his.sePublications
Change search
Refine search result
1 - 9 of 9
CiteExportLink to result list
Permanent link
Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • harvard1
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf
Rows per page
  • 5
  • 10
  • 20
  • 50
  • 100
  • 250
Sort
  • Standard (Relevance)
  • Author A-Ö
  • Author Ö-A
  • Title A-Ö
  • Title Ö-A
  • Publication type A-Ö
  • Publication type Ö-A
  • Issued (Oldest first)
  • Issued (Newest first)
  • Created (Oldest first)
  • Created (Newest first)
  • Last updated (Oldest first)
  • Last updated (Newest first)
  • Disputation date (earliest first)
  • Disputation date (latest first)
  • Standard (Relevance)
  • Author A-Ö
  • Author Ö-A
  • Title A-Ö
  • Title Ö-A
  • Publication type A-Ö
  • Publication type Ö-A
  • Issued (Oldest first)
  • Issued (Newest first)
  • Created (Oldest first)
  • Created (Newest first)
  • Last updated (Oldest first)
  • Last updated (Newest first)
  • Disputation date (earliest first)
  • Disputation date (latest first)
Select
The maximal number of hits you can export is 250. When you want to export more records please use the Create feeds function.
  • 1.
    Berg, Sofia
    et al.
    University of Skövde, School of Life Sciences. University of Skövde, The Systems Biology Research Centre. IFM Theory and Modelling, Div. of Theoretical Biology, Linköping Univ., Linköping, Sweden.
    Christianou, Maria
    IFM Theory and Modelling, Div. of Theoretical Biology, Linköping Univ., Linköping, Sweden.
    Jonsson, Tomas
    University of Skövde, School of Life Sciences. University of Skövde, The Systems Biology Research Centre.
    Ebenman, Bo
    IFM Theory and Modelling, Div. of Theoretical Biology, Linköping Univ., Linköping, Sweden.
    Using sensitivity analysis to identify keystone species and keystone links in size-based food webs2011In: Oikos, ISSN 0030-1299, E-ISSN 1600-0706, Vol. 120, no 4, p. 510-519Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Human-induced alterations in the birth and mortality rates of species and in the strength of interactions within and between species can lead to changes in the structure and resilience of ecological communities. Recent research points to the importance of considering the distribution of body sizes of species when exploring the response of communities to such perturbations. Here, we present a new size-based approach for assessing the sensitivity and elasticity of community structure (species equilibrium abundances) and resilience (rate of return to equilibrium) to changes in the intrinsic growth rate of species and in the strengths of species interactions. We apply this approach on two natural systems, the pelagic communities of the Baltic Sea and Lake Vättern, to illustrate how it can be used to identify potential keystone species and keystone links. We find that the keystone status of a species is closely linked to its body size. The analysis also suggests that communities are structurally and dynamically more sensitive to changes in the effects of prey on their consumers than in the effects of consumers on their prey. Moreover, we discuss how community sensitivity analysis can be used to study and compare the fragility of communities with different body size distributions by measuring the mean sensitivity or elasticity over all species or all interaction links in a community. We believe that the community sensitivity analysis developed here holds some promise for identifying species and links that are critical for the structural and dynamic robustness of ecological communities.

  • 2.
    Berg, Sofia
    et al.
    University of Skövde, School of Bioscience. University of Skövde, The Systems Biology Research Centre. Dept of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Div. of Theoretical Biology, Linköping Univ., Linköping, Sweden.
    Pimenov, Aexander
    Weierstrass Inst., Berlin, Germany / Environmental Research Inst., Univ. College Cork, Cork, Ireland.
    Palmer, Catherine
    Weierstrass Inst., Berlin, Germany.
    Emmerson, Mark
    School of Biological Sciences, Queen's Univ. Belfast, Belfast, United Kingdom.
    Jonsson, Tomas
    University of Skövde, School of Bioscience. University of Skövde, The Systems Biology Research Centre. Dept of Ecology, Swedish Univ. of Agricultural Sciences, Uppsala, Sweden.
    Ecological communities are vulnerable to realistic extinction sequences2015In: Oikos, ISSN 0030-1299, E-ISSN 1600-0706, Vol. 124, no 4, p. 486-496Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 3.
    Jacob, Ute
    et al.
    Institute for Hydrobiology and Fisheries Science, University of Hamburg, Hamburg, Germany.
    Jonsson, Tomas
    Population Ecology Unit, Institute for Ecology, Uppsala, Sweden.
    Berg, Sofia
    EnviroPlanning AB, Göteborg, Sweden.
    Brey, Thomas
    Alfred Wegener Institute for Polar and Marine Research, Bremerhaven, Germany.
    Eklöf, Anna
    Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology (IFM), Linköping University, Linköping, Sweden.
    Mintenbeck, Katja
    Alfred Wegener Institute for Polar and Marine Research, Bremerhaven, Germany.
    Möllmann, Christian
    Institute for Hydrobiology and Fisheries Science, University of Hamburg, Hamburg, Germany.
    Morissette, Lyne
    M-Expertise Marine, Sainte-Luce, Canada.
    Rau, Andrea
    Johann Heinrich von Thünen Institute for Baltic Sea Fisheries, Rostock, Germany.
    Petchey, Owen
    Institute of Evolutionary Biology and Environmental Studies, University of Zurich, Zurich, Switzerland.
    Valuing biodiversity and ecosystem services in a complex marine ecosystem2015In: Aquatic Functional Biodiversity: An Ecological and Evolutionary Perspective / [ed] Andrea Belgrano, Guy Woodward & Ute Jacob, London: Academic Press, 2015, p. 189-207Chapter in book (Refereed)
  • 4.
    Jacob, Ute
    et al.
    University of Hamburg, Inst Hydrobiol & Fisheries Sci, Hamburg, Germany.
    Thierry, Aaron
    University of Sheffield, Dept Anim & Plant Sci, Western Bank, Sheffield S10 2TN, S Yorkshire, England / Microsoft Res, Cambridge, England.
    Brose, Ulrich
    Georg-August University Göttingen JF Blumenbach Inst Zool & Anthropol, Syst Conservat Biol Grp, Göttingen, Germany.
    Arntz, Wofe E.
    Alfred Wegener Inst Polar & Marine Res, Bremerhaven, Germany.
    Berg, Sofia
    University of Skövde, School of Life Sciences. University of Skövde, The Systems Biology Research Centre.
    Brey, Thomas
    Alfred Wegener Institute for Polar and Marine Research.
    Fetzer, Ingo
    UFZ Helmholtz Ctr Environm Res, Dept Environm Microbiol, Leipzig, Germany.
    Jonsson, Tomas
    University of Skövde, School of Life Sciences. University of Skövde, The Systems Biology Research Centre.
    Mintenbeck, Katja
    Alfred Wegener Inst Polar & Marine Res, Bremerhaven, Germany.
    Möllmann, Christian
    Univ Hamburg, Inst Hydrobiol & Fisheries Sci, Hamburg, Germany.
    Petchey, Owen
    Univ Zurich, Inst Evolutionary Biol & Environm Studies, Zurich, Switzerland.
    Riede, Jens O.
    Univ Gottingen, JF Blumenbach Inst Zool & Anthropol, Syst Conservat Biol Grp, Gottingen, Germany.
    Dunne, Jennifer A.
    Santa Fe Inst, Santa Fe, NM 87501 USA / Pacific Ecoinformat & Computat Ecol Lab, Berkeley, CA USA.
    The Role of Body Size in Complex Food Webs: A Cold Case2011In: Advances in Ecological Research, ISSN 0065-2504, E-ISSN 2163-582X, Vol. 45, p. 181-223Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Human-induced habitat destruction, overexploitation, introduction of alien species and climate change are causing species to go extinct at unprecedented rates, from local to global scales. There are growing concerns that these kinds of disturbances alter important functions of ecosystems. Our current understanding is that key parameters of a community (e.g. its functional diversity, species composition, and presence/absence of vulnerable species) reflect an ecological network’s ability to resist or rebound from change in response to pressures and disturbances, such as species loss. If the food web structure is relatively simple, we can analyse the roles of different species interactions in determining how environmental impacts translate into species loss. However, when ecosystems harbour species-rich communities, as is the case in most natural systems, then the complex network of ecological interactions makes it a far more challenging task to perceive how species’ functional roles influence the consequences of species loss. One approach to deal with such complexity is to focus on the functional traits of species in order to identify their respective roles: for instance, large species seem to be more susceptible to extinction than smaller species. Here, we introduce and analyse the marine food web from the high Antarctic Weddell Sea Shelf to illustrate the role of species traits in relation to network robustness of this complex food web. Our approach was threefold: firstly, we applied a new classification system to all species, grouping them by traits other than body size; secondly, we tested the relationship between body size and food web parameters within and across these groups and finally, we calculated food web robustness. We addressed questions regarding (i) patterns of species functional/trophic roles, (ii) relationships between species functional roles and body size and (iii) the role of species body size in terms of network robustness. Our results show that when analyzing relationships between trophic structure, body size and network structure, the diversity of predatory species types needs to be considered in future studies.

  • 5.
    Jonsson, Tomas
    et al.
    University of Skövde, School of Bioscience. University of Skövde, The Systems Biology Research Centre. Department of Ecology, Swedish University of Agricultural Sciences, Uppsala, Sweden.
    Berg, Sofia
    University of Skövde, School of Bioscience. University of Skövde, The Systems Biology Research Centre. Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Division of Theoretical Biology, Linköping University, Linköping, Sweden.
    Emmerson, Mark
    School of Biological Sciences, Queen's University Belfast, Belfast, UK.
    Pimenov, Alexander
    Environmental Research Institute, University College Cork, Lee Road, Cork, Ireland / Weierstrass Institute, Berlin, Germany.
    The context dependency of species keystone status during food web disassembly2015In: Food Webs, ISSN 2352-2496, Vol. 5, p. 1-10Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 6.
    Jonsson, Tomas
    et al.
    University of Skövde, School of Bioscience. University of Skövde, The Systems Biology Research Centre. Dept of Ecology, Swedish Univ. of Agricultural Sciences, Uppsala, Sweden.
    Berg, Sofia
    University of Skövde, School of Bioscience. University of Skövde, The Systems Biology Research Centre. Dept of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Div. of Theoretical Biology, Linköping Univ., Linköping, Sweden.
    Pimenov, Alexander
    Environmental Res. Inst., Univ. College Cork, Cork, Ireland / Weierstrass Inst., Berlin, Germany.
    Palmer, Catherine
    Environmental Res. Inst., Univ. College Cork, Cork, Ireland.
    Emmerson, Mark
    School of Biological Sciences, Queen's Univ. Belfast, Belfast, United Kingdom.
    The reliability of R50 as a measure of vulnerability of food webs to sequential species deletions2015In: Oikos, ISSN 0030-1299, E-ISSN 1600-0706, Vol. 124, no 4, p. 446-457Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 7.
    Kaneryd, Linda
    et al.
    Division of Theoretical Biology, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Linköping University, Linköping, Sweden.
    Borrvall, Charlotte
    Division of Theoretical Biology, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Linköping University, Linköping, Sweden.
    Berg, Sofia
    University of Skövde, School of Life Sciences. University of Skövde, The Systems Biology Research Centre. Division of Theoretical Biology, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Linköping University, Linköping, Sweden.
    Curtsdotter, Alva
    Division of Theoretical Biology, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Linköping University, Linköping, Sweden.
    Eklöf, Anna
    Division of Theoretical Biology, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Linköping University, Linköping, Sweden.
    Hauzy, Céline
    Division of Theoretical Biology, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Linköping University, Linköping, Sweden / Laboratoire Ecologie et Evolution, Université Pierre et Marie Curie, Paris, France.
    Jonsson, Tomas
    University of Skövde, School of Life Sciences. University of Skövde, The Systems Biology Research Centre.
    Münger, Peter
    Division of Theoretical Biology, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Linköping University, Linköping, Sweden.
    Setzer, Malin
    University of Skövde, School of Life Sciences. University of Skövde, The Systems Biology Research Centre. Division of Theoretical Biology, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Linköping University, Linköping, Sweden.
    Säterberg, Torbjörn
    Division of Theoretical Biology, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Linköping University, Linköping, Sweden.
    Ebenman, Bo
    Division of Theoretical Biology, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Linköping University, Linköping, Sweden.
    Species-rich ecosystems are vulnerable to cascading extinctions in an increasingly variable world2012In: Ecology and Evolution, ISSN 2045-7758, E-ISSN 2045-7758, Vol. 2, no 4, p. 858-874Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Global warming leads to increased intensity and frequency of weather extremes. Such increased environmental variability might in turn result in increased variation in the demographic rates of interacting species with potentially important consequences for the dynamics of food webs. Using a theoretical approach, we here explore the response of food webs to a highly variable environment.We investigate how species richness and correlation in the responses of species to environmental fluctuations affect the risk of extinction cascades. We find that the risk of extinction cascades increases with increasing species richness, especially when correlation among species is low. Initial extinctions of primary producer species unleash bottom-up extinction cascades, especially in webs with specialist consumers. In this sense, species-rich ecosystems are less robust to increasing levels of environmental variability than species-poor ones. Our study thus suggests that highly speciesrich ecosystems such as coral reefs and tropical rainforests might be particularly vulnerable to increased climate variability.

  • 8.
    Säterberg, Torbjörn
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Division of Theoretical Biology, Sweden / Swedish University of Agricultural Sciences, Department of Aquatic Resources, Öregrund, Sweden.
    Jonsson, Tomas
    University of Skövde, School of Bioscience. University of Skövde, The Systems Biology Research Centre. Swedish University of Agricultural Sciences, Department of Ecology, Uppsala, Sweden.
    Yearsley, Jon
    University College Dublin, School of Biology & Environmental Science, Ireland / UCD Earth Institute, Belfield, Dublin 4, Ireland.
    Berg, Sofia
    University of Skövde, School of Bioscience. University of Skövde, The Systems Biology Research Centre.
    Ebenman, Bo
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Division of Theoretical Biology, Sweden / Stockholm University, SRC, Sweden.
    A potential role for rare species in ecosystem dynamics2019In: Scientific Reports, ISSN 2045-2322, E-ISSN 2045-2322, Vol. 9, p. 1-12, article id 11107Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The ecological importance of common species for many ecosystem processes and functions is unquestionably due to their high a bundance.Yet, the importance of rare species is much less understood. Here we take a theoretical approach, exposing dynamical models of ecological networks to small perturbations, to explore the dynamical importance of rare and common species. We find that both species types contribute to the recovery of communities following generic perturbations (i.e. perturbations affecting all species).Yet, when perturbations are selective (i.e. affects only one species), perturbations to rare species have the most pronounced effect on community stability. We show that this is due to the strong indirect effects induced by perturbations to rare species. Because indirect effects typically set in at longer timescales, our results indicate that the importance of rare species may be easily overlooked and thus underrated. Hence, our study provides a potential ecological motive for the management and protection of rare species.

  • 9.
    Vrasdonk, Emke
    et al.
    Chalmers University of Technology.
    Palme, Ulrika
    Chalmers University of Technology.
    Lennartsson, Tommy
    Swedish University of Agricultural Sciences, Uppsala.
    Antonelli, Alexandre
    University of Gothenburg.
    Berg, Sofia
    University of Skövde, School of Bioscience. University of Skövde, The Systems Biology Research Centre.
    Jonsson, Annie
    University of Skövde, School of Bioscience. University of Skövde, The Systems Biology Research Centre.
    Cederberg, Christel
    Chalmers University of Technology.
    Defining the reference situation for biodiversity in Life Cycle Assessments: Review and recommendations2016Conference paper (Refereed)
1 - 9 of 9
CiteExportLink to result list
Permanent link
Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • harvard1
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf