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  • 1.
    Jacobsson, Jenny
    et al.
    Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Linköping University, Linköping, Sweden.
    Timpka, Toomas
    Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Linköping University, Linköping, Sweden.
    Kowalski, Jan
    Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Linköping University, Linköping, Sweden.
    Nilsson, Sverker
    Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Linköping University, Linköping, Sweden.
    Ekberg, Joakim
    Högskolan i Skövde, Institutionen för vård och natur. Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Linköping University, Linköping, Sweden.
    Dahlström, Örjan
    Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Linköping University, Linnaeus Centre HEAD, Linköping, Sweden.
    Renström, Per A.
    Department of Molecular Medicine and Surgery, Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Injury patterns in Swedish elite athletics: Annual incidence, injury types and risk factors2013Inngår i: British Journal of Sports Medicine, ISSN 0306-3674, E-ISSN 1473-0480, Vol. 47, nr 15, s. 941-952Artikkel i tidsskrift (Fagfellevurdert)
    Abstract [en]

    Objective: To estimate the incidence, type and severity of musculoskeletal injuries in youth and adult elite athletics athletes and to explore risk factors for sustaining injuries. Design: Prospective cohort study conducted during a 52-week period. Setting: Male and female youth and adult athletics athletes ranked in the top 10 in Sweden (n=292). Results: 199 (68%) athletes reported an injury during the study season. Ninety-six per cent of the reported injuries were non-traumatic (associated with overuse). Most injuries (51%) were severe, causing a period of absence from normal training exceeding 3 weeks. Log-rank tests revealed risk differences with regard to athlete category (p=0.046), recent previous injury (>3 weeks time-loss; p=0.039) and training load rank index (TLRI; p=0.019). Cox proportional hazards regression analyses showed that athletes in the third (HR 1.79; 95% CI 1.54 to 2.78) and fourth TLRI quartiles (HR 1.79; 95% CI 1.16 to 2.74) had almost a twofold increased risk of injury compared with their peers in the first quartile and interaction effects between athlete category and previous injury; youth male athletes with a previous serious injury had more than a fourfold increased risk of injury (HR=4.39; 95% CI 2.20 to 8.77) compared with youth females with no previous injury. Conclusions: The injury incidence among both youth and adult elite athletics athletes is high. A training load index combing hours and intensity and a history of severe injury the previous year were predictors for injury. Further studies on measures to quantify training content and protocols for safe return to athletics are warranted. © 2013 BMJ Publishing Group Ltd & British Association of Sport and Exercise Medicine.

  • 2.
    Nordfeldt, Sam
    et al.
    Division of Child and Adolescent Psychiatry, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Linköping University, Linköping, Sweden / Center for Medical Technology Assessment, Department of Medicine and Health Sciences, Linköping University, Linköping, Sweden.
    Ängarne-Lindberg, Teresia
    Division of Child and Adolescent Psychiatry, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Linköping University, Linköping, Sweden.
    Nordwall, Maria
    Division of Paediatrics, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Linköping University, Linköping, Sweden / Paediatric Clinic, Vrinnevi Hospital, Norrköping, Sweden.
    Ekberg, Joakim
    Högskolan i Skövde, Institutionen för vård och natur.
    Berterö, Carina
    Division of Nursing Sciences, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Linköping University, Linköping, Sweden.
    As Facts and Chats Go Online, What Is Important for Adolescents with Type 1 Diabetes?2013Inngår i: PLoS ONE, ISSN 1932-6203, E-ISSN 1932-6203, Vol. 8, nr 6, artikkel-id e67659Artikkel i tidsskrift (Fagfellevurdert)
    Abstract [en]

    Background:Continued refinement of resources for patient information, education and support is needed. Considering the rapid development of new communication practices, the perspectives of young people themselves warrant more attention using a wide research focus. The purpose of this study was to understand information-seeking behaviours, Internet use and social networking online in adolescents with type 1 diabetes (T1DM). This applied to their everyday life, including the context of diabetes and their experiences and need of contact with T1DM peers.Methodology/Principal Findings:Twenty-four adolescents aged 10-17 years with T1DM were recruited from a county hospital in the south-east of Sweden. Qualitative data were obtained using eight focus groups, wherein each participant engaged in a 60-90 minute video/audio-recorded session. The focus group data were transcribed and analysed using qualitative content analysis. Some demographic and medical information was also collected. The three main categories that were identified; Aspects of Security, Updating, and Plainness and their sub-categories gave significant information about how to enhance information retrieval and peer contacts related to T1DM. Regarding the persons' information-seeking behaviour, Internet use, and use of social media some differences could be identified depending on gender and age.Conclusions/Significance:Sensitivity and adaptation to users' needs and expectations seem crucial in the development of future online resources for adolescents with T1DM. To start with, this could mean applying a wider range of already existing information and communication technologies. Health practitioners need to focus on the areas of security of information and communication, frequency of updating, and simplicity of design-less is more. © 2013 Nordfeldt et al.

  • 3.
    Teder, Marie
    et al.
    Linköping University, Sweden.
    Morelius, Evalotte
    Linköping University, Sweden.
    Nordwall, Maria
    Linköping University, Sweden / Vrinnevi Hospital, Norrköping, Sweden.
    Bolme, Per
    Linköping University, Sweden / Vrinnevi Hospital, Norrköping, Sweden.
    Ekberg, Joakim
    Högskolan i Skövde, Institutionen för vård och natur.
    Wilhelm, Elisabeth
    Linköping University, Sweden.
    Timpka, Toomas
    Linköping University, Sweden.
    Family-Based Behavioural Intervention Program for Obese Children: An Observational Study of Child and Parent Lifestyle Interpretations2013Inngår i: PLoS ONE, ISSN 1932-6203, E-ISSN 1932-6203, Vol. 8, nr 8, artikkel-id e71482Artikkel i tidsskrift (Fagfellevurdert)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: Family-based behavioural intervention programs (FBIPs) against childhood obesity have shown promising results, but the mediating mechanisms have not been identified. The aim of this study was to examine changes in obese childrens lifestyle habits during a 2-year FBIP according to their own and parents' reports, the concordance between these reports and the correlations to change in post-intervention z-BMI. Methods: An observational study of 26 children (8.3-12.0 years) and their parents participating in a 2-year FBIP was performed. Weight and height were measured from baseline to 12 months after the end of the program. Eating habits and physical-and sedentary activity were reported separately by children and parents. Data were analysed with regard to concordance between parents' and children's reports and association between the lifestyle reports and change in z-BMI at the study endpoint using descriptive statistics and parametric and non-parametric tests. Results: According to both children's and parents' reports, the level of physical activity among the children had increased after the intervention as well as the agreement between the informants' reports. According to the children, eating habits had improved, while the parents' reports showed an improvement only with regard to binge eating. The concordance between children and parents regarding eating habits was slight to fair also after the intervention. No statistically significant associations between changes in lifestyle reports and changes in z-BMI were observed. Conclusions: Child and parent reports of physical activity were found to converge and display an improvement in a 2-year FBIP, while the reports on eating habits showed a more refractory pattern. Changes in concordance and agreement between children and parents reports did not correlate with weight reduction. Further methods development and studies of the processes during family-based interventions against childhood obesity are warranted.

  • 4.
    Timpka, Toomas
    et al.
    Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Faculty of Health Sciences, Linköping University.
    Jacobsson, Jenny
    Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Faculty of Health Sciences, Linköping University.
    Bickenbach, Jerome
    Department of Philosophy, Queen’s University, Kingston, ON, Canada.
    Finch, Caroline F.
    Australian Centre for Research into Injury in Sport and its Prevention (ACRISP), Federation University Australia, Ballarat, VIC, Australia.
    Ekberg, Joakim
    Högskolan i Skövde, Institutionen för hälsa och lärande. Högskolan i Skövde, Forskningsspecialiseringen Hälsa och Lärande.
    Nordenfelt, Lennart
    Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Faculty of Health Sciences, Linköping University.
    What is a Sports Injury?2014Inngår i: Sports Medicine, ISSN 0112-1642, E-ISSN 1179-2035, Vol. 44, nr 4, s. 423-428Artikkel i tidsskrift (Fagfellevurdert)
    Abstract [en]

    Current sports injury reporting systems lack a common conceptual basis. We propose a conceptual foundation as a basis for the recording of health problems associated with participation in sports, based on the notion of impairment used by the World Health Organization. We provide definitions of sports impairment concepts to represent the perspectives of health services, the participants in sports and physical exercise themselves, and sports institutions. For each perspective, the duration of the causative event is used as the norm for separating concepts into those denoting impairment conditions sustained instantly and those developing gradually over time. Regarding sports impairment sustained in isolated events, sports injury denotes the loss of bodily function or structure that is the object of observations in clinical examinations; sports trauma is defined as an immediate sensation of pain, discomfort or loss of functioning that is the object of athlete self-evaluations; and sports incapacity is the sidelining of an athlete because of a health evaluation made by a legitimate sports authority that is the object of time loss observations. Correspondingly, sports impairment caused by excessive bouts of physical exercise is denoted as sports disease (overuse syndrome) when observed by health service professionals during clinical examinations, sports illness when observed by the athlete in self-evaluations, and sports sickness when recorded as time loss from sports participation by a sports body representative. We propose a concerted development effort in this area that takes advantage of concurrent ontology management resources and involves the international sporting community in building terminology systems that have broad relevance.

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