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  • 1.
    Lowe, Robert
    et al.
    University of Skövde, School of Humanities and Informatics. University of Skövde, The Informatics Research Centre.
    Herrera, Carlos
    University of Skövde, School of Humanities and Informatics.
    Morse, Anthony
    University of Skövde, School of Humanities and Informatics. University of Skövde, The Informatics Research Centre.
    Ziemke, Tom
    University of Skövde, School of Humanities and Informatics. University of Skövde, The Informatics Research Centre.
    The Embodied Dynamics of Emotion, Appraisal and Attention2007In: Attention in Cognitive Systems: Theories and Systems from an Interdisciplinary Viewpoint / [ed] Lucas Paletta, Erich Rome, Berlin, Heidelberg: Springer Berlin/Heidelberg, 2007, p. 1-20Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Emotions can be considered inextricably linked to embodied appraisals - perceptions of bodily states that inform agents of how they are faring in the world relative to their own well-being. Emotion-appraisals are thus relational phenomena the relevance of which can be learned or evolutionarily selected for given a reliable coupling between agent-internal and environmental states. An emotion-appraisal attentional disposition permits agents to produce behaviour that exploits such couplings allowing for adaptive agent performance across agent-environment interactions. This chapter discusses emotions in terms of dynamical processes whereby attentional dispositions are considered central to an understanding of behaviour. The need to reconcile a dynamical systems perspective with an approach that views emotions as attentional dispositions representative of embodied relational phenomena (embodied appraisals) is argued for. Attention and emotion are considered to be features of adaptive agent behaviour that are interdependent in their temporal, structural and organizational relations.

  • 2.
    Lowe, Robert
    et al.
    University of Skövde, School of Humanities and Informatics.
    Morse, Anthony
    University of Skövde, School of Humanities and Informatics.
    Ziemke, Tom
    University of Skövde, School of Humanities and Informatics.
    Predictive Regulation: Allostasis, Behavioural Flexibility and Fear Learning2008In: Proceedings of The Fourth Workshop on Anticipatory Behavior in Adaptive Learning Systems, Muncih, june 26th, 2008 / [ed] Giovanni Pezzulo, Martin V. Butz, Olivier Sigaud, Gianluca Baldassarre, Istituto di Scienze e Tecnologie della Cognizione - CNR , 2008Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 3.
    Lowe, Robert
    et al.
    University of Skövde, School of Humanities and Informatics.
    Philippe, Pierre
    University of Skövde, School of Humanities and Informatics.
    Montebelli, Alberto
    University of Skövde, School of Humanities and Informatics.
    Morse, Anthony
    University of Skövde, School of Humanities and Informatics.
    Ziemke, Tom
    University of Skövde, School of Humanities and Informatics.
    Affective Modulation of Embodied Dynamics2008In: The role of emotion in adaptive behaviour and cognitive robotics / [ed] Robert Lowe, Anthony Morse, Tom Ziemke, 2008, p. 48-64Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 4.
    Morse, Anthony
    et al.
    University of Skövde, School of Humanities and Informatics. University of Skövde, The Informatics Research Centre.
    Aktius, Malin
    University of Skövde, School of Humanities and Informatics. University of Skövde, The Informatics Research Centre.
    Dynamic liquid association: Complex learning without implausible guidance2009In: Neural Networks, ISSN 0893-6080, E-ISSN 1879-2782, Vol. 22, no 7, p. 875-889Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Simple associative networks have many desirable properties, but are fundamentally limited by their inability to accurately capture complex relationships. This paper presents a solution significantly extending the abilities of associative networks by using an untrained dynamic reservoir as an input filter. The untrained reservoir provides complex dynamic transformations, and temporal integration, and can be viewed as a complex non-linear feature detector from which the associative network can learn. Typically reservoir systems utilize trained single layer perceptrons to produce desired output responses. However given that both single layer perceptions and simple associative learning have the same computational limitations, i.e. linear separation, they should perform similarly in terms of pattern recognition ability. Further to this the extensive psychological properties of simple associative networks and the lack of explicit supervision required for associative learning motivates this extension overcoming previous limitations. Finally, we demonstrate the resulting model in a robotic embodiment, learning sensorimotor contingencies, and matching a variety of psychological data. (C) 2008 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  • 5.
    Morse, Anthony F.
    et al.
    University of Skövde, School of Humanities and Informatics. University of Skövde, The Informatics Research Centre.
    Herrera, Carlos
    University of Skövde, School of Humanities and Informatics. University of Skövde, The Informatics Research Centre.
    Clowes, Robert
    Center for Research in Cognitive Science, University of Sussex, Brighton, UK.
    Montebelli, Alberto
    University of Skövde, School of Humanities and Informatics. University of Skövde, The Informatics Research Centre.
    Ziemke, Tom
    University of Skövde, School of Humanities and Informatics. University of Skövde, The Informatics Research Centre.
    The role of robotic modelling in cognitive science2011In: New ideas in psychology, ISSN 0732-118X, E-ISSN 1873-3522, Vol. 29, no 3, p. 312-324Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    From the perspective of cognitive robotics, this paper presents a modern interpretation of Newell’s (1973) reasoning and suggestions for why and how cognitive psychologists should develop models of cognitive phenomena. We argue that the shortcomings of current cognitive modelling approaches are due in significant part to a lack of exactly the kind of integration required for the development of embodied autonomous robotics. Moreover we suggest that considerations of embodiment, situatedness, and autonomy, intrinsic to cognitive robotics, provide an appropriate basis for the integration and theoretic cumulation that Newell argued was necessary for psychology to mature. From this perspective we analyse the role of embodiment and modes of situatedness in terms of integration, cognition, emotion, and autonomy. Four complementary perspectives on embodied and situated cognitive science are considered in terms of their potential to contribute to cognitive robotics, cognitive science, and psychological theorizing: minimal cognition and organization, enactive perception and sensorimotor contingency, homeostasis and emotion, and social embedding. In combination these perspectives provide a framework for cognitive robotics, not only wholly compatible with the original aims of cognitive modelling, but as a more appropriate methodology than those currently in common use within psychology.

  • 6.
    Morse, Anthony F.
    et al.
    University of Skövde, School of Humanities and Informatics. University of Skövde, The Informatics Research Centre.
    Lowe, Robert
    University of Skövde, School of Humanities and Informatics. University of Skövde, The Informatics Research Centre.
    Ziemke, Tom
    University of Skövde, School of Humanities and Informatics. University of Skövde, The Informatics Research Centre.
    A Neurocomputational Model of Anticipation and Sustained Inattentional Blindness in Hierarchies2009In: Anticipatory Behavior in Adaptive Learning systems, ABiALS 2008 / [ed] Giovanni Pezzulo, Martin V. Butz, Olivier Sigaud, Gianluca Baldassarre, Berlin, Heidelberg: Springer Berlin/Heidelberg, 2009, p. 152-169Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Anticipation and prediction have been identified as key functions of many brain areas facilitating recognition, perception, and planning. In this chapter we present a hierarchical neurocomputational model in which feedback, effectively predicting or anticipating task-relevant features, leads to sustained inattentional blindness. A psychological experiment on sustained inattentional blindness in human subjects is simulated to provide visual input to a hierarchy of Echo State Networks. Other parts of the model receive input relevant to tracking the attended object and also detecting the unexpected object, feedback from which is then used to simulate engagement in the task and compared to results obtained without feedback, simulating passive observation. We find a significant effect of anticipation enhancing performance at the task and simultaneously degrading detection of unexpected features, thereby modelling the sustained inattentional blindness effect. We therefore suggest that anticipatory /predictive mechanisms are responsible for sustained inattentional blindness.

  • 7.
    Morse, Anthony F.
    et al.
    University of Skövde, School of Humanities and Informatics. University of Skövde, The Informatics Research Centre.
    Lowe, Robert
    University of Skövde, School of Humanities and Informatics. University of Skövde, The Informatics Research Centre.
    Ziemke, Tom
    University of Skövde, School of Humanities and Informatics. University of Skövde, The Informatics Research Centre.
    Manipulating space: modelling the role of transient dynamics in inattentional blindness2009In: Connection science (Print), ISSN 0954-0091, E-ISSN 1360-0494, Vol. 21, no 4, p. 275-296Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    According to Noë´s enactive theory of perception, sensorimotor knowledge allows us to predict the sensory outcomes of our actions. This paper suggests that tuning input filters with such predictions may be the cause of sustained inattentional blindness. Most models of learning capture statistically salient regularities in and between data streams. Such analysis is, however, severely limited by both the problem of marginal regularity and the credit assignment problem. A neurocomputational reservoir system can be used to alleviate these problems without training by enhancing the separability of regularities in input streams. However, as the regularities made separable vary with the state of the reservoir, feedback in the form of predictions of future sensory input can both enchance expected discriminations and hinder unanticipated ones. This renders the model blind to features not made separable in the regions of state space the reservoir in manipulated towards. This is demonstrated in a computational model of sustained inattentional blindness, leading to predictions about human behaviour that have yet to be tested.

  • 8.
    Morse, Anthony F.
    et al.
    University of Skövde, School of Humanities and Informatics. University of Skövde, The Informatics Research Centre.
    Ziemke, Tom
    University of Skövde, School of Humanities and Informatics. University of Skövde, The Informatics Research Centre.
    Action, Detection, and Perception: A Computational Model of the Relation Between Movement and Orientation Selectivity in the Cerebral Cortex2009In: Proceedings of the Thirty-First Annual Conferenceof theCognitive Science Society / [ed] Niels Taatgen & Hedderik van Rijn, Cognitive Science Society, Inc., 2009, p. 585-590Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    A fundamental tenet of enactive theories of cognition states that action is a necessary prerequisite to perception. In this paper we review the basis for this assumption and, with the help of a computational model of the famous Held and Hein kitten experiments, challenge the necessity of movement in subsequent detection. In normal development action does play an important role in setting up detection, but we aim here to widen our conceptions and consider the effect of correlations between non-motoric events.

  • 9.
    Morse, Anthony
    et al.
    University of Skövde, School of Humanities and Informatics.
    Lowe, Robert
    University of Skövde, School of Humanities and Informatics.
    Enacting Emotions: Somato-sensorimotor knowledge2007Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 10.
    Morse, Anthony
    et al.
    University of Skövde, School of Humanities and Informatics.
    Lowe, Robert
    University of Skövde, School of Humanities and Informatics.
    Ziemke, Tom
    University of Skövde, School of Humanities and Informatics.
    Towards an Enactive Cognitive Architecture2008Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 11.
    Morse, Antony F
    et al.
    University of Skövde, The Informatics Research Centre. University of Skövde, School of Humanities and Informatics.
    Ziemke, Tom
    University of Skövde, School of Humanities and Informatics. University of Skövde, The Informatics Research Centre.
    Cognitive Robotics, Enactive Perception, and Learning in the Real World2007In: CogSci 2007: The 29th Annual Conference of the Cognitive Science Society, 2007, p. 485-490Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Robotic cognitive modeling in the real world requires a level of integration and grounding rarely seen in more abstract modeling. However, like Newell we believe this is exactly the kind of integration needed to promote scientific cumulation in the cognitive sciences. We present a neural model of learning compatible with Noë’s account of enactive perception. We highlight that accounts of enactive perception tend to oversimplify the problem of identifying contingent relationships and introduce a novel way to address the problem of marginal regularities. Finally, we describe a general (non-task specific) model and present a number of real-world robotic experiments demonstrating a wide range of integrated psychological phenomena.

  • 12.
    Svensson, Henrik
    et al.
    University of Skövde, School of Humanities and Informatics. University of Skövde, The Informatics Research Centre.
    Morse, Anthony F.
    University of Skövde, School of Humanities and Informatics. University of Skövde, The Informatics Research Centre.
    Ziemke, Tom
    University of Skövde, School of Humanities and Informatics. University of Skövde, The Informatics Research Centre.
    Neural Pathways of Embodied Simulation2009In: Anticipatory Behavior in Adaptive Learning Systems: From Psychological Theories to Artificial Cognitive Systems / [ed] Giovanni Pezzulo, Martin V. Butz, Olivier Sigaud, Gianluca Baldassarre, Springer Berlin/Heidelberg, 2009, p. 95-114Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Simulation theories have in recent years proposed that a cognitiveagent's "inner world" can at least partly be constituted by internal emulations or simulations of its sensorimotor interaction with the world, i.e. covert perception and action. This paper further integrates simulation theory with the notion of the brain as a predictive machine. In particular, it outlines the neural pathways of covert simulations, which include implicit anticipation in cerebellar and basal gangliar circuits, bodily anticipation by means of forward models in the cerebellum, and environmental anticipation in the neocortex. The paper also discusses, to some extent, possible implications of the neural pathways of covert simulation for the frame problem, and the relation between procedural and declarative knowledge in covert simulations.

  • 13.
    Svensson, Henrik
    et al.
    University of Skövde, School of Humanities and Informatics. University of Skövde, The Informatics Research Centre.
    Morse, Anthony
    University of Skövde, School of Humanities and Informatics. University of Skövde, The Informatics Research Centre.
    Ziemke, Tom
    University of Skövde, School of Humanities and Informatics. University of Skövde, The Informatics Research Centre.
    Representation as Internal Simulation: A Minimalistic Robotic Model2009In: Proceedings of the Thirty-First Annual Conference of the Cognitive Science Society / [ed] Niels Taatgen & Hedderik van Rijn, Cognitive Science Society, Inc., 2009, p. 2890-2895Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Embodied cognition theorists have in recent years proposed that a cognitive agent's "representations" or "inner world" can at least partly be constituted by internal emulations or simulations of its sensorimotor interaction with the world, i.e. covert perception and action. This paper recapitulates some of the empirical evidence, distinguishes between implicit, internal and external anticipation, and discusses possible neural correlates. Furthermore a robotic neurocomputational model of external anticipation is presented and analyzed.

1 - 13 of 13
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