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  • 1.
    Eriksson, Irene
    et al.
    University of Skövde, School of Health and Education. University of Skövde, Health and Education.
    Ek, Kristina
    University of Skövde, School of Health and Education. University of Skövde, Health and Education.
    Jansson, Sofie
    Municipal Home Care, Jönköping, Sweden.
    Sjöström, Ulrika
    Psychiatric Clinic Ryhov, Jönköping, Sweden.
    Larsson, Margaretha
    University of Skövde, School of Health and Education. University of Skövde, Health and Education.
    To feel emotional concern: A qualitative interview study to explore telephone nurses’ experiences of difficult calls2019In: Nursing Open, E-ISSN 2054-1058, Vol. 6, no 3, p. 842-848Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Aim: To describe telenurses’ experiences of difficult calls.

    Design: A qualitative approach with a descriptive design was used to gain a deeper understanding of the telenurses’ experiences.

    Methods: The data were collected in spring 2017 through semi-structured interviews with 19 telenurses at call centres and primary healthcare centres and were analysed with qualitative content analysis.

    Results: Becoming emotionally concerned is central to the telenurse’s experiences of difficult calls. Difficult calls are accompanied by feelings such as inadequacy, uncertainty and anxiety, which can be described as emotional tension. Emotional tension refers to situations when the caller’s expressed emotions were conveyed to the telenurses and altered their state of mind. The telenurses stated that difficult calls that cause them to become anxious remain in their thoughts and go through their minds repeatedly, making a deep impression.

  • 2.
    Larsson, Margaretha
    University of Skövde, School of Health and Education. Linnéuniversitetet, Institutionen för hälso- och vårdvetenskap (HV).
    Tonårsflickors hälsa: att stödja och stärka2014Doctoral thesis, comprehensive summary (Other academic)
  • 3.
    Larsson, Margaretha
    et al.
    University of Skövde, School of Health and Education. University of Skövde, Health and Education. Linnæus University, Växjö, Sweden.
    Björk, Maria
    University of Skövde, School of Health and Education. CHILD Research Group, Department of Nursing Science, School of Health Sciences, Jönköping University, Jönköping, Sweden.
    Ekebergh, Margaretha
    Linnæus University, Växjö, Sweden.
    Johansson Sundler, Annelie
    University of Skövde, School of Health and Education.
    Striving to Make a Positive Difference: School Nurses’ Experiences of Promoting the Health and Well-Being of Adolescent Girls2014In: Journal of School Nursing, ISSN 1059-8405, E-ISSN 1546-8364, Vol. 30, no 5, p. 358-365Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In Sweden, school nurses are part of the School Health Service with the main objective of health promotion to support students’ health and attainment of educational goals. The aim in this phenomenological study was to illuminate the experiences of school nurses in promoting the health and well-being of adolescent girls. Seventeen school nurses were interviewed, both in groups and individually, to facilitate personal disclosure and expressions from their lived experiences. To achieve their goal of improving the health of adolescent girls, school nurses require flexibility in their approach and in endeavoring to make a positive difference they experience many challenges. This study concluded that school nurses can tactfully provide adolescent girls with knowledge and health guidance adjusted to individual needs and empowering the individual girl to participate in her own health process.

  • 4.
    Larsson, Margaretha
    et al.
    University of Skövde, School of Life Sciences. Linnæus University, Växjö, Sweden.
    Johansson Sundler, Annelie
    University of Skövde, School of Life Sciences.
    Ekebergh, Margaretha
    Linnæus University, Växjö, Sweden.
    Beyond Self-Rated Health: The Adolescent Girl's Lived Experience of Health in Sweden2013In: Journal of School Nursing, ISSN 1059-8405, E-ISSN 1546-8364, Vol. 29, no 1, p. 71-79Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The aim of this phenomenological study was to describe the phenomenon of health as experienced by adolescent girls in Sweden. Fifteen adolescent girls were interviewed with a focus on what made them feel well in their everyday life. This study reveals that the adolescent girl’s health is a complex phenomenon interwoven with their lives. Health arises in meaningful contexts, in an adolescent girl’s relations to others as well as in her ability to manage her life. Health is shaped in their everyday life and can be understood as a mood of “being” well that involves actions and practices. The results show that it is important to meet these girls from an open approach in order to support and strengthen their health and well-being. The health of adolescent girls can be supported, and it is a challenge for professionals, particularly school nurses, who meet these girls in everydag life to improve their health.

  • 5.
    Larsson, Margaretha
    et al.
    University of Skövde, School of Life Sciences.
    Johansson Sundler, Annelie
    University of Skövde, School of Life Sciences.
    Ekebergh, Margaretha
    Linnæus University.
    The influence of living conditions on adolescent girls' health2012In: International Journal of Qualitative Studies on Health and Well-being, ISSN 1748-2623, E-ISSN 1748-2631, Vol. 7, p. 19059-Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Adolescence is described by the Swedish National Board of Health and Welfare as the healthiest period in life. However, adolescent girls differ in that they self-report that their health decreases with age. The aim of this hermeneutical study was to describe the meaning of living conditions in relation to adolescent girls' health. Guided by principles of reflective lifeworld research, 15 interviews with adolescent girls were analysed. The result section consists of four narratives with their existential interpretations illustrating different ways of approaching living conditions and their meaning for health and wellbeing. The narratives are: Approaching everyday life in a balanced way-feeling harmonious; approaching everyday life with ambiguity-feeling confused; approaching everyday life as an intellectual project-striving for control; approaching everyday life as a struggle-feeling forlorn. In addition, a comprehensive understanding was developed by using the lifeworld dimensions: lived body, lived room, lived time, and lived relations. These dimensions may deepen the understanding of important parts of those living conditions which are meaningful for the girls' health and well-being. By using the dimensions, complex living conditions have been explored and the meaning of different parts clarified. The girls' thoughts and feelings are often ambiguous and sometimes contradictory, depending on the situation. The health of adolescent girls needs to be understood against the background of their experiences of living conditions. One way to support their health and well-being seems to be to supply them with forums where they can talk about their living conditions.

  • 6.
    Larsson, Margaretha
    et al.
    University of Skövde, School of Health and Education. University of Skövde, Health and Education. Faculty of Health and Life Sciences, Linnaeus University of Växjö, Växjö, Sweden.
    Sundler, Annelie Johansson
    University of Skövde, School of Health and Education. University of Skövde, Health and Education. School of Health, Care and Social Welfare, Mälardalens University, Västerås, Sweden.
    Ekebergh, Margaretha
    Faculty of Health and Life Sciences, Linnaeus University of Växjö, Växjö, Sweden.
    Björk, Maria
    University of Skövde, School of Health and Education. University of Skövde, Health and Education. The Research Group CHILD, Jönköping University, Jönköping, Sweden.
    Altering the Parenting Role: Parents' Experience of Supporting the Health and Well-Being of Their Adolescent Girls2015In: Child and Youth Care Forum, ISSN 1053-1890, E-ISSN 1573-3319, Vol. 44, no 3, p. 419-432Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background

    In research the relationships between parents and their adolescent daughters have been viewed from problem oriented perspectives, usually exploring negative effects and health-related problems. Health and well-being are complex phenomena and knowledge is needed on how parents can support the health and well-being of their daughter.

    Objectives

    The aim of this study was to illuminate parents’ experiences of supporting the health and well-being of their adolescent girls.

    Methods

    A descriptive design with a phenomenological approach including interviews, individually or in group with ten mothers and five fathers was conducted.

    Results

    Supporting the health and well-being of adolescent girls was experienced as challenging. The parents needed to altering the parenting role: from being the one who had previously set the limits they needed to rethink and be available for support. In this process interplay, communication and trust were important to support the health and well-being of the girls in an efficient way. This meaning was further illuminated by four constituents: Balancing the need for control, maintaining a trusting relationship, interplay to facilitate their daughters’ transition to independence, and an ambiguous parenting role.

    Conclusions

    This study highlights the importance of parents being involved in the everyday life of their adolescent daughter to support her health and well-being. The parents’ ability to contribute to the health and well-being of their girl seemed in this study dependent on their ability to communicate and alter the parenting role with sensitivity to the lifeworld of the adolescent girl.

  • 7.
    Sundler, Annelie Johansson
    et al.
    Faculty of Caring Science, Work Life and Social Welfare, University of Borås, Sweden.
    Blomberg, Karin
    Faculty of Medicine and Health, School of Health Sciences, Örebro University, Sweden.
    Bisholt, Birgitta
    Faculty of Health, Science and Technology, Department of Health Sciences, Karlstad University, Sweden.
    Eklund, Anna
    Faculty of Health, Science and Technology, Department of Health Sciences, Karlstad University, Sweden.
    Windahl, Jenny
    Faculty of Medicine and Health, School of Health Sciences, Örebro University, Sweden.
    Larsson, Margaretha
    University of Skövde, School of Health and Education. University of Skövde, Health and Education.
    Experiences of supervision during clinical education among specialised nursing students in Sweden: A cross-sectional study2019In: Nurse Education Today, ISSN 0260-6917, E-ISSN 1532-2793, Vol. 79, p. 20-24Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: The importance of the clinical learning environment in nurse education has gained increasing attention over the last decades. However, there is a lack of research on the learning environment, its significance and meaning in specialist nurse education. Objective: The objectives of the study were to investigate specialised nursing students' experiences of supervision during clinical practice and to compare students who were satisfied with the supervision with those who were dissatisfied with respect to a)organisation of supervision and number of preceptors, as well as time allocated by preceptors for b)supervision, c)reflection, d)discussion of intended learning outcomes, and e)assessments of students' performance by preceptors. Design: This study used a cross-sectional design. Sample and settings: A convenience sample of specialised nursing students was derived from five Swedish universities in the years 2016 and 2017. Methods: Data were collected using a questionnaire. Statistical analyses and a qualitative conventional content analysis were performed. Results: While almost all specialised nursing students reported that there had been time for discussion on their performance assessment, almost half of the students reported not getting time for supervision, or time for reflections and discussions on intended learning outcomes with the preceptor. Students reporting having time allocated for supervision by preceptors were found to be more satisfied with supervision. It was described as important that the preceptor(s)acknowledged the students previous work experiences. Even though being a registered nurse, reflections and feedback were described as valuable for the students learning. Several preceptors were described as positive allowing a broader picture and different views regarding working as a specialist nurse. Conclusions: This study indicates that supervision, in terms of discussions and reflections, of specialised nursing students is significant for learning experiences and satisfaction during clinical placement. © 2019 Elsevier Ltd

  • 8.
    Sundler, Annelie Johansson
    et al.
    Faculty of Caring Science, Work Life and Social Welfare, University of Borås, Sweden.
    Whilson, Marie
    University of Skövde, School of Health and Education. University of Skövde, Health and Education.
    Darcy, Laura
    Faculty of Caring Science, Work Life and Social Welfare, University of Borås, Sweden.
    Larsson, Margaretha
    University of Skövde, School of Health and Education. University of Skövde, Health and Education.
    Swedish School Nurses’ Experiences of Child Abuse2019In: Journal of School Nursing, ISSN 1059-8405, E-ISSN 1546-8364Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Child abuse recognition and the protection of children is a global concern. In Sweden, the role of the school nurse (SN) is to promote schoolchildren’s health and development and to identify and prevent harm. The aim of this study was to describe Swedish SN experiences of suspecting, identifying, and reporting child abuse and to compare them with respect to (a) years of experience as SN, (b) age of SN, and (c) pupil population size. A descriptive design was used. Two-hundred and thirty-three SNs completed a survey detailing their experiences. Most SNs (96%) reported having suspected a child suffering from physical or psychological abuse. Approximately half of them reported occurrences of honor-related violence (54%) and of child sexual abuse (57%). SNs with less nursing experience reported significantly less recognition and reporting of child abuse. The findings indicate that experiences of child abuse are common. Thus, it is vital that SNs have the necessary competency and support to identify and report suspected child abuse. 

  • 9.
    Sundler, Annelie Johansson
    et al.
    University of Borås.
    Wilhsson, Marie
    University of Skövde, School of Health and Education. University of Skövde, Health and Education.
    Darcy, Laura
    University of Borås.
    Larsson, Margaretha
    University of Skövde, School of Health and Education. University of Skövde, Health and Education.
    School nurses recognition of maltreatment of schoolchildren2019Conference paper (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Background

    Human rights incorporate children and maltreatment against children is a violation of children's fundamental human rights. The Children's Convention states that children should be protected from all forms of physical and mental violence, as well as neglect and sexual abuse. Long-term effects of child maltreatment influence children’s health and academic achievement. School nurses are responsible for the identification of school age children at risk of or subjected to maltreatment, thus enforcing children’s rights.

    Aim

    The aim was to explore school nurses experiences of recognizing maltreatment against children.

    Method

    A questionnaire survey with a descriptive design was conducted. A convenience sample of 233 school nurses attending the Swedish school nursing conference in 2018 answered the questionnaire. The questionnaire contained nine questions of child maltreatment, regarding domestic violence, sexual abuse and honor related violence.

    Result

    The vast majority of school nurses, 96%, reported experiences of child maltreatment within the family. Approximately half of them, 54 %, had experiences of honor related violence to the child and 57% had experiences of child sexual abuse. Experiences of a child admitting sexual abuse in the past year were less common, 14%, but only 8 % of the nurses had made a mandatory report regarding sexual abuse during that time. Overall, the number of nurses mandatorily reporting child maltreatment is less than the number suspecting the same. 

    Conclusion

    The findings indicate that experiences of child maltreatment among school nurses are common. However, not all suspected cases, particularly in relation to child sexual abuse, were reported. More research is needed to further explore mandatory reporting and why all suspected cases are not reported.

  • 10.
    Thorstensson, Stina
    et al.
    University of Skövde, School of Health and Education. University of Skövde, Health and Education.
    Blomgren, Carola
    Neighborhood Management North, Borås, Sweden.
    Sundler, Annelie J.
    University of Borås, Borås, Sweden.
    Larsson, Margaretha
    University of Skövde, School of Health and Education. University of Skövde, Health and Education.
    To break the weight gain: A qualitative study on the experience of school nurses working with overweight children in elementary school2018In: Journal of Clinical Nursing, ISSN 0962-1067, E-ISSN 1365-2702, Vol. 27, no 1-2, p. e251-e258Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Aims and objectives: To describe the experiences of school nurses working with overweight schoolchildren. 

    Background: School nurses play an important role in health promotion of overweight children. Lifestyle changes and interventions to address being overweight can improve health outcomes and decrease the risk for future health problems. 

    Design: A descriptive and qualitative design with a phenomenological approach was used. Data were gathered through interviews with school nurses working with overweight schoolchildren in Swedish elementary school; the data were subsequently analysed for meanings. 

    Results:Working with overweight children was perceived as demanding and challenging by the school nurses who found conversations on this topic emotionally loaded and complex. In addition, the school nurses needed to be sensitive and supportive to succeed in their support for a healthier everyday life for the schoolchildren. It was stated as important to find ways to break the child ’s weight gain and to cooperate with the parents in this work. The children ’s decrease in weight was experienced to be more successful when making small, step-by-step changes together with the child and his or her parents.

    Conclusions: This study concludes that health talks about being overweight may be a challenge for school nurses. Strategies used to manage and succeed in this work included engaging in motivational conversations, working step by step and cooperating with the child’s parents. Furthermore, the nurses experienced that they needed to provide emotional support for overweight children during school time. 

    Relevance to clinical practice: The school nurses’ health promotion needs to focus on how to break weight gain in overweight children. In this work, the nurses’ sensitiveness seems pivotal. Further research is needed on school nurses’ work with health promotion and support of overweight children concerning how to perform efficient communication and cooperation with the children and their parents.

  • 11.
    Thorstensson, Stina
    et al.
    University of Skövde, School of Health and Education. University of Skövde, Health and Education.
    Egnell, Maria
    Drottning Blankas Gymnasieskola (Academedia), Gothenburg.
    Larsson, Margaretha
    University of Skövde, School of Health and Education. University of Skövde, Health and Education.
    School nurses’ perceptions of using the physical environment of their office to support wellbeing2018In: British Journal of School Nursing, ISSN 1752-2803, E-ISSN 2052-2827, Vol. 13, no 3, p. 128-135Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: The physical environment has an impact on wellbeing. School nurses can use this to promote students’ health. Aim: The aim of this study is to elucidate school nurses’ perceptions of using the physical environment at their office, as a tool in nursing. Method: A qualitative interview study was conducted with five Swedish school nurses, using semi-structured questions. Data were analysed using qualitative content analysis. Results: Three categories (offering a health environment for wellbeing, being present in the environment for the children and using the environment for health education) and six subcategories emerged during analysis. Conclusions: School nurses made their office a place for wellbeing by using it for health information, as a sanctuary and as an environment that supports children’s need for integrity. How the school nurses used their environment depended on their personality. Obstacles included people in the school who had little knowledge of what school nurses’ work consists of and also the difficulty of appearing available to the children.

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