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  • 1.
    Adamson, Göran
    et al.
    University of Skövde, School of Engineering Science. University of Skövde, The Virtual Systems Research Centre.
    Wang, Lihui
    University of Skövde, School of Engineering Science. University of Skövde, The Virtual Systems Research Centre. Production Engineering, KTH Royal Institute of Technology, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Holm, Magnus
    University of Skövde, School of Engineering Science. University of Skövde, The Virtual Systems Research Centre.
    Moore, Philip
    University of Skövde, School of Engineering Science. University of Skövde, The Virtual Systems Research Centre. Academy for Innovation & Research, Falmouth University, UK.
    Adaptive Robotic Control in Cloud Environments2014In: Proceedings of the 24th International Conference on Flexible Automation and Intelligent Manufacturing / [ed] F. Frank Chen, Lancaster, Pennsylvania, USA: DEStech Publications, Inc , 2014, p. 37-44Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The increasing globalization is a trend which forces manufacturing industry of today to focus on more cost-effective manufacturing systems and collaboration within global supply chains and manufacturing networks. Cloud Manufacturing (CM) is evolving as a new manufacturing paradigm to match this trend, enabling the mutually advantageous sharing of resources, knowledge and information between distributed companies and manufacturing units. Providing a framework for collaboration within complex and critical tasks, such as manufacturing and design, it increases the companies’ ability to successfully compete on a global marketplace. One of the major, crucial objectives for CM is the coordinated planning, control and execution of discrete manufacturing operations in a collaborative and networked environment. This paper describes the overall concept of adaptive Function Block control of manufacturing equipment in Cloud environments, with the specific focus on robotic assembly operations, and presents Cloud Robotics as “Robot Control-as-a-Service” within CM.

  • 2.
    Adamson, Göran
    et al.
    University of Skövde, School of Engineering Science. University of Skövde, The Virtual Systems Research Centre.
    Wang, Lihui
    University of Skövde, School of Engineering Science. University of Skövde, The Virtual Systems Research Centre. Department of Production Engineering, KTH Royal Institute of Technology, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Holm, Magnus
    University of Skövde, School of Engineering Science. University of Skövde, The Virtual Systems Research Centre.
    Moore, Philip
    Academy for Innovation & Research, Falmouth University, Cornwall, United Kingdom.
    Cloud Manufacturing: A Critical Review of Recent Development and Future Trends2017In: International journal of computer integrated manufacturing (Print), ISSN 0951-192X, E-ISSN 1362-3052, Vol. 30, no 4-5, p. 347-380Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    There is an on-going paradigm shift in manufacturing, in which modern manufacturing industry is changing towards global manufacturing networks and supply chains. This will lead to the flexible usage of different globally distributed, scalable and sustainable, service-oriented manufacturing systems and resources. Combining recently emerged technologies, such as Internet of Things, Cloud Computing, Semantic Web, service-oriented technologies, virtualisation and advanced high-performance computing technologies, with advanced manufacturing models and information technologies, Cloud Manufacturing is a new manufacturing paradigm built on resource sharing, supporting and driving this change.

    It is envisioned that companies in all sectors of manufacturing will be able to package their resources and know-hows in the Cloud, making them conveniently available for others through pay-as-you-go, which is also timely and economically attractive. Resources, e.g. manufacturing software tools, applications, knowledge and fabrication capabilities and equipment, will then be made accessible to presumptive consumers on a worldwide basis.

    Cloud Manufacturing has been in focus for a great deal of research interest and suggested applications during recent years, by both industrial and academic communities. After surveying a vast array of available publications, this paper presents an up-to-date literature review together with identified outstanding research issues, and future trends and directions within Cloud Manufacturing.

  • 3.
    Adamson, Göran
    et al.
    University of Skövde, School of Engineering Science. University of Skövde, The Virtual Systems Research Centre.
    Wang, Lihui
    University of Skövde, School of Engineering Science. University of Skövde, The Virtual Systems Research Centre. Production Engineering KTH Royal Institute of Technology Stockholm, Sweden.
    Holm, Magnus
    University of Skövde, School of Engineering Science. University of Skövde, The Virtual Systems Research Centre.
    Moore, Philip
    Academy for Innovation & Research, Falmouth University, Cornwall, United Kingdom.
    Function Block Approach for Adaptive Robotic Control in Virtual and Real Environments2014In: Proceedings of the 14th Mechatronics Forum International Conference, Mechatronics 2014 / [ed] Leo J. De Vin; Jorge Solis, Karlstad: Karlstads universitet, 2014, p. 473-479Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Many manufacturing companies are facing an increasing amount of changes and uncertainty, caused by both internal and external factors. Frequently changing customer and market demands lead to variations in manufacturing quantities, product design and shorter product life-cycles, and variations in manufacturing capability and functionality contribute to a high level of uncertainty. The result is unpredictable manufacturing system performance, with an increased number of unforeseen events occurring in these systems. Such events are difficult for traditional planning and control systems to satisfactorily manage. For scenarios like these, with a dynamically changing manufacturing environment, adaptive decision making is crucial for successfully performing manufacturing operations. Relying on real-time information of manufacturing processes and operations, and their enabling resources, adaptive decision making can be realized with a control approach combining IEC 61499 event-driven Function Blocks (FBs) with manufacturing features. These FBs are small decision-making modules with embedded algorithms designed to generate the desired equipment control code. When dynamically triggered by event inputs, parameter values in their data inputs are forwarded to the appropriate algorithms, which generate new events and data output as control instructions. The data inputs also include monitored real-time information which allows the dynamic creation of equipment control code adapted to the actual run-time conditions on the shop-floor. Manufacturing features build on the concept that a manufacturing task can be broken down into a sequence of minor basic operations, in this research assembly features (AFs). These features define atomic assembly operations, and by combining and implementing these in the event-driven FB embedded algorithms, automatic code generation is possible. A test case with a virtual robot assembly cell is presented, demonstrating the functionality of the proposed control approach.

  • 4.
    Adamson, Göran
    et al.
    University of Skövde, School of Engineering Science. University of Skövde, The Virtual Systems Research Centre.
    Wang, Lihui
    University of Skövde, School of Engineering Science. University of Skövde, The Virtual Systems Research Centre. Department of Production Engineering, Royal Institute of Technology, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Moore, Philip
    University of Skövde, School of Engineering Science. University of Skövde, The Virtual Systems Research Centre.
    Feature-based control and information framework for adaptive and distributed manufacturing in cyber physical systems2017In: Journal of manufacturing systems, ISSN 0278-6125, E-ISSN 1878-6642, Vol. 43, p. 305-315Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Modern distributed manufacturing within Industry 4.0, supported by Cyber Physical Systems (CPSs), offers many promising capabilities regarding effective and flexible manufacturing, but there remain many challenges which may hinder its exploitation fully. One major issue is how to automatically control manufacturing equipment, e.g. industrial robots and CNC-machines, in an adaptive and effective manner. For collaborative sharing and use of distributed and networked manufacturing resources, a coherent, standardised approach for systemised planning and control at different manufacturing system levels and locations is a paramount prerequisite.

    In this paper, the concept of feature-based manufacturing for adaptive equipment control and resource-task matching in distributed and collaborative CPS manufacturing environments is presented. The concept has a product perspective and builds on the combination of product manufacturing features and event-driven Function Blocks (FB) of the IEC 61499 standard. Distributed control is realised through the use of networked and smart FB decision modules, enabling the performance of collaborative run-time manufacturing activities according to actual manufacturing conditions. A feature-based information framework supporting the matching of manufacturing resources and tasks, as well as the feature-FB control concept, and a demonstration with a cyber-physical robot application, are presented.

  • 5.
    Adamson, Göran
    et al.
    University of Skövde, School of Engineering Science. University of Skövde, The Virtual Systems Research Centre.
    Wang, Lihui
    University of Skövde, School of Engineering Science. University of Skövde, The Virtual Systems Research Centre. Department of Production Engineering, Royal Institute of Technology, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Moore, Philip
    University of Skövde, School of Engineering Science. University of Skövde, The Virtual Systems Research Centre.
    Feature-based Function Block Control Framework for Manufacturing Equipment in Cloud Environments2018In: International Journal of Production Research, ISSN 0020-7543, E-ISSN 1366-588X, Vol. 57, no 12, p. 3954-3974Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The ability to adaptively control manufacturing equipment in cloud environments is becoming increasingly more important. Industry 4.0, supported by Cyber Physical Systems and the concept of on-demand, scalable and pay-for-usage resource-sharing in cloud environments offers many promises regarding effective and flexible manufacturing. For implementing the concept of manufacturing services in a cloud environment, a cloud control approach for the sharing and control of networked manufacturing resources is required. This paper presents a cloud service-based control approach which has a product perspective and builds on the combination of event-driven IEC 61499 Function Blocks and product manufacturing features. Distributed control is realised through the use of a networked control structure of such Function Blocks as decision modules, enabling an adaptive run-time behaviour. The control approach has been developed and implemented as prototype systems for both local and distributed manufacturing scenarios, in both real and virtual applications. An application scenario is presented to demonstrate the applicability of the control approach. In this scenario, Assembly Feature-Function Blocks for adaptive control of robotic assembly tasks have been used.

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  • 6.
    Eriksson, Patric
    et al.
    University of Skövde, Department of Engineering Science.
    Moore, Philip
    Mechatronics Research group, School of Engineering and Manufacture, De Montfort University, Leicester, UK.
    A role for 'sensor simulation' and 'pre-emptive learning' in computer aided robotics1995In: 26th International Symposium on Industrial Robots, Symposium Proceedings: Competitive automation: new frontiers, new opportunities, Mechanical Engineering Publ. , 1995, p. 135-140Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Sensor simulation in Computer Aided Robotics (CAR) can enhance the capabilities of such systems to enable off-line generation of programmes for sensor driven robots. However, such sensor simulation is not commonly supported in current computer aided robotic environments. A generic sensor object model for the simulation of sensors in graphical environments is described in this paper. Such a model can be used to simulate a variety of sensors, for example photoelectric, proximity and ultrasonic sensors. Tests results presented here show that this generic sensor model can be customised to emulate the characteristics of the real sensors. The preliminary findings from the first off-line trained mobile robot are presented. The results indicate that sensor simulation within CARs can be used to train robots to adapt to changing environments.

  • 7.
    Frantzén, Marcus
    et al.
    University of Skövde, School of Technology and Society.
    Ng, Amos
    University of Skövde, School of Technology and Society.
    Moore, Philip
    University of Skövde, School of Technology and Society.
    A Scheduling System for Real-Time Decision Making Support Using Simulation-Based Optimization2010In: 20th International Conference on Flexible Automation and Intelligent Manufacturing 2010 (FAIM 2010): Volume 2 of 2, Curran Associates, Inc., 2010, p. 980-987Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 8.
    Gustavsson, Per M.
    et al.
    Training Systems and Information Fusion, Saab, Skövde, Sweden.
    Hieb, Michael
    Center of Excellence for C4I George Mason University, VA, USA.
    Eriksson, Patric
    De Montfort University, Leicester, UK ; Gothia Science Park, Skövde, Sweden.
    Moore, Philip
    Faculty of Computing Sciences & Engineering, De Montfort University, Leicester, UK.
    Niklasson, Lars
    University of Skövde, School of Humanities and Informatics.
    Machine Interpretable Representation of Commander's Intent2008In: Proceedings of the 13th International Command and Control Research and Technology Symposium (13th ICCRTS), 2008Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The Network-Centric approach envisioned in the Global Information Grid enables the interconnection of systems in a dynamic and flexible architecture to support multi-lateral, civilian and military missions. Constantly changing environments require commanders to plan for missions that allow organizations from various nations and agencies to join or separate from the teams performing the missions, depending on the situation, as missions unfold. The uncertainty within an actual mission, and the variety of potential organizations that support the mission after it is underway, makes Command Intent (CI) a critical concept for the mission team. With new and innovative information technologies, CI can now be made available to the team of organizations in a coalition environment. Using a flexible and linguistically based approach for representing CI allows Intent to be interpreted and processed by all participants – both humans and machines. CI representations need to be able to express mission team’s purpose, the anticipated End-State of the mission and desired key tasks. In this work, the expression of CI is developed to enable the structure and dynamics of collaboration support.

  • 9.
    Gustavsson, Per M.
    et al.
    Saab, Sweden ; C4I Center, George Mason University, United States.
    Hieb, Michael R.
    C4I Center, George Mason University, United States.
    Niklasson, Lars
    University of Skövde, School of Humanities and Informatics. University of Skövde, The Informatics Research Centre.
    Moore, Philip
    De Montfort University, United Kingdom.
    Eriksson, Patric
    De Montfort University, United Kingdom.
    Formalizing operations intent and effects for network-centric applications2009In: Proceedings of the 42nd Annual Hawaii International Conference on System Sciences, HICSS: 5-8 January 2009 Waikoloa, Big Island, Hawaii / [ed] Ralph H. Sprague Jr., IEEE Computer Society, 2009Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    A Network-Centric approach enables systems to be interconnected in a dynamic and flexible architecture to support multi-lateral, civilian and military missions. Constantly changing environments require commanders to plan for more flexible missions that allow organizations from various nations and agencies to join or separate from the teams performing the missions, depending on the situation. The uncertainty inherent in an actual mission, and the variety of potential organizations that support the mission after it is underway, makes Command Intent (CI) a critical concept for the mission team. Both humans and computerized decision support services need to have the ability to communicate and interpret a shared CI. This paper presents the Operations Intent and Effects Model (OIEM) - a model that relates CI to Effects, and supports both traditional military planning and Effects Based Operation. In the provided example the suggested Command and Control Language is used to express Operations Intent and Effects. © 2009 IEEE.

  • 10.
    Holm, Magnus
    et al.
    University of Skövde, School of Engineering Science. University of Skövde, The Virtual Systems Research Centre.
    Adamson, Göran
    University of Skövde, School of Engineering Science. University of Skövde, The Virtual Systems Research Centre.
    Wang, Lihui
    KTH Royal Institute of Technology, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Moore, Philip
    Academy of Innovation & Research, Falmouth University, United Kingdom.
    The Future Swedish Shop-Floor Operator – Interviews with Production Managers2014In: Proceedings of the sixth Swedish Production Symposium, 2014, 2014Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This paper is based on a study in which production and HR managers at six Swedish manufacturing industries have been interviewed about the role of the shop-floor operator, taking off in today’s situation in trying to identify the future one. As well as the production methods and the machines etc. in the production system continuously evolve, so does the environment of the shop-floor operator. Increasing complexity in the production systems raises demands on the operators’ ability to handle ICT-tools to gain decision support and knowledge needed in the future shop-floor environment. 

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  • 11.
    Holm, Magnus
    et al.
    University of Skövde, School of Engineering Science. University of Skövde, The Virtual Systems Research Centre.
    Danielsson, Oscar
    University of Skövde, School of Engineering Science. University of Skövde, The Virtual Systems Research Centre.
    Syberfeldt, Anna
    University of Skövde, School of Engineering Science. University of Skövde, The Virtual Systems Research Centre.
    Moore, Philip
    University of Skövde, School of Engineering Science. University of Skövde, The Virtual Systems Research Centre.
    Wang, Lihui
    Sustainable Manufacturing, KTH Royal Institute of Technology, Kungliga Tekniska Högskolan, Stockholm.
    Adaptive instructions to novice shop-floor operators using Augmented Reality2017In: Journal of Industrial and Production Engineering, ISSN 2168-1015, Vol. 34, no 5, p. 362-374Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This paper presents a novel system using Augmented Reality and Expert Systems to enhance the quality and efficiency of shop-floor operators. The novel system proposed provides an adaptive tool that facilitates and enhances support on the shop-floor, due to its ability to dynamically customize the instructions displayed, dependent upon the competence of the user. A comparative study has been made between an existing method of quality control instructions at a machining line in an automotive engine plant and this novel system. It has been shown that the new approach outcompetes the existing system, not only in terms of perceived usability but also with respect to two other important shop-floor variables: quality and productivity. Along with previous research, the outcomes of these test cases indicate the value of using Augmented Reality technology to enhance shop-floor operators’ ability to learn and master new tasks.

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  • 12.
    Holm, Magnus
    et al.
    University of Skövde, School of Engineering Science. University of Skövde, The Virtual Systems Research Centre.
    Frantzén, Marcus
    University of Skövde, School of Engineering Science. University of Skövde, The Virtual Systems Research Centre.
    Aslam, Tehseen
    University of Skövde, School of Engineering Science. University of Skövde, The Virtual Systems Research Centre.
    Moore, Philip
    Falmouth University, Penryn, Cornwall, United Kingdom.
    Wang, Lihui
    University of Skövde, School of Engineering Science. University of Skövde, The Virtual Systems Research Centre. KTH Royal Institute of Technology, Stockholm, Sweden.
    A methodology facilitating knowledge transfer to both research experienced companies and to novice SMEs2017In: International Journal of Enterprise Network Management, ISSN 1748-1252, Vol. 8, no 2, p. 123-140, article id IJENM0080202Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In this paper, knowledge transfer is defined as a process of disseminating both technological and theoretical understanding as well as enhancing both industrial and academic knowledge through conducted research to project partners collaborating within a research project. To achieve this, a new methodology called 'user groups' is introduced. It facilitates knowledge transfer between project participants in collaborative research programs engaging both experienced and unexperienced partners regardless of level of input. The introduced methodology 'user groups' provides tools for collaborating with several research partners even though their levels of engagement in the project and prior research experience may vary without dividing them into separate groups. It enables all project partners to gain new knowledge and by so doing extending the knowledge society. The case study shows that the eight engaged companies are able to cooperate, achieve their own objectives and, both jointly and individually, contribute to the overall project goals.

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  • 13.
    Moore, Philip
    et al.
    Mechatronics Research Group, Faculty of Computing Sciences and Engineering, De Montfort University, Leicester, UK.
    Pu, Junsheng S.
    Mechatronics Research Group, Faculty of Computing Sciences and Engineering, De Montfort University, Leicester, UK.
    Lundgren, Jan-Olof
    Volvo Automation, Engine Automation, Skövde, Sweden.
    Ujvari, Sandor
    University of Skövde, Department of Engineering Science.
    Intelligent semi-autonomous vehicles in materials handling1998In: Mechatronics '98: Proceedings of the 6th UK Mechatronics Forum International Conference, Skövde, Sweden, 9-11 September 1998 / [ed] Josef Adolfsson; Jeanette Karlsén, Oxford: Pergamon Press, 1998, p. 311-316Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    An increase in functionality of Semi-Autonomous Vehicles (SAV) through the implementation of intelligent distributed control and smart sensing techniques is presented. In combination with a modular design approach, this facilitates system modification and improvement, combined with faster customisation of the platform. A distributed and reactive behavioural control architecture will be used to realise local autonomous navigation capabilities; improved operator interaction; self protection and safer operation. A virtual engineering environment based on a suitable computer-aided-graphics platform will be used for modelling the vehicle; the environment in which it can operate; and pre-emptive learning and training of responses / behaviours.

  • 14.
    Moore, Philip
    et al.
    Mechatronics Research Group, Faculty of Computing Sciences and Engineering, De Montfort University, Leicester, UK.
    Ujvari, Sandor
    University of Skövde, Department of Engineering Science.
    Pu, Junsheng
    Mechatronics Research Group, Faculty of Computing Sciences and Engineering, De Montfort University, Leicester, UK.
    Lundgren, Jan-Olof
    Volvo Automation, Engine Automation, Skövde, Sweden.
    Xie, Changwen
    Mechatronics Research Group, Faculty of Computing Sciences and Engineering, De Montfort University, Leicester, UK.
    Intelligent semi-autonomous vehicles in materials handling1999In: Mechatronics (Oxford), ISSN 0957-4158, E-ISSN 1873-4006, Vol. 9, no 7, p. 881-892Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    An increase in functionality of semi-autonomous vehicles (SAV) through the implementation of intelligent distributed control and smart sensing techniques is presented. In combination with a modular design approach, this facilitates system modification and improvement, combined with faster customisation of the platform. A distributed and reactive behavioural control architecture is used to realise local autonomous navigation capabilities; improved operator interaction; self protection and safer operation. A virtual engineering environment based on a computer-aided-graphics platform is used (1) for modelling the vehicle and the environment in which it can operate; (2) developing pre-emptive learning and training of responses/behaviours, and (3) for evaluation of vehicle functionality as part of an integrated materials handling system.

  • 15.
    Ng, Amos
    et al.
    University of Skövde, School of Technology and Society.
    De Vin, Leo
    University of Skövde, School of Technology and Society.
    Sundberg, Martin
    University of Skövde.
    Oldefors, Fredrik
    University of Skövde.
    Moore, Philip
    De Montfort University, United Kingdom.
    Yeo, Sanho
    De Montfort University, United Kingdom.
    An integrated environment for machine system simulation, remote monitoring and fault detection2004Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 16.
    Syberfeldt, Anna
    et al.
    University of Skövde, School of Technology and Society. University of Skövde, The Virtual Systems Research Centre.
    Grimm, Henrik
    University of Skövde, School of Technology and Society. University of Skövde, The Virtual Systems Research Centre.
    Ng, Amos
    University of Skövde, School of Technology and Society. University of Skövde, The Virtual Systems Research Centre.
    Moore, Philip
    Computing Sciences & Engineering, De Montfort University, Leicester, UK.
    Multi-Objective Evolutionary Simulation-Optimisation of a Real-World Manufacturing Problem2008In: Proceedings of The 18th International Conference on Flexible Automation and Intelligent Manufacturing FAIM 2008: June 30th – July 2nd, 2008 University of Skövde, Sweden / [ed] Leo J. de Vin, Amos H. C. Ng, Peter Thorvald, William G. Sullivan, Munir Ahmad, Skövde: University of Skövde , 2008, Vol. 2, p. 1186-1193Conference paper (Refereed)
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  • 17.
    Ujvari, Sandor
    et al.
    University of Skövde, Department of Engineering Science.
    Eriksson, Patric
    Research Division, Prosolvia Systems AB, Vänersborg, Sweden.
    Moore, Philip
    Mechatronics Research Group, Faculty of Computing Sciences and Engineering, De Montfort University, Leicester, UK.
    Pu, Junsheng
    Mechatronics Research Group, Faculty of Computing Sciences and Engineering, De Montfort University, Leicester, UK.
    Simulation and emulation of sensor systems for intelligent vehicles1998In: Mechatronics '98: Proceedings of the 6th UK Mechatronics Forum International Conference, Skövde, Sweden, 9-11 September 1998 / [ed] Josef Adolfsson; Jeanette Karlsén , Pergamon Press, 1998, no 6th UK Mechatronics Forum International Conference, p. 385-390Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Simulation of sensor systems for mobile robots are described in this paper. By simulation of smart sensor systems, the performance of semi-autonomous vehicles / mobile robots can be enhanced. Smart sensor systems used in the field of mobile robotics can utilise adaptive algorithms. e. g. artificial neural nets, fuzzy logic or hybrid variants of these systems. The development, training and evaluation of adaptive algorithms for sensor systems can be done within a virtual environment in which graphical models are built to simulate an intelligent vehicle, its sensors, and its environment. The virtual sensors are validated by comparing the characteristics of the virtual sensors with those of the real devices.

  • 18.
    Ujvari, Sandor
    et al.
    University of Skövde, Department of Engineering Science.
    Moore, Philip R.
    Faculty of Computing Sciences and Engineering De Montfort University Leicester, United Kingdom.
    Using simulation for the design of Semi-Autonomous Vehicle systems2001In: IFAC Proceedings Volumes, ISSN 1474-6670, Vol. 33, no 20, p. 351-356Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The paper describes the development of Semi-Autonomous Vehicles (SAVS) in the context of Automated Guided Vehicle Systems (AGVS). During the design process of a complete material handling AGV-system many variables must be decided. A two-stage simulation approach of discrete event simulation and continuous path simulation, improves development and testing of SAVS, Decisions need to be made e. g. what main navigation sensor to use, how many vehicles are needed for the task. The interrelation of these parameters makes it difficult to find optimum or near-optimum values. Because of this, simulation is a very useful tool to design and evaluate AGV-systems. Copyright (C) 2000 IFAC.

  • 19.
    Wang, Lihui
    et al.
    University of Skövde, School of Technology and Society. University of Skövde, The Virtual Systems Research Centre.
    Adamson, Göran
    University of Skövde, School of Technology and Society. University of Skövde, The Virtual Systems Research Centre.
    Holm, Magnus
    University of Skövde, School of Technology and Society. University of Skövde, The Virtual Systems Research Centre.
    Moore, Philip
    Mechatronics Research Centre, De Montfort University, Leicester LE1 9BH, United Kingdom.
    A review of function blocks for process planning and control of manufacturing equipment2012In: Journal of manufacturing systems, ISSN 0278-6125, E-ISSN 1878-6642, Vol. 31, no 3, p. 269-279Article, review/survey (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Manufacturing in a job-shop environment is often characterized by a large variety of products in small batch sizes, requiring real-time monitoring for dynamic distributed decision making, and adaptive control capabilities that are able to handle, in a responsive way, different kinds of uncertainty, such as changes in demand and variations in production capability and functionality. In many manufacturing systems, traditional methods, based on offline processing performed in advance, are used. These methods are not up to the standard of handling uncertainty, in the dynamically changing environment of these manufacturing systems. Using real-time manufacturing intelligence and information to perform at a maximum level, with a minimum of unscheduled downtime, would be a more effective approach to handling the negative performance impacts of uncertainty. The objective of our research is to develop methodologies for distributed, adaptive and dynamic process planning as well as machine monitoring and control for machining and assembly operations, using event-driven function blocks. The implementation of this technology is expected to increase productivity, as well as flexibility and responsiveness in a job-shop environment. This paper, in particular, presents the current status in this field and a comprehensive overview of our research work on function block-enabled process planning and execution control of manufacturing equipment.

  • 20.
    Wang, Lihui
    et al.
    University of Skövde, School of Technology and Society. University of Skövde, The Virtual Systems Research Centre.
    Adamson, Göran
    University of Skövde, School of Technology and Society. University of Skövde, The Virtual Systems Research Centre.
    Holm, Magnus
    University of Skövde, School of Technology and Society. University of Skövde, The Virtual Systems Research Centre.
    Moore, Philip
    De Montfort University, UK.
    Current Status of Function Blocks for Process Planning and Execution Control of Manufacturing Equipment2011In: Proceedings of the 21st International Conference on Flexible Automation and Intelligent Manufacturing, FAIM 2011: June 26 - 29th 2011, Feng Chia University, Taiwan / [ed] F. Frank Chen ..., Society of Lean Enterprise Systems of Taiwan , 2011, p. 963-973Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Manufacturing in a job-shop environment is often characterized by a large variety of products in small batch size, requiring real-time monitoring for dynamic distributed decision making, as well as dynamic control capabilities that are able to handle, in a responsive and adaptive way, different kinds of uncertainty, such as changes in demand and variations in production capability and functionality. In many manufacturing systems, traditional methods, based on offline processing performed in advance, are used. These methods are not up to the standard of handling uncertainty, in the dynamically changing environment of these manufacturing systems. Using real-time manufacturing intelligence and information to perform at a maximum level, with a minimum of unscheduled downtime, would be a more effective approach to handling the negative performance impacts of uncertainty. The objective of our research is to develop methodologies for distributed, adaptive and dynamic process planning as well a machine monitoring and control for machining and assembly operations, using event-driven function blocks. The implementation of this technology is expected to increase productivity, as well as flexibility and responsiveness in a job-shop environment. This paper, in particular, presents the current status in this field and a comprehensive overview of our research work on function block-enabled process planning and execution control of manufacturing equipment.

  • 21.
    Yan, Xiu-Tian
    et al.
    Design, Manufacture and Engineering Management, University of Strathclyde, Glasgow, UK.
    Bradley, DavidDundee, UK.Russell, DavidMalvern, USA.Moore, PhilipUniversity of Skövde, School of Engineering Science. University of Skövde, Virtual Engineering Research Environment.
    Reinventing Mechatronics: Developing Future Directions for Mechatronics2020Conference proceedings (editor) (Refereed)
1 - 21 of 21
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