Högskolan i Skövde

his.sePublications
Change search
Refine search result
1 - 35 of 35
CiteExportLink to result list
Permanent link
Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • apa-cv
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf
Rows per page
  • 5
  • 10
  • 20
  • 50
  • 100
  • 250
Sort
  • Standard (Relevance)
  • Author A-Ö
  • Author Ö-A
  • Title A-Ö
  • Title Ö-A
  • Publication type A-Ö
  • Publication type Ö-A
  • Issued (Oldest first)
  • Issued (Newest first)
  • Created (Oldest first)
  • Created (Newest first)
  • Last updated (Oldest first)
  • Last updated (Newest first)
  • Disputation date (earliest first)
  • Disputation date (latest first)
  • Standard (Relevance)
  • Author A-Ö
  • Author Ö-A
  • Title A-Ö
  • Title Ö-A
  • Publication type A-Ö
  • Publication type Ö-A
  • Issued (Oldest first)
  • Issued (Newest first)
  • Created (Oldest first)
  • Created (Newest first)
  • Last updated (Oldest first)
  • Last updated (Newest first)
  • Disputation date (earliest first)
  • Disputation date (latest first)
Select
The maximal number of hits you can export is 250. When you want to export more records please use the Create feeds function.
  • 1.
    Behboudi, Afrouz
    Department of Cell and Molecular Biology - Genetics, Lundberg Laboratory, Göteborg University, Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Cytogenetic and Molecular Changes Involving Rat Chromosome 10 in Experimental Endometrial Adenocarcinoma2002Doctoral thesis, comprehensive summary (Other academic)
  • 2.
    Behboudi, Afrouz
    et al.
    Lundberg Laboratory for Cancer Research, Department of Pathology, Göteborg University, Sahlgrenska University Hospital, Göteborg, Sweden.
    Enlund, Fredrik
    Lundberg Laboratory for Cancer Research, Department of Pathology, Göteborg University, Sahlgrenska University Hospital, Göteborg, Sweden.
    Winnes, Marta
    Lundberg Laboratory for Cancer Research, Department of Pathology, Göteborg University, Sahlgrenska University Hospital, Göteborg, Sweden.
    Andrén, Ywonne
    Lundberg Laboratory for Cancer Research, Department of Pathology, Göteborg University, Sahlgrenska University Hospital, Göteborg, Sweden.
    Nordkvist, Anders
    Lundberg Laboratory for Cancer Research, Department of Pathology, Göteborg University, Sahlgrenska University Hospital, Göteborg, Sweden.
    Leivo, Ilmo
    Departmentof Pathology, Haartman Institute and Helsinki University Central Hospital, Universityof Helsinki, Finland.
    Flaberg, Emilie
    Microbiologyand Tumor Biology Center (MTC), Stockholm, Sweden.
    Szekely, Laszlo
    Microbiologyand Tumor Biology Center (MTC), Stockholm, Sweden.
    Mäkitie, Antti
    Department of Otorhinolaryngology, Helsinki University Central Hospital, Helsinki, Finland.
    Grenman, Reidar
    Department of Otorhinolaryngology — Head and Neck Surgery and Medical Biochemistry, University of Turku, Finland.
    Mark, Joachim
    Lundberg Laboratory for Cancer Research, Department of Pathology, Göteborg University, Sahlgrenska University Hospital, Göteborg, Sweden.
    Stenman, Göran
    Lundberg Laboratory for Cancer Research, Department of Pathology, Göteborg University, Sahlgrenska University Hospital, Göteborg, Sweden.
    Molecular classification of mucoepidermoid carcinomas—prognostic significance of the MECT1–MAML2 fusion oncogene2006In: Genes, Chromosomes and Cancer, ISSN 1045-2257, E-ISSN 1098-2264, Vol. 45, no 5, p. 470-481Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Mucoepidermoid carcinomas (MECs) of the salivary and bronchial glands are characterized by a recurrent t(11;19)(q21;p13) translocation resulting in a MECT1–MAML2 fusion in which the CREB-binding domain of the CREB coactivator MECT1 (also known as CRTC1, TORC1 or WAMTP1) is fused to the transactivation domain of the Notch coactivator MAML2. To gain further insights into the molecular pathogenesis of MECs, we cytogenetically and molecularly characterized a series of 29 MECs. A t(11;19) and/or an MECT1–MAML2 fusion was detected in more than 55% of the tumors. Several cases with cryptic rearrangements that resulted in gene fusions were detected. In fusion-negative MECs, the most common aberration was a single or multiple trisomies. Western blot and immunohistochemical studies demonstrated that the MECT1–MAML2 fusion protein was expressed in all MEC-specific cell types. In addition, cotransfection experiments showed that the fusion protein colocalized with CREB in homogeneously distributed nuclear granules. Analyses of potential downstream targets of the fusion revealed differential expression of the cAMP/CREB (FLT1 and NR4A2) and Notch (HES1 and HES5) target genes in fusion-positive and fusion-negative MECs. Moreover, clinical follow-up studies revealed that fusion-positive patients had a significantly lower risk of local recurrence, metastases, or tumor-related death compared to fusion-negative patients (P = 0.0012). When considering tumor-related deaths only, the estimated median survival for fusion-positive patients was greater than 10 years compared to 1.6 years for fusion-negative patients. These findings suggest that molecularly classifying MECs on the basis of an MECT1–MAML2 fusion is histopathologically and clinically relevant and that the fusion is a useful marker in predicting the biological behavior of MECs. © 2006 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  • 3.
    Behboudi, Afrouz
    et al.
    CMB-Genetics, Göteborg University, Sweden.
    Levan, Göran
    CMB-Genetics, Göteborg University, Sweden.
    Hedrich, Hans J.
    Zentrales Tierlabor, Medizinische Hochschule Hannover, Germany.
    Klinga-Levan, Karin
    CMB-Genetics, Göteborg University, Sweden.
    High-density marker loss of heterozygosity analysis of rat chromosome 10 in endometrial adenocarcinoma2001In: Genes, Chromosomes and Cancer, ISSN 1045-2257, E-ISSN 1098-2264, Vol. 32, no 4, p. 330-341Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Endometrial cancer is a disease with serious impact on the human population, but not much is known about genetic factors involved in this complex disease. Female BDII rats are genetically predisposed to spontaneous endometrial carcinoma, and the BDII inbred strain provides an experimental animal model for endometrial carcinoma development. In the present study, BDII females were crossed with males from two nonsusceptible inbred rat strains. Endometrial adenocarcinomas (EACs) developed in a proportion of the F1 and F2 progeny. We screened 18 EAC solid tumors and 9 EAC cell cultures for loss of heterozygosity (LOH) using fluorescent-PCR-based marker allelotyping methodology with 47 microsatellite markers covering the proximal part of rat chromosome 10 (RNO10). Conclusive evidence was obtained for LOH/deletion involving about 56 cM in the proximal part of RNO10 in DNA from six out of seven informative tumor cell cultures. Analysis of the solid tumors confirmed the presence of LOH in this part of RNO10 in 14 of 17 informative tumors. However, from the studies in the solid tumors it appeared that in fact three separate segments in the proximal part of RNO10 were affected. These three LOH/deletion regions were located approximately in cytogenetic bands 10q11-12, 10q22, and 10q24. © 2001 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  • 4.
    Behboudi, Afrouz
    et al.
    Göteborg University Inst. of Biomedicine, Clinical Genetics, Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Nordlander, Carola
    Göteborg University Inst. of Cell and Molecular Biology, Genetics, Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Klinga-Levan, Karin
    University of Skövde, School of Life Sciences.
    Karlsson, Sandra
    University of Skövde, School of Life Sciences.
    Evidence for a tumor suppressor locus distal to Tp53 – a study in experimental endometrial adenocarcinoma2007In: European Journal of Cancer Supplements, ISSN 1359-6349, E-ISSN 1878-1217, Vol. 5, no 4, p. 62-62Article in journal (Other academic)
  • 5.
    Behboudi, Afrouz
    et al.
    Department of Cell and Molecular Biology-Genetics, Lundberg Laboratory, Göteborg University, Sweden.
    Roshani, Leyla
    Department of Cell and Molecular Biology-Genetics, Lundberg Laboratory, Göteborg University, Sweden.
    Kost-Alimova, Marija
    Microbiology and Tumor Biology Center, Karolinska Institute, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Sjöstrand, Eleonor
    Department of Cell and Molecular Biology-Genetics, Lundberg Laboratory, Göteborg University, Sweden.
    Montelius-Alatalo, Kerstin
    Department of Cell and Molecular Biology-Genetics, Lundberg Laboratory, Göteborg University, Sweden.
    Röhme, Dan
    Department of Cell and Molecular Biology-Genetics, Lundberg Laboratory, Göteborg University, Sweden.
    Klinga-Levan, Karin
    Department of Cell and Molecular Biology-Genetics, Lundberg Laboratory, Göteborg University, Sweden.
    Ståhl, Fredrik
    Department of Cell and Molecular Biology-Genetics, Lundberg Laboratory, Göteborg University, Sweden.
    Detailed chromosomal and radiation hybrid mapping in the proximal part of rat Chromosome 10 and gene order comparison with mouse and human2002In: Mammalian Genome, ISSN 0938-8990, E-ISSN 1432-1777, Vol. 13, no 6, p. 302-309Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The rat provides valuable and sometimes unique models of human complex diseases. To fully exploit the rat models in biomedical research, it is important to have access to detailed knowledge of the rat genome organization as well as its relation to the human genome. Rat Chromosome 10 (RNO10) harbors several important cancer-related genes. Deletions in the proximal part of RNO10 were repeatedly found in a rat model for endometrial cancer. To identify functional and positional candidate genes in the affected region, we used radiation hybrid (RH) mapping and single- and dual-color fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) techniques to construct a detailed chromosomal map of the proximal part of RNO10. The regional localization of 14 genes, most of them cancer-related (Grin2a, Gspt1, Crebbp, Gfer, Tsc2, Tpsb1, Il9r, Il4, Irf1, Csf2, Sparc, Tp53, Thra1, Gh1), and of five microsatellite markers ( D10Mit10, D10Rat42, D10Rat50, D10Rat72, and D10Rat165) was determined on RNO10. For a fifteenth gene, Ppm1b, which had previously been assigned to RNO10, the map position was corrected to RNO6q12-q13.

  • 6.
    Behboudi, Afrouz
    et al.
    Department of Cell and Molecular Biology-Genetics, Lundberg Laboratory, Göteborg University, Sweden.
    Roshani, Leyla
    Department of Cell and Molecular Biology-Genetics, Lundberg Laboratory, Göteborg University, Sweden.
    Lundin, Lisa
    Department of Cell and Molecular Biology-Genetics, Lundberg Laboratory, Göteborg University, Sweden.
    Ståhl, Fredrik
    Department of Cell and Molecular Biology-Genetics, Lundberg Laboratory, Göteborg University, Sweden.
    Klinga-Levan, Karin
    Department of Cell and Molecular Biology-Genetics, Lundberg Laboratory, Göteborg University, Sweden.
    Levan, Göran
    Department of Cell and Molecular Biology-Genetics, Lundberg Laboratory, Göteborg University, Sweden.
    The Functional Significance of Absence: The Chromosomal Segment Harboring Tp53 Is Absent from the T55 Rat Radiation Hybrid Mapping Panel2002In: Genomics, ISSN 0888-7543, E-ISSN 1089-8646, Vol. 79, no 6, p. 844-848Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The T55 rat radiation hybrid (RH) mapping panel has been reported to retain the entire rat genome at retention frequencies between 22% and 37%. However, we found that a small segment of rat chromosome 10 harboring at least four different genes, including Tp53, was completely absent from the panel (retention frequency = 0%). Two other markers located in the vicinity exhibited much reduced retention (2–6%). RH clones are generated by transferring highly fragmented DNA into a recipient cell. There might be a strong selection against the transfer and retention of chromosome segments harboring an intact Tp53, as the action of this gene might prevent proliferation and establishment of the RH clone. Our finding further suggests that unexpected low retention or absence of chromosome segments in an RH panel may represent indications that the segments harbor genes with important functions in cell proliferation control.

  • 7.
    Behboudi, Afrouz
    et al.
    Department of Cell and Molecular Biology, Lundberg Laboratory, Göteborg University, Sweden.
    Sjöstrand, Eleonor
    Department of Cell and Molecular Biology, Lundberg Laboratory, Göteborg University, Sweden.
    Gómez-Fabre, P.
    Department of Cell and Molecular Biology, Lundberg Laboratory, Göteborg University, Sweden.
    Sjöling, Åsa
    Department of Cell and Molecular Biology, Lundberg Laboratory, Göteborg University, Sweden.
    Taib, Z.
    Department of Mathematics, Chalmers University of Technology, Göteborg, Sweden.
    Klinga-Levan, Karin
    Department of Cell and Molecular Biology, Lundberg Laboratory, Göteborg University, Sweden.
    Ståhl, Fredrik
    Department of Cell and Molecular Biology, Lundberg Laboratory, Göteborg University, Sweden.
    Levan, Göran
    Department of Cell and Molecular Biology, Lundberg Laboratory, Göteborg University, Sweden ; CMB-Genetics, Göteborg, Sweden.
    Evolutionary aspects of the genomic organization of rat chromosome 102002In: Cytogenetic and Genome Research, ISSN 1424-8581, E-ISSN 1424-859X, Vol. 96, no 1-4, p. 52-59Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Using FISH and RH mapping a chromosomal map of rat chromosome 10 (RNO10) was constructed. Our mapping data were complemented by other published data and the final map was compared to maps of mouse and human chromosomes. RNO10 contained segments homologous to mouse chromosomes (MMU) 11, 16 and 17, with evolutionary breakpoints between the three segments situated in the proximal part of RNO10. Near one of these breakpoints (between MMU17 and 11) we found evidence for an inversion ancestral to the mouse that was not ancestral to the condition in the rat. Within each of the chromosome segments identified, the gene order appeared to be largely conserved. This conservation was particularly clear in the long MMU11-homologous segment. RNO10 also contained segments homologous to three human chromosomes (HSA5, 16, 17). However, within each segment of conserved synteny were signs of more extensive rearrangements. At least 13 different evolutionary breakpoints were indicated in the rat-human comparison. In contrast to what was found between rat and mouse, the rat-human evolutionary breaks were distributed along the entire length of RNO10.

  • 8.
    Behboudi, Afrouz
    et al.
    Department of Clinical Genetics, Institute of Biomedicine, Göteborg University, Sweden.
    Stenman, Göran
    Department of Clinical Genetics, Institute of Biomedicine, Göteborg University, Sweden.
    CRTC1 (CREB regulated transcription coactivator 1)2006In: Atlas of Genetics and Cytogenetics in Oncology and Haematology, E-ISSN 1768-3262, no 2006-05-01Article, review/survey (Refereed)
  • 9.
    Behboudi, Afrouz
    et al.
    Department of Clinical Genetics, Institute of Biomedicine, Göteborg University, Sweden.
    Stenman, Göran
    Department of Clinical Genetics, Institute of Biomedicine, Göteborg University, Sweden.
    Skin: Clear cell hidradenoma of the skin (CCH)2006In: Atlas of Genetics and Cytogenetics in Oncology and Haematology, E-ISSN 1768-3262, Vol. 10, no 4, p. 285-287Article, review/survey (Refereed)
    Download full text (pdf)
    fulltext
  • 10.
    Behboudi, Afrouz
    et al.
    University of Skövde, School of Health Sciences. University of Skövde, Digital Health Research (DHEAR).
    Thelander, Tilia
    University of Skövde, School of Health Sciences. University of Skövde, Digital Health Research (DHEAR).
    Yazici, Duygu
    Koc University Research Center for Translational Medicine (KUTTAM), Koc University Hospital, Istanbul, Turkey.
    Celik, Yeliz
    Koc University Research Center for Translational Medicine (KUTTAM), Koc University Hospital, Istanbul, Turkey.
    Yucel-Lindberg, Tülay
    Department of Dental Medicine, Karolinska Institute, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Thunström, Erik
    Department of Molecular and Clinical Medicine, Sahlgrenska Academy, University of Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Peker, Yüksel
    Koc University Research Center for Translational Medicine (KUTTAM), Koc University Hospital, Istanbul, Turkey ; Department of Molecular and Clinical Medicine, Sahlgrenska Academy, University of Gothenburg, Sweden ; Department of Clinical Sciences, Respiratory Medicine and Allergology, Faculty of Medicine, Lund University, Lund, Sweden ; Division of Pulmonary, Allergy, and Critical Care Medicine, University of Pittsburgh School of Medicine, PA, USA.
    Association of TNF-alpha (-308G/A) Gene Polymorphism with Circulating TNF-alpha Levels and Excessive Daytime Sleepiness in Adults with Coronary Artery Disease and Concomitant Obstructive Sleep Apnea2021In: Journal of Clinical Medicine, E-ISSN 2077-0383, Vol. 10, no 15, article id 3413Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) is common in patients with coronary artery disease (CAD), in which inflammatory activity has a crucial role. The manifestation of OSA varies significantly between individuals in clinical cohorts; not all adults with OSA demonstrate the same set of symptoms; i.e., excessive daytime sleepiness (EDS) and/or increased levels of inflammatory biomarkers. The further exploration of the molecular basis of these differences is therefore essential for a better understanding of the OSA phenotypes in cardiac patients. In this current secondary analysis of the Randomized Intervention with Continuous Positive Airway Pressure in CAD and OSA (RICCADSA) trial (Trial Registry: ClinicalTrials.gov; No: NCT 00519597), we aimed to address the association of tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF-α)-308G/A gene polymorphism with circulating TNF-α levels and EDS among 326 participants. CAD patients with OSA (apnea–hypopnea-index (AHI) ≥ 15 events/h; n = 256) were categorized as having EDS (n = 100) or no-EDS (n = 156) based on the Epworth Sleepiness Scale score with a cut-off of 10. CAD patients with no-OSA (AHI < 5 events/h; n = 70) were included as a control group. The results demonstrated no significant differences regarding the distribution of the TNF-α alleles and genotypes between CAD patients with vs. without OSA. In a multivariate analysis, the oxygen desaturation index and TNF-α genotypes from GG to GA and GA to AA as well as the TNF-α-308A allele carriage were significantly associated with the circulating TNF-α levels. Moreover, the TNF-α-308A allele was associated with a decreased risk for EDS (odds ratio 0.64, 95% confidence interval 0.41–0.99; p = 0.043) independent of age, sex, obesity, OSA severity and the circulating TNF-α levels. We conclude that the TNF-α-308A allele appears to modulate circulatory TNF-α levels and mitigate EDS in adults with CAD and concomitant OSA.

    Download full text (pdf)
    fulltext
  • 11.
    Behboudi, Afrouz
    et al.
    Lundberg Laboratory for Cancer Research, Department of Pathology, Göeborg University, Sahlgrenska University Hospital, Göteborg, Sweden.
    Winnes, Marta
    Lundberg Laboratory for Cancer Research, Department of Pathology, Göeborg University, Sahlgrenska University Hospital, Göteborg, Sweden.
    Gorunova, Ludmila
    Department of Clinical Genetics, Lund University Hospital, Sweden.
    van den Oord, Joost J.
    Department of Pathology, Laboratory of Morphology and Molecular Pathology, University Hospital Leuven, Katholieke Universiteit Leuven, Belgium.
    Mertens, Fredrik
    Department of Clinical Genetics, Lund University Hospital, Sweden.
    Enlund, Fredrik
    Lundberg Laboratory for Cancer Research, Department of Pathology, Göeborg University, Sahlgrenska University Hospital, Göteborg, Sweden.
    Stenman, Göran
    Lundberg Laboratory for Cancer Research, Department of Pathology, Göeborg University, Sahlgrenska University Hospital, Göteborg, Sweden.
    Clear cell hidradenoma of the skin—a third tumor type with at (11; 19)‐associated TORC1–MAML2 gene fusion2005In: Genes, Chromosomes and Cancer, ISSN 1045-2257, E-ISSN 1098-2264, Vol. 43, no 2, p. 202-205Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Recent studies have shown that the t(11;19)(q21;p13) translocation in mucoepidermoid carcinomas and benign Warthin's tumors results in a fusion of the N-terminal CREB-binding domain of the cAMP coactivator TORC1 (a.k.a. MECT1 and WAMTP1) to the Notch coactivator MAML2. Here we show that a third tumor type, clear cell hidradenoma of the skin, also expresses this gene fusion. RT-PCR analysis of a clear cell hidradenoma with a t(11;19)(q21;p13) translocation revealed expression of a TORC1–MAML2 fusion transcript consisting of exon 1 of TORC1 fused to exons 2–5 of MAML2. Because the fusion was only detected in a single case, the frequency of this aberration in clear cell hidradenomas remains unknown. These results demonstrate that the t(11;19) in mucoepidermoid carcinoma, Warthin's tumor, and clear cell hidradenoma targets the same genes and results in identical gene fusions, indicating that at least subgroups of these glandular tumors evolve through activation of the same molecular pathways. © 2005 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  • 12.
    Bergman, Annika
    et al.
    Department of Medical and Clinical genetics, Sahlgrenska Academy, Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Abel, Frida
    Department of Medical and Clinical genetics, Sahlgrenska Academy, Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Behboudi, Afrouz
    Department of Medical and Clinical genetics, Sahlgrenska Academy, Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Yhr, Maria
    Department of Medical and Clinical genetics, Sahlgrenska Academy, Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Mattsson, Jan
    Department of Surgery, Sahlgrenska University hospital, Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Svensson, Jan H.
    Department of Surgery, Skaraborg hospital, Skövde, Sweden.
    Karlsson, Per
    Department of Oncology, Sahlgrenska University hospital, Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Nordling, Margareta
    Department of Medical and Clinical genetics, Sahlgrenska Academy, Gothenburg, Sweden.
    No germline mutations in supposed tumour suppressor genes SAFB1 and SAFB2 in familial breast cancer with linkage to 19p2008In: BMC Medical Genetics, E-ISSN 1471-2350, Vol. 9, no 1, article id 108Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background

    The scaffold attachment factor B1 and B2 genes, SAFB1/SAFB2 (both located on chromosome 19p13.3) have recently been suggested as tumour suppressor genes involved in breast cancer development. The assumption was based on functional properties of the two genes and loss of heterozygosity of intragenic markers in breast tumours further strengthened the postulated hypothesis. In addition, linkage studies in Swedish breast cancer families also indicate the presence of a susceptibility gene for breast cancer at the 19p locus. Somatic mutations in SAFB1/SAFB2 have been detected in breast tumours, but to our knowledge no studies on germline mutations have been reported. In this study we investigated the possible involvement of SAFB1/SAFB2 on familiar breast cancer by inherited mutations in either of the two genes.

    Results

    Mutation analysis in families showing linkage to the SAFB1/2 locus was performed by DNA sequencing. The complete coding sequence of the two genes SAFB1 and SAFB2 was analyzed in germline DNA from 31 affected women. No missense or frameshift mutations were detected. One polymorphism was found in SAFB1 and eight polymorphisms were detected in SAFB2. MLPA-anlysis showed that both alleles of the two genes were preserved which excludes gene inactivation by large deletions.

    Conclusion

    SAFB1 and SAFB2 are not likely to be causative of the hereditary breast cancer syndrome in west Swedish breast cancer families.

    Download full text (pdf)
    fulltext
  • 13.
    Celik, Y.
    et al.
    Neuroscience, Koç University Graduate School of Health Sciences, Istanbul, Turkey.
    Behboudi, Afrouz
    University of Skövde, School of Health Sciences. University of Skövde, Digital Health Research (DHEAR).
    Peker, Yüksel
    Pulmonary Medicine, Koç University Graduate School of Health Sciences, Istanbul, Turkey.
    Redline, S. S.
    Dept of Med & Div of Sleep Med, Brigham and Women's Hospital, Boston, MA, United States.
    Jelic, S.
    Columbia University Medical Center, New York, NY, United States.
    Gottlieb, D. J.
    VA Boston Healthcare System, Boston, MA, United States.
    Impact of Continuous Positive Airway Pressure on Serum Angiopoietin-2 Following Coronary Revascularization in Patients With Obstructive Sleep Apnea: The RICCADSA Study2023In: American Journal of Respiratory and Critical Care Medicine, ISSN 1073-449X, E-ISSN 1535-4970, Vol. 207, article id A6268Article in journal (Other academic)
  • 14.
    Celik, Yeliz
    et al.
    Department of Pulmonary Medicine, Koc University School of Medicine, Koc University Research Center for Translational Medicine (KUTTAM), Koc University, Istanbul, Turkey.
    Peker, Yüksel
    Department of Pulmonary Medicine, Koc University School of Medicine, Koc University Research Center for Translational Medicine (KUTTAM), Koc University, Istanbul, Turkey ; Department of Molecular and Clinical Medicine, Sahlgrenska Academy, University of Gothenburg, Sweden ; Department of Clinical Sciences, Respiratory Medicine and Allergology, Faculty of Medicine, Lund University, Sweden ; Division of Pulmonary, Allergy, and Critical Care Medicine, University of Pittsburgh School of Medicine, Pittsburgh, PA, United States ; Division of Sleep and Circadian Disorders, Brigham and Women’s Hospital, Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA, United States.
    Yucel-Lindberg, Tülay
    Department of Dental Medicine, Karolinska Institute, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Thelander, Tilia
    University of Skövde, School of Health Sciences. University of Skövde, Digital Health Research (DHEAR).
    Behboudi, Afrouz
    University of Skövde, School of Health Sciences. University of Skövde, Digital Health Research (DHEAR).
    Association of TNF-α (-308G/A) Gene Polymorphism with Changes in Circulating TNF-α Levels in Response to CPAP Treatment in Adults with Coronary Artery Disease and Obstructive Sleep Apnea2023In: Journal of Clinical Medicine, E-ISSN 2077-0383, Vol. 12, no 16, article id 5325Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Rationale: We recently demonstrated that patients with coronary artery disease (CAD) and obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) carrying the tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-α) A allele had increased circulating TNF-α levels compared with the ones carrying the TNF-α G allele. In the current study, we addressed the effect of TNF-α (-308G/A) gene polymorphism on circulating TNF-α levels following continuous positive airway pressure (CPAP) therapy. Methods: This study was a secondary analysis of the RICCADSA trial (NCT00519597) conducted in Sweden. CAD patients with OSA (apnea–hypopnea index) of ≥15 events/h and an Epworth Sleepiness Scale (ESS) score of <10 were randomized to CPAP or no-CPAP groups, and OSA patients with an ESS score of ≥10 were offered CPAP treatment. Blood samples were obtained at baseline and 12-month follow-up visits. TNF-α was measured by immunoassay (Luminex, R&D Systems). Genotyping of TNF-α-308G/A (single nucleotide polymorphism Rs1800629) was performed by polymerase chain reaction–restriction fragment length polymorphism. Results: In all, 239 participants (206 men and 33 women; mean age 64.9 (SD 7.7) years) with polymorphism data and circulating levels of TNF-α at baseline and 1-year follow-up visits were included. The median circulating TNF-α values fell in both groups between baseline and 12 months with no significant within- or between-group differences. In a multivariate linear regression model, a significant change in circulating TNF-α levels from baseline across the genotypes from GA to GA and GA to AA (standardized β-coefficient −0.129, 95% confidence interval (CI) −1.82; −0.12; p = 0.025) was observed in the entire cohort. The association was more pronounced among the individuals who were using the device for at least 4 h/night (n = 86; standardized β-coefficient −2.979 (95% CI −6.11; −1.21); p = 0.004)), whereas no significant association was found among the patients who were non-adherent or randomized to no-CPAP. The participants carrying the TNF-α A allele were less responsive to CPAP treatment regarding the decline in circulating TNF-α despite CPAP adherence (standardized β-coefficient −0.212, (95% CI −5.66; −1.01); p = 0.005). Conclusions: Our results suggest that TNF-α (-308G/A) gene polymorphism is associated with changes in circulating TNF-α levels in response to CPAP treatment in adults with CAD and OSA. 

    Download full text (pdf)
    fulltext
  • 15.
    Chen, Lei
    et al.
    University of Skövde, School of Humanities and Informatics.
    Nordlander, Carola
    CMB-Genetics, Lundberg Laboratory, Göteborg University, Sweden.
    Behboudi, Afrouz
    CMB-Genetics, Lundberg Laboratory, Göteborg University, Sweden.
    Olsson, Björn
    University of Skövde, School of Humanities and Informatics.
    Klinga Levan, Karin
    University of Skövde, School of Life Sciences.
    Deriving evolutionary tree models of the oncogenesis of endometrial adenocarcinoma2007In: International Journal of Cancer, ISSN 0020-7136, E-ISSN 1097-0215, Vol. 120, no 2, p. 292-296Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Endometrial adenocarcinoma (EAC) is the fourth leading cause of cancer death in women worldwide, but not much is known about the underlying genetic factors involved in the development of this complex disease. In the present work, we used 3 different algorithms to derive tree models of EAC oncogenesis from data on the frequencies of genomic alterations in rat chromosome 10 (RNO10). The tumor material was derived from progenies of crosses between the EAC susceptible BDII inbred rat strain and two non susceptible inbred rat strains. Data from allelic imbalance scans of RNO10 with microsatellite markers on solid tumor material and corresponding tissue cultures were used. For the analysis, RNO10 was divided into 24 segments containing a total of 59 informative microsatellite markers. The derived tree models show that genomic alterations have occurred in 11 of the 24 segments. In addition, the models provide information about the likely order of the alterations as well as their relationship with each other. Interestingly, there was a high degree of consistency among the different tree models and with the results of previous-studies, which supports the reliability of the tree models. Our results may be extended into a general approach for tree modeling of whole genome alterations during oncogenesis. (c) 2006 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  • 16.
    Enlund, Fredrik
    et al.
    Department of Pathology, Lundberg Laboratory for Cancer Research, Göteborg University, Sahlgrenska University Hospital, Göteborg, Sweden.
    Behboudi, Afrouz
    Department of Pathology, Lundberg Laboratory for Cancer Research, Göteborg University, Sahlgrenska University Hospital, Göteborg, Sweden.
    Andrén, Ywonne
    Department of Pathology, Lundberg Laboratory for Cancer Research, Göteborg University, Sahlgrenska University Hospital, Göteborg, Sweden.
    Öberg, Camilla
    Department of Cell and Molecular Biology, Karolinska Institute, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Lendahl, Urban
    Department of Cell and Molecular Biology, Karolinska Institute, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Mark, Joachim
    Department of Pathology, Lundberg Laboratory for Cancer Research, Göteborg University, Sahlgrenska University Hospital, Göteborg, Sweden.
    Stenman, Göran
    Department of Pathology, Lundberg Laboratory for Cancer Research, Göteborg University, Sahlgrenska University Hospital, Göteborg, Sweden.
    Altered Notch signaling resulting from expression of a WAMTP1-MAML2 gene fusion in mucoepidermoid carcinomas and benign Warthin's tumors2004In: Experimental Cell Research, ISSN 0014-4827, E-ISSN 1090-2422, Vol. 292, no 1, p. 21-28Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Chromosome translocations in neoplasia commonly result in fusion genes that may encode either novel fusion proteins or normal, but ectopically expressed proteins. Here we report the cloning of a novel fusion gene in a common type of salivary and bronchial gland tumor, mucoepidermoid carcinomas (MEC), as well as in benign Warthin's tumors (WATs). The fusion, which results from a t(11;19)(q21–22;p13) translocation, creates a chimeric gene in which exon 1 of a novel gene of unknown function, designated WAMTP1, is linked to exons 2–5 of the recently identified Mastermind-like Notch coactivator MAML2. In the fusion protein, the N-terminal basic domain of MAML2, which is required for binding to intracellular Notch (Notch ICD), is replaced by an unrelated N-terminal sequence from WAMTP1. Mutation analysis of the N-terminus of WAMTP1-MAML2 identified two regions of importance for nuclear localization (amino acids 11–20) and for colocalization with MAML2 and Notch1 ICD in nuclear granules (amino acids 21–42). Analyses of the Notch target genes HES5 and MASH1 in MEC tumors with and without the WAMTP1-MAML2 fusion revealed upregulation of HES5 and downregulation of MASH1 in fusion positive MECs compared to normal salivary gland tissue and MECs lacking the fusion. These findings suggest that altered Notch signaling plays an important role in the genesis of benign and malignant neoplasms of salivary and bronchial gland origin.

  • 17.
    Falck, Eva
    et al.
    University of Skövde, School of Life Sciences. University of Skövde, The Systems Biology Research Centre. Schoolof Health and Medical Sciences, Örebro University, Sweden.
    Behboudi, Afrouz
    University of Skövde, School of Life Sciences. University of Skövde, The Systems Biology Research Centre. Department of Medical and Clinical Genetics, Institute of Biomedicine, University of Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Klinga-Levan, Karin
    University of Skövde, School of Life Sciences. University of Skövde, The Systems Biology Research Centre.
    The impact of the genetic background on the genome make-up of tumor cells2012In: Genes, Chromosomes and Cancer, ISSN 1045-2257, E-ISSN 1098-2264, Vol. 51, no 5, p. 438-446Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Endometrial adenocarcinoma (EAC) is the most common form of malignancy in the female genital tract, ranking as the fourth leading form of invasive tumors that affect women. The BDII inbred rat strain has been used as a powerful tumor model in studies of the genetic background of EAC. Females from the BDII strain are prone to develop tumors with an incidence of more than 90%. Development of EAC in BDII female rats has similarities in pathogenesis, histopathological, and molecular properties to that of human, and thus represents a unique model for analysis of EAC tumorigenesis and for comparative studies in human EACs. In a previous study, a set of rat EAC cell lines derived from tumors developed in female crossprogenies between BDII and nonsusceptible rat strains were analyzed by spectral karyotyping (SKY). Here we present an analysis with specific focus on the impact of different genetic backgrounds on the rate and occurrence of genetic aberrations in experimental tumors using data presented in the previous report. We could reveal that the ploidy state, and the abundance and type of structural as well as numerical change differed between the two genetic setups. We have also identified chromosomes harboring aberrations independent of genetic input from the nonsusceptible strains, which provide valuable information for the identification of the genes involved in the development of EAC in the BDII model as well as in human endometrial tumors.

  • 18.
    Falck, Eva
    et al.
    University of Skövde, School of Life Sciences. University of Skövde, The Systems Biology Research Centre.
    Hedberg, Carola
    Department of Medical and Clinical Genetics, Institute of Biomedicine, University of Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Klinga-Levan, Karin
    University of Skövde, School of Life Sciences. University of Skövde, The Systems Biology Research Centre.
    Behboudi, Afrouz
    University of Skövde, School of Life Sciences. University of Skövde, The Systems Biology Research Centre. Department of Medical and Clinical Genetics, Institute of Biomedicine, University of Gothenburg, Sweden.
    SKY analysis revealed recurrent numerical and structural chromosome changes in BDII rat endometrial carcinomas2011In: Cancer Cell International, E-ISSN 1475-2867, Vol. 11, article id 20Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: Genomic alterations are common features of cancer cells, and some of these changes are proven to be neoplastic-specific. Such alterations may serve as valuable tools for diagnosis and classification of tumors, prediction of clinical outcome, disease monitoring, and choice of therapy as well as for providing clues to the location of crucial cancer-related genes. Endometrial carcinoma (EC) is the most frequently diagnosed malignancy of the female genital tract, ranking fourth among all invasive tumors affecting women. Cytogenetic studies of human ECs have not produced very conclusive data, since many of these studies are based on karyotyping of limited number of cases and no really specific karyotypic changes have yet been identified. As the majority of the genes are conserved among mammals, the use of inbred animal model systems may serve as a tool for identification of underlying genes and pathways involved in tumorigenesis in humans. In the present work we used spectral karyotyping (SKY) to identify cancer-related aberrations in a well-characterized experimental model for spontaneous endometrial carcinoma in the BDII rat tumor model. Results: Analysis of 21 experimental ECs revealed specific nonrandom numerical and structural chromosomal changes. The most recurrent numerical alterations were gains in rat chromosome 4 (RNO4) and losses in RNO15. The most commonly structural changes were mainly in form of chromosomal translocations and were detected in RNO3, RNO6, RNO10, RNO11, RNO12, and RNO20. Unbalanced chromosomal translocations involving RNO3p was the most commonly observed structural changes in this material followed by RNO11p and RNO10 translocations. Conclusion: The non-random nature of these events, as documented by their high frequencies of incidence, is suggesting for dynamic selection of these changes during experimental EC tumorigenesis and therefore for their potential contribution into development of this malignancy. Comparative molecular analysis of the identified genetic changes in this tumor model with those reported in the human ECs may provide new insights into underlying genetic changes involved in EC development and tumorigenesis.

    Download full text (pdf)
    fulltext
  • 19.
    Hamta, A.
    et al.
    CMB-Genetics, Göteborg University, Sweden.
    Adamovic, T.
    CMB-Genetics, Göteborg University, Sweden.
    Samuelson, Emma
    CMB-Genetics, Göteborg University, Sweden.
    Helou, K.
    Department of Oncology, Göteborg University, Sweden.
    Behboudi, Afrouz
    CMB-Genetics, Göteborg University, Sweden.
    Levan, Göran
    CMB-Genetics, Göteborg University, Sweden ; CMB-Genetics, Göteborg, Sweden.
    Chromosome ideograms of the laboratory rat (Rattus norvegicus) based on high-resolution banding, and anchoring of the cytogenetic map to the DNA sequence by FISH in sample chromosomes2006In: Cytogenetic and Genome Research, ISSN 1424-8581, E-ISSN 1424-859X, Vol. 115, no 2, p. 158-168Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    A detailed banded ideogram representation of the rat chromosomes was constructed based on actual G-banded prometaphase chromosomes. The approach yielded 535 individual bands, a significant increase compared to previously presented ideograms. The new ideogram was adapted to the existing band nomenclature. The gene locus positions in the rat draft DNA sequence were compared to the chromosomal positions as determined by dual-color FISH, using rat (RNO) chromosomes 6 and 15 and a segment of RNO4 as sample regions. It was found that there was generally an excellent correlation in the chromosome regions tested between the relative gene position in the DNA molecules and the sub-chromosomal localization by FISH and subsequent information transfer on ideograms from measurements of chromosomal images. However, in the metacentric chromosome (RNO15), the correlation was much better in the short arm than in the long arm, suggesting that the centromeric region may distort the linear relationship between the chromosomal image and the corresponding DNA molecule.

  • 20.
    Hedberg Oldfors, Carola
    et al.
    Sahlgrenska Academy, University of Gothenburg.
    Garcia Dios, Diego
    Sahlgrenska Academy, University of Gothenburg.
    Linder, Anna
    Sahlgrenska Academy, University of Gothenburg.
    Visuttijai, Kittichate
    University of Skövde, School of Bioscience. University of Skövde, The Systems Biology Research Centre. Sahlgrenska Academy, University of Gothenburg.
    Samuelson, Emma
    Sahlgrenska Academy, University of Gothenburg.
    Karlsson, Sandra
    University of Skövde, School of Bioscience. University of Skövde, The Systems Biology Research Centre.
    Nilsson, Staffan
    Chalmers University of Technology.
    Behboudi, Afrouz
    University of Skövde, School of Bioscience. University of Skövde, The Systems Biology Research Centre.
    Analysis of an independent tumor suppressor locus telomeric to Tp53 suggested Inpp5k and Myo1c as novel tumor suppressor gene candidates in this region2015In: BMC Genetics, E-ISSN 1471-2156, Vol. 16, no 1, article id 80Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Several reports indicate a commonly deleted chromosomal region independent from, and distal to the TP53 locus in a variety of human tumors. In a previous study, we reported a similar finding in a rat tumor model for endometrial carcinoma (EC) and through developing a deletion map, narrowed the candidate region to 700 kb, harboring 19 genes. In the present work real-time qPCR analysis, Western blot, semi-quantitative qPCR, sequencing, promoter methylation analysis, and epigenetic gene expression restoration analyses (5-aza-2'-deoxycytidine and/or trichostatin A treatments) were used to analyze the 19 genes located within the candidate region in a panel of experimental tumors compared to control samples.

    RESULTS:

    Real-time qPCR analysis suggested Hic1 (hypermethylated in cancer 1), Inpp5k (inositol polyphosphate-5-phosphatase K; a.k.a. Skip, skeletal muscle and kidney enriched inositol phosphatase) and Myo1c (myosin 1c) as the best targets for the observed deletions. No mutation in coding sequences of these genes was detected, hence the observed low expression levels suggest a haploinsufficient mode of function for these potential tumor suppressor genes. Both Inpp5k and Myo1c were down regulated at mRNA and/or protein levels, which could be rescued in gene expression restoration assays. This could not be shown for Hic1.

    CONCLUSION:

    Innp5k and Myo1c were identified as the best targets for the deletions in the region. INPP5K and MYO1C are located adjacent to each other within the reported independent region of tumor suppressor activity located at chromosome arm 17p distal to TP53 in human tumors. There is no earlier report on the potential tumor suppressor activity of INPP5K and MYO1C, however, overlapping roles in phosphoinositide (PI) 3-kinase/Akt signaling, known to be vital for the cell growth and survival, are reported for both. Moreover, there are reports on tumor suppressor activity of other members of the gene families that INPP5K and MYO1C belong to. Functional significance of these two candidate tumor suppressor genes in cancerogenesis pathways remains to be investigated.

    Download full text (pdf)
    fulltext
  • 21.
    Nordlander, Carola
    et al.
    Lundberg Laboratory, CMB-Genetics, Göteborg University, Sweden ; Department of Pathology, Lundberg Laboratory for Cancer Research, Göteborg, Sweden.
    Behboudi, Afrouz
    Department of Pathology, Lundberg Laboratory for Cancer Research, Göteborg, Sweden.
    Levan, Göran
    Lundberg Laboratory, CMB-Genetics, Göteborg University, Sweden ; Department of Pathology, Lundberg Laboratory for Cancer Research, Göteborg, Sweden.
    Klinga Levan, Karin
    University of Skövde, School of Life Sciences.
    Allelic imbalance on chromosome 10 in rat endometrial adenocarcinomas2005In: Cancer Genetics and Cytogenetics, ISSN 0165-4608, E-ISSN 1873-4456, Vol. 156, no 2, p. 158-166Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Earlier work using comparative genome hybridization (CGH) has shown that rat chromosome 10 (RNO10) is frequently involved in cytogenetic aberrations in BDII rat endometrial adenocarcinomas (EAC). Relative reduction in copy number (chromosomal deletions) was seen in the proximal to middle part of the chromosome, whereas there were increases in copy number in the distal part. The occurrence of RNO10 aberrations was further analyzed in DNA from primary tumor material from 42 EACs and 3 benign endometrial tumors using allelotyping of microsatellite markers. We found frequently that there were 4 quite distinct RNO10 regions that exhibited allelic imbalance. Based on these findings we believe that genes with relevance to EAC tumor development are situated in each of these chromosome regions. Extrapolation of our microsatellite marker data to the rat draft DNA sequence will facilitate the definition of the regions at the level of the DNA and to select and characterize candidate genes within each of the affected chromosome regions.

  • 22.
    Nordlander, Carola
    et al.
    CMB-Genetics, Lundberg Laboratory, Göteborg University, Gothenhurg, Sweden.
    Karlsson, Sandra
    University of Skövde, School of Life Sciences.
    Karlsson, Åsa
    CMB-Genetics, Lundberg Laboratory, Göteborg University, Gothenhurg, Sweden ; Division of Medicine/Oncology, Stanford School of Medicine, Stanford, CA 94305, United States.
    Sjöling, Åsa
    Institute of Biomedicine, Department of Microbiology and Immunology, Göteborg University, Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Winnes, Marta
    CMB-Genetics, Lundberg Laboratory, Göteborg University, Gothenhurg, Sweden ; Lundberg Laboratory for Cancer Research, Department of Pathology, Göteborg University, Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Klinga-Levan, Karin
    University of Skövde, School of Life Sciences.
    Behboudi, Afrouz
    Institute of Biomedicine, Department of Clinical Genetics, Göteborg University, Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Analysis of chromosome 10 aberrations in rat endometrial cancer: Evidence for a tumor suppressor locus distal to Tp532007In: International Journal of Cancer, ISSN 0020-7136, E-ISSN 1097-0215, Vol. 120, no 7, p. 1472-1481Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    We have recently shown in the BDII rat model of human endometrial adenocarcinoma (EAC), rat chromosome 10 (RNO10) is frequently involved in chromosomal aberrations. In the present study, we investigated the association between RNO10 deletions, allelic imbalance (AI) at RNO10q24 and Tp53 mutation in 27 rat EAC tumors. We detected chromosomal breakage accompanied by loss of proximal and/or gain of distal parts of RNO10 in approximately 2/3 of the tumors. This finding is suggestive of a tumor suppressor activity encoded from the proximal RNO10. Given the fact that Tp53 is located at RNO10q24-q25, we then performed Tp53 mutation analysis. However, we could not find a strong correlation between AI/deletions at RNO10q24 and Tp53 mutation. Instead, the observed patterns for AI, chromosomal breaks and deletions suggest that major selection was directed against a region located close to, but distal of Tp53. In different human malignancies a similar situation of AI at chromosome band 17p13.3 (HSA17p13.3) unassociated with TP53 mutation has been observed. Although RNO10 is largely homologous to HSA17, the conservation with respect to gene order among them is not extensive. We utilized publicly available draft DNA sequences to study intrachromosomal rearrangement during the divergence between HSA17 and RNO10. By using reciprocal comparison of rat and human genome data, we could substantially narrow down the candidate tumor suppressor region in rat from 3 Mb to a chromosomal segment of about 0.5 Mb in size. These results provide scientific groundwork for identification of the putative tumor suppressor gene(s) at 17p13.3 in human tumors

  • 23.
    Nordlander, Carola
    et al.
    Department of Cellular and Molecular Biology-Genetics Lundberg Institute, Göteborg, Sweden.
    Samuelson, Emma
    Sahlgrenska Academy Department of Clinical Genetics, Göteborg University, Sweden.
    Klinga-Levan, Karin
    University of Skövde, School of Life Sciences.
    Behboudi, Afrouz
    Recurrent Chromosome 10 Aberrations and Tp53 Mutations in Rat Endometrial Adenocarcinomas2008In: Advances in Experimental Medicine and Biology, ISSN 0065-2598, E-ISSN 2214-8019, Vol. 617, p. 519-525Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Human genetic heterogeneity and differences in the environment and life style make analysis of complex diseases such as cancer difficult. By using inbred animal strains, the genetic variability can be minimized and the environmental factors can be reasonably controlled. Endometrial adenocarcinoma (EAC) is the most common gynecologic malignancy, ranking fourth in incidence among tumors in women. The inbred BDII rat strain is genetically prone to spontaneously develop hormone-related EAC, and can be used as a tool to investigate and characterize genetic changes in this tumor type. In the present project, BDII females were crossed to males from two nonsusceptible rat strains and F1, F2, and backcross progeny were produced. Genetic and molecular genetic analysis of tumors showed that rat chromosome 10 (RNO10) was frequently involved in genetic changes. Our data indicate that often there was loss of chromosomal material in the proximal to middle part of the chromosome followed by gains in distal RNO10. This suggested that there is a tumor suppressor gene(s) in the proximal to middle part of RNO10 and an oncogene(s) in the distal part of the chromosome with potential significance in EAC development. The Tp53 gene, located at band RNO10q24-q25, was a strong candidate target for the observed aberrations affecting the middle part of the chromosome. However, our Tp53 gene mutation analyses suggested that a second gene situated very close to Tp53 might be the main target for the observed pattern of genetic changes.

  • 24.
    Peker, Yüksel
    et al.
    Pulmonary Medicine, Koç University Graduate School of Health Sciences, Istanbul, Turkey.
    Celik, Y.
    Neuroscience, Koç University Graduate School of Health Sciences, Istanbul, Turkey.
    Yucel-Lindberg, T.
    Karolinska Institute, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Behboudi, Afrouz
    University of Skövde, School of Health Sciences. University of Skövde, Digital Health Research (DHEAR).
    Association of TNF-α (-308 G/A) Gene Polymorphism With the Changes in Circulating TNF-α Levels Over 12 Months in Response to CPAP Treatment in the RICCADSA Cohort2023In: American Journal of Respiratory and Critical Care Medicine, ISSN 1073-449X, E-ISSN 1535-4970, Vol. 207, article id A2714Article in journal (Other academic)
  • 25.
    Peker, Yüksel
    et al.
    Pulmonary Medicine, Koç University School of Medicine, Istanbul, Turkey.
    Thelander, Tilia
    University of Skövde, School of Health Sciences. University of Skövde, Digital Health Research (DHEAR).
    Yazici, D.
    Pulmonary Medicine, Koç University School of Medicine, Istanbul, Turkey.
    Celik, Y.
    Pulmonary Medicine, Koç University School of Medicine, Istanbul, Turkey.
    Yucel-Lindberg, T.
    Odontology, Karolinska Institute, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Thunström, E.
    Molecular and Clinical Medicine, Sahlgrenska Academy, University of Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Behboudi, Afrouz
    University of Skövde, School of Health Sciences. University of Skövde, Digital Health Research (DHEAR).
    Association of TNF-α (-308G/A) Gene Polymorphism with Circulating TNF-α Levels and Excessive Daytime Sleepiness in Adults with Coronary Artery Disease and Concomitant Obstructive Sleep Apnea2021In: American Journal of Respiratory and Critical Care Medicine, ISSN 1073-449X, E-ISSN 1535-4970, Vol. 203, no 9 suppl S, article id A4713Article in journal (Other academic)
  • 26.
    Samuelson, Emma
    et al.
    Department of Medical and Clinical Genetics, Institute of Biomedicine, University of Gothenburg, Sahlgrenska Academy, Sweden ; Department of Cell and Molecular Biology, Genetics, Lundberg Laboratory, University of Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Hedberg, Carola
    Department of Medical and Clinical Genetics, Institute of Biomedicine, University of Gothenburg, Sahlgrenska Academy, Sweden ; Department of Cell and Molecular Biology, Genetics, Lundberg Laboratory, University of Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Nilsson, Staffan
    Department of Mathematical Statistics, Chalmers University of Technology, Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Behboudi, Afrouz
    Department of Medical and Clinical Genetics, Institute of Biomedicine, University of Gothenburg, Sahlgrenska Academy, Sweden.
    Molecular classification of spontaneous endometrial adenocarcinomas in BDII rats2009In: Endocrine-Related Cancer, ISSN 1351-0088, E-ISSN 1479-6821, Vol. 16, no 1, p. 99-111Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Female rats of the BDII/Han inbred strain are prone to spontaneously develop endometrial carcinomas (EC) that in cell biology and pathogenesis are very similar to those of human. Human EC are classified into two major groups: Type I displays endometroid histology, is hormone-dependent, and characterized by frequent microsatellite instability and PTEN, K-RAS, and CTNNB1 (β-Catenin) mutations; Type II shows non-endometrioid histology, is hormone-unrelated, displays recurrent TP53 mutation, CDKN2A (P16) inactivation, over-expression of ERBB2 (Her2/neu), and reduced CDH1 (Cadherin 1 or E-Cadherin) expression. However, many human EC have overlapping clinical, morphologic, immunohistochemical, and molecular features of types I and II. The EC developed in BDII rats can be related to type I tumors, since they are hormone-related and histologically from endometrioid type. Here, we combined gene sequencing (Pten, Ifr1, and Ctnnb1) and real-time gene expression analysis (Pten, Cdh1, P16, Erbb2, Ctnnb1, Tp53, and Irf1) to further characterize molecular alterations in this tumor model with respect to different subtypes of EC in humans. No mutation in Pten and Ctnnb1 was detected, whereas three tumors displayed sequence aberrations of the Irf1 gene. Significant down regulation of Pten, Cdh1, p16, Erbb2, and Ctnnb1 gene products was found in the tumors. In conclusion, our data suggest that molecular features of spontaneous EC in BDII rats can be related to higher-grade human type I tumors and thus, this model represents an excellent experimental tool for research on this malignancy in human.

  • 27.
    Samuelson, Emma
    et al.
    University of Gothenburg, Cell and Molecular Biology-Genetics, Göteborg, Sweden.
    Karlsson, Sandra
    University of Gothenburg, Clinical Genetics SU/Sahlgrenska Hospital, Göteborg, Sweden.
    Behboudi, Afrouz
    University of Gothenburg, Clinical Genetics SU/Sahlgrenska Hospital, Göteborg, Sweden.
    Positional cloning of t(3;6) in rat endometrial cancer2008In: European Journal of Cancer Supplements, ISSN 1359-6349, E-ISSN 1878-1217, Vol. 6, no 9, p. 72-72Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 28.
    Samuelson, Emma
    et al.
    Department of Clinical Genetics, Institute of Biomedicine, Sahlgrenska Academy, University of Gothenburg, Göteborg, Sweden.
    Karlsson, Sara
    Department of Clinical Genetics, Institute of Biomedicine, Sahlgrenska Academy, University of Gothenburg, Göteborg, Sweden.
    Partheen, Karolina
    Department of Oncology, University of Gothenburg, Göteborg, Sweden.
    Nilsson, Staffan
    Department of Mathematical Statistics, Chalmers University of Technology, Göteborg, Sweden.
    Szpirer, Claude
    IBMM, Université Libre de Bruxelles, Charleroi, Belgium.
    Behboudi, Afrouz
    University of Skövde, School of Life Sciences. University of Skövde, The Systems Biology Research Centre. Department of Clinical Genetics, Institute of Biomedicine, Sahlgrenska Academy, University of Gothenburg, Göteborg, Sweden.
    BAC CGH-array identified specific small-scale genomic imbalances in diploid DMBA-induced rat mammary tumors2012In: BMC Cancer, ISSN 1471-2407, E-ISSN 1471-2407, Vol. 12, article id 352Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: Development of breast cancer is a multistage process influenced by hormonal and environmental factors as well as by genetic background. The search for genes underlying this malignancy has recently been highly productive, but the etiology behind this complex disease is still not understood. In studies using animal cancer models, heterogeneity of the   genetic background and environmental factors is reduced and thus analysis and identification of genetic aberrations in tumors may become easier. To identify chromosomal regions   potentially involved in the initiation and progression of mammary cancer, in the present   work we subjected a subset of experimental mammary tumors to cytogenetic and molecular   genetic analysis.

    Methods: Mammary tumors were induced with DMBA (7,12-dimethylbenz[a]anthrazene) in female rats from the susceptible SPRD-Cu3 strain and from crosses and backcrosses between this strain and the resistant WKY strain. We first produced a general overview of chromosomal aberrations in the tumors using conventional kartyotyping (G-banding) and Comparative Genome Hybridization (CGH) analyses. Particular chromosomal changes were then analyzed in more details using an in-house developed BAC (bacterial artificial chromosome) CGH-array platform.

    Results: Tumors appeared to be diploid by conventional karyotyping, however several sub-microscopic chromosome gains or losses in the tumor material were identified by BAC CGH-array analysis. An oncogenetic tree analysis based on the BAC CGH-array data suggested gain of rat chromosome (RNO) band 12q11, loss of RNO5q32 or RNO6q21 as the earliest events in the development of these mammary tumors.

    Conclusions: Some of the identified changes appear to be more specific for DMBA-induced mammary tumors and some are similar to those previously reported in ACI rat model for estradiol-induced mammary tumors. The later group of changes is more interesting, since they may represent anomalies that involve genes with a critical role in mammary tumor development. Genetic changes identified in this work are at very small scales and thus may provide a more feasible basis for the identification of the target gene(s). Identification of the genes underlying these chromosome changes can provide new insights to the mechanisms   of mammary carcinogenesis.

    Download full text (pdf)
    BAC CGH-array identified specific small-scale genomic imbalances in diploid DMBA-induced rat mammary tumors
  • 29.
    Samuelson, Emma
    et al.
    Cell and Molecular Biology-Genetics, Göteborg University, Sweden.
    Levan, Karin
    Department of Oncology, Göteborg University, Sweden.
    Horvath, G.
    Department of Oncology, Göteborg University, Sweden.
    Levan, Göran
    Department of Clinical Genetics, Göteborg University, Sweden.
    Behboudi, Afrouz
    Department of Clinical Genetics, Göteborg University, Sweden.
    321 POSTER FISH analysis revealed amplifications of genes in both BDII rat model for endometrial adenocarcinomas and human type I endometrial tumors2007In: European Journal of Cancer Supplements, ISSN 1359-6349, E-ISSN 1878-1217, Vol. 5, no 4, p. 63-63Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 30.
    Samuelson, Emma
    et al.
    Genetics, Cell and Molecular Biology, University of Gothenburg, Sweden ; Department of Clinical Genetics, Institute of Biomedicine, Sahlgrenska Academy, University of Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Nilsson, Johanna
    Department of Clinical Genetics, Institute of Biomedicine, Sahlgrenska Academy, University of Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Walentinsson, Anna
    Genetics, Cell and Molecular Biology, University of Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Szpirer, Claude
    IBMM, Université Libre de Bruxelles, Gosselies, Belgium.
    Behboudi, Afrouz
    Department of Clinical Genetics, Institute of Biomedicine, Sahlgrenska Academy, University of Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Absence of Ras mutations in rat DMBA-induced mammary tumors2009In: Molecular Carcinogenesis, ISSN 0899-1987, E-ISSN 1098-2744, Vol. 48, no 2, p. 150-155Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Animal cancer models reduce genetic background heterogeneity and thus, may facilitate identification and analysis of specific genetic aberrations in tumor cells. Rat and human mammary glands have high similarity in physiology and show comparable hormone responsiveness. Thus, spontaneous and carcinogen (e.g., NMU and DMBA)-induced rat mammary models are valuable tools for genetic studies of breast cancer. In NMU-induced rat mammary tumors, activating mutations in Hras codon 12 have frequently been reported and are supposed to contribute to the mammary carcinogenic process. Involvement of Ras mutations in DMBA-induced tumors is less clear. In the present study we investigated the mutation status of the three Ras genes, Hras, Kras, and Nras, in DMBA-induced rat mammary tumors. We examined codons 12, 13, and 61 of all three genes for mutations in 71 tumors using direct sequencing method that in experimental conditions is sensitive enough to detect single nucleotide mutations even when present in only 25% of the test sample. No activating Ras gene mutation was found. Thus, in contrast to NMU-induced rat mammary tumor, tumorigenesis in DMBA-induced rat mammary tumors seems to be independent on activating mutations in the Ras genes. Our finding suggests that the genetic pathways selected in mammary tumor development are influenced by and perhaps dependent on the identity of the inducing agent, again emphasizing the importance of tumor etiology on the genetic changes in the tumor cells. © 2008 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  • 31.
    Samuelson, Emma
    et al.
    Sahlgrenska Academy Department of Clinical Genetics, Göteborg University, Sweden.
    Nordlander, Carola
    Department of Cellular and Molecular Biology-Genetics Lundberg Institute, Göteborg, Sweden.
    Levan, Göran
    Behboudi, Afrouz
    Amplification Studies of MET and Cdk6 in a Rat Endometrial Tumor Model and Their Correlation to Human Type I Endometrial Carcinoma Tumors2008In: Advances in Experimental Medicine and Biology, ISSN 0065-2598, E-ISSN 2214-8019, Vol. 617, p. 511-517Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Cancer is known to be a genetic disease that is both polygenic and heterogeneous, in most cases involving changes in several genes in a stepwise fashion. The spectrum of individual genes involved in the initiation and progression of cancer is greatly influenced by genetic factors unique to each patient. A study of complex diseases such as cancer is complicated by the genetic heterogeneous background and environmental factors in the human population. Endometrial cancer (EC) is ranked fourth among invasive tumors in women. In Sweden, approximately 1300 women (27/100,000 women) are diagnosed annually. To be able to study the genetic alterations in cancer, the use of an animal model is very convenient. Females of the BDII strain are genetically predisposed to EC and 90% of female BDII rats develop EC during their lifetime. Thus, BDII rats have been used to model human EC with respect to the genetics of susceptibility and of tumor development. A set of rat EC tumors was analyzed using conventional cytogenetics and comparative genome hybridization (CGH). Chromosomal aberrations, i.e., gains, were found on rat chromosome 4 (RNO4). Using FISH analysis, we concluded that the Met oncogene and Cdk6 (cyclin-dependent kinase 6) were amplified in this set of EC tumors. The data from this investigation were used to analyze a set of human endometrial tumors for amplification of Cdk6 and Met. Our preliminary data are indicative for a good correlation between our findings in the BDII rat model for EAC and the situation in human EC. These data provide strong support for the use of animal model systems for better understanding and scrutinizing of human complex disease of cancer.

  • 32.
    Sjöling, Åsa
    et al.
    Department of Cell and Molecular Biology–Genetics, Lundberg Laboratory, Göteborg University, Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Samuelson, Emma
    Department of Cell and Molecular Biology–Genetics, Lundberg Laboratory, Göteborg University, Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Adamovic, Tatjana
    Department of Cell and Molecular Biology–Genetics, Lundberg Laboratory, Göteborg University, Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Behboudi, Afrouz
    Department of Cell and Molecular Biology–Genetics, Lundberg Laboratory, Göteborg University, Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Röhme, Dan
    Department of Cell and Molecular Biology–Genetics, Lundberg Laboratory, Göteborg University, Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Levan, Göran
    Department of Cell and Molecular Biology–Genetics, Lundberg Laboratory, Göteborg University, Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Recurrent allelic imbalance at the rat Pten locus in DMBA-induced fibrosarcomas2002In: Genes, Chromosomes and Cancer, ISSN 1045-2257, E-ISSN 1098-2264, Vol. 36, no 1, p. 70-79Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The tumor-suppressor gene PTEN (phosphatase and tensin homolog) is frequently inactivated in different types of human tumors. Less is known about the involvement of the homologous gene Pten in animal model systems of cancer. By sequencing one of the introns of rat Pten, we found an informative intragenic PCR marker suitable for genetic studies. Through use of this marker, the position of Pten in the genetic linkage map was localized to the distal part of rat chromosome 1 (RNO1) by analysis of F2 progeny from an intercross between inbred strains BN and LE. Subsequently, 22 markers from this region (including the intragenic Pten marker) were used to study the occurrence of allelic imbalance in distal RNO1 in fibrosarcomas that had been induced by DMBA in F1(BN×LE) rats. The analysis revealed that allelic imbalance was common in the vicinity of Pten, and there was loss or reduction of one of the Pten alleles in more than 60% of the fibrosarcomas. DNA sequencing was preformed to investigate whether the Pten allele remaining in the tumors was inactivated by mutation. However, no mutations were detected in the genomic sequence of Pten exons 5 to 9 in any of the fibrosarcomas, and normal mRNA transcripts were expressed in all tumors. Thus, based on the targeted selection for loss of Pten observed in some of these tumors and the absence of inactivation of the remaining allele, we suggest that haploinsufficiency of Pten may be an important factor in rat DMBA-induced fibrosarcomas. © 2002 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  • 33.
    Sjöling, Åsa
    et al.
    Department of Cell and Molecular Biology-Genetics, Göteborg, Sweden ; Department of Medical Microbiology and Immunology, Göteborg, Sweden.
    Walentinsson, Anna
    Department of Cell and Molecular Biology-Genetics, Göteborg, Sweden.
    Nordlander, Carola
    Department of Cell and Molecular Biology-Genetics, Göteborg, Sweden.
    Karlsson, Åsa
    Department of Cell and Molecular Biology-Genetics, Göteborg, Sweden.
    Behboudi, Afrouz
    Department of Cell and Molecular Biology-Genetics, Göteborg, Sweden.
    Samuelson, Emma
    Department of Cell and Molecular Biology-Genetics, Göteborg, Sweden.
    Levan, Göran
    Department of Cell and Molecular Biology-Genetics, Göteborg, Sweden.
    Röhme, Dan
    Department of Cell and Molecular Biology-Genetics, Göteborg, Sweden.
    Assessment of allele dosage at polymorphic microsatellite loci displaying allelic imbalance in tumors by means of quantitative competitive-polymerase chain reaction2005In: Cancer Genetics and Cytogenetics, ISSN 0165-4608, E-ISSN 1873-4456, Vol. 157, no 2, p. 97-103Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Analysis of allelic imbalance at polymorphic marker loci is usually employed to identify chromosomal regions affected by recurrent aberrations in tumor genomes. Such regions are likely to harbor genes involved in the onset and/or progression of cancer. Although often used to identify regions of loss of heterozygosity caused by deletions/rearrangements near tumor suppressor gene loci, allelic imbalance can also reflect regional amplification, indicating the presence of oncogenes. It is difficult to tell these two situations apart after ordinary polymerase chain reaction (PCR), but here we describe a method that distinguishes allelic loss from allelic gain. The level of allelic imbalance was determined by quantitative PCR (QPCR) in the presence of an internal control DNA that displayed a third allele at the locus studied. To validate the efficiency of allele quantitation, we analyzed an amplified region in a set of rat fibrosarcomas. In four tumor samples with amplification of the Met oncogene, we could show with QPCR that there was amplification of one of the alleles at a microsatellite marker located close to Met. QPCR may be useful for cancer studies because experiments may be predesigned for using either suitable microsatellite markers or the abundant and polymorphic poly-A tails of rodent identifier sequences.

  • 34.
    Visuttijai, Kittichate
    et al.
    University of Gothenburg, Göteborg, Sweden.
    Ejeskär, Katarina
    University of Skövde, School of Bioscience. University of Skövde, The Systems Biology Research Centre.
    Behboudi, Afrouz
    University of Skövde, School of Bioscience. University of Skövde, The Systems Biology Research Centre.
    Analyses of protein expression of PI 3-kinase/AKT signaling in response to altered expression of motor protein MYO1C2015In: Cancer Research, ISSN 0008-5472, E-ISSN 1538-7445, Vol. 75, no 15 Supplement, article id 2166Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 35.
    Visuttijai, Kittichate
    et al.
    University of Skövde, School of Bioscience. University of Skövde, The Systems Biology Research Centre. Department of Medical and Clinical Genetics, Sahlgrenska Academy, University of Gothenburg.
    Pettersson, Jennifer
    Department of Medical and Clinical Genetics, Sahlgrenska Academy, University of Gothenburg, Gothenburg.
    Mehrbani Azar, Yashar
    University of Skövde, School of Bioscience.
    van den Bout, Iman
    Department of physiology, Faculty of Health Sciences, University of Pretoria, South Africa.
    Örndal, Charlotte
    Department of Pathology, Sahlgrenska University Hospital, Gothenburg.
    Marcickiewicz, Janusz
    Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, Halland Hospital Varberg, Varberg.
    Nilsson, Staffan
    Institute of Mathematical Statistics, Chalmers University of Technology, Gothenburg.
    Hörnquist, Michael
    Department of Science and Technology, University of Linköping, Norrköping.
    Olsson, Björn
    University of Skövde, School of Bioscience. University of Skövde, The Systems Biology Research Centre.
    Ejeskär, Katarina
    University of Skövde, School of Bioscience. University of Skövde, The Systems Biology Research Centre.
    Behboudi, Afrouz
    University of Skövde, School of Bioscience. University of Skövde, The Systems Biology Research Centre.
    Lowered Expression of Tumor Suppressor Candidate MYO1C Stimulates Cell Proliferation, Suppresses Cell Adhesion and Activates AKT2016In: PLOS ONE, E-ISSN 1932-6203, Vol. 11, no 10, article id e0164063Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Myosin-1C (MYO1C) is a tumor suppressor candidate located in a region of recurrent losses distal to TP53. Myo1c can tightly and specifically bind to PIP2, the substrate of Phosphoinositide 3-kinase (PI3K), and to Rictor, suggesting a role for MYO1C in the PI3K pathway. This study was designed to examine MYO1C expression status in a panel of well-stratified endometrial carcinomas as well as to assess the biological significance of MYO1C as a tumor suppressor in vitro. We found a significant correlation between the tumor stage and lowered expression of MYO1C in endometrial carcinoma samples. In cell transfection experiments, we found a negative correlation between MYO1C expression and cell proliferation, and MYO1C silencing resulted in diminished cell migration and adhesion. Cells expressing excess of MYO1C had low basal level of phosphorylated protein kinase B (PKB, a.k.a. AKT) and cells with knocked down MYO1C expression showed a quicker phosphorylated AKT (pAKT) response in reaction to serum stimulation. Taken together the present study gives further evidence for tumor suppressor activity of MYO1C and suggests MYO1C mediates its tumor suppressor function through inhibition of PI3K pathway and its involvement in loss of contact inhibition.

    Download full text (pdf)
    KV1
1 - 35 of 35
CiteExportLink to result list
Permanent link
Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • apa-cv
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf