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  • 1.
    Björk, Maria
    et al.
    University of Skövde, School of Life Sciences.
    Johansson Sundler, Annelie
    University of Skövde, School of Life Sciences.
    Hammarlund, Kina
    University of Skövde, School of Life Sciences.
    Hallström, Inger
    Lund University, Department of Health Sciences, Lund, Sweden.
    Living an everyday life shaded with traces from the cancer trajectory – families' lived experiences in a six year follow up2012In: Pediatric Blood & Cancer, ISSN 1545-5009, E-ISSN 1545-5017, Vol. 59, no 6, p. 1130-1130Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 2.
    Björk, Maria
    et al.
    University of Skövde, School of Health and Education. University of Skövde, Health and Education. CHILD Research Group, Department of Nursing Science, School of Health Sciences, Jönköping University, Jönköping, Sweden.
    Sundler, Annelie J.
    University of Skövde, School of Health and Education. University of Skövde, Health and Education. Faculty of Caring Science, Work Life and Social Welfare, University of Borås, Borås, Sweden.
    Hallström, Inger
    Department of Health Sciences, Faculty of Medicine, Lund University, Lund, Sweden.
    Hammarlund, Kina
    University of Skövde, School of Health and Education. University of Skövde, Health and Education.
    Like being covered in a wet and dark blanket: Parents' lived experiences of losing a child to cancer2016In: European Journal of Oncology Nursing, ISSN 1462-3889, E-ISSN 1532-2122, Vol. 25, p. 40-45Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Purpose: The aim of this study was to illuminate parents' lived experiences of losing a child to cancer. Method: Interviews and a narrative about parents' experiences of losing a child to cancer were gathered from six parents of children whom had participated in a longitudinal study across the child's illness trajectory. The analysis of the data was inspired by van Manen's hermeneutic phenomenological approach. Results: One essential theme emerged: Like being covered in a wet and dark blanket, as well as six related themes: Feeling conflicting emotions, Preparing for the moment of death, Continuing parenting after death, Recollecting and sharing memories, Working through the sorrow and New perspectives in life. Conclusion: There is a need for good palliative care. If not, there is a risk that the parent will perseverate and blame themselves for not being a good parent during the suffering child's last time in life. Meetings with the parents six months and two years after the child's death might facilitate healing through the grief process. 

  • 3.
    Björk, Maria
    et al.
    University of Skövde, School of Life Sciences.
    Thelin, Anna
    Ryhov Hospital, Jönköping.
    Peterson, Inger
    Ryhov Hospital, Jönköping.
    Hammarlund, Kina
    University of Skövde, School of Life Sciences.
    A journey filled with emotions - mothers' experiences of breastfeeding their preterm infant in a Swedish neonatal ward2012In: Breastfeeding Review, ISSN 0729-2759, Vol. 20, no 1, p. 25-31Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The study took place in a 10-bed neonatal ward in a hospital in the south of Sweden and includes mothers having given birth to a preterm infant born before the 37th week of gestation. The aim of the study was to illuminate mothers' experiences of breastfeeding a preterm infant in a neonatal ward. Data collection includes written protocols from twelve mothers. These protocols were analysed thematically. The results indicated that the mothers should be offered a private place where they can breastfeed or express breastmilk, and that the breastmilk should not be placed in a shared area. The mothers described that they did not want to be separated from their preterm infant during the night. Finally, they also pointed out the importance of support from the health professionals for establishing an exclusive breastfeeding regime.

  • 4.
    Ek, Kristina
    et al.
    University of Skövde, School of Health and Education. University of Skövde, Health and Education.
    Westin, Lars
    University of Skövde, School of Health and Education. University of Skövde, Health and Education.
    Prahl, Charlotte
    Ersta Sköndal University College and Ersta Hospital, Palliative Research Centre, Stockholm, Sweden / Ersta Sköndal University College, Department of Health Care Sciences, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Österlind, Jane
    Ersta Sköndal University College and Ersta Hospital, Palliative Research Centre, Stockholm, Sweden / Ersta Sköndal University College, Department of Health Care Sciences, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Strang, Susann
    Sahlgrenska Academy, University of Gothenburg, Institute of Health and Care Sciences, Göteborg, Sweden / Angered Local Hospital, Angered, Sweden.
    Bergh, Ingrid
    University of Skövde, School of Health and Education. University of Skövde, Health and Education.
    Henoch, Ingela
    Angered Local Hospital, Angered, Sweden / University of Gothenburg Centre for Person-Centred Care (GPCC), Sahlgrenska Academy, University of Gothenburg, Göteborg, Sweden / Ersta Sköndal University College and Ersta Hospital, Palliative Research Centre, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Hammarlund, Kina
    University of Skövde, School of Health and Education. University of Skövde, Health and Education.
    Death and caring for dying patients: exploring first-year nursing students' descriptive experiences2014In: International Journal of Palliative Nursing, ISSN 1357-6321, E-ISSN 2052-286X, Vol. 20, no 10, p. 509-515Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Aim: To describe first-year nursing student`s expereinces of witnessing death and providing end-of-life care. Methods: This study is a part of a larger longitudial prject. Interviews (n=17) were conducted with nursing students at the end of their fisrt year of education. To analyse the interviews (lived-expereince description), a thematic analysis, "a search for meaning" (Van Manen, 1997) was applied. Result: The results are presented within the framework of four separate themes: (1) The thought of death is more frightening than the actual epereince, (2) Daring to approach the dying patient and offering something of oneself, (3) The expereince of not sufficing in the face of death and (4) being confronted with one`s own feelings. Conclusion: Nursing students require continous support and opportunity to reflect and discuss their experiences about caring for dying patients and confronting death throughout the entirety of their education. In addition, teachers and clinical superviosors need t give support using reflective practice to help students to devlo confidence in their capacity for caring dying patients.

  • 5.
    Hagelin, Carina Lundh
    et al.
    Sophiahemmet University, Stockholm, Sweden / Stockholms Sjukhem Foundation, Stockholm, Sweden / Department of Learning, Informatics, Management and Ethics, Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Melin-Johansson, Christina
    Department of Nursing, Mid Sweden University, Östersund, Sweden / Institute of Caring Sciences and Health, The Sahlgrenska Academy, University of Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Henoch, Ingela
    Institute of Caring Sciences and Health, The Sahlgrenska Academy, University of Gothenburg, Sweden / Angered's Local Hospital, Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Bergh, Ingrid
    University of Skövde, School of Health and Education. University of Skövde, Health and Education.
    Ek, Kristina
    University of Skövde, School of Health and Education. University of Skövde, Health and Education.
    Hammarlund, Kina
    University of Skövde, School of Health and Education. University of Skövde, Health and Education.
    Prahl, Charlotte
    Department of Health Care Sciences, Ersta Sköndal University College, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Strang, Susann
    Institute of Caring Sciences and Health, The Sahlgrenska Academy, University of Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Westin, Lars
    University of Skövde, School of Health and Education. University of Skövde, Health and Education.
    Österlind, Jane
    Department of Health Care Sciences, Ersta Sköndal University College, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Browall, Maria
    University of Skövde, School of Health and Education. University of Skövde, Health and Education.
    Factors influencing attitude toward care of dying patients in first-year nursing students2016In: International Journal of Palliative Nursing, ISSN 1357-6321, E-ISSN 2052-286X, Vol. 22, no 1, p. 28-36Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    AIM: To describe Swedish first-year undergraduate nursing students' attitudes toward care of dying patients. Possible influences such as age, earlier care experiences, care education, experiences of meeting dying patients and place of birth were investigated.

    METHOD: The Frommelt Attitude Toward Care of the Dying Scale (FATCOD) was used in six universities. Descriptive statistics and regression analysis were used.

    RESULTS: Some 371 students (67.3%) reported overall positive attitude toward caring for dying patients (total mean FATCOD 119.5, SD 10.6) early in their first semester. Older students, students with both earlier care experience and earlier education, those with experience of meeting a dying person, and students born in Sweden reported the highest scores, a more positive attitude.

    CONCLUSION: Age, earlier care experience and education, experiences of meeting a dying person and place of birth seems to affect students' attitudes toward care of the dying and need to be considered among nursing educators.

  • 6.
    Hammarlund, Kina
    University of Skövde, School of Life Sciences.
    Riskfyllda möten2012In: Skolhälsan, ISSN 0284-284X, no 1, p. 14-15Article in journal (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
  • 7.
    Hammarlund, Kina
    University of Skövde, School of Life Sciences.
    Riskfyllda möten2010In: Jordemodern, ISSN 0021-7468, Vol. 123, no 6, p. 4-7Article in journal (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
  • 8.
    Hammarlund, Kina
    University of Skövde, School of Life Sciences.
    Riskfyllda möten: en studie om unga människors upplevelser av sexuellt överförbara infektioner och sexuellt risktagande2009Doctoral thesis, comprehensive summary (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    The overall aim of the present thesis is to contribute to the knowledge in young people´s experiences, thoughts and norms regarding sexually transmitted infections (STI) and sexual risk-taking. The specific aims are two-fold. The first aim is to explain and understand young Swedish men and women´s lived experience of an STI, in this case genital warts (I, II). The second is to explain and understand the values and attitudes of young men and women to sexual risk-taking (III) in relation to perceptions of gender (IV).

    The theoretical perspectives are a reflective lifeworld approach, hermeneutic and gender perspectives. The thesis is based on individual interviews (I, II) and focus groups (III, IV).

    The results show that a young person infected by an STI, will experience encounters at different levels. A person with an STI is forced to meet him/herself and their own prejudices. Loss of innocence is highly significant and symbolic for women, while other person´s attitudes are more important for men (I, II). Also, being a disease carrier is of great significance, which has an impact on their views of future meaningful relationships (II).

    Sexual risk-taking, such as it was expressed in the focus groups with young people, revealed a pattern that is described as a ‘game’. In that game, a dialogue might feel more intimate than intercourse. These teenagers often view their one night stand partners as objects, as opposed to love relationships where they are viewed as subjects, i.e. persons to be cared for. Engaging in sexual risk-taking often starts at a club where these teenagers pretend that they are spontaneous (III).

    This game is further illuminated in a secondary analysis with a gender perspective. There are frequent misunderstandings between young men and women that are based on gender constructions, which derive from lack of communication. Hence, they have to take part in a balancing act while shaping their sexual identity and trying to maintain their self-esteem. For these young women, this also concerns not getting a bad reputation. In this act of balance, it is difficult to discuss sexuality and how to protect one’s sexual health (IV).

    The discussion emphasizes that a professional caring dialogue with young people about STI: s and sexual-risk taking must have reference in the young person´s own reality. Thus, professional health care workers who meet a young person infected with an STI appear to face a challenging task. This involves helping reduce anxiety by defusing the situation, and at the same time to make the person understand the importance of using a condom in order to prevent STI: s.

  • 9.
    Hammarlund, Kina
    University of Skövde, School of Life Sciences.
    Ungdomars sexuella risktagande2009In: Framtider, ISSN 0281-0492, no 4, p. 25-28Article in journal (Other academic)
  • 10.
    Hammarlund, Kina
    et al.
    University of Skövde, School of Health and Education. University of Skövde, Health and Education.
    Andersson, Emilie
    Home healthcare, Falköping Municipality, Falköping, Sweden.
    Tenenbaum, Hanna
    Primary healthcare, Vara, Sweden.
    Sundler, Annelie Johansson
    University of Skövde, School of Health and Education. University of Skövde, Health and Education. Faculty of Caring Science, Work Life and Social Welfare, University of Borås, Borås, Sweden.
    We are also interested in how fathers feel: a qualitative exploration of child health center nurses' recognition of postnatal depression in fathers2015In: BMC Pregnancy and Childbirth, ISSN 1471-2393, E-ISSN 1471-2393, Vol. 15, article id 290Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    BACKGROUND: To become a parent is an emotionally life-changing experience. Paternal depression during the postnatal period has been associated with emotional and behavioral problems in children. The condition has predominantly been related to mothers, and the recognition of paternal postnatal depression (PND) has been paid less attention to. PND in fathers may be difficult to detect. However, nurses in pediatric services meet a lot of fathers and are in a position to detect a father who is suffering from PND. Therefore, the aim of this study was (a) to explore Child Health Center nurses' experiences of observing depression in fathers during the postnatal period; and (b) to explore hindrances of observing these fathers.

    METHODS: A qualitative descriptive study was conducted. Ten nurses were interviewed in 2014. A thematic data analysis was performed and data were analyzed for meaning.

    RESULTS: Paternal PND was experienced as being vague and difficult to detect. Experiences of fathers with such problems were limited, and it was hard to grasp the health status of the fathers, something which was further complicated when routines were lacking or when gender attitudes influenced the daily work of the nurses.

    CONCLUSION: This study contributes to an increased awareness of hindrances to the recognition of PND in fathers. The importance to detect all signals of paternal health status in fathers suffering from PND needs to be acknowledged. Overall, more attention needs to be paid to PND in fathers where a part of the solution for this is that they are screened just like the mothers.

  • 11.
    Hammarlund, Kina
    et al.
    University of Skövde, School of Health and Education. University of Skövde, Health and Education.
    Falck, Johanna
    Bymarken School area, Jönköping.
    Lind, Jennie
    Gallerian Health Clinic, Jönköping.
    Thorstensson, Stina
    University of Skövde, School of Health and Education. University of Skövde, Health and Education.
    Meeting and supporting students who have parents with mental ill-health2015In: British Journal of School Nursing, ISSN 1752-2803, E-ISSN 2052-2827, Vol. 10, no 4, p. 182-187Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Mental ill-health is an increasing problem in Swedish society. If a parent is suffering from mental illness, it can have negative consequences for the child’s wellbeing, health and developmental process. The challenge for school nurses is to identify and support these students. The aim of this study is to describe school nurses’ experiences from meeting and supporting students who have parents with mental ill-health. Interviews with six school nurses were performed after snowball recruitment with purposive sampling and analysed using qualitative content analysis. School nurses’ experience of meeting and supporting students who have parents with mental ill-health shows that this is complex and demands competence and collaboration. Their competences in collaboration with others as well as their ability to show an open and tolerant attitude were important in order to build trustful relations with students, their parents and other professionals.

  • 12.
    Hammarlund, Kina
    et al.
    University of Skövde, School of Life Sciences. Växjö University, Sweden.
    Lundgren, Ingela
    Borås University College, Sweden / Växjö University, Sweden.
    Nyström, Maria
    Borås University College, Sweden / Växjö University, Sweden.
    In the heat of the night, it is difficult to get it right: teenagers' attitudes and values towards sexual risk-taking2008In: International Journal of Qualitative Studies on Health and Well-being, ISSN 1748-2623, E-ISSN 1748-2631, Vol. 3, no 2, p. 103-112Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This study, using a hermeneutic approach, is based on data from four focus group interviews with 25 Swedish teenagers participating, ranging from 18-19 years of age. The aim is to gain a deeper understanding of teenagers' values and attitudes towards sexually transmitted infections (STIs) and sexual risk-taking. The teenagers seem to seek an excuse to fend off responsibility and deny their sexual risk-taking, an excuse provided by drunkenness. Under the influence of alcohol, teenagers are not too shy to have sex but remain embarrassed to talk about condom use. It seems as though the dialogue feels more intimate than the intercourse when it comes to protecting ones sexual health. To be able to act out in this sexual risk-taking the teenager often views the partner in a one-night-stand as an object, as opposed to a love relationship where they view their partner as subject, a person they care for. Engaging in sexual risk-taking often starts at a club where the teenagers go out to socialize and drink alcohol. They then play a game and a part of the game is to pretend that they do not play a game. In this game, certain rules are to be followed and the rules are set up by the girl, mainly to protect the romantic image of being carefully selected and thereby protected from being stigmatized as “sluts” or “whores”.

  • 13.
    Hammarlund, Kina
    et al.
    University of Skövde, School of Life Sciences.
    Lundgren, Ingela
    University of Skövde, School of Life Sciences.
    Nyström, Maria
    Department of Health and Natural Science, Borås University College, University of Växjö, Sweden.
    To contract genital warts – a risk of losing love?: Experiences of Swedish men living with genital warts2007In: International Journal of Men's Health, ISSN 1532-6306, E-ISSN 1933-0278, Vol. 6, no 2, p. 100-114Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Using a life-world hermeneutic approach, this study focused on the interviews with eight Swedish men living with genital warts. The men expressed a need for control over their situation, a control that was easier to maintain if the warts were invisible. Some of the men expressed prejudiced attitudes toward those who contract a venereal infection and their own feelings of shame appeared to correlate with these prejudices. In their meetings with health care providers, the men viewed a competent health care provider as someone who combined professional distance with a personal approach. Finally, the fact that men saw themselves as disease carriers was of great significance to them and influenced their views of future meaningful relationships.

  • 14.
    Hammarlund, Kina
    et al.
    University of Skövde, School of Life Sciences.
    Nyström, Maria
    Ersta Sköndal University College and Växjo University, Sweden.
    The lived experience of genital warts: The Swedish example2004In: Health Care for Women International, ISSN 0739-9332, E-ISSN 1096-4665, Vol. 25, no 5, p. 489-502Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Our aim in this study was to analyze and describe young Swedish women's experiences of living with genital warts. Interviews with 10 young women, aged 16-21 years, were interpreted within a lifeworld hermeneutic tradition. The women experience themselves as victims of a disgusting disease. Furthermore, they appear to disregard the fact that their own lifestyles could be a risk factor for contracting venereal infections. On the other hand they get to know their bodies better after the gynecological examinations where the treatment begins. Their loss of innocence is considerable; thus it seems fair to compare this experience with earlier epochs' ideas about loss of virginity due to the first intercourse. Consequently the young women also start looking at themselves as adults, and they take responsibility for the consequences of their sexuality.

  • 15.
    Hammarlund, Kina
    et al.
    University of Skövde, School of Life Sciences.
    Nyström, Maria
    Borås University College.
    Jomeen, Julie
    University of Hull.
    Young women's experiences of managing self-treatment for anogenital warts2012In: Sexual & Reproductive HealthCare, ISSN 1877-5756, E-ISSN 1877-5764, Vol. 3, no 3, p. 117-121Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Objectives: The purpose of this study is to explore the experiences of self-treatment for anogenital warts from the perspective of a group of young women who received it.

    Study design: Ten young Swedish women were interviewed in the study, aged between16 and 21. The young women had been diagnosed with anogenital warts and self-managed their treatment with 0.5% podophyllotoxin solution.

    Results: Self-management using 0.5% podophyllotoxin solution poses numerous difficulties. The nature of the treatment as a topical liquid is particularly testing for young women in terms of both application and genital pain, with implications for continuation of the treatment regime. The self-treatment challenges both personal integrity as well as interpersonal relations and creates a personal responsibility which appears to be somewhat overwhelming at times.

    Conclusions: Health care professionals need to recognize the challenge that self-treatment poses to their clients. The issues that create difficulty in relation to topical liquid treatment regimes and importantly can lead to poor adherence to the treatment regime and discontinuation could easily be overcome by the use of different preparations. Continuity of care provider across treatments and alternative mechanisms of support would not only address some of the aspects that young women raise as particularly embarrassing and shameful, but also improve quality of care and increase general satisfaction with service provision.

  • 16.
    Hammarlund, Kina
    et al.
    University of Skövde, School of Health and Education. University of Skövde, Health and Education.
    Sjunnesson, Sara
    LBS kreativa gymnasiet, Lund, Sweden.
    Tettenborn, Nina
    Plusgymnasiet Malmö, Sweden.
    Jomeen, Julie
    Faculty of Health and Social Care, University of Hull, United Kingdom.
    Thorstensson, Stina
    University of Skövde, School of Health and Education. University of Skövde, Health and Education.
    ‘I had a lump in my stomach’: Swedish gay and lesbian students’ experiences of their time in school2017In: British Journal of School Nursing, ISSN 1752-2803, E-ISSN 2052-2827, Vol. 12, no 6, p. 284-290Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Gay and lesbian youth can experience ignorance and a lack of acknowledgement surrounding their sexual orientation during their time in school. This qualitative interview study describes how Swedish gay and lesbian students experience their secondary school years on the basis that society has heteronormative values.

    The data is based on eight telephone interviews with gay and lesbian young adults, aged 18–25 and was analysed using a qualitative narrative approach.

    The findings presented four themes: not fitting into the norm of heterosexuality, lacking confirmation of their own homosexuality, finding courage, seeing the school as a supportive or a non-supportive environment.

    A way to normalise homosexuality can be to discuss sexual development and attraction from a health-promoting perspective. Professionals working in school need to feel comfortable with issues such as sexuality in order to create a situation of confidence for the student.

  • 17.
    Henoch, Ingela
    et al.
    Institute of Health and Care Sciences, Sahlgrenska Academy, University of Gothenburg.
    Browall, Maria
    University of Skövde, School of Health and Education. University of Skövde, Health and Education.
    Melin-Johansson, Christina
    Department of Health Sciences, Mid Sweden University, Östersund.
    Danielson, Ella
    Institute of Health and Care Sciences, Sahlgrenska Academy, University of Gothenburg / Department of Health Sciences, Mid Sweden University, Östersund.
    Udo, Camilla
    Department of Health Sciences, Mid Sweden University, Östersund.
    Johansson Sundler, Annelie
    University of Skövde, School of Health and Education.
    Björk, Maria
    University of Skövde, School of Health and Education.
    Ek, Kristina
    University of Skövde, School of Health and Education.
    Hammarlund, Kina
    University of Skövde, School of Health and Education.
    Bergh, Ingrid
    University of Skövde, School of Health and Education.
    Strang, Susann
    Institute of Health and Care Sciences, Sahlgrenska Academy, University of Gothenburg / Angered Local Hospital, Gothenburg, Sweden.
    The Swedish version of the Frommelt attitude toward care of the dying scale: Aspects of validity and factors influencing nurses' and nursing students' attitudes2014In: Cancer Nursing, ISSN 0162-220X, E-ISSN 1538-9804, Vol. 37, no 1, p. E1-E11Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    BACKGROUND: Nurses' attitudes toward caring for dying persons need to be explored. The Frommelt Attitude Toward Care of the Dying (FATCOD) scale has not previously been used in Swedish language. OBJECTIVES: The objectives of this study were to compare FATCOD scores among Swedish nurses and nursing students with those from other languages, to explore the existence of 2 subscales, and to evaluate influences of experiences on attitudes toward care of dying patients. METHODS: A descriptive, cross-sectional, and predictive design was used. The FATCOD scores of Swedish nurses from hospice, oncology, surgery clinics, and palliative home care and nursing students were compared with published scores from the United States, Israel, and Japan. Descriptive statistics, t tests, and factor and regression analyses were used. RESULTS: The sample consisted of 213 persons: 71 registered nurses, 42 enrolled nurses, and 100 nursing students. Swedish FATCOD mean scores did not differ from published means from the United States and Israel, but were significantly more positive than Japanese means. In line with Japanese studies, factor analyses yielded a 2-factor solution. Total FATCOD and subscales had low Cronbach α's. Hospice and palliative team nurses were more positive than oncology and surgery nurses to care for dying patients. CONCLUSIONS: Although our results suggest that the Swedish FATCOD may comprise 2 distinct scales, the total scale may be the most adequate and applicable for use in Sweden. Professional experience was associated with nurses' attitudes toward caring for dying patients. IMPLICATION FOR PRACTICE: Care culture might influence nurses' attitudes toward caring for dying patients; the benefits of education need to be explored.

  • 18.
    Henoch, Ingela
    et al.
    The Sahlgrenska Academy, University of Gothenburg, Institute of Health and Care Sciences, Gothenburg, Sweden / Angered Local Hospital, Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Melin-Johansson, Christina
    The Sahlgrenska Academy, University of Gothenburg, Institute of Health and Care Sciences, Gothenburg, Sweden / Mid Sweden University, Department of Health Sciences, Östersund, Sweden.
    Bergh, Ingrid
    University of Skövde, School of Health and Education. University of Skövde, Health and Education.
    Strang, Susann
    The Sahlgrenska Academy, University of Gothenburg, Institute of Health and Care Sciences, Gothenburg, Sweden / Angered Local Hospital, Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Ek, Kristina
    University of Skövde, School of Health and Education. University of Skövde, Health and Education.
    Hammarlund, Kina
    University of Skövde, School of Health and Education. University of Skövde, Health and Education.
    Lundh Hagelin, Carina
    Sophiahemmet University, Stockholm, Sweden / Karolinska Institutet, Department of Learning, Informatics, Management and Ethics, Stockholm, Sweden / Stockholms Sjukhem Foundation, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Westin, Lars
    University of Skövde, School of Health and Education. University of Skövde, Health and Education.
    Österlind, Jane
    Ersta Sköndal University College and Ersta Hospital, Palliative Research Centre, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Browall, Maria
    University of Skövde, School of Health and Education. University of Skövde, Health and Education. Karolinska Institutet, Department of Neurobiology, Care Science and Society, Division of Nursing, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Undergraduate nursing students' attitudes and preparedness toward caring for dying persons: A longitudinal study2017In: Nurse Education in Practice, ISSN 1471-5953, E-ISSN 1873-5223, Vol. 26, p. 12-20, article id S1471-5953(17)30384-0Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Nursing education needs to prepare students for care of dying patients. The aim of this study was to describe the development of nursing students' attitudes toward caring for dying patients and their perceived preparedness to perform end-of-life care. A longitudinal study was performed with 117 nursing students at six universities in Sweden. The students completed the Frommelt Attitude Toward Care of the Dying Scale (FATCOD) questionnaire at the beginning of first and second year, and at the end of third year of education. After education, the students completed questions about how prepared they felt by to perform end-of-life care. The total FATCOD increased from 126 to 132 during education. Five weeks' theoretical palliative care education significantly predicted positive changes in attitudes toward caring for dying patients. Students with five weeks' theoretical palliative care training felt more prepared and supported by the education to care for a dying patient than students with shorter education. A minority felt prepared to take care of a dead body or meet relatives.

  • 19.
    Strang, Susann
    et al.
    Sahlgrenska Academy, University of Gothenburg, Institute of Health and Care Sciences, Sweden / Angered Local Hospital, Sweden.
    Bergh, Ingrid
    University of Skövde, School of Health and Education. University of Skövde, Health and Education.
    Ek, Kristina
    University of Skövde, School of Health and Education. University of Skövde, Health and Education.
    Hammarlund, Kina
    University of Skövde, School of Health and Education. University of Skövde, Health and Education.
    Prahl, Charlotte
    Ersta Sköndal University College / Ersta Hospital, Palliative Research Centre, Stockholm, Sweden / Department of Health Care Sciences, Ersta Sköndal University College, Sweden.
    Westin, Lars
    University of Skövde, School of Health and Education. University of Skövde, Health and Education.
    Österlind, Jane
    Ersta Sköndal University College / Ersta Hospital, Palliative Research Centre, Stockholm, Sweden / Department of Health Care Sciences, Ersta Sköndal University College, Sweden.
    Henoch, Ingela
    Sahlgrenska Academy, University of Gothenburg, Institute of Health and Care Sciences, Sweden / University of Gothenburg Centre for Person-Centred Care, Sahlgrenska Academy, University of Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Swedish nursing students' reasoning about emotionally demanding issues in caring for dying patients2014In: International Journal of Palliative Nursing, ISSN 1357-6321, E-ISSN 2052-286X, Vol. 20, no 4, p. 194-200Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    AIM: To describe nursing students' reasoning about emotionally demanding questions concerning the care of dying patients.

    METHODS: The Frommelt Attitude Toward Care of the Dying (FATCOD) Scale was completed by students at the beginning of their education, and there was great variation in the responses to five items. At a follow-up measurement in the second year, an open-ended question, 'How did you reason when completing this question?', was added to each of the these five items. Qualitative content analysis was used to analyse the responses.

    RESULTS: Of 140 students who completed the FATCOD, 111 provided free-text responses. The analysis of these responses revealed three themes: death perceptions, the students' understanding of their current situation, and the nurse's responsibility.

    CONCLUSION: This study provides useful information on students' reasoning about emotionally demanding questions relating to the care of dying patients. Such knowledge is valuable in helping students to overcome their fear and fulfil their expectations concerning their future proficiency.

  • 20.
    Sundler, Annelie Johansson
    et al.
    University of Skövde, School of Life Sciences.
    Hallström, Inger
    Lund University, Lund, Sweden.
    Hammarlund, Kina
    University of Skövde, School of Life Sciences.
    Björk, Maria
    University of Skövde, School of Life Sciences.
    Living an Everyday Life Through a Child's Cancer Trajectory: Families' Lived Experiences 7 Years After Diagnosis2013In: Journal of Pediatric Oncology Nursing, ISSN 1043-4542, E-ISSN 1532-8457, Vol. 30, no 6, p. 293-300Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The aim of this study was to illuminate the lived experiences of families where a child had survived 7 years from a diagnosis of childhood cancer. This article describes one part of an inductive and longitudinal research project that included 17 families. Four families whose child was diagnosed with cancer 7 years previously were interviewed using a hermeneutical phenomenological approach. The families lived experience was described in one essential theme, "Living an everyday life through the child's cancer trajectory," further illuminated in 3 related themes: "Leaving the disease behind yet feeling its presence," "Being the same yet always different," and "Feeling stronger yet vulnerable." The results suggest that family members feel vulnerable even if a long period of time has passed since completion of treatment. To varied degrees they still may need support. When moving forward in life, the family members are helped if they can reconcile their memories and experiences derived from the childhood cancer trajectory. © 2013 by Association of Pediatric Hematology/Oncology Nurses.

  • 21. Ådin, Hanna
    et al.
    Ekstrand, Maria
    Hammarlund, Kina
    University of Skövde, School of Life Sciences.
    Oskönt, krångligt, plastigt2009In: Insikt, ISSN 1104-0912, no 4, p. 8-9Article in journal (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
  • 22.
    Österlind, Jane
    et al.
    Ersta Sköndal University College and Ersta Hospital, Palliative Research Centre, Stockholm, Sweden / Ersta Sköndal University College, Department of Health Care Sciences, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Prahl, Charlotte
    Ersta Sköndal University College and Ersta Hospital, Palliative Research Centre, Stockholm, Sweden / Ersta Sköndal University College, Department of Health Care Sciences, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Westin, Lars
    University of Skövde, School of Health and Education. University of Skövde, Health and Education.
    Strang, Susann
    Sahlgrenska Academy, University of Gothenburg, Institute of Health and Care Sciences, Sweden / Angered Hospital, Sweden.
    Bergh, Ingrid
    University of Skövde, School of Health and Education. University of Skövde, Health and Education.
    Henoch, Ingela
    Ersta Sköndal University College and Ersta Hospital, Palliative Research Centre, Stockholm, Sweden / Angered Hospital, Sweden / University of Gothenburg Centre for Person-Centred Care (GPCC), Sahlgrenska Academy, University of Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Hammarlund, Kina
    University of Skövde, School of Health and Education. University of Skövde, Health and Education.
    Ek, Kristina
    University of Skövde, School of Health and Education. University of Skövde, Health and Education.
    Nursing students' perceptions of caring for dying people, after one year in nursing school2016In: Nurse Education Today, ISSN 0260-6917, E-ISSN 1532-2793, Vol. 41, p. 12-16Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Aim: To describe Swedish nursing students' perceptions of caring for dying people after the first year of a three year in a nursing programme at three university nursing schools in Sweden. Methods: Interviews (n = 17) were undertaken with nursing students at the end of their first year. A phenomenographic approach was used to design and structure the analysis of the nursing students' perceptions. Results: The analysis resulted in five categories: 1) from abstract to reality, 2) from scary to natural, 3) increased knowledge can give bad conscience, 4) time limits versus fear of end-of-life conversations, and 5) meeting with relatives. Conclusion: Nursing students need to be prepared both theoretically and within practice to encounter death and dying and to care for dying persons. By combining their theoretical knowledge of dying and death with their own encounters of death and dying people in practice, the students can be supported to develop an understanding of dying and death as a natural part of life rather than something frightening. 

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