and dietary habits in a similar direction, our specific aim was to examine whether these associations were independent of parental norms. In the Swedish sample of the European Identification and prevention of dietary and lifestyle-induced health effects in children and infants (IDEFICS) study, parents filled in questionnaires about their 2 to 9-year-old children's (n = 1,733) lifestyle and diets. Associations between screen habits and sweetened beverage consumption were found independent of parental norms regarding sweetened beverages. A longitudinal analysis revealed that sweetened beverage consumption at 2-year follow-up was predicted by exposure to commercial TV at baseline (OR 1.4, 95 % CI 1.1-1.9). Cross-sectional analysis showed that the likelihood of consuming sweetened beverages at least 1-3 times per week increased for each hour/day watching television (OR 1.5, 95 % CI 1.2-1.9), and for being exposed to commercials (OR 1.6, 95 % CI 1.3-2.1). TV viewing time and commercial exposure contributed to the associations independently of each other. The results strengthen the assumption that it is possible to influence children's dietary habits through their TV habits.

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