his.sePublications
Change search
Refine search result
1 - 18 of 18
CiteExportLink to result list
Permanent link
Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • harvard1
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf
Rows per page
  • 5
  • 10
  • 20
  • 50
  • 100
  • 250
Sort
  • Standard (Relevance)
  • Author A-Ö
  • Author Ö-A
  • Title A-Ö
  • Title Ö-A
  • Publication type A-Ö
  • Publication type Ö-A
  • Issued (Oldest first)
  • Issued (Newest first)
  • Created (Oldest first)
  • Created (Newest first)
  • Last updated (Oldest first)
  • Last updated (Newest first)
  • Disputation date (earliest first)
  • Disputation date (latest first)
  • Standard (Relevance)
  • Author A-Ö
  • Author Ö-A
  • Title A-Ö
  • Title Ö-A
  • Publication type A-Ö
  • Publication type Ö-A
  • Issued (Oldest first)
  • Issued (Newest first)
  • Created (Oldest first)
  • Created (Newest first)
  • Last updated (Oldest first)
  • Last updated (Newest first)
  • Disputation date (earliest first)
  • Disputation date (latest first)
Select
The maximal number of hits you can export is 250. When you want to export more records please use the Create feeds function.
  • 1.
    Borg, Julia
    et al.
    Malmö University Hospital, Lund University, .
    Melander, Olle
    Malmö University Hospital, Lund University.
    Johansson, Linda
    University of Skövde, The Systems Biology Research Centre. University of Skövde, School of Life Sciences.
    Uvnäs-Moberg, Kerstin
    Swedish University of Agriculture Sciences.
    Rehfeld, Jens F.
    Rigshospitalet, University og Copenhagen.
    Ohlsson, Bodil
    Malmö University Hospital, Lund University.
    Gastroparesis is associated with oxytocin deficiency, oesophageal dysmotility with hyperCCKemia, and autonomic neuropathy with hypergastrinemia2009In: BMC Gastroenterology, ISSN 1471-230X, E-ISSN 1471-230X, Vol. 9, p. Article number 17-Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: Gastrointestinal (GI) dysmotility and autonomic neuropathy are common problems among diabetics with largely unknown aetiology. Many peptides are involved in the autonomic nervous system regulating the GI tract. The aim of this study was to examine if concentrations of oxytocin, cholecystokinin (CCK), gastrin and vasopressin in plasma differ between diabetics with normal function and dysfunction in GI motility.

    Methods: Nineteen patients with symptoms from the GI tract who had been examined with gastric emptying scintigraphy, oesophageal manometry, and deep-breathing test were included. They further received a fat-rich meal, after which blood samples were collected and plasma frozen until analysed for hormonal concentrations.

    Results: There was an increase in postprandial oxytocin plasma concentration in the group with normal gastric emptying (p = 0.015) whereas subjects with delayed gastric emptying had no increased oxytocin secretion (p = 0.114). Both CCK and gastrin levels increased after the meal, with no differences between subjects with normal respective delayed gastric emptying. The concentration of vasopressin did not increase after the meal. In patients with oesophageal dysmotility the basal level of CCK tended to be higher (p = 0.051) and those with autonomic neuropathy had a higher area under the curve (AUC) of gastrin compared to normal subjects (p = 0.007).

    Conclusion: Reduced postprandial secretion of oxytocin was found in patients with delayed gastric emptying, CCK secretion was increased in patients with oesophageal dysmotility, and gastrin secretion was increased in patients with autonomic neuropathy. The findings suggest that disturbed peptide secretion may be part of the pathophysiology of digestive complications in diabetics.

  • 2.
    Eklund, Malin B.
    et al.
    Department of Physiology and Pharmacology, Karolinska Institutet, SE-171 77 Stockholm, Sweden.
    Johansson, Linda
    University of Skövde, The Systems Biology Research Centre. University of Skövde, School of Life Sciences.
    Uvnäs-Moberg, Kerstin
    Department of Animal Environment and Health, Swedish University of Agriculture, P.O. Box 234, SE-532 23 Skara, Sweden.
    Arborelius, Lotta
    Department of Clinical Neuroscience, Division of Psychology, Karolinska Institutet, SE-171 76 Stockholm, Sweden.
    Differential effects of repeated long and brief maternal separation on behaviour and neuroendocrine parameters in Wistar dams2009In: Behavioural Brain Research, ISSN 0166-4328, E-ISSN 1872-7549, Vol. 203, no 1, p. 69-75Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Repeated, prolonged maternal separation has been suggested to model the development of a depression-like syndrome in rats. The long separations from the pups have been proposed to be stressful for the dams, which in turn could mediate the changes seen in adult offspring. In the present study we investigated whether prolonged maternal separation really is stressful for rat dams by studying parameters known to be affected by long-term stress such as spontaneous motor activity, anxiety-like behaviour, adrenal gland weight and plasma corticosterone levels. Dams were separated from their litter for either 4 h (MS240) or 15 min (MS15) on eight random days during postnatal day 1–14, or left undisturbed (animal facility reared, AFR). After weaning MS240 dams showed decreased peripheral activity and habituated slower in horizontal activity. On the contrary, MS15 dams showed more peripheral activity and less rearing activity compared to both AFR and MS240 dams when habituated to the testing apparatus, suggesting that MS15 dams are more anxious. The adrenal glands from MS15 dams weighed significantly less and plasma corticosterone levels were significantly higher compared to AFR and MS240 dams. These results suggest that repeated brief maternal separations from pups could be stressful for rat mothers, whereas prolonged separations are not. Since these results are in contrast to the current notion that the short separation procedure may be considered as a safe milieu, whereas the prolonged separations have been suggested to be stressful for both dams and pups, further studies in this field are warranted.

  • 3.
    Handlin, Linda
    University of Skövde, The Systems Biology Research Centre. University of Skövde, School of Life Sciences.
    Human-Human and Human-Animal Interaction: Some Common Physiological and Psychological Effects2010Doctoral thesis, comprehensive summary (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    The aim of the present thesis was to investigate hormonal and physiological effects in mothers during a breastfeeding session and in dogs and their owners in response to short-term interaction.In study one, sixty-six mothers receiving either exogenous oxytocin infusion and/or epidural analgesia (EDA) during labor or intramuscular oxytocin injection post partum were studied. Oxytocin, prolactin, adrenocorticotrophic hormone (ACTH) and cortisol levels, as well as blood pressure were measured during a breastfeeding session two days after birth. In response to breastfeeding two days after birth, the mothers displayed a pulsatile release of oxytocin and increasing prolactin levels. In addition, the activity in the HPA-axis was reduced and maternal blood pressure decreased. The results also show that EDA administration in combination with oxytocin during labor resulted insignificantly lower oxytocin levels and higher cortisol levels, as well as higher bloodpressure in response to breastfeeding two days after birth, compared to EDA administration alone. In addition, oxytocin infusions dose-dependently lowered the mothers’ endogenous oxytocin levels two days after birth. In study two, ten female dog owners and their male Labrador dogs participated, together with ten controls. Their levels of oxytocin, cortisol and insulin, as well as their heart rate, were measured. The connection between the quality of the dogowner relationship and hormone levels was also explored. Short-term interaction between dogs and their owners resulted in oxytocin release in both species and their cortisol levels and heart rate were also affected. Oxytocin levels and positive attitudes regarding the dog-owner relationship were positively correlated. In conclusion, both human-human and human-animal interactions induce oxytocin release and promote oxytocin mediated effects, such as decreasing cortisol levels and blood pressure. In addition, social interaction and oxytocin levels arepositively related.

  • 4.
    Handlin, Linda
    et al.
    University of Skövde, The Systems Biology Research Centre. University of Skövde, School of Life Sciences.
    Hydbring-Sandberg, Eva
    Swedish Univ Agr Sci, Dept Anat Physiol & Biochem, Uppsala, Sweden .
    Nilsson, Anne
    Swedish Univ Agr Sci, Dept Anim Environm & Hlth, Skara, Sweden .
    Ejdebäck, Mikael
    University of Skövde, School of Bioscience. University of Skövde, The Systems Biology Research Centre. Göteborgs universitet.
    Jansson, Anna
    Swedish Univ Agr Sci, Dept Anim Nutr & Management, S-75007 Uppsala, Sweden.
    Uvnäs-Moberg, Kerstin
    University of Skövde, The Systems Biology Research Centre. University of Skövde, School of Life Sciences.
    Short-Term Interaction between Dogs and Their Owners: Effects on Oxytocin, Cortisol, Insulin and Heart Rate-An Exploratory Study2011In: Anthrozoos, ISSN 0892-7936, E-ISSN 1753-0377, Vol. 24, no 3, p. 301-315Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The aim of this exploratory study was to determine heart rate and the levels of oxytocin, cortisol, and insulin in dogs and their owners in response to a short-term interaction. In addition, the dogs' behavior was studied. The owners' responses were compared with those obtained from a control group. Ten female volunteers and their own male Labrador dogs participated in an experiment during which the owner stroked, petted, and talked with her dog during the first 3 minutes. Blood samples were collected from both dog and owner before (0) and at 1, 3, 5, 15, 30, and 60 minutes after the start of the interaction. Blood samples were analyzed by EIA. Heart rate was monitored telemetrically. The data were analyzed using linear mixed models and paired t-tests. The dogs' oxytocin levels were significantly increased 3 minutes after the start of the interaction (p = 0.027). Cortisol levels were significantly increased after 15 and 30 minutes (p = 0.004 and p = 0.022, respectively), and heart rate was significantly decreased after 55 minutes (p = 0.008). The dogs displayed normal behaviors during the experiment. The owners' oxylocin levels peaked between 1 and 5 minutes after interaction (p = 0.026). No such effect was seen in the controls. Cortisol levels displayed a significant decrease at 15 or 30 minutes in both owners and controls, and insulin levels did so at 60 minutes (p = 0.030, p = 0.002 and p = 0.002, p < 0.0001, respectively). Heart rate decreased significantly in the owners at 55 and 60 minutes (p = 0.0008) but not in the controls. In conclusion, short-term sensory interaction between dogs and their owners influences hormonal levels and heart rate. However, further studies need to be performed in order to better understand the effects of interaction between dogs and their owners.

  • 5.
    Handlin, Linda
    et al.
    University of Skövde, The Systems Biology Research Centre. University of Skövde, School of Life Sciences. Department of Animal Environment and Health, Swedish University of Agriculture, Skara, Sweden.
    Jonas, Wibke
    Department of Women and Child Health, Division of Reproductive and Perinatal Health Care, Karolinska Institute, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Petersson, Maria
    Department of Molecular Medicine, Endocrine and Diabetes Unit, Karolinska University Hospital/Karolinska Institute, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Ejdebäck, Mikael
    University of Skövde, School of Life Sciences. University of Skövde, The Systems Biology Research Centre.
    Ransjö-Arvidsson, Anna-Berit
    Department of Women and Child Health, Division of Reproductive and Perinatal Health Care, Karolinska Institute, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Nissen, Eva
    University of Skövde, School of Life Sciences. Department of Women and Child Health, Division of Reproductive and Perinatal Health Care, Karolinska Institute, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Uvnäs-Moberg, Kerstin
    University of Skövde, School of Life Sciences. Department of Animal Environment and Health, Swedish University of Agriculture, Skara, Sweden.
    Effects of Sucking and Skin-to-Skin Contact on Maternal ACTH and Cortisol Levels During the Second Day Postpartum - Influence of Epidural Analgesia and Oxytocin in the Perinatal Period2009In: Breastfeeding Medicine, ISSN 1556-8253, E-ISSN 1556-8342, Vol. 4, no 4, p. 207-220Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background and Aims: In this study we made a detailed analysis of the mothers' release pattern of adreno-corticotropic hormone (ACTH) and cortisol during a breastfeeding session during the second day postpartum and related these patterns to maternal oxytocin levels as well to the duration of sucking and the duration of skin-to-skin contact before sucking the breast. Furthermore, we investigated if epidural analgesia and oxytocin administration during and after labor influenced the release pattern of ACTH and cortisol.

    Methods: Sixty-three primiparae were included in the study. Fourteen received oxytocin intramuscularly postpartum, nine received oxytocin infusion, 14 received epidural analgesia combined with oxytocin infusion, and six received epidural analgesia alone. Twenty mothers did not receive any of these medical interventions. Blood samples were analyzed for ACTH and cortisol by enzyme-linked immunoassay.

    Results: Both ACTH and cortisol levels fell significantly during the breastfeeding session. A significant negative relationship was found between oxytocin and ACTH levels, but not between oxytocin and cortisol levels. A contact before onset of sucking was significantly and negatively associated with lower cortisol levels, but not with ACTH levels. Cortisol levels differed significantly between mothers having received epidural analgesia with and without oxytocin.

    Conclusions: Breastfeeding is associated with a decrease of ACTH and cortisol levels. Skin-to-skin contact contributes to this effect. ACTH correlated negatively with the duration of sucking and median oxytocin levels, whereas cortisol levels correlated inversely with the duration of skin-to-skin contact preceding sucking, suggesting a partial dissociation between the mechanisms regulating ACTH and cortisol release. In addition, medical interventions in connection with birth influence the activity of the hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal axis 2 days after birth.

  • 6.
    Handlin, Linda
    et al.
    University of Skövde, School of Life Sciences. University of Skövde, The Systems Biology Research Centre.
    Jonas, Wibke
    Karolinska Institute.
    Ransjö-Arvidson, Anna-Berit
    Karolinska Institute.
    Petersson, Maria
    Karolinska University Hospital.
    Uvnäs-Moberg, Kerstin
    University of Skövde, School of Life Sciences. University of Skövde, The Systems Biology Research Centre.
    Nissen, Eva
    University of Skövde, School of Life Sciences. University of Skövde, The Systems Biology Research Centre.
    Influence of Common Birth Interventions on Maternal Blood Pressure Patterns During Breastfeeding 2 Days After Birth2012In: Breastfeeding Medicine, ISSN 1556-8253, Vol. 7, no 2, p. 93-99Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Objective: This study investigated possible influences of medical interventions during labor on maternal blood pressure during a breastfeed 2 days postpartum.

    Subjects and Methods: Sixty-six primiparae with normal deliveries were consecutively recruited. Blood pressure was measured at –5, 10, 30, and 60 minutes during a morning breastfeed 2 days postpartum. Five treatment groups were formed based on the medical interventions received during labor: Non-medicated mothers (Control group, n=21); mothers receiving epidural analgesia (EDA) with oxytocin (OT) stimulation (EDAOT group, n=14); mothers receiving EDA without OT stimulation (EDAnon-OT group, n=7); mothers receiving OT stimulation only (OT intravenously [iv] group, n=9); and mothers receiving 10 IU of OT intramuscularly (im) only (OT im group, n=15).

    Results: Baseline diastolic, but not systolic, blood pressure differed between the groups as displayed by significantly lower diastolic blood pressure in the EDAnon-OT group compared with the Control group, the OT iv group, and the EDAOT group (p=0.045, p=0.041, and p=0.024, respectively). Both systolic and diastolic blood pressure fell significantly during the breastfeeding session in the Control group (p=0.001 and p=0.004, respectively), the OT im group (p=0.006 and p=0.001, respectively), and the EDAOT group (p=0.028 and p=0.002, respectively), and the fall in diastolic blood pressure tended to be significant in the OT iv group (p=0.050). The duration of skin-to-skin contact before breastfeeding correlated positively with the decrease in systolic blood pressure in the OT im group (Rs=0.540, p=0.046).

    Conclusion: Administration of EDA during labor lowers baseline diastolic blood pressure and abolishes the fall in blood pressure in response to a breastfeed 2 days after birth.

  • 7.
    Handlin, Linda
    et al.
    University of Skövde, School of Health and Education. University of Skövde, Health and Education.
    Muller, Jasmin
    University of Skövde, School of Health and Education. University of Skövde, Health and Education.
    Ekström, Anette
    University of Skövde, School of Health and Education. University of Skövde, Health and Education.
    Promoting health of Swedish workers by complementary methods: example of a study design of a longitudinal randomized controlled intervention study2017In: Medical Research Archives, ISSN 2375-1916, Vol. 5, no 8, p. 1-13Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: When designing, implementing, and evaluating a work site health promotion program, it is necessary to ensure that the program is evidence based. The present article aims to present in-depth information on the design of a longitudinal randomized controlled complementary intervention pilot study that follows the Consort recommendations to evaluate possible effects of a health promotive intervention in healthy workers.

    Methods: Employees from four different workplaces were randomly assigned to one of the following groups: i) Massage and mental training (sitting in the armchair and receiving mechanical massage while listening to mental training programs, n=19), ii) Massage (sitting in the armchair and receiving mechanical massage only, n=19), iii) Mental training (sitting in the armchair and listening to mental training programs only, n=19), iv) Pause (sitting in the armchair but not receiving mechanical massage or listening to mental training programs, n=19), v) Control (not sitting in the armchair at all, n=17). The study lasted for eight weeks. Immediately before the randomization, after four weeks and after eight weeks the participants responded to statements from the Swedish Scale of Personality and had their heart rate, blood pressure and fingertip temperature measured.

    Results: Receiving mechanical massage and listening to mental training programs, either separately or in combination, during working hours had some positive effects on the employees’ own evaluation of their health, as well as their heart rate, blood pressure and fingertip temperature. However, the intervention need to be evaluated further.

    Conclusion: The approach described makes it possible to design, implement and evaluate a work site health promotion program, also on pilot-study level and these results should be seen as a first step towards larger randomized studies. This types of studies need to focus on healthy participants and special care should be taken to guarantee adequately powered study groups and their homogeneity.

  • 8.
    Handlin, Linda
    et al.
    University of Skövde, School of Life Sciences. University of Skövde, The Systems Biology Research Centre.
    Nilsson, Anne
    University of Skövde, School of Life Sciences. University of Skövde, The Systems Biology Research Centre.
    Ejdebäck, Mikael
    University of Skövde, School of Bioscience. University of Skövde, The Systems Biology Research Centre.
    Hydbring-Sandberg, Eva
    University of Agricultural Sciences, Uppsala.
    Uvnäs-Moberg, Kerstin
    University of Skövde, School of Life Sciences. University of Skövde, The Systems Biology Research Centre.
    Associations between the Psychological Characteristics of the Human-Dog Relationship and Oxytocin and Cortisol Levels2012In: Anthrozoos, ISSN 0892-7936, E-ISSN 1753-0377, Vol. 25, no 2, p. 215-228Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The aim of the present study was to explore possible correlations between dog owners' relationships with their dogs, as measured with the Monash Dog Owner Relationship Scale (MDORS), and oxytocin and cortisol levels in both the owners and their dogs. Ten female owners of male Labrador Retrievers completed the MDORS. The scores obtained from the single items, subscales, and total score of the MDORS were calculated. Ten blood samples were collected from each dog owner and her dog during a 60-minute interaction. Blood samples were analyzed for oxytocin and cortisol by Enzyme Immuno Assay (EIA) and mean values of oxytocin and cortisol were calculated in both owners and dogs. The MDORS scores obtained were correlated with basal and mean oxytocin and cortisol levels. The correlation analysis revealed some relationships between the scores of items in the MDORS that reflect the character of the dog-owner-relationship and the owners' hormone levels. For example, higher oxytocin levels in the owners were associated with greater frequency in kissing their dogs (rs = 0.864, p = 0.001). Lower cortisol levels in the owners were associated with their perception that it will be more traumatic when their dog dies (rs = -0.730, p = 0.025). The correlation analysis also revealed some relationships between the scores of items in the MDORS and the dogs' hormone levels. For example, greater frequency in owners kissing their dogs was associated with higher oxytocin levels in the dogs (rs = 0.753, p = 0.029). Six items in the subscale Perceived Costs, as well as the subscale itself, correlated significantly with the dogs' oxytocin levels (rs = 0.820, p = 0.007), that is, the lower the perceived cost, the higher the dogs' oxytocin levels. In addition, significant correlations between the oxytocin levels of the owners and the dogs were demonstrated. Possible mechanisms behind these correlations are discussed. In conclusion, the scores of some items and the subscales of the MDORS correlated with oxytocin, and to a lesser extent cortisol, levels in both the owners and dogs.

  • 9.
    Handlin, Linda
    et al.
    University of Skövde, School of Health and Education. University of Skövde, Health and Education.
    Nilsson, Anne
    Department of Animal Environment and Health, Swedish University of Agricultural Sciences, Skara, Sweden.
    Lidfors, Lena
    Department of Animal Environment and Health, Swedish University of Agricultural Sciences, Skara, Sweden.
    Petersson, Maria
    Department of Molecular Medicine and Surgery, Endocrine and Diabetes Unit, Karolinska Institutet, Sweden.
    Uvnäs-Moberg, Kerstin
    Department of Animal Environment and Health, Swedish University of Agricultural Sciences, Skara, Sweden.
    The Effects of a Therapy Dog on the Blood Pressure and Heart Rate of Older Residents in a Nursing Home2018In: Anthrozoos, ISSN 0892-7936, E-ISSN 1753-0377, Vol. 31, no 5, p. 567-576Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The aim of the present project was to investigate whether repeated visits by a therapy dog to nursing homes might affect the older residents’ systolic blood pressure and heart rate. A secondary aim was to investigate and compare effects (differences in responses) in older people with high and normal systolic blood pressure. The project consisted of two consecutive studies; the dog study (two researchers and a therapy dog with a handler visited the residents at three nursing homes, n = 13), and the controlstudy (the two researchers alone visited the residents at three different nursinghomes, n = 13). The studies were divided into three periods; period 1(weeks 1–2), period 2 (weeks 3–4), and period 3 (weeks 5–6) and included two visits per week. The dog and her handler visited during periods 2 and 3 in the dog study. Participants’ heart rate and blood pressure were measured at 0 and 20 minutes at each visit. The data were analyzed using Friedman’s twowayanalysis of Variance by Rank with post-hoc analysis using Wilcoxonsigned-rank tests with a Bonferroni correction, and also with the mann-Whitney U test for independent samples. In the dog study, participants’ heartrate decreased significantly (p = 0.006) from period 1 to period 3. Participants with an initial systolic blood pressure ≥ 130 mmhg had a significant decreasein both systolic blood pressure (p = 0.009) and heart rate (p = 0.009). In the control study, participants’ heart rate and systolic blood pressure did not change significantly. the participants in the dog study had a significantly lower systolic blood pressure during period 3 (p = 0.016) compared with those in the control study. In conclusion, repeated visits by a therapy dog–handler team decreased the older adults’ heart rate, and for those with high initial systolic blood pressure, blood pressure also decreased. In addition, systolic blood pressure decreased significantly in the dog group when compared with the control group.

  • 10.
    Jonas, W.
    et al.
    Division of Reproductive and Perinatal Heath Care, Department of Woman and Child Health, Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Johansson, Linda M.
    University of Skövde, The Systems Biology Research Centre. University of Skövde, School of Life Sciences. Department of Animal Environment and Health, Swedish University of Agriculture, Skara, Sweden.
    Nissen, Eva
    University of Skövde, School of Life Sciences. Division of Reproductive and Perinatal Heath Care, Department of Woman and Child Health, Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Ejdebäck, Mikael
    University of Skövde, The Systems Biology Research Centre. University of Skövde, School of Life Sciences.
    Ransjö-Arvidson, A. B.
    Division of Reproductive and Perinatal Heath Care, Department of Woman and Child Health, Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Uvnäs-Moberg, Kerstin
    Department of Animal Environment and Health, Swedish University of Agriculture, Skara.
    Effects of Intrapartum Oxytocin Administration and Epidural Analgesia on the Concentration of Plasma Oxytocin and Prolactin, in Response to Suckling During the Second Day Postpartum2009In: Breastfeeding Medicine, ISSN 1556-8253, E-ISSN 1556-8342, Vol. 4, no 2, p. 71-82Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: Oxytocin and prolactin stimulate milk ejection and milk production during breastfeeding. The aim of the present study was to make a detailed analysis of maternal release of oxytocin and prolactin in response to breastfeeding during the second day postpartum in mothers who had received oxytocin either intravenously for stimulation of labor or intramuscularly for prevention of postpartum hemorrhage and/or epidural analgesia or those who had received no such treatment in connection with birth.

    Methods: In a descriptive comparative study plasma oxytocin and prolactin concentrations were measured in response to suckling during the second day postpartum in women who had received intravenous intrapartum oxytocin (n = 8), intramuscular postpartum oxytocin (n = 13), or epidural analgesia, either with (n = 14) or without (n = 6) intrapartum oxytocin infusion, and women who received none of these interventions (n = 20). Hormone levels were analyzed by enzyme immunoassay.

    Results: All mothers showed a pulsatile oxytocin pattern during the first 10 minutes of breastfeeding. Women who had received epidural analgesia with oxytocin infusion had the lowest endogenous median oxytocin levels. The more oxytocin infusion the mothers had received during labor, the lower their endogenous oxytocin levels were during a breastfeeding during the second day postpartum. A significant rise of prolactin was observed after 20 minutes in all women, but after 10 minutes in mothers having received oxytocin infusion during labor. In all women, oxytocin variability and the rise of prolactin levels between 0 and 20 minutes correlated significantly with median oxytocin and prolactin levels.

    Conclusion: Oxytocin, released in a pulsatile way, and prolactin were released by breastfeeding during the second day postpartum. Oxytocin infusion decreased endogenous oxytocin levels dose-dependently. Furthermore, oxytocin infusion facilitated the release of prolactin. Epidural analgesia in combination with oxytocin infusion influenced endogenous oxytocin levels negatively.

  • 11.
    Muller, Jasmin
    et al.
    University of Skövde, School of Health and Education. University of Skövde, Health and Education.
    Ekström, Anette
    University of Skövde, School of Health and Education. University of Skövde, Health and Education.
    Harlén, Mikael
    University of Skövde, School of Engineering Science. University of Skövde, The Virtual Systems Research Centre.
    Lindmark, Ulrika
    School of Health Sciences, Jönköping University, Jönköping, Sweden.
    Handlin, Linda
    University of Skövde, School of Health and Education. University of Skövde, Health and Education.
    Mechanical massage and mental training program effect employees' heart rate, blood pressure and fingertip temperature: An exploratory pilot study2016In: European Journal of Integrative Medicine, ISSN 1876-3820, E-ISSN 1876-3839, Vol. 8, no 5, p. 762-768Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Introduction: Inability to relax and recover is suggested to be a key factor for stress-related health problems. This study aimed to investigate possible effects of mechanical massage and mental training, used either separately or in combination during working hours. Methods: Employees were randomly assigned to one of the following groups: i) Mechanical massage combined with mental training (n = 19), ii) Mechanical massage (n = 19), iii) Mental training (n = 19), iv) Pause (n = 19), v) Control (n = 17). The study lasted for eight weeks. Heart rate, blood pressure and fingertip temperature were measured at start, after four and after eight weeks. Results: Between-group analysis showed that heart rate differed significantly between the groups after 4 weeks (p = 0.020) and tended to differ after eight weeks (p = 0.072), with lowest levels displayed in the massage group and the control group. Blood pressure and fingertip temperature did not differ between the groups. Within-group analysis showed that mechanical massage decreased heart rate (p = 0.038) and blood pressure (systolic p = 0.019, diastolic p = 0.026) and increased fingertip temperature (p = 0.035). Mental training programs reduced heart rate (p = 0.036). Combining the two methods increased diastolic blood pressure (p = 0.028) and decreased fingertip temperature (p = 0.031). The control group had a significant decrease in systolic blood pressure during the first four weeks of the study (p = 0.038) Conclusion: Receiving mechanical massage and listening to mental training programs, either separately or in combination, during working hours had some positive effects on the employees’ heart rate, blood pressure and fingertip temperature. The effects were especially strong for employees who received mechanical massage only.

  • 12.
    Muller, Jasmin
    et al.
    University of Skövde, School of Health and Education. University of Skövde, Health and Education.
    Handlin, Linda
    University of Skövde, School of Health and Education. University of Skövde, Health and Education.
    Harlén, Mikael
    University of Skövde, School of Engineering Science.
    Lindmark, Ulrika
    School of Health Sciences, Jönköping University, Jönköping, Sweden.
    Ekström, Anette
    University of Skövde, School of Health and Education. University of Skövde, Health and Education.
    Mechanical massage and mental training programmes affect employees´ anxiety, stress susceptibility and detachment – a randomised explorative pilot study2015In: BMC Complementary and Alternative Medicine, ISSN 1472-6882, E-ISSN 1472-6882, Vol. 15, no 1, article id 302Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    BACKGROUND:

    Working people's reduced ability to recover has been proposed as a key factor behind the increase in stress-related health problems. One not yet evidence-based preventive method designed to help employees keep healthy and be less stressed is an armchair with built-in mechanical massage and mental training programmes, This study aimed to evaluate possible effects on employees' experience of levels of "Anxiety", "Stress Susceptibility", "Detachment" and "Social Desirability" when using mechanical massage and mental training programmes, both separately and in combination, during working hours.

    METHODS:

    Employees from four different workplaces were randomly assigned to one of the following groups: i) Massage and mental training (sitting in the armchair and receiving mechanical massage while listening to the mental training programmes, n=19), ii) Massage (sitting in the armchair and receiving mechanical massage only, n=19), iii) Mental training (sitting in the armchair and listening to the mental training programmes only, n=19), iv) Pause (sitting in the armchair but not receiving mechanical massage or listening to the mental training programmes, n=19), v) Control (not sitting in the armchair at all, n=17). In order to discover how the employees felt about their own health they were asked to respond to statements from the "Swedish Scale of Personality" (SSP), immediately before the randomisation, after four weeks and after eight weeks (end-of-study).

    RESULTS:

    There were no significant differences between the five study groups for any of the traits studied ("Somatic Trait Anxiety", "Psychic Trait Anxiety", "Stress Susceptibility", "Detachment" and "Social Desirability") at any of the occasions. However, the massage group showed a significant decrease in the subscale "Somatic Trait Anxiety" (p=0.032), during the entire study period. Significant decreases in the same subscale were also observed in the pause group between start and week eight (p=0.040) as well as between week four and week eight (p=0.049) and also in the control group between the second and third data collection (p=0.014). The massage and mental training group showed a significant decrease in "Stress Susceptibility" between week four and week eight (p=0.022). The pause group showed a significant increase in the subscale "Detachment" (p=0.044).

    CONCLUSIONS:

    There were no significant differences between the five study groups for any of the traits studied. However, when looking at each individual group separately, positive effects in their levels of "Anxiety", "Stress Susceptibility" and "Detachment" could be seen. Although the results from this pilot study indicate some positive effects, mechanical chair massage and mental training programmes used in order to increase employee's ability to recover, needs to be evaluated further as tools to increase the employees ability to recover.

  • 13.
    Muller, Jasmin
    et al.
    University of Skövde, School of Health and Education. University of Skövde, Health and Education.
    Handlin, Linda
    University of Skövde, School of Health and Education. University of Skövde, Health and Education.
    Harlén, Mikael
    University of Skövde, School of Engineering Science. University of Skövde, The Virtual Systems Research Centre.
    Lindmark, Ulrika
    Högskolan i Jönköping, Sweden.
    Ekström, Anette
    University of Skövde, School of Health and Education. University of Skövde, Health and Education.
    The value of armchairs in providing mechanical massage and mental relaxation programmes is not established for workplace health promotion2016In: Focus on Alternative and Complementary Therapies, ISSN 1465-3753, E-ISSN 2042-7166, Vol. 21, no 1, p. 44-45Article in journal (Other academic)
  • 14.
    Petersson, Maria
    et al.
    Endocrine and Diabetes Unit, Department of Molecular Medicine and Surgery, Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Uvnäs-Moberg, Kerstin
    Department of Animal Environment and Health, Swedish University of Agricultural Sciences, Skara, Sweden.
    Nilsson, Anne
    Department of Animal Environment and Health, Swedish University of Agricultural Sciences, Skara, Sweden.
    Gustafsson, Lise-Lotte
    Department of Animal Environment and Health, Swedish University of Agricultural Sciences, Skara, Sweden.
    Hydbring-Sandberg, Eva
    Department of Anatomy, Physiology and Biochemistry, Swedish University of Agricultural Sciences, Uppsala, Sweden.
    Handlin, Linda
    University of Skövde, School of Health and Education. University of Skövde, Health and Education.
    Oxytocin and Cortisol Levels in Dog Owners and Their Dogs Are Associated with Behavioral Patterns: An Exploratory Study2017In: Frontiers in Psychology, ISSN 1664-1078, E-ISSN 1664-1078, Vol. 8, article id 1796Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    We have previously shown that dog–owner interaction results in increasing oxytocin levels in owners and dogs, decreasing cortisol levels in owners but increasing cortisol levels in dogs. The present study aimed to further investigate whether oxytocin and cortisol levels in the previously tested owners and dogs were associated with their behaviors during the interaction experiment. Ten female volunteer dog–owners and their male Labrador dogs participated in a 60 min interaction experiment with interaction taking place during 0–3 min and blood samples for analysis of oxytocin and cortisol were collected at 0, 1, 3, 5, 15, 30, and 60 min. The entire experiment was videotaped and the following variables were noted; the different types (stroking, scratching, patting and activating touch, i.e., scratching and patting combined) as well as the frequency of touch applied by the owner, the number of times the owner touched her dog, the dog’s positions and time spent in each position. Correlations were analyzed between the behavioral variables and basal oxytocin levels, maximum oxytocin levels, delta oxytocin levels, basal cortisol levels and cortisol levels at 15 min. Owners with low oxytocin levels before and during the interaction touched their dogs more frequently (0 min: Rs = −0.683, p = 0.042; oxytocin maximum: Rs = −0.783, p = 0.013). The lower the dogs’ oxytocin levels during the interaction, the more stroking they received (Rs = −0.717, p = 0.041). The more frequently activating touch was applied by the owner, the higher the dogs’ cortisol levels became (15 min: Rs = 0.661, p = 0.038). The higher the owners’ maximum oxytocin level the fewer position changes the dogs made (Rs = −0.817, p = 0.007) and the shorter time they spent sitting (Rs = −0.786, p = 0.036), whereas the higher the owners’ basal cortisol levels, the longer time the dogs spent standing (0 min: Rs = 0.683, p = 0.041). In conclusion, oxytocin and cortisol levels, both in dogs and in their owners, are associated with the way the owners interact with their dogs and also with behaviors caused by the interaction.

  • 15.
    Rehn, Therese
    et al.
    Swedish University of Agricultural Sciences, Department of Animal Environment and Health, Uppsala, Sweden.
    Handlin, Linda
    University of Skövde, School of Bioscience. University of Skövde, The Systems Biology Research Centre.
    Uvnäs-Moberg, Kerstin
    University of Skövde, School of Bioscience. University of Skövde, The Systems Biology Research Centre. Swedish University of Agricultural Sciences, Department of Animal Environment and Health, Uppsala, Sweden.
    Keeling, Linda J.
    Swedish University of Agricultural Sciences, Department of Animal Environment and Health, Uppsala, Sweden.
    Dogs' endocrine and behavioural responses at reunion are affected by how the human initiates contact2014In: Physiology and Behavior, ISSN 0031-9384, E-ISSN 1873-507X, Vol. 124, p. 45-53Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 16.
    Uvnäs-Moberg, Kerstin
    et al.
    Department of Animal Environment and Health, Swedish University of Agricultural Sciences, Skara, Sweden.
    Handlin, Linda
    University of Skövde, School of Health and Education. University of Skövde, Health and Education.
    Kendall-Tackett, Kathleen
    Texas Tech University School of Medicine, Amarillo, TX, USA.
    Petersson, Maria
    Department of Molecular Medicine and Surgery, Endocrine and Diabetes Unit, Karolinska Institutet, Sweden.
    Oxytocin is a principal hormone that exerts part of its effects by active fragments2019In: Medical Hypotheses, ISSN 0306-9877, E-ISSN 1532-2777, Vol. 133, p. 1-9, article id 109394Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Oxytocin is a nonapeptide consisting of a cyclic six amino-acid structure and a tail of three amino acids. It was originally known for its ability to induce milk ejection and to stimulate uterine contractions. More recently, oxytocin has been shown to stimulate social behaviors, and exert pain-relieving, anti-stress/anti-inflammatory and restorative effects. We hypothesize that oxytocin is a principal hormone that, in part, exerts its effects after degradation to active fragments with more specific effect profiles. Experimental findings on rats show that administered oxytocin exerts biphasic effects. For example, after an initial increase in pain threshold, a second more long-lasting increase follows. Blood pressure and cortisol levels initially increase and then reverse into a long-lasting decrease in blood pressure and cortisol. Whereas the initial effects are, the second-phase effects are not blocked by an oxytocin antagonist, but by an opioid mu-antagonist and by an alpha 2-adrenoreceptor antagonist, respectively, suggesting that other receptors are involved. Repeated administration of oxytocin induces multiple anti-stress effects, which are mediated by alpha 2-adrenoreceptors. Repeated administration of linear oxytocin and linear oxytocin fragments with a retained C-terminal reduce spontaneous motor activity, a sedative or anti-stress effect, suggesting that alpha 2-adrenoreceptors have been activated. In contrast, linear mid-fragments stimulate motor activity. Low-intensity stimulation of cutaneous nerves in rats, as well as breastfeeding and skin-to-skin contact between mothers and babies, trigger immediate anti-stress effects. Some of these effects are likely caused by open ring/linear C-terminal fragments activating alpha 2-adrenoreceptors. Oxytocin fragments may be pre-formed and released in the brain or created by metabolic conversion of the principal hormone oxytocin in the central nervous system. Oxytocin and its fragments may also be released from peripheral sites, such as peripheral nerves, the gastrointestinal tract, and blood vessels in response to decreased sympathetic or increased parasympathetic nervous tone. Smaller fragments of oxytocin produced in the periphery may easily pass the blood-brain barrier to induce effects in the brain. In conclusion, oxytocin is linked to many different, sometimes opposite effects. The intact cyclic molecule may act to initiate social interaction and associated psychophysiological effects, whereas linear oxytocin and C-terminal fragments may induce relaxation and anti-stress effects following social interaction. In this way, the principal hormone oxytocin and its fragments may take part in a behavioral sequence, ranging from approach and interaction to calm and relaxation. Linear fragments, with an exposed cysteine-residue, may exert anti-inflammatory and antioxidant effects and thereby contribute to the health-promoting effects of oxytocin. 

  • 17.
    Uvnäs-Moberg, Kerstin
    et al.
    The Swedish University of Agricultural Sciences, Skara.
    Handlin, Linda
    University of Skövde, School of Life Sciences. University of Skövde, The Systems Biology Research Centre.
    Petersson, Maria
    Karolinska Institutet.
    Promises and pitfalls of hormone research in human-animal interaction2011In: How Animals Affect Us: Examining the Influence of Human-Animal Interaction on Child Development and Human Health / [ed] Peggy McCardle, Sandra McCune, James A. Griffin, Valerie Maholmes, American Psychological Association (APA), 2011, 1Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 18.
    Uvnäs-Moberg, Kerstin
    et al.
    University of Skövde, School of Health and Education. University of Skövde, Health and Education. Department of Animal Environment and Health, Swedish University of Agricultural Sciences, Skara, Sweden.
    Handlin, Linda
    University of Skövde, School of Health and Education. University of Skövde, Health and Education.
    Petersson, Maria
    Department of Molecular Medicine and Surgery, Endocrine and Diabetes Unit, Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Self-soothing behaviors with particular reference to oxytocin release induced by non-noxious sensory stimulation2015In: Frontiers in Psychology, ISSN 1664-1078, E-ISSN 1664-1078, Vol. 5, article id 1529Article, review/survey (Refereed)
1 - 18 of 18
CiteExportLink to result list
Permanent link
Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • harvard1
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf