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  • 1.
    Alenljung, Beatrice
    University of Skövde, School of Humanities and Informatics.
    Decision-making in the Requirements Engineering Process: A Human-centred Approach2005Licentiate thesis, comprehensive summary (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Complex decision-making is a prominent aspect of requirements engineering and the need for improved decision support for requirements engineers has been identified by a number of authors. A first step toward better decision support in requirements engineering is to understand decision-makers’ complex decision situations. To gain a holistic perspective of the decision situation from a decision-makers perspective, a decision situation framework has been created. The framework evolved through a literature analysis of decision support systems and decision-making theories. The decision situation of requirements engineers has been studied at Ericsson Microwave Systems and is described in this thesis. Aspects of decision situations are decision matters, decision-making activities, and decision processes. Another aspect of decision situations is the factors that affect the decision-maker. A number of interrelated factors have been identified. Each factor consists of problems and these are related to decision-making theories. The consequences of this for requirements engineering decision support, represented as a list that consists of desirable high-level characteristics, are also discussed.

  • 2.
    Alenljung, Beatrice
    University of Skövde, School of Humanities and Informatics. University of Skövde, The Informatics Research Centre.
    Envisioning a future decision support system for requirements engineering: A holistic and human-centred perspective2008Doctoral thesis, monograph (Other academic)
  • 3.
    Alenljung, Beatrice
    et al.
    University of Skövde, School of Informatics. University of Skövde, The Informatics Research Centre.
    Andreasson, Rebecca
    University of Skövde, School of Informatics. University of Skövde, The Informatics Research Centre. Department of Information Technology, Visual Information & Interaction. Uppsala University, Uppsala, Sweden.
    Billing, Erik A.
    University of Skövde, School of Informatics. University of Skövde, The Informatics Research Centre.
    Lindblom, Jessica
    University of Skövde, School of Informatics. University of Skövde, The Informatics Research Centre.
    Lowe, Robert
    University of Skövde, School of Informatics. University of Skövde, The Informatics Research Centre.
    User Experience of Conveying Emotions by Touch2017In: Proceedings of the 26th IEEE International Symposium on Robot and Human Interactive Communication (RO-MAN), IEEE, 2017, p. 1240-1247Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In the present study, 64 users were asked to convey eight distinct emotion to a humanoid Nao robot via touch, and were then asked to evaluate their experiences of performing that task. Large differences between emotions were revealed. Users perceived conveying of positive/pro-social emotions as significantly easier than negative emotions, with love and disgust as the two extremes. When asked whether they would act differently towards a human, compared to the robot, the users’ replies varied. A content analysis of interviews revealed a generally positive user experience (UX) while interacting with the robot, but users also found the task challenging in several ways. Three major themes with impact on the UX emerged; responsiveness, robustness, and trickiness. The results are discussed in relation to a study of human-human affective tactile interaction, with implications for human-robot interaction (HRI) and design of social and affective robotics in particular. 

  • 4.
    Alenljung, Beatrice
    et al.
    University of Skövde, School of Informatics. University of Skövde, The Informatics Research Centre.
    Andreasson, Rebecca
    Department of Information Technology, Uppsala University.
    Lowe, Robert
    Department of Applied IT, University of Gothenburg.
    Billing, Erik
    University of Skövde, School of Informatics. University of Skövde, The Informatics Research Centre.
    Lindblom, Jessica
    University of Skövde, School of Informatics. University of Skövde, The Informatics Research Centre.
    Conveying Emotions by Touch to the Nao Robot: A User Experience Perspective2018In: Multimodal Technologies and Interaction, ISSN 2414-4088, Vol. 2, no 4, article id 82Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Social robots are expected gradually to be used by more and more people in a widerrange of settings, domestic as well as professional. As a consequence, the features and qualityrequirements on human–robot interaction will increase, comprising possibilities to communicateemotions, establishing a positive user experience, e.g., using touch. In this paper, the focus is ondepicting how humans, as the users of robots, experience tactile emotional communication with theNao Robot, as well as identifying aspects affecting the experience and touch behavior. A qualitativeinvestigation was conducted as part of a larger experiment. The major findings consist of 15 differentaspects that vary along one or more dimensions and how those influence the four dimensions ofuser experience that are present in the study, as well as the different parts of touch behavior ofconveying emotions.

  • 5.
    Alenljung, Beatrice
    et al.
    University of Skövde, School of Informatics. University of Skövde, The Informatics Research Centre.
    Lindblom, Jessica
    University of Skövde, School of Informatics. University of Skövde, The Informatics Research Centre.
    User Experience of Socially Interactive Robots: Its Role and Relevance2015In: Handbook of Research on Synthesizing Human Emotion in Intelligent Systems and Robotics / [ed] Jordi Vallverdú, Hershey, Pennsylvania, USA: IGI Global, 2015, p. 352-364Chapter in book (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Socially interactive robots are expected to have an increasing importance in everyday life for a growing number of people, but negative user experience (UX) can entail reluctance to use robots. Positive user experience underpins proliferation of socially interactive robots. Therefore, it is essential for robot developers to put serious efforts to attain social robots that the users experience as positive. In current human-robot interaction (HRI) research, user experience is reckoned to be important and is used as an argument for stating that something is positive. However, the notion of user experience is noticeably often taken for granted and is neither described nor problematized. By recognizing the complexity of user experience the intended contributions can be even more valuable. Another trend in HRI research is to focus on user experience evaluation and examination of user experience. The current research paths of user experience of socially interactive robots are not enough. This chapter suggests that additional research directions are needed in order accomplish long-term, wide-spread success of socially interactive robots.

  • 6.
    Alenljung, Beatrice
    et al.
    University of Skövde, School of Informatics. University of Skövde, The Informatics Research Centre.
    Lindblom, Jessica
    University of Skövde, School of Informatics. University of Skövde, The Informatics Research Centre.
    Andreasson, Rebecca
    University of Skövde, School of Informatics. University of Skövde, The Informatics Research Centre. Department of Information Technology, Visual Information & Interaction. Uppsala University, Uppsala, Sweden.
    Ziemke, Tom
    University of Skövde, School of Informatics. University of Skövde, The Informatics Research Centre. Department of Computer & Information Science, Linköping University, Linköping, Sweden.
    User Experience in Social Human-Robot Interaction2017In: International Journal of Ambient Computing and Intelligence (IJACI), ISSN 1941-6237, E-ISSN 1941-6245, Vol. 8, no 2, p. 12-31Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Socially interactive robots are expected to have an increasing importance in human society. For social robots to provide long-term added value to people’s lives, it is of major importance to stressthe need for positive user experience (UX) of such robots. The human-centered view emphasizes various aspects that emerge in the interaction between humans and robots. However, a positive UX does not appear by itself but has to be designed for and evaluated systematically. In this paper, the focus is on the role and relevance of UX in human-robot interaction (HRI) and four trends concerning the role and relevance of UX related to socially interactive robots are identified, and three challenges related to its evaluation are also presented. It is argued that current research efforts and directions are not sufficient in HRI research, and that future research needs to further address interdisciplinary research in order to achieve long-term success of socially interactive robots.

  • 7.
    Alenljung, Beatrice
    et al.
    University of Skövde, School of Informatics. University of Skövde, The Informatics Research Centre.
    Maurin Söderholm, Hanna
    Högskolan i Borås.
    Designing Simulation-Based Training for Prehospital Emergency Care: Participation from a Participants Perspective2015In: Human-Computer Interaction: Designing and Evaluation: 17th International Conference, HCI International 2015, Los Angeles, CA, USA, August 2-7, 2015, Proceedings, Part I / [ed] Masaaki Kurosu, Springer Berlin/Heidelberg, 2015, Vol. 9169, p. 297-306Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Simulation-based training for prehospital emergency care is characterized by high degrees of complexity. Thorough knowledge of both the work and the setting is crucial and it is therefore important to involve both end-users and other stakeholders during the whole design process. This paper investigates a design process by focusing on how project participants experience the work process and participation of a multi-disciplinary, research-practitioner design team. This case study focuses on the work within a development project of a new prehospital emergency training facility. Open-ended interviews were conducted with the project participants halfway through the project. Strikingly, the results show that while there are problems and tensions that potentially could overturn the project, all participants express strong satisfaction with their participation in the project. This implies that the accumulated positive experiences are so strong that they overshadow tensions and problems that under other circumstances could have caused a project breakdown.

  • 8.
    Alenljung, Beatrice
    et al.
    University of Skövde, School of Humanities and Informatics. University of Skövde, The Informatics Research Centre.
    Nilsson, Maria
    University of Skövde, School of Humanities and Informatics. University of Skövde, The Informatics Research Centre.
    Beslutstödssystem2012In: Kognitionsvetenskap / [ed] Jens Allwood, Mikael Jensen, Studentlitteratur, 2012, 1, p. 595-602Chapter in book (Refereed)
  • 9.
    Alenljung, Beatrice
    et al.
    University of Skövde, School of Humanities and Informatics. University of Skövde, The Informatics Research Centre.
    Nilsson, Maria
    University of Skövde, School of Humanities and Informatics. University of Skövde, The Informatics Research Centre.
    Människa-dator-interaktion2012In: Kognitionsvetenskap / [ed] Jens Allwood, Mikael Jensen, Studentlitteratur, 2012, 1, p. 573-581Chapter in book (Refereed)
  • 10.
    Alenljung, Beatrice
    et al.
    University of Skövde, School of Humanities and Informatics.
    Persson, Anne
    University of Skövde, School of Humanities and Informatics.
    Decision-making activities in the requirements engineering decision processes: A case study2006In: the 14th International Conference on Information Systems Development: ISD 2005 / [ed] Nilsson, AG; Gustas, R; Wojtkowski, W; Wojtkowski, WG; Wrycza, S; Zupancic, J, Springer, 2006, p. 707-718Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Complex decision-making is a prominent aspect of requirements engineering and the need for improved decision support for requirements engineers has been identified by a number of authors. A first step toward better decision support is to understand decision-makers’ complex decision situations. Aspects of decision situations are decision matters, decision-making activities, and decision processes. In this paper we present two requirements engineering decision processes and their decision-making activities and decision matters. These were identified in a case study conducted at Ericsson Microwave Systems. We also discuss the consequences of these for requirements engineering decision support.

  • 11.
    Alenljung, Beatrice
    et al.
    University of Skövde, School of Humanities and Informatics.
    Persson, Anne
    University of Skövde, School of Humanities and Informatics.
    Decision-making from the decision-maker's perspective: A framework for analysing decision situations2005In: BIR 2005: proceedings of the 4th international conference on business informatics research / [ed] Per Backlund, Sven Carlsson, Eva Söderström, Skövde: Skövde University , 2005, p. 13-22Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 12.
    Alenljung, Beatrice
    et al.
    University of Skövde, School of Humanities and Informatics. University of Skövde, The Informatics Research Centre.
    Persson, Anne
    University of Skövde, School of Humanities and Informatics. University of Skövde, The Informatics Research Centre.
    DESCRY: A Method for Evaluating Decision-Supporting Capabilities of Requirements Engineering2008In: Requirements Engineering: Foundation for Software Quality: 14th International Working Conference, REFSQ 2008, Montpellier, France, June 16-17, 2008, Proceedings / [ed] Barbara Paech, Colette Rolland, Springer Berlin/Heidelberg, 2008, p. 52-57Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Complex decision-making is a prominent aspect of requirements engineering (RE) and the need for improved decision support for RE decision-makers has been identified by a number of authors in the research literature. Decision-supporting features and qualities can be integrated in RE tools. Thus, there is a need to evaluate the decision-supporting capabilities of RE tools. In this paper, we introduce a summative, criteria-based evaluation method termed DESCRY, which purpose is to investigate to what extent RE tools have decision-supporting capabilities. The criteria and their related questions are empirically as well as theoretically grounded.

  • 13.
    Alenljung, Beatrice
    et al.
    University of Skövde, School of Humanities and Informatics.
    Persson, Anne
    University of Skövde, School of Humanities and Informatics.
    Factors that affect requirements engineers in their decision situations: A case study2005In: Proceedings of the 11th International Workshop on Requirements Engineering: Foundation for Software Quality: REFSQ'05: in conjunction with CAiSE '05, 13-14 June 2005, Porto, Portugal / [ed] Erik Kamsties, Essen: Universität Duisburg-Essen , 2005, p. 101-108Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 14.
    Alenljung, Beatrice
    et al.
    University of Skövde, School of Humanities and Informatics. University of Skövde, The Informatics Research Centre.
    Persson, Anne
    University of Skövde, School of Humanities and Informatics. University of Skövde, The Informatics Research Centre.
    Portraying the practice of decision-making in requirements engineering: a case of large scale bespoke development2008In: Requirements Engineering, ISSN 0947-3602, E-ISSN 1432-010X, Vol. 13, no 4, p. 257-279Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

     

    Complex decision-making is a prominent aspect of requirements engineering (RE) and the need for improved decision support for RE decision-makers has been identified by a number of authors in the research literature. A first step toward better decision support in requirements engineering is to understand multifaceted decision situations of decision-makers. In this paper, the focus is on RE decision-making in large scale bespoke development. The decision situation of RE decision-makers on a subsystem level has been studied at a systems engineering company and is depicted in this paper. These situations are described in terms of, e.g., RE decision matters, RE decision-making activities, and RE decision processes. Factors that affect RE decision-makers are also identified.

     

  • 15.
    Alenljung, Beatrice
    et al.
    University of Skövde, School of Humanities and Informatics.
    Persson, Anne
    University of Skövde, School of Humanities and Informatics.
    Supporting requirement-based decision-making in the software engineering process: A position paper2004In: The Tenth International Workshop on Requirements Engineering: Foundation for Software Quality (REFSQ 2004), 2004, p. 63-68Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 16.
    Andreasson, Rebecca
    et al.
    University of Skövde, School of Informatics. University of Skövde, The Informatics Research Centre. Department of Information Technology, Uppsala University, Uppsala, Sweden.
    Alenljung, Beatrice
    University of Skövde, School of Informatics. University of Skövde, The Informatics Research Centre.
    Billing, Erik
    University of Skövde, School of Informatics. University of Skövde, The Informatics Research Centre.
    Lowe, Robert
    Department of Applied IT, University of Gothenburg, Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Affective Touch in Human–Robot Interaction: Conveying Emotion to the Nao Robot2018In: International Journal of Social Robotics, ISSN 1875-4791, E-ISSN 1875-4805, Vol. 10, no 4, p. 473-491Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Affective touch has a fundamental role in human development, social bonding, and for providing emotional support in interpersonal relationships. We present, what is to our knowledge, the first HRI study of tactile conveyance of both positive and negative emotions (affective touch) on the Nao robot, and based on an experimental set-up from a study of human–human tactile communication. In the present work, participants conveyed eight emotions to a small humanoid robot via touch. We found that female participants conveyed emotions for a longer time, using more varied interaction and touching more regions on the robot’s body, compared to male participants. Several differences between emotions were found such that emotions could be classified by the valence of the emotion conveyed, by combining touch amount and duration. Overall, these results show high agreement with those reported for human–human affective tactile communication and could also have impact on the design and placement of tactile sensors on humanoid robots.

  • 17.
    Holgersson, Jesper
    et al.
    University of Skövde, School of Informatics. University of Skövde, The Informatics Research Centre.
    Alenljung, Beatrice
    University of Skövde, School of Informatics. University of Skövde, The Informatics Research Centre.
    Söderström, Eva
    University of Skövde, School of Informatics. University of Skövde, The Informatics Research Centre.
    User participation at a discount: Exploring the use and reuse of personas in public service development2015In: ECIS 2015 PROCEEDINGS: ECIS 2015 Research-in-Progress Papers, Association for Information Systems, 2015, p. paper 30-Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In recent years, we have seen an ever increasing push for new public e-services. Such e-services must be useful and beneficial for governments but also for citizens. In order to develop e-services that are effective, efficient and satisfactory for the citizens, the citizens have to be kept in focus and be involved in the development process. However, municipalities face pressure to develop a wide range of e-services, but at the same time battle palpable scarce resources. In this paper, a concept that addresses this problem within an ongoing research project is presented. We express this concept as ‘figurative user participation through the use and reuse of empirically grounded personas with help of persona repository including usage guidance that is shared among several municipalities’. The purpose of this paper is to empirically explore municipalities’ perceptions and attitudes towards this concept. The result shows that the municipalities are positive to the concept and consider it having great potentials. However, some challenges and pitfalls have also been brought out that need to be taken into account and addressed. 

  • 18.
    Lindblom, Jessica
    et al.
    University of Skövde, School of Informatics. University of Skövde, The Informatics Research Centre.
    Alenljung, Beatrice
    University of Skövde, School of Informatics. University of Skövde, The Informatics Research Centre.
    Socially Embodied Human-Robot Interaction: Addressing human Emotions with Theories of Embodied Cognition2015In: Handbook of Research on Synthesizing Human Emotion in Intelligent Systems and Robotics / [ed] Jordi Vallverdú, Hershey, Pennsylvania, USA: IGI Global, 2015, p. 169-190Chapter in book (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    A fundamental challenge of human interaction with socially interactive robots, compared to other interactive products, comes from them being embodied. The embodied nature of social robots questions to what degree humans can interact ‘naturally' with robots, and what impact the interaction quality has on the user experience (UX). UX is fundamentally about emotions that arise and form in humans through the use of technology in a particular situation. This chapter aims to contribute to the field of human-robot interaction (HRI) by addressing, in further detail, the role and relevance of embodied cognition for human social interaction, and consequently what role embodiment can play in HRI, especially for socially interactive robots. Furthermore, some challenges for socially embodied interaction between humans and socially interactive robots are outlined and possible directions for future research are presented. It is concluded that the body is of crucial importance in understanding emotion and cognition in general, and, in particular, for a positive user experience to emerge when interacting with socially interactive robots.

  • 19.
    Lowe, Robert
    et al.
    Department of Applied IT, University of Gothenburg, Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Andreasson, Rebecca
    Department of Information Technology, Uppsala University, Uppsala, Sweden.
    Alenljung, Beatrice
    University of Skövde, School of Informatics. University of Skövde, The Informatics Research Centre.
    Lund, Anja
    Department of Chemistry and Chemical Engineering, Chalmers University of Technology, Gothenburg, Sweden / The Swedish School of Textiles, University of Borås, Borås, Sweden.
    Billing, Erik
    University of Skövde, School of Informatics. University of Skövde, The Informatics Research Centre.
    Designing for a Wearable Affective Interface for the NAO Robot: A Study of Emotion Conveyance by Touch2018In: Multimodal Technologies and Interaction, ISSN 2414-4088, Vol. 2, no 1Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    We here present results and analysis from a study of affective tactile communication between human and humanoid robot (the NAO robot). In the present work, participants conveyed eight emotions to the NAO via touch. In this study, we sought to understand the potential for using a wearable affective (tactile) interface, or WAffI. The aims of our study were to address the following: (i) how emotions and affective states can be conveyed (encoded) to such a humanoid robot, (ii) what are the effects of dressing the NAO in the WAffI on emotion conveyance and (iii) what is the potential for decoding emotion and affective states. We found that subjects conveyed touch for longer duration and over more locations on the robot when the NAO was dressed with WAffI than when it was not. Our analysis illuminates ways by which affective valence, and separate emotions, might be decoded by a humanoid robot according to the different features of touch: intensity, duration, location, type. Finally, we discuss the types of sensors and their distribution as they may be embedded within the WAffI and that would likely benefit Human-NAO (and Human-Humanoid) interaction along the affective tactile dimension.

  • 20.
    Rose, Jeremy
    et al.
    University of Skövde, School of Informatics. University of Skövde, The Informatics Research Centre.
    Alenljung, Beatrice
    University of Skövde, School of Informatics. University of Skövde, The Informatics Research Centre.
    Uppföljning: Utbildning på forskarnivå2018Report (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
  • 21.
    Susi, Tarja
    et al.
    University of Skövde, School of Informatics. University of Skövde, The Informatics Research Centre.
    Lindblom, Jessica
    University of Skövde, School of Informatics. University of Skövde, The Informatics Research Centre.
    Alenljung, Beatrice
    University of Skövde, School of Informatics. University of Skövde, The Informatics Research Centre.
    Promoting sustainability: Learning new practices through ICT2015In: Exploring the Material Conditions of Learning: Computer Supported Collaborative Learning (CSCL) Conference 201: Volume 2 / [ed] Oskar Lundwall, Päivi Häkkinen, Timothy Koschmann, Pierre Tchounikine & Sten Ludvigsen, Gothenburg, Sweden: Intenational Society of the Learning Sciences , 2015, Vol. 2, p. 743-744Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The purpose of this paper is to promote sustainability as an important research topic within the computer-supported collaborative learning (CSCL) community. CSCL can play a crucial role in the achievement of sustainability, which is paramount for the well-being of current and future generations. While CSCL brings formal educational settings to mind, computers and cooperative learning should be considered in a wider perspective since learning also takes place in and through people’s everyday practices. This paper considers two on-going research projects outside mainstream CSCL research, to illustrate ways that technology can lead to changed practices for the benefit of increased environmental and social sustainability. The projects concern children’s online practices and social sustainability, and information and communication technology (ICT) and practices in sustainable agriculture, respectively.

  • 22.
    Söderström, Eva
    et al.
    University of Skövde, School of Informatics. University of Skövde, The Informatics Research Centre.
    Holgersson, Jesper
    University of Skövde, School of Informatics. University of Skövde, The Informatics Research Centre.
    Alenljung, Beatrice
    University of Skövde, School of Informatics. University of Skövde, The Informatics Research Centre.
    Göbel, Hannes
    Section for Information Technology, Univer sity College of Borås, Borås, Sweden.
    Hallqvist, Carina
    Section for Information Technology, Univer sity College of Borås, Borås, Sweden.
    The Conceptual Confusion Around “e-service”: Practitioners' Conceptions2015In: Open and Big Data Management and Innovation / [ed] Marijn Janssen, Matti Mäntymäki, Jan Hidders, Bram Klievink, Winfried Lamersdorf, Bastiaan van Loenen, Anneke Zuiderwijk, Cham, Switzerland: Springer, 2015, p. 366-371Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The e-service concept has been a central concern in many researchand practitioner areas in recent years. There are expectations of citizens, customers,commercial companies and public organizations of what e-services are,their functionality and benefits. However, there is conceptual confusion thatmay hamper collaboration and research viability. This paper explores the conceptualvagueness and presents an empirical investigation of how the e-serviceconcept is treated in practice, along with its kindred concept “IT service”. Resultsshow that public and commercial organizations approach e-services differently,that translation problems can cause lack of comparability in research results,and that additional concepts may be introduced instead of e-service.

1 - 22 of 22
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