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  • 1.
    Bertilsson, Erik
    et al.
    University of Skövde, School of Technology and Society. University of Skövde, The Virtual Systems Research Centre.
    Gustafsson, E.
    University of Skövde, School of Technology and Society. University of Skövde, The Virtual Systems Research Centre.
    Hanson, L.
    Chalmers University of Technology.
    Högberg, Dan
    University of Skövde, School of Technology and Society. University of Skövde, The Virtual Systems Research Centre.
    Swedish engineering anthropometric web resource2011In: Proceedings of the 43rd Annual Nordic Ergonomics Society Conference / [ed] Juha Lindfors Merja Savolainen, Seppo Väyrynen, University of Oulu , 2011, p. 442-446Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Anthropometry, the study of human measurements, is central in the design of products and workplaces. This paper describes how Swedish anthropometric data is made available through a web page (www.antropometri.se) intended to be used by designers and engineers when developing new products and workplaces. With the anthropometric web resource it is possible to get mean and standard deviation values, and to calculate percentile values, for a number of anthropometric measurements. Further functionality on the web page enables simultaneous consideration of several anthropometric measurements. The web page also contains guidelines for how to use anthropometric data depending on the design task at hand.

  • 2.
    Bertilsson, Erik
    et al.
    University of Skövde, School of Technology and Society. University of Skövde, The Virtual Systems Research Centre.
    Hanson, L.
    Chalmers University of Technology.
    Högberg, Dan
    University of Skövde, School of Technology and Society. University of Skövde, The Virtual Systems Research Centre.
    Rhén, Ida-Märta
    University of Skövde, School of Technology and Society. University of Skövde, The Virtual Systems Research Centre.
    Creation of the IMMA manikin with consideration of anthropometric diversity2011In: Proceedings of the 21st International Conference on Production Research (ICPR), Fraunhofer Verlag , 2011Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Digital human modelling (DHM) systems are used to simulate production processes and analyse the human-machine interaction, particularly at early development stages. Consideration of anthropometric variation is central in DHM simulations due to the necessity of ensuring intended accommodation levels. This paper describes the process of how digital human models are created and defined within the IMMA software. The process begins with the definition of a number of key measurements, which acts as the basis for the definition of several boundary manikins using a confidence ellipsoid methodology. These manikins represents the appropriate confidence region and hence the anthropometric diversity. Key measurements are then entered into regression equations to define the complete set of measurements for each manikin. These measurements are based on the appropriate ISO-standard. Finally, measurements are used to define the size and alignment of each segment in the biomechanical model of the manikin. The manikins are then used to automatically simulate and analyse human-machine interaction.

  • 3.
    Bertilsson, Erik
    et al.
    University of Skövde, School of Technology and Society. University of Skövde, The Virtual Systems Research Centre.
    Högberg, Dan
    University of Skövde, School of Technology and Society. University of Skövde, The Virtual Systems Research Centre.
    Hanson, Lars
    Department of Product and Production Development, Chalmers University of Technology, Göteborg, Sweden / Industrial Development, Scania CV, Södertälje, Sweden.
    Digital Human Model Module and Work Process for Considering Anthropometric Diversity2010In: Proceedings of the 3rd Applied Human Factors and Ergonomics (AHFE) International Conference / [ed] Gavriel Salvendy, Waldemar Karwowski, Louisville: AHFE International , 2010Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In digital human modelling (DHM), ergonomics evaluations are typically done with few human models. However, humans vary a lot in sizes and shapes. Therefore, few manikins can rarely ensure accommodation of an entire target population. Different approaches exist on how to consider anthropometric diversity. This paper reviews current  DHM  tools  and  clarify  problems  and  opportunities  when  working  with anthropometric diversity. The aim is to suggest  functionality  for a state of the art DHM  module  and  work  process  for  considering  anthropometric  diversity.  The study is done by an analysis of some of the current DHM systems and by interviews of  personnel  at  car  companies  about  their  way  of  working  with  anthropometric diversity. The study confirmed that critical production simulations are often done in early development stages with only one or a few human models. The reason for this is claimed to be time consuming processes, both at the creation of the human model but  mainly  when  correctly  positioning  the  model  in  the  CAD  environment.  The development  of  a  new  method  and  work  process  for  considering  anthropometric diversity is suggested. Necessary features for such a module are that it shall be easy to use and not require expert knowledge about the consideration of anthropometric diversity. It shall also be configurable and transparent, in a sense that it should be possible  to  work  with  own  anthropometric  data  and  ergonomics  evaluation standards. The module has to be flexible and have different entrances depending on the type of anthropometric problem being analyzed. An improved work method is expected to lead to faster and more correct analyses.

  • 4.
    Bertilsson, Erik
    et al.
    University of Skövde, School of Technology and Society. University of Skövde, The Virtual Systems Research Centre.
    Högberg, Dan
    University of Skövde, School of Technology and Society. University of Skövde, The Virtual Systems Research Centre.
    Hanson, Lars
    Chalmers University of Technology.
    Using experimental design to define boundary manikins2012In: Work: A Journal of Prevention, Assessment and Rehabilitation, ISSN 1051-9815, Vol. 41, p. 4598-4605Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    When evaluating human-machine interaction it is central to consider anthropometric diversity to ensure intended accommodation levels. A well-known method is the use of boundary cases where manikins with extreme but likely measurement combinations are derived by mathematical treatment of anthropometric data. The supposition by that method is that the use of these manikins will facilitate accommodation of the expected part of the total, less extreme, population. In literature sources there are differences in how many and in what way these manikins should be defined. A similar field to the boundary case method is the use of experimental design in where relationships between affecting factors of a process is studied by a systematic approach. This paper examines the possibilities to adopt methodology used in experimental design to define a group of manikins. Different experimental designs were adopted to be used together with a confidence region and its axes. The result from the study shows that it is possible to adapt the methodology of experimental design when creating groups of manikins. The size of these groups of manikins depends heavily on the number of key measurements but also on the type of chosen experimental design.

  • 5.
    Bertilsson, Erik
    et al.
    University of Skövde, School of Technology and Society. University of Skövde, The Virtual Systems Research Centre.
    Högberg, Dan
    University of Skövde, School of Technology and Society. University of Skövde, The Virtual Systems Research Centre.
    Hanson, Lars
    Chalmers University of Technology.
    Wondmagegne, Yosief
    University of Skövde.
    Multidimensional consideration of anthropometric diversity2011In: Proceedings of DHM, First International Symposium on Digital Human Modeling, Université Claude Bernard Lyon , 2011, p. 1-6Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Boundary manikins, the concept of creating statistically extreme cases to accommodate a big part of the less extreme population has been known for decades. Despite this, many ergonomics simulations are done with few human models. This fact can be explained by the time consuming processes when working with many manikins in current digital human modelling (DHM) tools, but may also be a result of difficulty to understand how these manikins are calculated and defined. This paper focuses on the method of defining boundary manikins and how that functionality can be integrated into a DHM tool. Examples of boundary case methods in the literature often use Principal Component Analysis (PCA) which makes it possible to reduce the dimensions of the problem without much loss of the variance of the analysed data. Using PCA often demands some extent of manual analysis at the critical stage of reducing dimensions. This paper will explain a similar methodology for ceating boundary manikins from any number of variables, i.e. anthropometric variables chosen as key measurements. This method of creating a group of manikins is intended to be used in an automatic simulation feature in the IMMA software being developed in the associated research project. By using the method, a confidence region in the standardized space is created from eigenvectors and scaled eigenvalues of a correlation matrix. Boundary manikins are chosen at the ends of the axes of the enclosing confidence region, and one manikin of mean values is also added to the group of manikins. In the method presented here, the number of manikins created depends directly on the number of variables, which lead to the fact that the decision making of which key measurements to consider has to be done carefully to not create an overwhelming number of manikins. In comparison with one method using PCA, the method presented in this paper creates more manikins with a bigger difference in the max and min values of the chosen key measurements. If a limited number of cases are of crucial interest, then using PCA to reduce the dimensions of the problem is a good method to use. But if it is possible to create automated simulations the limitation of the number of manikins might not be so important. This will, though, depend heavily on the speed of the automated simulations.

  • 6.
    Bertilsson, Erik
    et al.
    University of Skövde, The Virtual Systems Research Centre. University of Skövde, School of Technology and Society. Department of Product and Production Development, Chalmers University of Technology, Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Keyvani, Ali
    Department of Product and Production Development, Chalmers University of Technology, Gothenburg, Sweden / Innovatum AB, Trollhättan, Sweden.
    Högberg, Dan
    University of Skövde, The Virtual Systems Research Centre. University of Skövde, School of Technology and Society.
    Hanson, Lars
    Department of Product and Production Development, Chalmers University of Technology, Gothenburg, Sweden / Industrial Development, Scania CV, Södertälje, Sweden.
    Assessment of manikin motions in IMMA2012In: Advances in Applied Human Modeling and Simulation / [ed] Vincent G. Duffy, Boca Raton: CRC Press, 2012, p. 235-244Chapter in book (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    When evaluating human-machine interaction in a virtual environment using Digital human modelling (DHM) it is important to ensure that the predicted motions lie within the range of behavioural diversity for different people within a population. This paper presents a study in which a comparison is made between motions predicted by the DHM tool IMMA (Intelligently Moving Manikin) and motions from real humans stored in a motion database. Results show similar motions but the predicted motions were in total statistically significantly different compared to the motions performed by real persons. The differences are most likely due to the balance function and joint constraints that the IMMA tool uses for predicting motions. Differences can also be due to other factors, aside of body size, such as age, gender or strength that affects the movement behaviour.

  • 7.
    Bertilsson, Erik
    et al.
    University of Skövde, The Virtual Systems Research Centre. University of Skövde, School of Technology and Society.
    Svensson, Erik
    University of Skövde, The Virtual Systems Research Centre. University of Skövde, School of Technology and Society.
    Högberg, Dan
    University of Skövde, The Virtual Systems Research Centre. University of Skövde, School of Technology and Society.
    Hanson, Lars
    Department of Product and Production Development, Chalmers University of Technology, Göteborg, Sweden / Industrial Development, Scania CV, Södertälje, Sweden.
    Use of digital human modelling and consideration of anthropometric diversity in Swedish industry2010In: Proceedings of the 42nd annual Nordic Ergonomic Society Conference, 2010Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This  paper  study  and  clarify  problems,  needs  and  opportunities  when  working  with anthropometric  diversity  in  digital  human  modelling  (DHM)  systems.  A  comparison between  product  development  and  production  development  in  Swedish  automotive industry is made. Interviews with DHM users and ergonomics specialists about their way of working with anthropometric diversity confirmed that simulations are often done with only one or  a  few  human models.  The reason for  this  is  claimed  to  be  time  consuming processes, both at the creation of the human model but mainly when correctly positioning the model in the CAD environment.

  • 8.
    Brolin, Anna
    et al.
    University of Skövde, School of Engineering Science. University of Skövde, The Virtual Systems Research Centre.
    Brolin, Erik
    University of Skövde, School of Engineering Science. University of Skövde, The Virtual Systems Research Centre.
    Högberg, Dan
    University of Skövde, School of Engineering Science. University of Skövde, The Virtual Systems Research Centre.
    Second cycle education program in virtual ergonomics and design2018In: Proceedings of the 20th Congress of the International Ergonomics Association (IEA 2018): Volume VII: Ergonomics in Design / [ed] Sebastiano Bagnara, Riccardo Tartaglia, Sara Albolino, Thomas Alexander, Yushi Fujita, Cham: Springer, 2018, Vol. 824, p. 1058-1065Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Current product and production development tends to become more complex where principal design decisions are made in very early development phases when product data only exist in virtual formats. To support this virtual product realisation process there exist a number of tools and technologies. Considering ergonomics and human factors in an increasingly complex process with often complex tools requires competent people able to handle multidisciplinary development challenges in a proactive manner. To answer the need for educational programs to cover these issues the School of Engineering Science at University of Skövde has developed a new master (second cycle) program Virtual Ergonomics and Design. The aim with the program is to give students and future product and production developers, necessary knowledge and skills to effectively use virtual tools for analysis, development, and verification of ergonomics and integrate ergonomics and user aspects into the product realisation process. This is achieved through a number of courses that partly forms a core within the subject Virtual product realisation but also provides in-depth knowledge in ergonomics. Students will in a possible future role as design or production engineers have a great influence on ergonomics in manufacturing departments but also better perception of ergonomics, higher motivation and knowledge of support tools and methods for ergonomics integration.

  • 9.
    Brolin, Erik
    University of Skövde, School of Engineering Science. University of Skövde, The Virtual Systems Research Centre. Chalmers University of Technology.
    Anthropometric diversity and consideration of human capabilities: Methods for virtual product and production development2016Doctoral thesis, comprehensive summary (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Contemporary product and production development is typically carried out with the support of computer tools where the design of products and workstations are originated and evaluated within virtual environments. Ergonomics addresses factors important to consider in the product and production development process to ensure a good fit between humans and the items being designed. Digital human modelling (DHM) tools enable simulations and analyses of ergonomics in virtual environments. Anthropometry is central when using DHM tools for product and production development to ensure that the design fits the intended proportion of the targeted population from a physical perspective. Several methods have been prescribed to consider the anthropometric diversity that exists within human populations. Still many DHM based simulations in product and production development processes are done with approaches that are poor in representing anthropometric diversity. Hence, there is a need for better tools and methods that would support DHM tool users to more effectively and efficiently consider anthropometric diversity in the design process.

    In this thesis current methods for anthropometric diversity considerations have been reviewed and new methods and functionality have been developed and implemented in a DHM tool. Mathematical models have been developed to consider three specific parts important to the consideration of anthropometric diversity: generation of suitable test cases, prediction of missing anthropometric data and implementation of more diverse anthropometric variables such as strength and flexibility. Results show that the proposed methods are accurate and advantageous compared to approaches often used in industry today. The mathematical models for generation of suitable test cases and prediction of missing anthropometric data have been implemented in an anthropometric software module. The module has undergone usability testing with industry DHM tools users. The developed anthropometric module is shown to answer to relevant needs of DHM tool users and fit into the work processes related to DHM simulations and ergonomics analyses utilised in industry today.

  • 10.
    Brolin, Erik
    University of Skövde, School of Technology and Society. University of Skövde, The Virtual Systems Research Centre.
    Consideration of anthropometric diversity: Methods for virtual product and production development2012Licentiate thesis, comprehensive summary (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Ergonomics and Human Factors address factors important to consider in the product and production development process. This is done through a User Centred Design process where focus is put on human-machine interactions. Digital human modelling (DHM) tools provide and facilitate rapid simulations, visualisations and analyses of the human-machine interactions in a virtual environment. Anthropometry, the study of human measurements, is central in DHM simulations due to the necessity of ensuring intended accommodation levels. Several methods have been described to consider the anthropometric diversity that exists within human populations. Still, many simulations are done with few human models, so called manikins, in industry today due to the time consuming processes when working with many manikins in current DHM tools. Hence, there is a need for better tools and methods. To increase the understanding among DHM users there is also a need to illustrate differences in results when using different approaches, and to evaluate the validity of the assumptions that methods for anthropometric diversity consideration are based upon.

    In this thesis current methods for anthropometric diversity considerations have been reviewed and the differences in evaluation results when utilizing different approaches have been analysed. New methods and functionality have been developed and implemented in DHM tools and the possibilities to include more physical characteristics and in turn consider more aspects of human diversity have been explored. Results shows that the proposed methods are advantageous compared to approaches often used in industry today and will, if used, increase the consideration of anthropometric diversity when using DHM tools for the design of products and workplaces.

  • 11.
    Brolin, Erik
    et al.
    University of Skövde, School of Engineering Science. University of Skövde, The Virtual Systems Research Centre. Department of Product and Production Development, Chalmers University of Technology, Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Hanson, Lars
    Department of Product and Production Development, Chalmers University of Technology, Gothenburg, Sweden / Industrial Development, Scania CV, Södertälje, Sweden.
    Högberg, Dan
    University of Skövde, School of Engineering Science. University of Skövde, The Virtual Systems Research Centre.
    Digital human arm models with variation in size, strength and range of motion2014In: / [ed] Masaaki Mochimaru and Makiko Kouchi, 2014Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Digital human modelling (DHM) systems can be used to simulate production processes and analyse the human-machine interaction, particularly at early design stages. The human-machine interaction is affected and limited by factors or characteristics belonging to the human user and the machine or product but also the surrounding environment. DHM systems consider in most cases only physical user capabilities and with focus on consideration of body size related anthropometric diversity. However, the human-machine interaction is not only affected by the size and proportions of a user but for example also the user´s muscle strength and range of motion (ROM). This paper describes a study where diversity in strength and ROM, together with diversity in body size, is implemented in the process of creating data for a group of human arm models. A literature study was done to investigate the diversity of strength and ROM and the correlation between such measurements and body size data. The results from the literature study showed that there is little correlation between body size, strength and ROM. The study also showed that there are few published studies where body size, strength and ROM have been tested at the same time. From the literature study, generic correlation coefficients between body size, strength and ROM were synthesized. Using these correlation coefficients and Principal Component Analysis, data for a group of 14 female arm models with varying body size, strength and ROM were calculated. The results show that it is possible to introduce additional variables such as strength and ROM, but also that data of the correlation between body size and other types of anthropometric measurements are scarce. New measurement studies are important to decrease the uncertainties when predicting correlation coefficients between body size, strength and ROM variables.

  • 12.
    Brolin, Erik
    et al.
    University of Skövde, The Virtual Systems Research Centre. University of Skövde, School of Technology and Society. Department of Product and Production Development, Chalmers University of Technology, Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Hanson, Lars
    Department of Product and Production Development, Chalmers University of Technology, Gothenburg, Sweden / Industrial Development, Scania CV, Södertälje, Sweden.
    Högberg, Dan
    University of Skövde, The Virtual Systems Research Centre. University of Skövde, School of Technology and Society.
    Örtengren, Roland
    Department of Product and Production Development, Chalmers University of Technology, Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Conditional Regression Model for Prediction of Anthropometric Variables2013In: 2013 Digital human modeling symposium / [ed] Matt Reed, 2013Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In digital human modelling (DHM) systems consideration of anthropometry is central. Important functionality in DHM tools is the regression model, i.e. the possibility to predict a complete set of measurements based on a number of defined independent anthropometric variables. The accuracy of a regression model is measured by how well the model predicts dependent variables based on independent variables, i.e. known key anthropometric measurements. In literature, existing regression models often use stature and/or body weight as independent variables in so-called flat regressions models which can produce estimations with large errors when there are low correlations between the independent and dependent variables. This paper suggests a conditional regression model that utilise all known measurements as independent variables when predicting each unknown dependent variable. The conditional regression model is compared to a flat regression model, using stature and weight as independent variables, and a hierarchical regression model that uses geometric and statistical relationships between body measurements to create specific linear regression equations in a hierarchical structure. The accuracy of the models is assessed by evaluating the coefficient of determination, R2 and the root-mean-square deviation (RMSD). The results from the study show that using a conditional regression model that makes use of all known variables to predict the values of unknown measurements is advantageous compared to the flat and hierarchical regression models. Both the conditional linear regression model and the hierarchical regression model have the advantage that when more measurements are included the models will give a better prediction of the unknown measurements compared to the flat regression model based on stature and weight. A conditional linear regression model has the additional advantage that any measurement can be used as independent variable. This gives the possibility to only include measurements that have a direct connection to the design dimensions being sought. Utilising the conditional regression model would create digital manikins with enhanced accuracy that would produce more realistic and accurate simulations and evaluations when using DHM tools for the design of products and workplaces.

  • 13.
    Brolin, Erik
    et al.
    University of Skövde, The Virtual Systems Research Centre. University of Skövde, School of Technology and Society.
    Högberg, Dan
    University of Skövde, The Virtual Systems Research Centre. University of Skövde, School of Technology and Society.
    Hanson, Lars
    Industrial Development, Scania CV, Södertalje, Sweden / Chalmers University of Technology, Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Description of boundary case methodology for anthropometric diversity consideration2012In: International Journal of Human Factors Modelling and Simulation, ISSN 1742-5549, Vol. 3, no 2, p. 204-223Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This paper describes and evaluates the boundary case methodology for the simultaneous consideration of variance for a number of selected anthropometric variables. The methodology includes the calculation of key dimension values for extreme but likely anthropometric measurement combinations. This data can be applied when utilising digital human modelling (DHM) tools for proactive design work and entered as input data when representative manikins are defined. The mathematical procedure is clearly described and exemplified to demonstrate how to use the methodology in design work. The outcome of the method is illustrated and compared using several different cases where the number of measurements is varied and where principal component analysis (PCA) is used to reduce the number of dimensions in one case. The paper demonstrates that the proposed boundary case method is advantageous compared to approaches based on the use of univariate percentile data in design.

  • 14.
    Brolin, Erik
    et al.
    University of Skövde, School of Engineering Science. University of Skövde, The Virtual Systems Research Centre. Department of Product and Production Development, Chalmers University of Technology, Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Högberg, Dan
    University of Skövde, School of Engineering Science. University of Skövde, The Virtual Systems Research Centre.
    Hanson, Lars
    Department of Product and Production Development, Chalmers University of Technology, Gothenburg, Sweden / Industrial Development, Scania CV, Södertälje, Sweden.
    Design of a Digital Human Modelling Module for Consideration of Anthropometric Diversity2014In: Advances in Applied Digital Human Modeling / [ed] Vincent Duffy, AHFE Conference , 2014, p. 114-120Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 15.
    Brolin, Erik
    et al.
    University of Skövde, School of Engineering Science. University of Skövde, The Virtual Systems Research Centre.
    Högberg, Dan
    University of Skövde, School of Engineering Science. University of Skövde, The Virtual Systems Research Centre.
    Hanson, Lars
    University of Skövde, School of Engineering Science. University of Skövde, The Virtual Systems Research Centre. Department of Product and Production Development, Chalmers University of Technology, Gothenburg, Sweden / Industrial Development, Scania CV, Södertälje, Sweden.
    Björkenstam, Staffan
    Fraunhofer-Chalmers Centre, Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Virtual test persons based on diverse anthropometric data for ergonomics simulations and analysis2017In: Proceedings of the 49th NES 2017 Conference "Joy at Work", Lund, August 20-23, 2017 / [ed] Anna-Lisa Osvalder, Mikael Blomé and Hajnalka Bodnar, Lund: Lund University, Faculty of Engineering , 2017, p. 232-239Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This paper describes a study where diverse anthropometric data is included in the process of generating data for a group of virtual test persons. Data on body size, strength and ROM were either collected on an individual level or predicted and synthesized and then used in cluster analyses to generate six unique virtual test persons. Results show that the method is able to generate detailed virtual test persons which enables more realistic and accurate simulations, as strength and ROM data is included into the motion prediction algorithms used to generate motions.

  • 16.
    Brolin, Erik
    et al.
    University of Skövde, School of Engineering Science. University of Skövde, The Virtual Systems Research Centre. Department of Product and Production Development, Chalmers University of Technology, Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Högberg, Dan
    University of Skövde, School of Engineering Science. University of Skövde, The Virtual Systems Research Centre.
    Hanson, Lars
    University of Skövde, School of Engineering Science. University of Skövde, The Virtual Systems Research Centre. Industrial Development, Scania, Scania CV, Södertälje, Sweden / Department of Product and Production Development, Chalmers University of Technology, Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Örtengren, Roland
    Department of Product and Production Development, Chalmers University of Technology, Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Adaptive regression model for prediction of anthropometric data2017In: International Journal of Human Factors Modelling and Simulation, ISSN 1742-5549, Vol. 5, no 4, p. 285-305Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This paper presents and evaluates an adaptive linear regression model for the prediction of unknown anthropometric data based on a flexible set of known predictive data. The method is based on conditional regression and includes use of principal component analysis to reduce effects of multicollinearity between the predictive variables. Results from the study show that the proposed adaptive regression model produces more accurate predictions compared to a flat regression model based on stature and weight, and also compared to a hierarchical regression model, that uses geometric and statistical relationships between body measurements to create specific linear regression equations in a hierarchical structure. An additional evaluation shows that the accuracy of the adaptive regression model increases logarithmically with the sample size. Apart from the sample size, the accuracy of the regression model is affected by the number of, and on which measurements that are, variables in the predictive dataset.

  • 17.
    Brolin, Erik
    et al.
    University of Skövde, School of Engineering Science. University of Skövde, The Virtual Systems Research Centre. Chalmers University of Technology, Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Högberg, Dan
    University of Skövde, School of Engineering Science. University of Skövde, The Virtual Systems Research Centre.
    Hanson, Lars
    University of Skövde, School of Engineering Science. University of Skövde, The Virtual Systems Research Centre. Chalmers University of Technology, Gothenburg, Sweden / Industrial Development, Scania CV, Södertälje, Sweden.
    Örtengren, Roland
    Department of Product and Production Development, Chalmers University of Technology, Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Adaptive regression model for synthesizing anthropometric population data2017In: International Journal of Industrial Ergonomics, ISSN 0169-8141, E-ISSN 1872-8219, Vol. 59, p. 46-53Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This paper presents the development of an adaptive linear regression model for synthesizing of missing anthropometric population data based on a flexible set of known predictive data. The method is based on a conditional regression model and includes use of principal component analysis, to reduce effects of multicollinearity between selected predictive measurements, and incorporation of a stochastic component, using the partial correlation coefficients between predicted measurements. In addition, skewness of the distributions of the dependent variables is considered when incorporating the stochastic components. Results from the study show that the proposed regression models for synthesizing population data give valid results with small errors of the compared percentile values. However, higher accuracy was not achieved when the number of measurements used as independent variables was increased compared to using only stature and weight as independent variables. This indicates problems with multicollinearity that principal component regression were not able to overcome. Descriptive statistics such as mean and standard deviation values together with correlation coefficients is sufficient to perform the conditional regression procedure. However, to incorporate a stochastic component when using principal component regression requires raw data on an individual level.

    Relevance to industry

    When developing products, workplaces or systems, it is of great importance to consider the anthropometric diversity of the intended users. The proposed regression model offers a procedure that gives valid results, maintains the correlation between the measurements that are predicted and is adaptable regarding which, and number of, predictive measurements that are selected.

  • 18.
    Brolin, Erik
    et al.
    University of Skövde, School of Engineering Science. University of Skövde, The Virtual Systems Research Centre.
    Högberg, Dan
    University of Skövde, School of Engineering Science. University of Skövde, The Virtual Systems Research Centre.
    Hanson, Lars
    University of Skövde, School of Engineering Science. University of Skövde, The Virtual Systems Research Centre. Industrial Development, Scania CV, Södertälje.
    Örtengren, Roland
    Chalmers University of Technology, Gothenburg.
    Development and evaluation of an anthropometric module for digital human modelling systems2019In: International Journal of Human Factors Modelling and Simulation, ISSN 1742-5549, Vol. 7, no 1, p. 47-70Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This paper presents the development of a software module and a graphical user interface which aims to support the definition of anthropometry of manikins in a digital human modelling (DHM) tool. The module is developed from user interviews and literature studies, as well as mathematical methods for anthropometric diversity consideration. The module has functionality to create both single manikins and manikin families, where it is possible to combine or analyse different population datasets simultaneously. The developed module and its interface have been evaluated via focus group interviews and usability tests by DHM tool users. Results from the studies show that the developed module and its interface has relevant functionality, fits well into industrial work processes, and is easy to use. The study also identifies possibilities to further increase usability.

  • 19.
    Brolin, Erik
    et al.
    University of Skövde, School of Engineering Science. University of Skövde, The Virtual Systems Research Centre. Department of Product and Production Development, Chalmers University of Technology, Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Högberg, Dan
    University of Skövde, School of Engineering Science. University of Skövde, The Virtual Systems Research Centre.
    Hanson, Lars
    University of Skövde, School of Engineering Science. University of Skövde, The Virtual Systems Research Centre. Industrial Development, Scania, Scania CV, Södertälje, Sweden / Department of Product and Production Development, Chalmers University of Technology, Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Örtengren, Roland
    Department of Product and Production Development, Chalmers University of Technology, Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Generation and evaluation of distributed cases by clustering of diverse anthropometric data2016In: International Journal of Human Factors Modelling and Simulation, ISSN 1742-5557, Vol. 5, no 3, p. 210-229Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This paper describes a study where diversity in body size, strength and joint range of motion, together with diversity in other capability measurements, is included in the process of generating data for a group of test cases using cluster analysis. Descriptive statistics and correlation data was acquired for 15 variables for different age groups and both sexes. Based on this data, a population of 10,000 individuals was synthesised using correlated random numbers. The synthesised data was used in cluster analyses where three different clustering algorithms were applied and evaluated; hierarchical clustering, k-means clustering and Gaussian mixture distribution clustering. Results from the study show that the three clustering algorithms produce groups of test cases with different characteristics, where the hierarchical and k-means algorithm give the most diverse results and where the Gaussian mixture distribution gives results that are in between the first two.

  • 20.
    Brolin, Erik
    et al.
    University of Skövde, School of Engineering Science. University of Skövde, The Virtual Systems Research Centre.
    Mahdavian, Nafise
    University of Skövde, School of Engineering Science. University of Skövde, The Virtual Systems Research Centre.
    Högberg, Dan
    University of Skövde, School of Engineering Science. University of Skövde, The Virtual Systems Research Centre.
    Hanson, Lars
    University of Skövde, School of Engineering Science. University of Skövde, The Virtual Systems Research Centre. Industrial Development, Scania CV, Södertälje.
    Johansson, Joakim
    Bombardier Transportation Sweden AB, Västerås.
    Possibilities and challenges for proactive manufacturing ergonomics2019In: Proceedings of the 20th Congress of the International Ergonomics Association (IEA 2018): Volume VIII: Ergonomics and Human Factors in Manufacturing, Agriculture, Building and Construction, Sustainable Development and Mining / [ed] Sebastiano Bagnara, Riccardo Tartaglia, Sara Albolino, Thomas Alexander, Yushi Fujita, Cham: Springer, 2019, Vol. 825, p. 11-20Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This paper identifies and describes product development activities where ergonomics issues could be considered and illustrates how that could be done through a number of different approaches. The study is divided into two parts where an interview study is done to identify where in a product development process consideration of ergonomics issues are or could be done. The second part of the study includes an observation, motion capture and simulation study of current manufacturing operations to evaluate and compare three different assessment approaches; observational based ergonomics evaluation, usages of motion capture data and DHM simulation and evaluation. The results shows the importance of consideration of ergonomics in early development phases and that the ergonomics assessment process is integrated in the overall product and production development process.

  • 21.
    Hanson, Lars
    et al.
    Scania CV / Chalmers.
    Högberg, Dan
    University of Skövde, School of Engineering Science. University of Skövde, The Virtual Systems Research Centre.
    Carlson, Johan S
    Fraunhofer Chalmers Centre.
    Bohlin, Robert
    Fraunhofer Chalmers Centre.
    Brolin, Erik
    University of Skövde, School of Engineering Science. University of Skövde, The Virtual Systems Research Centre. Chalmers.
    Delfs, Niclas
    Fraunhofer Chalmers Centre.
    Mårdberg, Peter
    Fraunhofer Chalmers Centre.
    Stefan, Gustafsson
    Fraunhofer Chalmers Centre.
    Keyvani, Ali
    Högskolan Väst / Chalmers.
    Rhen, Ida-Märta
    Fraunhofer Chalmers Centre / Chalmers.
    IMMA – Intelligently moving manikins in automotive applications2014Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 22.
    Hanson, Lars
    et al.
    University of Skövde, School of Engineering Science. University of Skövde, The Virtual Systems Research Centre.
    Högberg, Dan
    University of Skövde, School of Engineering Science. University of Skövde, The Virtual Systems Research Centre.
    Carlson, Johan S.
    Geometry and Motion Planning group, Fraunhofer-Chalmers Center, Göteborg, Sweden.
    Delfs, Niclas
    Geometry and Motion Planning group, Fraunhofer-Chalmers Center, Göteborg, Sweden.
    Brolin, Erik
    University of Skövde, School of Engineering Science. University of Skövde, The Virtual Systems Research Centre.
    Mårdberg, Peter
    Geometry and Motion Planning group, Fraunhofer-Chalmers Center, Göteborg, Sweden.
    Spensieri, Domenico
    Geometry and Motion Planning group, Fraunhofer-Chalmers Center, Göteborg, Sweden.
    Björkenstam, Staffan
    Geometry and Motion Planning group, Fraunhofer-Chalmers Center, Göteborg, Sweden.
    Nyström, Johan
    Geometry and Motion Planning group, Fraunhofer-Chalmers Center, Göteborg, Sweden.
    Ore, Fredrik
    School of Innovation, Design and Engineering, Mälardalen University, Eskilstuna, Sweden.
    Industrial path solutions - intelligently moving manikins2019In: DHM and Posturography / [ed] Sofia Scataglini, Gunther Paul, London: Academic Press, 2019, p. 115-124Chapter in book (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    IPS IMMA (Industrial Path Solutions - Intelligently Moving Manikins) is a digital human modeling tool developed in close cooperation between academia and industry in Sweden. The academic consortium behind the software consists of expertise within applied mathematics, ergonomics, and engineering. The development of IMMA was initiated from the vehicle industries’ need of an effective, efficient, objective, and user-friendly software for verification of manufacturing ergonomics. The ‘Industrial path solutions - intelligently moving manikins’ chapter consists of two main sections: the first about the commercially available tool, and the second about current or recent research projects developing the software further. Commercial IPS IMMA is presented by describing the biomechanical model and appearance, anthropometrics module, motion prediction, instruction language, and ergonomics evaluation. The research projects focus on dynamic motions simulation, muscle modelling and application areas such as human-robot collaboration, occupant packaging, and layout planning.

  • 23.
    Högberg, Dan
    et al.
    University of Skövde, School of Technology and Society. University of Skövde, The Virtual Systems Research Centre.
    Bertilsson, Erik
    University of Skövde, School of Technology and Society. University of Skövde, The Virtual Systems Research Centre. Department of Product and Production Development, Chalmers University of Technology, Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Hanson, L.
    Department of Product and Production Development, Chalmers University of Technology, Gothenburg, Sweden / Industrial Development, Scania CV, Södertälje, Sweden.
    A pragmatic approach to define anthropometric boundary manikins for multiple populations2012In: NES2012 Proceedings, Saltsjöbaden, Sweden, August 19-22, 2012: Ergonomics for sustainability and growth / [ed] Ann-Beth Antonsson & Göran M. Hägg, Stockholm: KTH Royal Institute of Technology, 2012Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The paper addresses the call for methods that can assist designers to consider anthropometric diversity when designing products or workstations, and hence formulate more sustainable design solutions. A basic method for the definition of boundary manikins for bivariate design problems and combined populations is described, exemplified and evaluated. The method can be used for defining virtual test groups when using digital human modelling tools for evaluating anthropometry related aspects of human-product interfaces at early design phases. It can also be used to indentify persons with certain anthropometry to build up test groups for performing physical tests.

  • 24.
    Högberg, Dan
    et al.
    University of Skövde, School of Technology and Society. University of Skövde, The Virtual Systems Research Centre.
    Bertilsson, Erik
    University of Skövde, School of Technology and Society. University of Skövde, The Virtual Systems Research Centre.
    Hanson, Lars
    Chalmers University of Technology.
    A basic step towards increased accommodation level accuracy when using DHM tools2011In: Proceedings of DHM, First International Symposium on Digital Human Modeling, Université Claude Bernard Lyon , 2011, p. 1-6Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The paper addresses the need to consider anthropometric diversity in design and suggests a basic approach for the simultaneous consideration of variance in two key dimensions. This as a basic step from the common, but in many cases poor, approach to use univariate percentile data in design. The bivariate method described can be applied when utilising DHM tools for design in that key dimension values for extreme but likely anthropometric measurement combinations are calculated and entered as input data when representative manikins are defined. The mathematical procedure is described and the outcome of the method is compared to a typical percentile based approach, indicating more accurate accommodation levels being reached by the proposed method. The method is to be seen as a simple method to be used for basic design problems where variance in few anthropometric dimensions are to be considered simultaneously, and not as an alternative for more advanced multivariate methods. The paper takes a pragmatic standpoint, directing its message towards practitioners using DHM tools for design purposes.

  • 25.
    Högberg, Dan
    et al.
    University of Skövde, School of Engineering Science. University of Skövde, The Virtual Systems Research Centre.
    Brolin, Erik
    University of Skövde, School of Engineering Science. University of Skövde, The Virtual Systems Research Centre. Department of Product and Production Development, Chalmers University of Technology, Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Hanson, Lars
    University of Skövde, School of Engineering Science. University of Skövde, The Virtual Systems Research Centre. Department of Product and Production Development, Chalmers University of Technology, Gothenburg, Sweden / Industrial Development, Scania CV, Södertälje, Sweden.
    Accommodation levels for ellipsoid versus cuboid defined boundary cases2015In: Procedia Manufacturing, ISSN 2351-9789, Vol. 3, p. 3702-3708Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The boundary case method is established for the representation and consideration of anthropometric diversity in design tasks with certain characteristics. Sometime boundary cases are defined separately for two distributions, e.g. for females and males, which may lead to a situation where some boundary cases will be redundant in that they are located within the joint distribution rather than on the joint boundary. This paper describes and illustrates a method for automatic identification of redundant boundary cases that are located within two three-dimensional overlapping distributions.

    Practitioner Summary: The paper describes a pragmatic way to focus the design work on users with specific limiting body measurement combinations that can be used to obtain design data or be used to describe appropriate test persons or digital human models for design problems where the boundary case method is suitable.

  • 26.
    Högberg, Dan
    et al.
    University of Skövde, School of Engineering Science. University of Skövde, The Virtual Systems Research Centre.
    Brolin, Erik
    University of Skövde, School of Engineering Science. University of Skövde, The Virtual Systems Research Centre.
    Hanson, Lars
    University of Skövde, School of Engineering Science. University of Skövde, The Virtual Systems Research Centre.
    Accommodation levels for ellipsoid versus cuboid defined boundary cases2015In: Proceedings of the 6th International Conference on Applied Human Factors and Ergonomics (AHFE 2015), AHFE , 2015Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The definition and use of boundary cases is a common approach when aiming to anthropometrically accommodate a desired percentage of the targeted population by a design. The cases are defined based on anthropometric data that represents the targeted population. Approaches that define cases based on the variation within just one body measurement are poor for most design problems in representing anthropometric diversity. Hence, the consideration of variation within several body measurements is preferred. However, an approach that is based on performing several separate studies of the variation within a number of measurements leads to undesired reduction of accommodation due to the lack of consideration of the effects of correlations between measurements. This paper compares theoretical accommodation levels when using an ellipsoid versus a cuboid based approach for defining boundary cases to represent anthropometric variation within three body measurements. The ellipsoid approach considers correlations between body measurements whereas the cuboid approach does not consider correlations between body measurements. The paper suggests the application of the ellipsoid method for defining boundary cases for better reaching desired accommodation levels in boundary case based design problems. These cases can be used to define computer manikins when using digital human modelling tools. The method is also applicable when wishing to select extreme but representative real people to be involved in physical fitting trials.

  • 27.
    Högberg, Dan
    et al.
    University of Skövde, School of Engineering Science. University of Skövde, The Virtual Systems Research Centre.
    Brolin, Erik
    University of Skövde, School of Engineering Science. University of Skövde, The Virtual Systems Research Centre. Department of Product and Production Development, Chalmers University of Technology, Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Hanson, Lars
    Department of Product and Production Development, Chalmers University of Technology, Gothenburg, Sweden / Industrial Development, Scania CV, Södertälje, Sweden.
    Basic Method for Handling Trivariate Normal Distributions in Case Definition for Design and Human Simulation2014In: Advances in Applied Digital Human Modeling, AHFE Conference , 2014, p. 27-40Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 28.
    Högberg, Dan
    et al.
    University of Skövde, School of Engineering Science. University of Skövde, The Virtual Systems Research Centre.
    Brolin, Erik
    University of Skövde, School of Engineering Science. University of Skövde, The Virtual Systems Research Centre.
    Hanson, Lars
    University of Skövde, School of Engineering Science. University of Skövde, The Virtual Systems Research Centre. Industrial Development, Scania CV.
    Concept of Formalized Test Procedure for Proactive Assessment of Ergonomic Value by Digital Human Modelling Tools in Lean Product Development2018In: Advances in Human Factors in Simulation and Modeling: Proceedings of the AHFE 2017 International Conference on Human Factors in Simulation and Modeling / [ed] Cassenti, Daniel N., Cham, Switzerland: Springer, 2018, Vol. 591, p. 425-436Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    A concept of a formalized test procedure for proactive assessment of ergonomic value by digital human modelling (DHM) tools in lean product development (LPD) is proposed and described. The objective of the formalized procedure is to integrate the utilization of DHM tools in LPD and to support the delivery of ergonomic value and reduce waste in product and production development processes. A design process model is illustrated and described, and examples are given of how to specify and work with ergonomic value in the process.

  • 29.
    Högberg, Dan
    et al.
    University of Skövde, School of Engineering Science. University of Skövde, The Virtual Systems Research Centre.
    Brolin, Erik
    University of Skövde, School of Engineering Science. University of Skövde, The Virtual Systems Research Centre. Chalmers University of Technology.
    Hanson, Lars
    University of Skövde, School of Engineering Science. University of Skövde, The Virtual Systems Research Centre. Chalmers University of Technology / Scania CV.
    Identification of redundant boundary cases2015In: Proceedings of the 19th Triennial Congress of the International Ergonomics Association / [ed] Lindgaard, G. and Moore, D. (Eds.), Zürich, Switzerland: The International Ergonomics Association , 2015, p. 1-5Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The boundary case method is established for the representation and consideration of anthropometric diversity in design tasks with certain characteristics. Sometime boundary cases are defined separately for two distributions, e.g. for females and males, which may lead to a situation where some boundary cases will be redundant in that they are located within the joint distribution rather than on the joint boundary. This paper describes and illustrates a method for automatic identification of redundant boundary cases that are located within two three-dimensional overlapping distributions.

    Practitioner Summary: The paper describes a pragmatic way to focus the design work on users with specific limiting body measurement combinations that can be used to obtain design data or be used to describe appropriate test persons or digital human models for design problems where the boundary case method is suitable.

  • 30.
    Högberg, Dan
    et al.
    University of Skövde, School of Engineering Science. University of Skövde, The Virtual Systems Research Centre.
    Ruiz Castro, Pamela
    University of Skövde, School of Engineering Science. University of Skövde, The Virtual Systems Research Centre.
    Mårdberg, Peter
    University of Skövde, School of Engineering Science. Fraunhofer-Chalmers Centre, Gothenburg.
    Delfs, Niclas
    Fraunhofer-Chalmers Centre, Gothenburg.
    Nurbo, Pernilla
    Volvo Car Corporation, Gothenburg.
    Fragoso, Paulo
    Scania CV, Södertälje.
    Andersson, Lina
    Volvo Trucks, Gothenburg.
    Brolin, Erik
    University of Skövde, School of Engineering Science. University of Skövde, The Virtual Systems Research Centre.
    Hanson, Lars
    University of Skövde, School of Engineering Science. University of Skövde, The Virtual Systems Research Centre.
    DHM Based Test Procedure Concept for Proactive Ergonomics Assessments in the Vehicle Interior Design Process2018In: Proceedings of the 20th Congress of the International Ergonomics Association (IEA 2018): Volume V: Human Simulation and Virtual Environments / [ed] Sebastiano BagnaraRiccardo TartagliaSara AlbolinoThomas AlexanderYushi Fujita, Cham, Switzerland: Springer, 2018, Vol. 822, p. 314-323Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The development of a digital human modelling (DHM) based test procedure concept for the assessment of physical ergonomics conditions in virtual phases of the vehicle interior design process is illustrated and discussed. The objective of the test procedure is to be a valuable tool for ergonomic evaluations and decision support along the design process, so that ergonomic issues can be dealt with in an efficient, objective and proactive manner. The test procedure is devised to support companies in having stable and objective processes, in accordance with lean product development (LPD) philosophies. The overall structure and fundamental functionality of the test procedure concept is explained by a simplified use case, utilizing the DHM tool IPS IMMA to: define manikin families and manikin tasks; predict manikin motions; and visualize simulations and ergonomics evaluation outcomes.

  • 31.
    Iriondo Pascual, Aitor
    et al.
    University of Skövde, School of Engineering Science. University of Skövde, The Virtual Systems Research Centre.
    Högberg, Dan
    University of Skövde, School of Engineering Science. University of Skövde, The Virtual Systems Research Centre.
    Syberfeldt, Anna
    University of Skövde, School of Engineering Science. University of Skövde, The Virtual Systems Research Centre.
    Brolin, Erik
    University of Skövde, School of Engineering Science. University of Skövde, The Virtual Systems Research Centre.
    Hanson, Lars
    University of Skövde, School of Engineering Science. University of Skövde, The Virtual Systems Research Centre. Scania CV, Södertälje, Sweden.
    Application of Multi-objective Optimization on Ergonomics in Production: A Case Study2020In: Advances in Additive Manufacturing, Modeling Systems and 3D Prototyping: Proceedings of the AHFE 2019 International Conference on Additive Manufacturing, Modeling Systems and 3D Prototyping, July 24-28, 2019, Washington D.C., USA / [ed] Massimo Di Nicolantonio, Emilio Rossi, Thomas Alexander, Springer, 2020, p. 584-594Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Taking a holistic perspective is central in production development, aiming to optimize ergonomics and overall production system performance. Hence, there is a need for tools and methods that can support production companies to identify the production system alternatives that are optimal regarding both ergonomics and production efficiency. The paper presents a devised case study where multi-objective optimization is applied, as a step to towards the development of such an optimization tool. The overall objective in the case study is to find the best order in which an operator performs manual tasks during a workday, considering ergonomics and production system efficiency simultaneously. More specifically, reducing the risk of injury from lifting tasks and improving the throughput are selected as the two optimization objectives. An optimization tool is developed, which communicates with a digital human modelling tool to simulate work tasks and assess ergonomics. 

  • 32.
    Mahdavian, Nafise
    et al.
    University of Skövde, School of Engineering Science. University of Skövde, The Virtual Systems Research Centre.
    Lind, Carl Mikael
    Unit of Occupational medicine, Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden / Division of Ergonomics, KTH Royal Institute of Technology, Huddinge, Sweden.
    Diaz Olivares, Jose Antonio
    Division of Ergonomics, KTH Royal Institute of Technology, Huddinge, Sweden.
    Iriondo Pascual, Aitor
    University of Skövde, School of Engineering Science. University of Skövde, The Virtual Systems Research Centre.
    Högberg, Dan
    University of Skövde, School of Engineering Science. University of Skövde, The Virtual Systems Research Centre.
    Brolin, Erik
    University of Skövde, School of Engineering Science. University of Skövde, The Virtual Systems Research Centre.
    Yang, Liyun
    Unit of Occupational medicine, Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden / Division of Ergonomics, KTH Royal Institute of Technology, Huddinge, Sweden.
    Forsman, Mikael
    Unit of Occupational medicine, Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden / Division of Ergonomics, KTH Royal Institute of Technology, Huddinge, Sweden.
    Hanson, Lars
    University of Skövde, School of Engineering Science. University of Skövde, The Virtual Systems Research Centre. Scania CV, Södertälje, Sweden.
    Effect of Giving Feedback on Postural Working Techniques2018In: Advances in Manufacturing Technology XXXII: Proceedings of the 16th International Conference on Manufacturing Research, incorporating the 33rd National Conference on Manufacturing Research, September 11–13, 2018, University of Skövde, Sweden / [ed] Peter Thorvald, Keith Case, Amsterdam, Netherlands: IOS Press, 2018, p. 247-252Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Working postures and movements affect work efficiency and musculoskeletal health. To reduce the biomechanical exposure in physically demanding settings, working techniques may be improved by giving instant ergonomic feedback to the operator. This study investigates if feedback can be used to decrease adverse postures and movements in assembly work. A prototype solution of a smart textile workwear was used on a trainee assembly line. Posture and movement signals of 24 trainee operators were sampled via the workwear, transferred to a tablet for analyses and used to provide feedback suggesting improvements of work technique. Two modes of feedback were tested. Every participant’s work technique was measured before and after receiving the feedback and the results were compared. For upper arm elevation angle ≥60, behaviour change is indicated, supporting a positive work technique change, and indicated a future usefulness of technical automatic feedback for operators.

  • 33.
    Mahdavian, Nafise
    et al.
    University of Skövde, School of Engineering Science. University of Skövde, The Virtual Systems Research Centre.
    Ruiz Castro, Pamela
    University of Skövde, School of Engineering Science. University of Skövde, The Virtual Systems Research Centre.
    Brolin, Erik
    University of Skövde, School of Engineering Science. University of Skövde, The Virtual Systems Research Centre.
    Högberg, Dan
    University of Skövde, School of Engineering Science. University of Skövde, The Virtual Systems Research Centre.
    Hanson, Lars
    University of Skövde, School of Engineering Science. University of Skövde, The Virtual Systems Research Centre. Industrial Development, Scania, Södertälje, Sweden.
    Digital human modelling in a virtual environment of CAD parts and a point cloud2017In: Proceedings of the 5th International Digital Human Modeling Symposium / [ed] Sascha Wischniewski & Thomas Alexander, Federal Institute for Occupational Safety and Health , 2017, p. 283-291Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Manual assembly is a time and cost consuming phase of production. It is crucial to design the assembly process so that overall system efficiency, quality output and human well-being meet desired levels. Since manual assembly involve humans, one support in the production design process is to use digital human modelling (DHM) tools to model and assess different design scenarios prior to the actual production process. In the traditional way, various CAD tools are used by engineers to model the production layout and the workstations. Then, these models typically are imported into a DHM tool to simulate human work, and to apply ergonomic evaluation methods on the simulated work tasks. This work, supported by CAD and DHM, can be a time consuming and iterative process as precise information and measurements of the actual assembly environment are needed, e.g. related to actual geometries of factory premises or of facilities surrounding the workstations. However, introducing point cloud scanning technology can provide the user with a more correct and realistic virtual representation of the environment, which allows for a faster and more precise design process.The aim of this paper is to present the developments and capabilities of the DHM tool IPS IMMA (Intelligently Moving Manikins) in an assembly process and in a virtual environment provided by point cloud scanning.

  • 34.
    Rhen, Ida-Märta
    et al.
    University of Skövde, The Virtual Systems Research Centre. University of Skövde, School of Technology and Society.
    Högberg, Dan
    University of Skövde, School of Technology and Society. University of Skövde, The Virtual Systems Research Centre.
    Hanson, Lars
    Chalmers University of Technology / Industrial Development Scania CV.
    Bertilsson, Erik
    University of Skövde, The Virtual Systems Research Centre. University of Skövde, School of Technology and Society.
    Dynamic wrist exposure analysis of a digital human model2012In: Proceedings of the 4th International Conference on Applied Human Factors and Ergonomics, CRC Press, 2012, p. 3944-3953Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Simulation and visualisation software such as digital human modelling (DHM) tools have been designed to predict and evaluate ergonomics within a virtual environment. Today’s DHM tools typically include observation-based evaluation methods, initially designed for visual observation. Direct measurement techniques enable assessment of quantitative data similar to the information derived from the DHM. Such technique allows detailed and time-dependent risk aspects to be considered in the ergonomics evaluation. No methods in commercial DHM software calculate time-dependent information, which is shown as an important risk factor in the development of work-related musculoskeletal disorder (WMSD). This paper presents and discusses an ergonomics assessment approach based on the theory of a dose-response relationship between exposure and the risk of arising injury. The focus of the approach presented is on the wrist-joint.

  • 35.
    Ruiz Castro, Pamela
    et al.
    University of Skövde, School of Engineering Science. University of Skövde, The Virtual Systems Research Centre.
    Mahdavian, Nafise
    University of Skövde, School of Engineering Science. University of Skövde, The Virtual Systems Research Centre.
    Brolin, Erik
    University of Skövde, School of Engineering Science. University of Skövde, The Virtual Systems Research Centre.
    Högberg, Dan
    University of Skövde, School of Engineering Science. University of Skövde, The Virtual Systems Research Centre.
    Hanson, Lars
    University of Skövde, School of Engineering Science. University of Skövde, The Virtual Systems Research Centre. Industrial Development, Scania, Södertälje, Sweden.
    IPS IMMA for designing human-robot collaboration workstations2017In: Proceedings of the 5th International Digital Human Modeling Symposium / [ed] Sascha Wischniewski & Thomas Alexander, Federal Institute for Occupational Safety and Health , 2017, p. 263-273Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The global competition has forced manufacturing companies to further increase their productivity. This, together with technology development and changes in regulations, have led to the introduction of new types of workstations in production lines, where human operators collaborate with industrial robots to perform work tasks. As any type of product, these workstations need to be designed in the most optimal way to deliver the expected value. In the design process of these collaborative workstations, separate virtual simulations of industrial robots and human operators can be made with multiple commercial software. Separate simulations reduce the efficiency of the design process and makes it harder to identify successful design solutions. Hence, there is a need for software tools that are capable of simultaneous simulation of the human-robot collaboration in a workstation. Providing engineers with such tools will assist their tasks to optimize the human and robot workflow, while proactively ensuring proper ergonomic conditions for operators.This paper describes and illustrates how the digital human modelling (DHM) tool IPS IMMA can aid in the design of human-robot collaboration workstations. A use case where the human operator collaborates with a robot to produce a section of a pedal car in a virtual scenario is described. The use case illustrates the current capabilities and limitations of the software to simulate human-robot collaborations in workstations. Hence, the use case aims to provide input for further development of DHM tools aimed to assist the design of human-robot collaboration workstations.

  • 36.
    Svensson, Erik
    et al.
    University of Skövde, The Virtual Systems Research Centre. University of Skövde, School of Technology and Society.
    Bertilsson, Erik
    University of Skövde, The Virtual Systems Research Centre. University of Skövde, School of Technology and Society.
    Högberg, Dan
    University of Skövde, The Virtual Systems Research Centre. University of Skövde, School of Technology and Society.
    Hanson, Lars
    Chalmers University of Technology.
    Anthropometrics and Ergonomics Assessment in the IMMA Manikin2010In: Proceedings of the 3rd Applied Human Factors and Ergonomics (AHFE) International Conference / [ed] Gavriel Salvendy, Waldemar Karwowski, Louisville: AHFE International , 2010Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Digital Human Modeling (DHM) tools are useful for simulating human work and proactively evaluating ergonomic conditions. IMMA (Intelligently Moving Manikin) is a project that aims to develop software that combines digital human modeling and path planning. The work in the IMMA project is divided into a number of work packages that gradually increases the complexity of the problem. This poster paper regards both the functionality for ergonomics assessment and consideration of anthropometric diversity in the DHM tool being developed. Reviews of current DHM tools and interviews with DHM users and ergonomics specialists were done to clarify problems, needs and opportunities when working with anthropometrics and ergonomics evaluations. Interviews showed that simulations and following evaluations are almost solely based on static postures and with few human models. The main reason for this is claimed to be complex and time consuming processes when creating and evaluating simulations. Both the review of current DHM tools and the interviews confirmed that there is an evident need for more time-dependant evaluation methods and a better coverage of the intended users’ diversity. Attained knowledge from the analysis of current DHM tools and interviews are used to create work processes and two specific modules intended to be implemented in the new IMMA DHM tool. Key issues for the modules are ease of use and flexibility. The overall objective with the IMMA DHM system is to offer a tool that support faster and more correct ergonomics analyses.

  • 37.
    Svensson, Erik
    et al.
    University of Skövde, The Virtual Systems Research Centre. University of Skövde, School of Technology and Society.
    Bertilsson, Erik
    University of Skövde, The Virtual Systems Research Centre. University of Skövde, School of Technology and Society.
    Högberg, Dan
    University of Skövde, The Virtual Systems Research Centre. University of Skövde, School of Technology and Society.
    Hanson, Lars
    Chalmers University of Technology.
    Review of the incorporation, utilization and future demands of ergonomic evaluation methods in Digital Human Modelling2010In: Proceedings of the 42nd annual Nordic Ergonomic Society Conference: Proactive Ergonomics - implementation of ergonomics in planning of jobs, tasks, systems and environments, 2010, p. D1-6-D1-10Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This study reviews assessment methods in DHM tools and explore the utilization of these methods in  industry. Interviews  with  DHM  users  and  ergonomics  specialists  within the Swedish  automotive  industry  showed  that  simulations  and  following  evaluations  are almost  solely  based  on  static  postures.  Integrated  evaluation  tools  in  current  DHM systems are seldom utilized; instead they use company specific evaluation methods. Both the  review  of current  DHM  tools and  the  interviews  confirmed that  there is  an  evident need  for  more  time-dependant  evaluation  methods.  The  results  are  used  to  present  a conceptual DHM module dealing with time-dependant ergonomics assessment. 

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