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  • 1. Dahlbäck, Nils
    et al.
    Rambusch, Jana
    University of Skövde, The Informatics Research Centre. University of Skövde, School of Humanities and Informatics.
    Susi, Tarja
    University of Skövde, School of Humanities and Informatics. University of Skövde, The Informatics Research Centre.
    Distribuerad kognition2012In: Kognitionsvetenskap / [ed] Jens Allwood, Mikael Jensen, Studentlitteratur, 2012, 1, p. 487-496Chapter in book (Refereed)
  • 2.
    Lindblom, Jessica
    et al.
    University of Skövde, School of Humanities and Informatics. University of Skövde, The Informatics Research Centre.
    Susi, Tarja
    University of Skövde, School of Humanities and Informatics. University of Skövde, The Informatics Research Centre.
    Situerad kognition2012In: Kognitionsvetenskap / [ed] Jens Allwood, Mikael Jensen, Lund: Studentlitteratur, 2012, 1, p. 477-485Chapter in book (Refereed)
  • 3.
    Lindblom, Jessica
    et al.
    University of Skövde, The Informatics Research Centre. University of Skövde, School of Humanities and Informatics.
    Susi, Tarja
    University of Skövde, School of Humanities and Informatics. University of Skövde, The Informatics Research Centre.
    Tysk, Anni
    University of Skövde, School of Technology and Society.
    Social kognition2012In: Kognitionsvetenskap / [ed] Jens Allwood, Mikael Jensen, Lund: Studentlitteratur, 2012, 1, p. 383-392Chapter in book (Refereed)
  • 4.
    Nilsson, Maria
    et al.
    University of Skövde, School of Humanities and Informatics. University of Skövde, The Informatics Research Centre.
    Susi, Tarja
    University of Skövde, School of Humanities and Informatics. University of Skövde, The Informatics Research Centre.
    van Laere, Joeri
    University of Skövde, School of Humanities and Informatics. University of Skövde, The Informatics Research Centre.
    Ziemke, Tom
    University of Skövde, School of Humanities and Informatics. University of Skövde, The Informatics Research Centre.
    Formalising Distributed Cognition into a Tool to Capture Information Fusion Processes2008In: Proceedings of the second Skövde Workshop on Information Fusion Topics, Skövde: University of Skövde , 2008, p. 34-38Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

     The presented research is motivated by the limited ability of current methods to capture the nature of information fusion processes. Fusion processes typically include both humans and technology, hence, there is a need for a new way to analyse such processes. With the aid of distributed cognition, the interaction between decision makers and IF technology can be captured more clearly, and thereby critical bottlenecks can be identified which may require further automation. Application of the tool may advance the research area of information fusion.

     

     

  • 5.
    Nilsson, Maria
    et al.
    University of Skövde, The Informatics Research Centre.
    van Laere, Joeri
    University of Skövde, School of Humanities and Informatics. University of Skövde, The Informatics Research Centre.
    Susi, Tarja
    University of Skövde, School of Humanities and Informatics. University of Skövde, The Informatics Research Centre.
    Ziemke, Tom
    University of Skövde, School of Humanities and Informatics. University of Skövde, The Informatics Research Centre.
    Information fusion in practice: A distributed cognition perspective on the active role of users2012In: Information Fusion, ISSN 1566-2535, E-ISSN 1872-6305, Vol. 13, no 1, p. 60-78Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Traditionally, the focus of most information fusion research has been on computational aspects, as illustrated by, for example, different versions of the JDL data fusion model. Consequently, the human user has mainly been conceived as a relatively passive recipient of fused information. However, the importance of understanding the active role of human information processing in information fusion is gaining increasing recognition, as also reflected in discussions of a "level 5" in the JDL model. This paper presents a case study of the interaction between human and machine information processing in a maritime surveillance control room. A detailed analysis of cognitive processes and information flows involved in identifying and tracking moving vessels illustrates how machines and human operators collaboratively perform fusion in a highly distributed fashion. The theoretical framework of distributed cognition provides an alternative or complementary way of analysing information fusion systems/processes that more clearly reveals the actual complexities of the interaction between human and machine information processing in practice. (C) 2011 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  • 6.
    Rambusch, Jana
    et al.
    University of Skövde, School of Informatics. University of Skövde, The Informatics Research Centre.
    Alklind Taylor, Anna-Sofia
    University of Skövde, School of Informatics. University of Skövde, The Informatics Research Centre.
    Susi, Tarja
    University of Skövde, School of Informatics. University of Skövde, The Informatics Research Centre.
    A pre-study on spectatorship in eSports2017Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    A pre-study of spectators' perspectives on eSports was conducted in collaboration with two Swedish game development companies. The main goal was to identify factors that contribute to qualitative spectator experiences and how they can influence game design. A qualitative approach was chosen to explore spectators' perspectives on eSports through observations and focus-group interviews of 28 participants in total. Results indicate that spectatorship is a complex issue that goes beyond the mere watching of a game. We identified four themes that are important for qualitative spectator experiences: the need for an overview of game events; highlighting and exposing hidden objects and events; viewer- and commentator-friendly game pacing; the importance of professional commentators and casters. Based on the results, we present design guidelines and recommendations for the development of games in eSports.

  • 7.
    Rambusch, Jana
    et al.
    University of Skövde, School of Humanities and Informatics. University of Skövde, The Virtual Systems Research Centre.
    Susi, Tarja
    University of Skövde, School of Humanities and Informatics. University of Skövde, The Informatics Research Centre.
    Serious Learning while Having Fun2010In: Kognition und Technologie im kooperativen Lernen: Vom Wissenstransfer zur Knowledge Creation, Göttingen: Vandenhoeck & Ruprecht, 2010, p. 77-90Chapter in book (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In this paper we consider learning in the context of computer games, in terms of socio-cultural theories on learning and cognition. We emphasise on the tools involved in players’ learning activities, such as the use of »social tools«, and their role in the learning situation. Integrating (parts of) the computer game area with socio-cultural learning theories can prove beneficial for a more balanced understanding of learning in computer (game) environments. As a step in this direction, this paper discusses a case study of Counter-strike players and their learning from a cognitive science perspective.

  • 8.
    Rambusch, Jana
    et al.
    University of Skövde, School of Humanities and Informatics. University of Skövde, The Informatics Research Centre.
    Susi, Tarja
    University of Skövde, School of Humanities and Informatics. University of Skövde, The Informatics Research Centre.
    Situated play2008In: Beyond the Brain: Embodied, Situated and Distributed Cognition, Cambridge Scholars Publishing, 2008, p. 215-226Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 9.
    Rambusch, Jana
    et al.
    University of Skövde, School of Humanities and Informatics. University of Skövde, The Informatics Research Centre.
    Susi, Tarja
    University of Skövde, School of Humanities and Informatics. University of Skövde, The Informatics Research Centre.
    The Challenge of Managing Affordances in Computer Game Play2008In: Human IT, ISSN 1402-1501, E-ISSN 1402-151X, Vol. 9, no 3, p. 83-109Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This paper discusses affordance with respect to computer games and game play activity. The game environment, with its complex and seemingly multiple affordances, presents a challenge, for players as well as researchers, since it consists of two worlds: the virtual and the real one. For games to be played successfully, affordances of both worlds need to be integrated. However, since Gibson’s The Ecological Approach to Visual Perception (1986), numerous different opinions on what constitutes an affordance have appeared, most of them deviating from the original Gibsonian conceptualisation. This has lead to confusion and misunderstandings among researchers, and is now also spreading into computer games research. This paper aims to raise awareness of what the affordance concept can, and cannot, explain and of the fact that some of the possible actions perceived by a player in a game also are rooted in socio-cultural conventions and the player’s experience of having a body.

  • 10.
    Rambusch, Jana
    et al.
    University of Skövde, School of Humanities and Informatics. University of Skövde, The Informatics Research Centre.
    Susi, Tarja
    University of Skövde, School of Humanities and Informatics. University of Skövde, The Informatics Research Centre.
    Ekman, Stefan
    University of Skövde, School of Humanities and Informatics. University of Skövde, The Informatics Research Centre.
    Wilhelmsson, Ulf
    University of Skövde, School of Humanities and Informatics. University of Skövde, The Informatics Research Centre.
    A Literary Excursion Into the Hidden (Fan) Fictional Worlds of Tetris, Starcraft, and Dreamfall2009In: Breaking New Ground: Innovation in Games, Play, Practice and Theory, DiGRA , 2009Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In this paper, we discuss a part of participatory culture that so far has not received much attention in the academic world; it is the writing and reading of game fan fiction. The focus in this paper is on fan fiction, based on three different games that represent three different game genres: Tetris, StarCraft and Dreamfall: The Longest Journey. The aim is to advance our understanding of how players experience and understand the game environment, and promote further research interest in fan fiction based on computer games. We do this by discussing narrative elements in the above mentioned computer games, and the fan fiction that is based on them.

  • 11.
    Rambusch, Jana
    et al.
    University of Skövde, School of Humanities and Informatics.
    Susi, Tarja
    University of Skövde, School of Humanities and Informatics.
    Ziemke, Tom
    University of Skövde, School of Humanities and Informatics.
    Artefacts as Mediators of Distributed Social Cognition: A Case Study2005In: Proceedings of the twenty-sixth annual conference of the Cognitive Science Society, August 4 - 7, 2004, Chicago, Illinois, USA / [ed] Kenneth Forbus, Dedre Gentner & Terry Regier, Lawrence Erlbaum Associates, 2005, p. 1113-1118Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Traditionally, cognition has been regarded as the outcome of internal cognitive processes manipulating mental representations. More recently, however, it has become clear that cognition cannot be separated from the social and material environment in which people live and act, and that in many cases cognition is distributed among individuals and environmental properties. One important aspect has turned out to be artefacts and their use, and there is growing interest in understanding how tool use affects cognition. However, even with this increased awareness of the role of artefacts, the focus has mainly been on the cognitive processes and representations of individuals, while the social role of artefacts has received less attention. An ethnographically inspired field study, observing a hospital’s children admission unit, was conducted to investigate the way individual and collaborative work are affected by the use of artefacts within a given social context. The results indicate that the use of artefacts is closely coupled to the social environment, that to some degree social interactions are transformed into more indirect, individual processes, and that artefacts are crucial for high-level processes such as memory and coordination.

  • 12.
    Sellberg, Charlott
    et al.
    University of Skövde, School of Informatics. University of Skövde, The Informatics Research Centre.
    Susi, Tarja
    University of Skövde, School of Informatics. University of Skövde, The Informatics Research Centre.
    Technostress in the office: a distributed cognition perspective on human-technology interaction2014In: Cognition, Technology & Work, ISSN 1435-5558, E-ISSN 1435-5566, Vol. 16, no 2, p. 187-201Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Technology is a mobile and integral part of many work places, and computers and other information and communication technology have made many users' work life easier, but technology can also contribute to problems in the cognitive work environment and, over time, create technostress. Much previous research on technostress has focused on the use of digital technology and its effects, measured by questionnaires, but in order to further examine how technostress arises in the modern workplace, a wider perspective on interactions between people and technology is needed. This paper applies a distributed cognition perspective to human-technology interaction, investigated through an observational field study. Distributed cognition focuses on the organisation of cognitive systems, and technostress in this perspective becomes an emergent phenomenon within a complex and dynamic socio-technical system. A well-established questionnaire was also used (for a limited sample), to gain a frame of reference for the results from the qualitative part of the study. The implications are that common questionnaire-based approaches very well can and should be complemented with a broader perspective to study causes of technostress. Based on the present study, a redefinition of technostress is also proposed. © 2013 Springer-Verlag London.

  • 13.
    Susi, Tarja
    University of Skövde, School of Informatics. University of Skövde, The Informatics Research Centre.
    Embodied interaction, coordination and reasoning in computer gameplay2014In: The Routledge Handbook of Embodied Cognition / [ed] Lawrence Shapiro, New York: Routledge, 2014, p. 184-193Chapter in book (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Embodied cognition has received increasing interest, as seen in research on the many subjects ranging from sensorimotor processes to cultural aspects (e.g., Clark 2011; Gibbs 2005; Robbins & Aydede 2009/Eds.; Shapiro 2011). There is no one unified conception of the mind, but a general claim is that cognition is grounded in bodily experiences and is distributed across brain, body and environment (e.g., Clark 1997; 2011). Cognition is a complex phenomenon, and as stated by Gibbs (2005: 9), it is “what occurs when the body engages the physical, cultural world and [it] must be studied in terms of the dynamical interactions between people and the environment”. This chapter will discuss embodied interaction, coordination and reasoning in computer gameplay, and the construction of a cooperative two player computer game to accord with the embodied nature of cognition and action. The computer game discussed here, “The search for the gold reserve”, was developed specifically to be installed as an integral part of an adventure tour in a military fortress. The game was constructed so that players’ whole bodies would be engaged in the gameplay, thereby enhancing the gameplay experience. Playing the game is an “embodied practical activity” (O’Connor & Glenberg 2003) comprising a mesh of interrelations between the player’s own body, co-players, the players’ cognitions, game devices and the physical context of game play, virtual environment and socio-cultural aspects. […] The discussion will bring out sensori-motoric, contextual and socio-cultural aspects of embodiment, as embodiment concurrently cuts across the different aspects. Sensori-motoric aspects are mainly discussed in relation to the game’s input/output devices, and the intercoupling between players and the game. Contextual aspects are brought forth by the game environment and the game’s relation to the whole adventure tour, and socio-cultural aspects come to the fore through players cooperative problem solving.

  • 14.
    Susi, Tarja
    University of Skövde, School of Humanities and Informatics.
    In search of the Holy Grail: Understanding artefact mediation in social interactions2005In: Proceedings of the 27th Annual Conference of the Cognitive Science Society: CogSci05 / [ed] Bruno G. Bara, Lawrence Barsalou, Monica Bucciarelli, Mahwah, NJ: Lawrence Erlbaum Associates, 2005, p. 2110-2115Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 15.
    Susi, Tarja
    University of Skövde, School of Informatics. University of Skövde, The Informatics Research Centre.
    Social cognition, artefacts, and stigmergy revisited: Concepts of coordination2016In: Cognitive Systems Research, ISSN 2214-4366, E-ISSN 1389-0417, Vol. 38, no Special Issue: SI, p. 41-49Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    A number of different coordination concepts have been developed to explain how individual activities are coordinated on a social level, and the variety of concepts shows there is an interest in many domains to find such explanations. Stigmergy being one of them, has come to be increasingly applied on various kinds of human activities. In other domains we find other concepts for explaining how environmental resources contribute to work activities or how people use them to structure their work. This paper discusses different coordination concepts, including stigmergy, articulation work, coordination mechanisms, triggers, placeholders, and entry points. The first three concepts are explicitly concerned with coordination among several agents, while the last three instead concern individual activities, but arguably they can be extended to the social level. They also bring an explicitly cognitive dimension to coordination, which is not as salient in the former concepts. The concepts discussed here do have some similarities, but also important differences. They may not be interchangeable, but they could complement each other, or contribute to further elaboration of existing concepts. The stigmergic sign, e.g., could usefully be developed to recognise qualitative differences in its role as a coordination mechanism.

  • 16.
    Susi, Tarja
    University of Skövde.
    Tools and artefacts: the effect of knowing ‘where-from’ on their present use2006In: The 28th Annual Conference of the Cognitive Science Society, 2006, p. 2210-2215Conference paper (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    This paper focuses on how past knowledge of tools/artefacts

    affect their present use. The discussion is based on

    Wartofsky’s (1979) primary, secondary, and tertiary artefacts,

    and Engeström’s (1990) subsequent activity theoretical

    elaboration. While Engeström identifies two different kinds of

    internal (mental) secondary artefacts, this paper identifies an

    additional kind of tertiary artefact – ‘where-from’ artefact –

    that consists of experience based knowledge of the past. The

    conception of where-from, contributes to understanding, for

    instance, why people handle objects the way they do. This

    artefact, identified in a workplace study, also plays an

    important role in the process of learning through

    apprenticeship, since what novices are provided, in terms of

    instructions etc., partly depends on the more knowledgeable

    person’s past experiences.

  • 17.
    Susi, Tarja
    et al.
    University of Skövde, School of Humanities and Informatics.
    Johannesson, Mikael
    University of Skövde, School of Humanities and Informatics.
    Backlund, Per
    University of Skövde, School of Humanities and Informatics.
    Serious Games: An Overview2007Report (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    This report discusses some issues concerning serious games, that is, (digital) games used for purposes other than mere entertainment. The starting point is the serious games concept itself, and what the actually means. Further, serious games allow learners to experience situations that are impossible in the real world for reasons of safety, cost, time, etc., but they are also claimed to have positive impacts on the players’ development of a number of different skills. Subsequently, some possible positive (and negative) impacts of serious games are discussed. Further, some of the markets such games are used in are considered here, including, military games, government games, educational games, corporate games, and healthcare games. This report also identifies some (mainly academic) actors in the North American and the European serious games market. This report is part of the DISTRICT (Developing Industrial Strategies Through Innovative Cluster and Technologies) project: Serious Games Cluster and Business Network (SER3VG), which is part of the Interreg IIIC Programme.

  • 18.
    Susi, Tarja
    et al.
    University of Skövde, School of Humanities and Informatics.
    Lindblom, Jessica
    University of Skövde, School of Humanities and Informatics.
    Building bridges between the islands of artifact, embodiment, and social interaction2005In: First ISCAR Congress: acting in changing worlds: learning, communication, and minds in intercultural activities: abstracts, September, 20-24, 2005, Sevilla, Spain / [ed] Rubio, D. A., Seville: University of Seville , 2005, p. 841-842Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 19.
    Susi, Tarja
    et al.
    University of Skövde, School of Informatics. University of Skövde, The Informatics Research Centre.
    Lindblom, Jessica
    University of Skövde, School of Informatics. University of Skövde, The Informatics Research Centre.
    Alenljung, Beatrice
    University of Skövde, School of Informatics. University of Skövde, The Informatics Research Centre.
    Promoting sustainability: Learning new practices through ICT2015In: Exploring the Material Conditions of Learning: Computer Supported Collaborative Learning (CSCL) Conference 201: Volume 2 / [ed] Oskar Lundwall, Päivi Häkkinen, Timothy Koschmann, Pierre Tchounikine & Sten Ludvigsen, Gothenburg, Sweden: Intenational Society of the Learning Sciences , 2015, Vol. 2, p. 743-744Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The purpose of this paper is to promote sustainability as an important research topic within the computer-supported collaborative learning (CSCL) community. CSCL can play a crucial role in the achievement of sustainability, which is paramount for the well-being of current and future generations. While CSCL brings formal educational settings to mind, computers and cooperative learning should be considered in a wider perspective since learning also takes place in and through people’s everyday practices. This paper considers two on-going research projects outside mainstream CSCL research, to illustrate ways that technology can lead to changed practices for the benefit of increased environmental and social sustainability. The projects concern children’s online practices and social sustainability, and information and communication technology (ICT) and practices in sustainable agriculture, respectively.

  • 20.
    Susi, Tarja
    et al.
    University of Skövde, School of Humanities and Informatics.
    Lindblom, Jessica
    University of Skövde, School of Humanities and Informatics.
    Ziemke, Tom
    University of Skövde, School of Humanities and Informatics.
    Beyond the bounds of cognition2003In: Proceedings of the 25th Annual Conference of the Cognitive Science Society, 2003, p. 1134-1139Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 21.
    Susi, Tarja
    et al.
    University of Skövde, School of Humanities and Informatics. University of Skövde, The Informatics Research Centre.
    Rambusch, Jana
    University of Skövde, The Informatics Research Centre. University of Skövde, School of Humanities and Informatics.
    Kognition och verktyg2012In: Kognitionsvetenskap: en introduktion / [ed] Jens Allwood & Mikael Jensen, Lund: Studentlitteratur, 2012, 1, p. 497-506Chapter in book (Refereed)
  • 22.
    Susi, Tarja
    et al.
    University of Skövde, School of Humanities and Informatics. University of Skövde, The Informatics Research Centre.
    Rambusch, Jana
    University of Skövde, School of Humanities and Informatics. University of Skövde, The Informatics Research Centre.
    Situated Play: Just a temporary blip?2007In: Situated Play: The 2007 world conference of Digital Games Research Association, DiGRA , 2007, p. 730-735Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In this paper we discuss how cognitive science may contribute to understanding the concepts of situatedness and situated play. While situatedness has become something of a catch-all term, it actually has several different meanings, ranging from “higher” social-cultural forms to “lower” sensori-motoric activities. We also discuss an often overlooked, but crucial aspect of situatedness, which is the use of external resources such as tools and their use. As willbecome apparent, a more thorough understanding of situatedness and tool use are key to understanding computer games and people’s everyday playing activities.

  • 23.
    Susi, Tarja
    et al.
    University of Skövde, School of Humanities and Informatics.
    Ziemke, Tom
    University of Skövde, School of Humanities and Informatics.
    On the subject of objects: Four views on object perception and tool use2005In: tripleC (cognition, communication, co-operation): Journal for a Global Sustainable Information Society / Unified Theory of Information Research Group, ISSN 1726-670X, E-ISSN 1726-670X, Vol. 3, no 2, p. 6-19Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This paper addresses the relation between an agent and its environment, and more specifically, how subjects perceive object/artefacts/tools and their (possible) use. Four different conceptions of the relation between subject and object are compared here: functional tone (von Uexküll), equipment (Heidegger), affordance (Gibson), and entry point (Kirsh). even as these concepts have developed within different disciplines (theoretical biology, philosophy, psychology, and cognitive science) and in very different historical contexts, they are used more or less interchangeably in much of the literature, and typically conflated under the label of ‘affordance’. However, at closer inspection, they turn out to have not only similarities, but also substantial differences, which are identified and discussed here. Given that the relation between subjects and their objects is crucial to understanding human cognition and interaction with tools and technology, as well as robots’ interaction with their environment, we argue that these differences deserve some more attention than they have received so far.

  • 24.
    Torstensson, Niklas
    et al.
    University of Skövde, School of Informatics. University of Skövde, The Informatics Research Centre.
    Susi, Tarja
    University of Skövde, School of Informatics. University of Skövde, The Informatics Research Centre.
    Online sexual grooming and offender tactics -: What can we learn from social media dialogues?2015In: Proceedings of the 2015 Swecog Conference / [ed] Billing, E., Lindblom, J. & Ziemke, T., Skövde, 2015, Vol. 3, p. 23-23Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    While online social networking sites and other digital media provide a means for positive online experiences, they are also being misused for offences like online sexual grooming. Attempts have been made to analyse and model online grooming in order to understand this kind of predator behaviour (e.g., O’Connell, 2004; Williams et al., 2013). This research, and the resulting models of the grooming process, is however, invariably based on material where adult decoys (e.g., researchers, law enforcement officers, adults trained to entrap offenders) pose as children in the interaction with potential offenders. We argue that such material, i.e., decoy-offender chat logs, does not reflect real grooming processes; Decoys have an underlying agenda to make prosecutable cases against offenders, which entails decoys resorting to manipulation tactics otherwise typical for offender behaviour. In all essence, this often leads to a dialogue with two adults using grooming tactics on each other, and the resulting models do not capture the patterns of child-offender dialogues.

    Contrary to previous research, we have analysed real-world child-offender chat logs from closed forums. Our data set, selected dialogues (ca. 500 pages) from a corpus of ca. 12 000 A4-pages was thematically analysed and categorised using NVivo 10 software. The coding was done by both authors for inter-rater reliability. Where coding differed, the authors explored the categorisation until agreement was reached (cf., Whittle et al., 2013). The material was also compared to decoy-offender chat logs (ca. 100 pages, publically available on perverted-justice.com).

    The analysis of the different data sets reveal quite different pictures of the grooming process. While previous models describe the grooming process as sequential (O’Connell, 2004) or thematic (Williams et al., 2013), our findings suggest a far more complex behavioural pattern – significantly diverse dialogue patterns with different tactics emerge, depending on whether the respondent is a decoy or a child, and their respective responses. The (preliminary) results show differences in both dialogue and process structure. Dialogues with decoys commonly show what can best be described as “artificial compliance”, presumably due to their underlying agenda of generating prosecutable cases. Furthermore, decoys tease out personal information from the offenders, and also share “personal” information about themselves, even when not asked for it.

    Child-offender dialogues instead show patterns of reluctance or objections to offender requests for personal information, suggestions of sexual nature, etc. Another offender tactic is threats to obtain compliance, which was not found in any of the analysed decoy-offender dialogues. Other deviations include differences in dialogue length, number of dialogue turns, and complexity, with regard to changes in topics and offender tactics. Further research is necessary for a more thorough understanding of online grooming, and new models are needed that reflect real-world grooming processes. This includes offender behaviours, reasoning, decisions, and tactics used in grooming. Further, such knowledge is of outmost importance for risk awareness measures for young people so they can better cope with online challenges and risks, and make sensible judgements and decisions in online interactions.

  • 25.
    van Laere, Joeri
    et al.
    University of Skövde, School of Humanities and Informatics. University of Skövde, The Informatics Research Centre.
    Lindblom, Jessica
    University of Skövde, School of Humanities and Informatics. University of Skövde, The Informatics Research Centre.
    Susi, Tarja
    University of Skövde, School of Humanities and Informatics. University of Skövde, The Informatics Research Centre.
    Kommunal krisövning i teori och praktik2009Report (Other academic)
  • 26.
    van Laere, Joeri
    et al.
    University of Skövde, School of Humanities and Informatics. University of Skövde, The Informatics Research Centre.
    Lindblom, Jessica
    University of Skövde, School of Humanities and Informatics. University of Skövde, The Informatics Research Centre.
    Susi, Tarja
    University of Skövde, School of Humanities and Informatics. University of Skövde, The Informatics Research Centre.
    Requirements for emergency management training from a 'passion for failures' perspective2007In: Proceedings of the 4th International Conference on Information Systems for Crisis Response and Management / [ed] B. van de Walle, P. Burghardt, and K. Niewenhuis, Brussels University Press , 2007, p. 449-456Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Swedish municipalities are stimulated to conduct emergency management exercises in addition to developing crisis plans. These exercises tend to be grounded in an instrumental philosophy. There is too much focus on doing the exercise and too little attention for the implementation of lessons learned afterwards. A common experience is that the same 'mistakes' are discovered again and again in yearly exercises. Furthermore there is a paradoxical balance between empowering the organization in its learning process (positive feedback) and revealing the failures (negative feedback). In this paper we reflect on the learning process in a Swedish municipality in 2006 where two emergency management exercises were held and where a minor and a major crisis occured during the year. We argue that the longitudinal learning process should be the focus in stead of ad hoc exercises. In addition we develop some requirements for emergency management training from a 'passion for failures' perspective.

  • 27.
    Wilhelmsson, Ulf
    et al.
    University of Skövde, School of Informatics. University of Skövde, The Informatics Research Centre.
    Toftedahl, Marcus
    University of Skövde, School of Informatics. University of Skövde, The Informatics Research Centre.
    Susi, Tarja
    University of Skövde, School of Informatics. University of Skövde, The Informatics Research Centre.
    Torstensson, Niklas
    University of Skövde, School of Informatics. University of Skövde, The Informatics Research Centre.
    Sjölin, Anders
    University of Skövde, School of Informatics. University of Skövde, The Informatics Research Centre.
    Tuori, Petri
    LBS Borås, Sweden.
    A Computer Game for an Enhanced Visitor Experience: Integration of Reality and Fiction2014In: Proceedings of the International Conference on Interfaces and Human Computer Interaction 2014 Game and Entertainment Technologies 2014 and Computer Graphics, Visualization, Computer Vision and Image Processing 2014 - Part of the Multi Conference on Computer Science and Information Systems, MCCSIS 2014 / [ed] Katherine Blashki & Yincai Xiao, IADIS Press, 2014, p. 149-156Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This paper describes the development of a computer game for enhanced visitor experiences of an adventure tour, in which the game is integrated. The game project was run 2011-2013 and included the development of an arcade style two player cooperative computer game, game controls, graphics, sound and music. The adventure tour takes place in an old military fortress where visitors participate in searching for gold that has been stolen. The tour starts with a 3D movie that provides the plot and introduces hero and villain characters. The story is then carried forth by a game master who brings the visitors on a tour along the fortress’ vaults, during which they also play the computer game. The adventure tour is structured by a semi-fictional framing story that interweaves history, physical environment, and hero and villain characters. To withhold interdependency in the overall design of the adventure tour and the game, Caillois’s (1958/2001) taxonomy for games was chosen as a basis, combined with narrative key elements carried across the adventure tour. The game was also designed to accord with the embodied nature of human activity, allowing players to engage their whole bodies in the gameplay. Initial game evaluation results indicate the game contributes to an enhanced visitor experience of the adventure tour.

  • 28.
    Ziemke, Tom
    et al.
    University of Skövde, School of Humanities and Informatics.
    Bergfeldt, Nicklas
    University of Skövde, School of Humanities and Informatics.
    Buason, Gunnar
    University of Skövde, School of Humanities and Informatics.
    Susi, Tarja
    University of Skövde, School of Humanities and Informatics.
    Svensson, Henrik
    University of Skövde, School of Humanities and Informatics.
    Evolving Cognitive Scaffolding and Environment Adaptation: A New Research Direction for Evolutionary Robotics2004In: Connection Science, ISSN 0954-0091, Vol. 16, no 4, p. 339-350Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Many researchers in embodied cognitive science and artificial intelligence, and evolutionary robotics in particular, emphasize the interaction of brain, body and environment as crucial to the emergence of intelligent, adaptive behaviour. Accordingly, the interaction between agent and environment, as well as the co-adaptation of artificial brains and bodies, has been the focus of much research in evolutionary robotics. Hence, there are plenty of studies of robotic agents/species adapting to a given environment. Many animals, on the other hand, in particular humans, to some extent can choose to adapt the environment to their own needs instead of adapting (only) themselves. That alternative has been studied relatively little in robot experiments. This paper, therefore, presents some simple initial simulation experiments, in a delayed response task setting, that illustrate how the evolution of environment adaptation can serve to provide cognitive scaffolding that reduces the requirements for individual agents. Furthermore, theoretical implications, open questions and future research directions for evolutionary robotics are discussed.

1 - 28 of 28
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