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  • 1.
    Asplund, Annika
    et al.
    University of Skövde, School of Bioscience. University of Skövde, The Systems Biology Research Centre. Takara Bio Europe AB (former Cellartis AB), Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Pradip, Arvind
    Takara Bio Europe AB (former Cellartis AB), Gothenburg, Sweden / Novo Nordisk A/S, Bagsværd, Denmark.
    van Giezen, Mariska
    Takara Bio Europe AB (former Cellartis AB), Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Aspegren, Anders
    Takara Bio Europe AB (former Cellartis AB), Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Choukair, Helena
    Takara Bio Europe AB (former Cellartis AB), Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Rehnström, Marie
    Takara Bio Europe AB (former Cellartis AB), Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Jacobsson, Susanna
    Takara Bio Europe AB (former Cellartis AB), Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Ghosheh, Nidal
    University of Skövde, School of Bioscience. University of Skövde, The Systems Biology Research Centre.
    El Hajjam, Dorra
    Takara Bio Europe AB (former Cellartis AB), Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Holmgren, Sandra
    Takara Bio Europe AB (former Cellartis AB), Gothenburg, Sweden / Institute of Biomedicine, Sahlgrenska Academy, University of Gothenburg, Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Larsson, Susanna
    Takara Bio Europe AB (former Cellartis AB), Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Benecke, Jörg
    Takara Bio Europe AB (former Cellartis AB), Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Butron, Mariela
    Takara Bio Europe AB (former Cellartis AB), Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Wigander, Annelie
    Takara Bio Europe AB (former Cellartis AB), Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Noaksson, Karin
    Takara Bio Europe AB (former Cellartis AB), Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Sartipy, Peter
    University of Skövde, School of Bioscience. University of Skövde, The Systems Biology Research Centre. AstraZeneca R&D, GMD CVMD GMed, Mölndal, Sweden.
    Björquist, Petter
    Takara Bio Europe AB (former Cellartis AB), Gothenburg, Sweden / NovaHep AB, Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Edsbagge, Josefina
    Takara Bio Europe AB (former Cellartis AB), Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Küppers-Munther, Barbara
    University of Skövde, School of Bioscience. University of Skövde, The Systems Biology Research Centre. Takara Bio Europe AB (former Cellartis AB), Arvid Wallgrens Backe 20, 413 46, Gothenburg, Sweden.
    One Standardized Differentiation Procedure Robustly Generates Homogenous Hepatocyte Cultures Displaying Metabolic Diversity from a Large Panel of Human Pluripotent Stem Cells2016In: Stem Cell Reviews, ISSN 1550-8943, E-ISSN 1558-6804, Vol. 12, no 1, p. 90-104Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Human hepatocytes display substantial functional inter-individual variation regarding drug metabolizing functions. In order to investigate if this diversity is mirrored in hepatocytes derived from different human pluripotent stem cell (hPSC) lines, we evaluated 25 hPSC lines originating from 24 different donors for hepatic differentiation and functionality. Homogenous hepatocyte cultures could be derived from all hPSC lines using onestandardized differentiation procedure. To the best of our knowledge this is the first report of a standardized hepatic differentiation procedure that is generally applicable across a large panel of hPSC lines without any adaptations to individual lines. Importantly, with regard to functional aspects, such as Cytochrome P450 activities, we observed that hepatocytes derived from different hPSC lines displayed inter-individual variation characteristic for primary hepatocytes obtained from different donors, while these activities were highly reproducible between repeated experiments using the same line. Taken together, these data demonstrate the emerging possibility to compile panels of hPSC-derived hepatocytes of particular phenotypes/genotypes relevant for drug metabolism and toxicity studies. Moreover, these findings are of significance for applications within the regenerative medicine field, since our stringent differentiation procedure allows the derivation of homogenous hepatocyte cultures from multiple donors which is a prerequisite for the realization of future personalized stem cell based therapies.

  • 2.
    Ghosheh, Nidal
    et al.
    University of Skövde, School of Bioscience. University of Skövde, The Systems Biology Research Centre. Institute of Biomedicine, Department of Clinical Chemistry and Transfusion Medicine, Sahlgrenska Academy, University of Gothenburg, Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Olsson, Björn
    University of Skövde, School of Bioscience. University of Skövde, The Systems Biology Research Centre.
    Edsbagge, Josefina
    Takara Bio Europe AB, Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Küppers-Munther, Barbara
    Takara Bio Europe AB, Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Van Giezen, Mariska
    Takara Bio Europe AB, Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Asplund, Annika
    University of Skövde, School of Bioscience. University of Skövde, The Systems Biology Research Centre.
    Andersson, Tommy B.
    AstraZeneca R&D, CVMD DMPK, Mölndal, Sweden / Department of Physiology and Pharmacology, Section of Pharmacogenetics, Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Björquist, Petter
    NovaHep AB, Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Carén, Helena
    Sahlgrenska Cancer Center, Department of Pathology, Institute of Biomedicine, Sahlgrenska Academy, University of Gothenburg, Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Simonsson, Stina
    Institute of Biomedicine, Department of Clinical Chemistry and Transfusion Medicine, Sahlgrenska Academy, University of Gothenburg, Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Sartipy, Peter
    University of Skövde, School of Bioscience. University of Skövde, The Systems Biology Research Centre. AstraZeneca R&D, GMD CVMD GMed, Mölndal, Sweden.
    Synnergren, Jane
    University of Skövde, School of Bioscience. University of Skövde, The Systems Biology Research Centre.
    Highly Synchronized Expression of Lineage-Specific Genes during In Vitro Hepatic Differentiation of Human Pluripotent Stem Cell Lines2016In: Stem Cells International, ISSN 1687-9678, Vol. 2016, article id 8648356Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Human pluripotent stem cells- (hPSCs-) derived hepatocytes have the potential to replace many hepatic models in drug discovery and provide a cell source for regenerative medicine applications. However, the generation of fully functional hPSC-derived hepatocytes is still a challenge. Towards gaining better understanding of the differentiation and maturation process, we employed a standardized protocol to differentiate six hPSC lines into hepatocytes and investigated the synchronicity of the hPSC lines by applying RT-qPCR to assess the expression of lineage-specific genes (OCT4, NANOG, T, SOX17, CXCR4, CER1, HHEX, TBX3, PROX1, HNF6, AFP, HNF4a, KRT18, ALB, AAT, and CYP3A4) which serve as markers for different stages during liver development. The data was evaluated using correlation and clustering analysis, demonstrating that the expression of these markers is highly synchronized and correlated well across all cell lines. The analysis also revealed a distribution of the markers in groups reflecting the developmental stages of hepatocytes. Functional analysis of the differentiated cells further confirmed their hepatic phenotype. Taken together, these results demonstrate, on the molecular level, the highly synchronized differentiation pattern across multiple hPSC lines. Moreover, this study provides additional understanding for future efforts to improve the functionality of hPSC-derived hepatocytes and thereby increase the value of related models.

  • 3.
    Godoy, Patricio
    et al.
    IfADo-Leibniz Research Centre for Working Environment and Human Factors at the Technical University Dortmund, Dortmund, Germany / Department of Physiology, Faculty of Biological Sciences, University of Concepción, Chile.
    Schmidt-Heck, Wolfgang
    Leibniz Institute for Natural Product Research and Infection Biology eV-Hans-Knöll Institute, Jena, Germany.
    Natarajan, Karthick
    University of Cologne, Institute of Neurophysiology and Center for Molecular Medicine Cologne (CMMC), Cologne, Germany.
    Lucendo-Villarin, Baltasar
    MRC Centre for Regenerative Medicine, University of Edinburgh, Edinburgh, United Kingdom.
    Szkolnicka, Dagmara
    MRC Centre for Regenerative Medicine, University of Edinburgh, Edinburgh, United Kingdom.
    Asplund, Annika
    University of Skövde, School of Bioscience. University of Skövde, The Systems Biology Research Centre. Takara Bio Europe AB (former Cellartis AB), Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Björquist, Petter
    NovaHep AB, Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Widera, Agata
    IfADo-Leibniz Research Centre for Working Environment and Human Factors at the Technical University Dortmund, Dortmund, Germany.
    Stöber, Regina
    IfADo-Leibniz Research Centre for Working Environment and Human Factors at the Technical University Dortmund, Dortmund, Germany.
    Campos, Gisela
    IfADo-Leibniz Research Centre for Working Environment and Human Factors at the Technical University Dortmund, Dortmund, Germany.
    Hammad, Seddik
    IfADo-Leibniz Research Centre for Working Environment and Human Factors at the Technical University Dortmund, Dortmund, Germany.
    Sachinidis, Agapios
    University of Cologne, Institute of Neurophysiology and Center for Molecular Medicine Cologne (CMMC), Cologne, Germany.
    Chaudhari, Umesh
    University of Cologne, Institute of Neurophysiology and Center for Molecular Medicine Cologne (CMMC), Cologne, Germany.
    Damm, Georg
    Charité University Medicine Berlin, Department of General-, Visceral- and Transplantation Surgery, Berlin, Germany.
    Weiss, Thomas S.
    Center for Liver Cell Research, Department of Pediatrics and Juvenile Medicine, University of Regensburg Hospital, Regensburg, Germany.
    Nüssler, Andreas
    Eberhard Karls University Tübingen, BG Trauma Center, Siegfried Weller Institut, Tübingen, Germany.
    Synnergren, Jane
    University of Skövde, School of Bioscience. University of Skövde, The Systems Biology Research Centre.
    Edlund, Karolina
    IfADo-Leibniz Research Centre for Working Environment and Human Factors at the Technical University Dortmund, Dortmund, Germany.
    Küppers-Munther, Barbara
    Takara Bio Europe AB (former Cellartis AB), Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Hay, David C.
    MRC Centre for Regenerative Medicine, University of Edinburgh, Edinburgh, United Kingdom.
    Hengstler, Jan G.
    IfADo-Leibniz Research Centre for Working Environment and Human Factors at the Technical University Dortmund, Dortmund, Germany.
    Gene networks and transcription factor motifs defining the differentiation of stem cells into hepatocyte-like cells2015In: Journal of Hepatology, ISSN 0168-8278, E-ISSN 1600-0641, Vol. 63, no 4, p. 934-942Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    BACKGROUND & AIMS: The differentiation of stem cells to hepatocyte-like cells (HLC) offers the perspective of unlimited supply of human hepatocytes. However, the degree of differentiation of HLC remains controversial. To obtain an unbiased characterization, we performed a transcriptomic study with HLC derived from human embryonic and induced stem cells (ESC, hiPSC) from three different laboratories.

    METHODS: Genome-wide gene expression profiles of ESC and HLC were compared to freshly isolated and up to 14days cultivated primary human hepatocytes. Gene networks representing successful and failed hepatocyte differentiation, and the transcription factors involved in their regulation were identified.

    RESULTS: Gene regulatory network analysis demonstrated that HLC represent a mixed cell type with features of liver, intestine, fibroblast and stem cells. The "unwanted" intestinal features were associated with KLF5 and CDX2 transcriptional networks. Cluster analysis identified highly correlated groups of genes associated with mature liver functions (n=1057) and downregulated proliferation associated genes (n=1562) that approach levels of primary hepatocytes. However, three further clusters containing 447, 101, and 505 genes failed to reach levels of hepatocytes. Key TF of two of these clusters include SOX11, FOXQ1, and YBX3. The third unsuccessful cluster, controlled by HNF1, CAR, FXR, and PXR, strongly overlaps with genes repressed in cultivated hepatocytes compared to freshly isolated hepatocytes, suggesting that current in vitro conditions lack stimuli required to maintain gene expression in hepatocytes, which consequently also explains a corresponding deficiency of HLC.

    CONCLUSIONS: The present gene regulatory network approach identifies key transcription factors which require modulation to improve HLC differentiation.

  • 4.
    Starokozhko, Viktoriia
    et al.
    Division of Pharmacokinetics Toxicology and Targeting, Groningen Research Institute for Pharmacy, University of Groningen, Groningen, The Netherlands.
    Vatakuti, Suresh
    Division of Pharmacokinetics Toxicology and Targeting, Groningen Research Institute for Pharmacy, University of Groningen, Groningen, The Netherlands.
    Schievink, Bauke H.
    Department of Clinical Pharmacy and Pharmacology, University of Groningen, University Medical Center Groningen, Groningen, The Netherlands.
    Merema, Marjolijn T.
    Division of Pharmacokinetics Toxicology and Targeting, Groningen Research Institute for Pharmacy, University of Groningen, Groningen, The Netherlands.
    Asplund, Annika
    University of Skövde, School of Bioscience. University of Skövde, The Systems Biology Research Centre.
    Synnergren, Jane
    University of Skövde, School of Bioscience. University of Skövde, The Systems Biology Research Centre.
    Aspegren, Anders
    Takara Bio Europe AB, Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Groothuis, Geny M. M.
    Division of Pharmacokinetics Toxicology and Targeting, Groningen Research Institute for Pharmacy, University of Groningen, Groningen, The Netherlands.
    Maintenance of drug metabolism and transport functions in human precision-cut liver slices during prolonged incubation for 5 days2017In: Archives of Toxicology, ISSN 0340-5761, E-ISSN 1432-0738, Vol. 91, no 5, p. 2079-2092Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Human precision-cut liver slices (hPCLS) are a valuable ex vivo model that can be used in acute toxicity studies. However, a rapid decline in metabolic enzyme activity limits their use in studies that require a prolonged xenobiotic exposure. The aim of the study was to extend the viability and function of hPCLS to 5 days of incubation. hPCLS were incubated in two media developed for long-term culture of hepatocytes, RegeneMed(®), and Cellartis(®), and in the standard medium WME. Maintenance of phase I and II metabolism was studied both on gene expression as well as functional level using a mixture of CYP isoform-specific substrates. Albumin synthesis, morphological integrity, and glycogen storage was assessed, and gene expression was studied by transcriptomic analysis using microarrays with a focus on genes involved in drug metabolism, transport and toxicity. The data show that hPCLS retain their viability and functionality during 5 days of incubation in Cellartis(®) medium. Albumin synthesis as well as the activity and gene expression of phase I and II metabolic enzymes did not decline during 120-h incubation in Cellartis(®) medium, with CYP2C9 activity as the only exception. Glycogen storage and morphological integrity were maintained. Moreover, gene expression changes in hPCLS during incubation were limited and mostly related to cytoskeleton remodeling, fibrosis, and moderate oxidative stress. The expression of genes involved in drug transport, which is an important factor in determining the intracellular xenobiotic exposure, was also unchanged. Therefore, we conclude that hPCLS cultured in Cellartis(®) medium are a valuable human ex vivo model for toxicological and pharmacological studies that require prolonged xenobiotic exposure.

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