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  • 1.
    Hiort af Ornäs, Viktor
    University of Skövde, The Virtual Systems Research Centre. University of Skövde, School of Technology and Society.
    Significant Things & Significant Use: A self report study on objects of experiences with things2010In: Proceedings of the 7th International Conference on Design and Emotion / [ed] K. Sato, P.M.A. Desmet, P. Hekkert, G. Ludden, & A. Mathew, Design & Emotion Society , 2010Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Things thrill and delight, but also elicit frustration. To take experiences into consideration in product development there is a need to identify what they are directed at and what elicits them, i.e. their objects and antecedents. Self-reports collected from 51 participants covering 298 examples of emotions with things were analysed in order to identify what people find significant in experiences with every day products. The object of reactions and judgements was frequently something beyond the product and participants also described use, ideas and events as significant. In many cases the reported experiences focused on situations and events rather than the product as such. While use, ideas and events all constitute antecedents of experiences, they can also become objects of experiences at certain points of time and it may be possible to scaffold for them in design.

  • 2.
    Hiort af Ornäs, Viktor
    University of Skövde, The Virtual Systems Research Centre. University of Skövde, School of Technology and Society.
    The Significance of Things: Affective User-Artefact Relations2010Doctoral thesis, comprehensive summary (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Products help people act, but also thrill, excite, and elicit fear, joy and anger. Artefacts are a natural part of people’s everyday lives, sometimes associated with values, dreams and aspirations. While traditional user-centred approaches have focused on efficiency and effectiveness of use, injury prevention etc. new approaches focusing on product experience have emerged. However, while increased attention is being paid to the experiential side of goods and services there remains a need for knowledge and methodology with which to address experiences with things, especially with regard to elicitation, specification and evaluation of requirements. This project has therefore taken an exploratory qualitative approach, aiming to elucidate what it is that people find significant in experiences with products. 159 participants in six different studies have shared descriptions of experiences with things. The studies have come from different perspectives, triangulating data collected in individual and group interviews with self-reports. The analysis indicates that things often matter not in terms of their mere presence or physical properties, but by standing out from expectations, requiring attention or referring to some idea. Often the significance of products lay in the role(s) they play in events, and the perceived impact the thing has on the person’s ability to realise motives. While only a fraction of all experiences with things could be prescribed in product development it is possible to scaffold conditions that increase or decrease their likelihood. Three perspectives that could potentially be addressable in development work are: significant things and associated meanings, significance in use and significance of consequences beyond use. These imply somewhat different objectives for design and different needs for knowledge. User experience is not a property or quality of an artefact, but a perspective that can to some extent be addressed by enabling developers to identify requirements and align their understanding with what users find significant.

  • 3.
    Hjort af Ornäs, Viktor
    University of Skövde, School of Technology and Society.
    Communicative challenges with dematerialised products2006In: Connecting fields: 5th Nordcode Seminar & Workshop, Oslo, May 10-12, 2006, 2006, p. 5 s.-Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Increasing the service components of products may contribute towards sustainable consumption and enable customisation of products, but changes conditions for communication. In a study on functional sales, participants in two focus groups were presented with four hypothetical examples. The participants were found to question the motives and capabilities of the producer and were quite sceptical to the offers. This text explores if this may be explained by how the offers were presented and interpreted, and by inherent problems with communicative aspects of dematerialised products. Dematerialisation changes the conditions for communication at different stages of the product usage lifecycle. A physical artefact may embody meaning which helps the user interpret the product and its consequences. In use it may enable sending messages to others. Over time products also become associated with personal meanings which may be important in long term use and attachment. Dematerialisation changes the conditions for all of these.

  • 4.
    Hjort af Ornäs, Viktor
    University of Skövde, School of Technology and Society. Chalmers University of Technology.
    Feelings for products: Sensations, intentions, beliefs and emotions2006In: Proceedings from the 5th Conference on Design and Emotion 2006 / [ed] M. A. Karlsson, P. Desmet, J. van Erp, Göteborg: Department of Product and Production Development, Division Design, Chalmers University of Technology , 2006, p. 1-15Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 5.
    Hjort af Ornäs, Viktor
    University of Skövde, School of Technology and Society.
    Towards a typology of emotional experiences with things2012In: Design Responsibility: Potentials and Pitfalls / [ed] Malene Leerberg & Lene Wul, Kolding: Designskolen Kolding , 2012, p. 185-Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 6.
    Hjort af Ornäs, Viktor
    University of Skövde, School of Technology and Society.
    Users, emotions and meaningful things2007Licentiate thesis, comprehensive summary (Other academic)
  • 7.
    Hjort af Ornäs, Viktor
    et al.
    University of Skövde, School of Technology and Society.
    Persson, Sara
    Chalmers University of Technology / Høgskolen i Agder.
    Jordan, Patrick W.
    Things, constructs and meanings2007In: Design semiotics in use, 2007Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Inspired by George Kelly’s method for eliciting constructs this study addresses meanings ascribed to products. 49 participants were interviewed using Kelly’s construct elicitation procedures, showing triads of products. The results highlight methodological issues in capturing meaning with products. Kelly’s approach has the benefit of not relying on predetermined scales and highlights a need to consider a syntactical dimension. Reasoning along the lines of Kelly’s constructive alternativism we need to look at the variety constructs that may be applicable to a product. However the approach of using triads may be beneficial also in studies resting on other theories. 

  • 8.
    Hjort af Ornäs, Viktor
    et al.
    University of Skövde, School of Technology and Society.
    Pilerot, Ola
    University of Skövde.
    Design for information literacy: towards embedded information literacy education for product design engineering students2006In: Creating Knowledge IV, 2006Conference paper (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    This paper describes improvements in how information literacy is taught on a design methodology course. The change is presented in the light of four approaches to information literacy education suggested by Bundy (2004). Our guiding principle has been that information literacy should be contextualized and embedded in the curricular activities of design. There are parallels in the design process and the information seeking process, and using these is one way to help students relate to the subject. Statements indicate that the students found the assignments worthwhile and became familiar with resources that they will use in the future. While we have strived for an embedment of information literacy, the course is probably more correctly described as one in which information literacy has been integrated. We describe how the course has developed over years and point to potential future improvements that may lead to a design of the course where

    information literacy can be seen as truly embedded.

  • 9.
    Hjort af Ornäs, Viktor
    et al.
    University of Skövde, School of Humanities and Informatics.
    Rexfeldt, Oscar
    Möjliggöranden, Avlastningar, Tvång och Hinder: Konsumenters resonemang kring praktiska konsekvenser av fyra funktionserbjudanden2007Report (Other academic)
  • 10.
    Hjort af Ornäs, Viktor
    et al.
    University of Skövde, School of Technology and Society.
    Rexfeldt, Oskar
    Betalning för nytta: Privatkonsumenters resonemang kring tre funktionserbjudanden2006Report (Other academic)
  • 11.
    Hjort af Ornäs, Viktor
    et al.
    University of Skövde, School of Technology and Society.
    Rexfelt, O
    Functional Sales From a Comsumer Perspective2006In: Wnoderground: the 2006 Design Research Society International Conference, 2006Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 12.
    Keitsch, Martina
    et al.
    Oslo School of Architecture and Design, Norway.
    Hjort af Ornäs, Viktor
    University of Skövde, School of Technology and Society. Chalmers University of Technology, Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Meaning and Interpretation: An analysis of two theoretical perspectives in product design2008In: Proceedings from the 6th Conference on Design and Emotion 2008, The Hong Kong Polytechnic University , 2008Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Experiences gain increasing attention in design research, but theories are inconsistent, and the foundations of different methods are rarely discussed. Design research has sui generis no fixed epistemology, and is open to methodological eclecticism. However, as paradigms successively change from positivistic towards more comprehensive views, discussions on how underlying theoretical assumptions influence approaches are needed. This paper examines and compares axiological, epistemological and methodological aspects of two perspectives: Kansei engineering, and a postmodernist framework. Both frameworks aim to match designers' conceptions of product symbolism etc. to those of the user group, but they evolve from different theoretical starting points. Analyzing the contents of underlying theories and their influence on methods and expected results is an important part of theory development that may also support designers in making methodological choices.

  • 13.
    Persson, Sara
    et al.
    Faculty of Engineering and Science, University of Agder, NO-4898 Grimstad, Norway.
    Hjort af Ornäs, Viktor
    University of Skövde, School of Technology and Society.
    Jordan, Patrick W.
    Department of Product- and Production Development, Division of Design, Chalmers University of Technology, SE-412 96 Göteborg, Sweden.
    Product constructs: Investigating differences between human factors specialists, industrial designers and engineers2007In: Proceedings of the 39th annual Nordic Ergonomic Society Conference, Lysekil, Sweden, October 1-3, 2007 (NES 2007) CD-ROM, Nordic Ergonomics Society, 2007Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In  the  product  development  work,  differences  in  language,  education  and cultural thought worlds influence actors’ view of the product. Drawing on personal  construct  psychology,  this  paper  investigates  differences  in  how triads of products are distinguished from each other to reveal the usage of constructs  depending  on  disciplinary  belonging.  The  study  identifies  some differences  in  the  use  of  constructs  between  human  factors  specialists, industrial designers and engineers.

  • 14. Rexfelt, O
    et al.
    Hiort af Ornäs, Viktor
    University of Skövde, School of Technology and Society. University of Skövde, The Virtual Systems Research Centre.
    Funktionsförsäljning till privatkonsumenter: Resonemang kring fyra funktionserbjudanden2006Report (Other academic)
  • 15.
    Rexfelt, Oskar
    et al.
    Chalmers University of Technology.
    Hjort af Ornäs, Viktor
    University of Skövde, The Virtual Systems Research Centre. University of Skövde, School of Technology and Society.
    Consumer acceptance of product-service systems: Designing for relative advantages and uncertainty reductions2009In: Journal of Manufacturing Technology Management, ISSN 1741-038X, E-ISSN 1758-7786, Vol. 20, no 5, p. 674-699Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Purpose – Product-service systems (PSS) could potentially benefit consumers, but empirical studies of business-to-consumer PSS solutions have been scarce. The purpose of this paper is to identify conditions for consumer acceptance, and propose a methodology for PSS development. Design/methodology/approach – Factors influencing consumer acceptance of PSS are investigated through focus groups and individual interviews, and elaborated in relation to theory from user acceptance and innovation adoption literature. Procedures for conceptual development of PSS are then proposed, based on methodology adapted from user-centred design. Findings – The two factors “impact on everyday life”, and “uncertainties” in anticipating such consequences were repeatedly brought up by participants. PSS affect consumers through practical implications for the activities they engage in. This goes beyond the service encounter, is highly complex and case specific why development processes should include iterative studies with consumers. Research limitations/implications – The studies use hypothetical PSS offers. Validation and refinement of the proposed methodology would require application in commercial development projects.Practical implications - The proposed methodology is expected to support requirements elicitation, and facilitate early stages of PSS development.Originality/value - This paper presents empirical findings regarding consumer acceptance, and provides a detailed analysis of factors that are central to PSS acceptance. It also introduces methodology for description and analysis of the complex consequences a solution may have from a consumer perspective.

  • 16. Rexfelt, Oskar
    et al.
    Hjort af Ornäs, Viktor
    University of Skövde, School of Technology and Society.
    From consumption to use: Consumer requirements in functional sales2008In: Proceedings of the Seventh International Symposium on Tools and Methods of Competitive Engineering - TMCE 2008, April 21-25, Izmir, Turkey / [ed] Horváth, I & Rusák, Z, IOS Press, 2008Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 17. Rexfelt, Oskar
    et al.
    Hjort af Ornäs, Viktor
    University of Skövde, School of Technology and Society.
    Rosenblad, E.
    PSS for private consumers - User requirements and prerequisites for consumer acceptance2007Conference paper (Refereed)
1 - 17 of 17
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