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  • 1.
    Kirkpatrick, Graeme
    et al.
    University of Manchester, United Kingdom.
    Mazierska, Ewa
    University of Central Lancashire, United Kingdom.
    Kristensen, Lars
    University of Skövde, School of Informatics. University of Skövde, The Informatics Research Centre. lars.kristensen@his.se.
    Marxism and the computer game2016In: Journal of Gaming & Virtual Worlds, ISSN 1757-191X, E-ISSN 1757-1928, Vol. 8, no 2, p. 117-130Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This article asks the question, how should the computer game as a new cultural form be assessed from a Marxist perspective? Marxism is a developed theoretical discourse operative in several domains that are potentially relevant to computer games. The first part of our discussion focuses on Marx’s discussion of technology in relation to art and presents his historical dialectic of alienation and disalienation. This dialec-tic highlights the ambivalence of technology: it is both the condition of possibility of a society of a plenty in which humanity is freed from drudgery and yet, with each step forward, it is associated with the imposition of new demands and novel forms of oppression. Viewed in this way, computer games are an important manifestation of digital technology, deeply implicated in new forms of capitalism. In the second section we use Marx’s ideas on art to explore the aesthetics of the new medium. The aesthetic occupies a special place in Marxist thought because it defines a space of reflection in which we can find a momentary escape from the fray of conflictual social relations and from which the future may shine a light. Viewed as a form of art, computer games are also ambivalent. On one side, they have been associated with a revival of play and a new culture of levity and creativity, which has spread as far as contemporary workplaces and even transformed the design of industrial, or productive, technology. At the same time, we argue that there has been no corre-sponding social transformation – people are not more free as a result of ‘gamifica-tion’. Rather, it seems that computer games present a deepening entanglement of aesthetic values (play, freedom, imagination) with technologies of control (interface, system, rules). In conclusion, we suggest that digital games bring the dream of art to life but that the result is not freedom but rather a perversion of play as its facility for opening up imagined spaces is used to restrict access to the space of freedom.

  • 2.
    Kristensen, Lars
    University of Skövde, School of Informatics. University of Skövde, The Informatics Research Centre.
    Anna Matison: After You’re Gone (Posle tebia, 2016)2018In: Kinokultura, ISSN 1478-6567, no 61Article, book review (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Review of Anna Matison's film After You’re Gone (Posle tebia, 2016).

  • 3.
    Kristensen, Lars
    University of Skövde, School of Informatics. University of Skövde, The Informatics Research Centre.
    Art and Game Obstruction2016Collection (editor) (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Artists, writers, computer programmers, designers, tutors and curators, game researchers and game developers: All were present at the ‘Art and Game Obstruction’ summer school held at Skövde Art Museum in 2015. This anthology documents what happened and the result is a unique insight into research and creative practices. What is the art in computer games and what is the playability in contemporary art? These are some of the questions explored in this collection. Here, the key ‘players’ of the summer school give their view on the intersection between art and games.

  • 4.
    Kristensen, Lars
    University of Skövde, School of Humanities and Informatics.
    Baltic Cinema from beyond Western Eyes: Baltic Cinemas after the 90s: Shifting (Hi)stories and (Id)entities by Renata Šukaitytė (ed.)2013In: Studies in Eastern European Cinema, ISSN 2040-350X, Vol. 4, no 1Article, book review (Other academic)
  • 5.
    Kristensen, Lars
    University of Skövde, School of Informatics. University of Skövde, The Informatics Research Centre.
    Bicycle cinema: Machine identity and the moving image2017In: Thesis Eleven, ISSN 0725-5136, E-ISSN 1461-7455, Vol. 138, no 1, p. 65-80Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This paper examines the relationship between identities and the bicycle as portrayed in films. The analysis finds that taking the viewpoint of the bicycle emancipates the bicycle from being subjected to closure, as the constructionists would have it, and thus articulates the differences with which the bicycle can communicate to its rider. The paper examines the bicycle as depicted in three films: Premium Rush  (Davis Koepp, 2012), A Sunday in Hell  (Jørgen Leth, 1977) and Life on Earth  (Abderrahmane Sissako, 1998). It engages with the concept of ‘interpretative flexibility’ and the development of the bicycle, as examined by Wiebe Bijker and others, and argues that the interpretative flexibility of bicycles does not cease just because the high-wheeler was abandoned and the ‘safety’ bicycle was universally accepted. The fight for the role of the bicycle continues and the bicycle is subject to constant transformations in order to reconstruct it according to human needs. Andrew Feenberg’s modified constructivism is applied to re-examine the technical development of the bicycle, claiming that technology is dependent on specific social structures as well as human agency. The paper argues that just as social structures are negotiable and unfixed at any point in time, the bicycle too is never neutral but remains negotiable and unfixed. Consequently, since the bicycle constantly ‘speaks’ back to the user, there is never closure in the technical development of the bicycle. Drawing on the writings of Bruno Latour and the Deleuzian idea of assemblages, the bicycle and its rider are considered as an organic entity that is constantly forged and un-forged. Understanding the rhetoric of the bicycle machine helps the convergence of a bicycle becoming with becoming a rider, marking the bicycle as equal to its rider. Viewed in this way, the hierarchy of agency collapses and a crystallization emerges out of the rider and bicycle entwinement.

  • 6.
    Kristensen, Lars
    University of Central Lancashire.
    BOOK REVIEW: The imperial trace: Recent Russian cinema by Nancy Condee2014In: Studies in European Cinema, ISSN 1741-1548, E-ISSN 2040-0594, Vol. 11, no 2Article, book review (Other academic)
  • 7.
    Kristensen, Lars
    University of Skövde, School of Informatics. University of Skövde, The Informatics Research Centre.
    Dominik Spritzendorfer and Elena Tikhonova: Elektro Moskva (2013)2014In: KinoKultura, ISSN 1478-6567, Vol. 45Article, book review (Other academic)
  • 8.
    Kristensen, Lars
    University of Skövde, School of Informatics. University of Skövde, The Informatics Research Centre.
    Early Non-Fiction Filmmaking in the Baltic Region: Identity, Ethnography and Spectacle2014Conference paper (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Ethnographic photography and painting precede cinema (Griffith, 2002), but moving images substantially increases the intersection of knowledge regimes and entertainment. The ethnographic film extends the Eurocentric mastery of the gaze and enlarges the colonial enterprise with camera technology. It is not until recently that vision and mastery, with regard to race, representation and visual cultural production, have been analysed within a cross-cultural framework (Pratt, 1992; Stam and Shohat, 1994). This approach has proven successful when dealing with the ethnographic image’s enmeshment of scientific data and popular amusement (Rony, 1996), because it focuses on form and authority, unravelling cinema’s most intricate relationships, namely the interplay between filmmaker, cinematic style and audience. One of the key questions in this research is precisely the issue of authority, as raised in connection with the construction of primitivism, e.g. Robert Flatherty’s Nanook of the North (1922), or questioning power in documentary narratives, e.g. Luis Buñuel's Las Hurdes (1933). To what degree is the ethnographic film of the Baltic region invoking the ‘unequal looking’ regime (Ginsburg, 2002), which has been paradigmatic for filmmakers to follow or break with (as with Las Hurdes)?

     

    The paper will focus on Soviet and Estonian anthropological films. For example, in Journey through Setoland (1913), Estonia’s first filmmaker, Johannes Pääsuke, depicted the cultural peculiarities and traditions of the Setos, a small ethnic group populating the borderlands between Estonia and Russia, or Soviet documentarist Vladimir Erofeyev, who in turn was very much influenced by the pre-revolution ethnographic filmmaker Fyodor Bremer (Izvolov, 1996). Filmmakers, like Konstantin Märska, continued this tradition where cinematography was sensitive to ‘different human types’ (Kärk, 2010). The paper will argue that these early non-fiction filmmakers shaped the future tradition of documentary filmmaking in not only Estonia and Russia but throughout the Baltic region.

  • 9.
    Kristensen, Lars
    University of Skövde, School of Informatics. University of Skövde, The Informatics Research Centre.
    Eastern Europe proves to be a Nordic mirage2019In: Studies in East European Cinema, ISSN 2040-350X, E-ISSN 2040-3518Article, book review (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Book Review of Beyond Eastern Noir: reimaging Russia and Eastern Europe in Nordic cinemas, authored by Anna Estera Mrozewicz, Edinburgh University Press, 2018, 256p., ISBN-978-1474418102

  • 10.
    Kristensen, Lars
    University of Skövde, School of Informatics. University of Skövde, The Informatics Research Centre.
    Näripea, Eva
    Gazing at the Baltic: Tourist Discourse in the Cinema of the Baltic Sea Countries2016In: Music, Art and Diplomacy during the Cold War / [ed] Simo Mikkonen and Pekka Suutari, Farnham: Ashgate, 2016Chapter in book (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The article concentrates on spatial representations in cinemas of Eastern and Western countries around the Baltic Sea from the perspective of the so-called 'tourist gaze', as theorised principally by John Urry. Drawing on his writings, several authors have recognised essential similarities between the representational regimes of socialist realism in the Eastern bloc and tourism marketing as practiced on both sides of the Iron Curtain. This aim article is to compare if and how the ‘tourist gaze’ manifested in different ideological settings, looking at urban representations in films from Estonia (the cycle of so-called ‘Old Town films’ from the 1960s and 1970s), Poland (Do widzenia, do jutra / Goodbye, See You Tomorrow, dir. Janusz Morgenstern, 1960) and Sweden (Mannen från andra sidan / The Man from the Other Side, dir. Yuri Yegorov, 1972).

  • 11.
    Kristensen, Lars
    University of Skövde, School of Informatics. University of Skövde, The Informatics Research Centre.
    Gennadii Ostrovskii: Dumpling Brothers (Pel’meni, 2013)2014In: KinoKultura, ISSN 1478-6567, Vol. 43Article, book review (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
  • 12.
    Kristensen, Lars
    University of Skövde, School of Informatics. University of Skövde, The Informatics Research Centre.
    Interv'yu: Aleksei Balabanov i Sergei Sel'yanov2016In: Brikolazh reszhissyora Balabanova / [ed] Frederik H. White, Nizhny Novgorod: Dekom , 2016, p. 172-182Chapter in book (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
    Abstract [en]

    Interview with Russian filmmaker Aleksei Balabanov and his producer Sergei Sel'yanov. Carried out in January 2003 at Lenfilm in St Petersburg.

  • 13.
    Kristensen, Lars
    University of Skövde, School of Informatics. University of Skövde, The Informatics Research Centre.
    Liusia Matveeva: The Embroideress (Vyshival’shchitsa 2014)2015In: Kinokultura, ISSN 0950-2289, E-ISSN 2326-5507, no 50Article, book review (Other academic)
  • 14.
    Kristensen, Lars
    University of Skövde, School of Informatics. University of Skövde, The Informatics Research Centre.
    Marxist Resistance at Bicycle Speed: Screening the Critical Mass Movenement2015In: Marxism and Film Activism: Screening Alternative Worlds / [ed] Ewa Mazierska and Lars Kristensen, New York and London: Berghahn Books, 2015, p. 213-233Chapter in book (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The chapter discusses a certain type of activism and cinema associated with it, which cannot be described as strictly ‘Marxist’, but which might appeal to Marxist viewers: the Critical Mass movement. This movement, which started in the early 1990s, consists of groups of bicyclists riding through inner cities in numerous countries. The Critical Massmovement can be assessed in two basic ways: either as a means of combating capitalism by challenging the domination of a private car in the cities and advocating living in a more sustainable and greener way, or as a one-issue activismthat diverts attention from the crucial problem of capitalism, which is that of class. The chapter also discusses the films that represent and advocate bikeactivism and living according to the ‘bike ethos’ in terms of their production, textual characteristics and distribution. It draws attention to the fact that cinema is crucial for bike activism and the internet is indispensable for Mass Movement cinema.

  • 15.
    Kristensen, Lars
    University of Skövde, School of Informatics. University of Skövde, The Informatics Research Centre.
    Mikhail Brashinsky: Shopping Tour (Shopping tur, 2012)2014In: KinoKultura, ISSN 1478-6567, Vol. 44Article, book review (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
  • 16.
    Kristensen, Lars
    University of Skövde, School of Informatics.
    Polish Actor-Directors Playing Russians: Skolimowski and Stuhr2014In: Polish Cinema in a Transnational Context / [ed] Ewa Mazierska and Michael Goddard, Rochester, NY: University of Rochester Press , 2014, p. 194-212Chapter in book (Refereed)
  • 17.
    Kristensen, Lars
    University of Skövde, School of Informatics. University of Skövde, The Informatics Research Centre.
    Postcommunist Cinema: A case study of three films2015In: Rethinking Histories of Arts in the 20th Century / [ed] Claire Levy, Joanna Spassova-Dikova and Elka Traykova, Sofia: Institute of Art Studies , 2015, p. 157-170Chapter in book (Refereed)
  • 18.
    Kristensen, Lars
    University of Skövde, School of Informatics. University of Skövde, The Informatics Research Centre.
    Russians in space: Ideological problems for red sci-fi cinema2014Conference paper (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    The imagined worlds of sci-fi films have to be projected as being founded on both ‘rational scientific’ reasoning and at the same time have ‘no normative ground’. This gives the genre a precarious relationship with not only past and present, but also reality. This could equally be said for socialist realism, which frequently featured films with no normative ground in reality while sporting a logical rationality of what the future would be like. Science fiction, in cinema and literature, gives concrete projections of future, which are both plausible and farfetched.

    In the Eastern Bloc, science fiction was one of the most cherished film genres. As the genre has functioned worldwide, communist science fiction films were able to fulfill the cinematic medium’s potential of creating imagined worlds. Despite this fact, the science fiction films never became mass-produced. In the Soviet Union, in particular, the genre never really took off. In his brief history of the Soviet sci-fi cinema in Sight and Sound (July 2011), James Blackford lists only about 20 Soviet productions, from Aelita (1924) to Zero City (1989), but this is from an industry that made an average of 150 films per year. What were obstacles for producing sci-fi films on a large scale? In this paper, I will argue that there are three ways in which we view this lack of focus: (1) large production cost, (2) socialist realist concerns and (3) issues of colonialism.

    The paper will look at four Eastern European sci-fi films, Silent Star (1960), Icarus XB 1 (1963), Signal (1970) and Pilot Pirx’s Inquest (1979). Nearly, all these films are made in coproduction and with the international cast. Two of the films are made by East German and Polish film companies and one in collaboration with Tallinn film studio in Estonia. Three of the films are based on Stanislaw Lem’s stories and one by Calos Rauch, but all have Russian characters, who perform various roles during each film. As professors, scientists, captains of spacecrafts or more ordinary members of space crews, these Russian characters are adhering to the projecting of socialist realism, where harmony and international friendship was the backbone of a full communist future. 

  • 19.
    Kristensen, Lars
    University of Skövde, School of Informatics. University of Skövde, The Informatics Research Centre.
    Sergei Taramaev, Liubov’ Lvova: Metamorphosis (Metamorfozis 2015)2017In: Kinokultura, ISSN 0023-2076, E-ISSN 2217-7809, Vol. 55Article, book review (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
    Abstract [en]

    Film review

  • 20.
    Kristensen, Lars
    University of Skövde, School of Informatics. University of Skövde, The Informatics Research Centre.
    Svetlana Baskova’s response to Russian national neoliberalism in For Marx …2018In: Contemporary Cinema and Neoliberal Ideology / [ed] Ewa Mazierska, Lars Kristensen, New York: Routledge, 2018, p. 73-87Chapter in book (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The chapter deals with the film For Marx …  (2012) by the Russian filmmaker Svetlana Baskova, which is a homage to Sergei Eisenstein’s Strike  (1925). Baskova examines it in the context of the peculiar brand of neoliberalism adopted in Russia ruled by Vladimir Putin and the type of cinema promoted by his regime. The chapter argues that while ‘Putin’s cinema’ is expected to convey patriotic values in a way which makes them easy to understand and be embraced by the general public, in exchange for being supported by the state throughout the entire process of production and distribution, Baskova opted out of this system, by making a film which does not adhere either to the dominant ways of making films or to the dominant ideology. The chapter maintains that For Marx …  is a product of cinephilia since it was financially supported by Cine Fantom, a film club based in Moscow, and is an example of ‘non- cinema’, understood as a type of film which ostensibly rejects the principles of cinema. The chapter raises an interesting question, namely whether films in the vein of For Marx …  constitute a serious alternative to the dominant cinema, in contemporary Russia and elsewhere or rather act as a smokescreen, behind which the servants of the authoritarian state perpetuate their ultimately undemocratic cultural practices.

  • 21.
    Kristensen, Lars
    University of Skövde, School of Humanities and Informatics.
    The conversational intervention2013In: The Drouth, ISSN 1474-6190, no 44, p. 62-69Article in journal (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
  • 22.
    Kristensen, Lars
    University of Skövde, School of Informatics.
    The 'Far East' Neighbour in Nikita Mikhalkov's Urga (1991)2014In: Postcolonial Approaches to Eastern European Cinema: Portraying Neighbours On-Screen / [ed] Ewa Mazierska, Lars Kristensen, Eva Näripea, London and New York: I.B. Tauris, 2014, p. 277-302Chapter in book (Refereed)
  • 23.
    Kristensen, Lars
    University of Skövde, School of Informatics. University of Skövde, The Informatics Research Centre.
    "Wanna Be in the New York Times?": Epic History and War City as Global Cinema2016In: Contested Interpretations of the Past in Polish, Russian and Ukrainian Film: Screen as Battlefield / [ed] Sander Brouwer, Leiden and Boston: Brill Academic Publishers, 2016, p. 21-39Chapter in book (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The three films discussed in this paper have the city as part of their titles: Leningrad/Attack on Leningrad (2009) is directed by Aleksander Buravsky and tells the story of the Leningrad siege during the Second World War, featuring an international cast of well-known actors, such as Gabriel Byrne, Armin Mueller-Stahl and Mira Sorvino. Rigas Sargi/Defenders of Riga (2007), directed by Aigars Grauba, is a co-production with an Estonian film company, and centres on the short period when Latvia gained independence after the First World War. Jerzy Hoffman’s 1920 Bitwa Warszawska/Battle of Warsaw 1920 (2011) is also set in the post-World War I period, focusing on the Miracle at Vistula, when the Polish army managed to defeat the approaching Red Army. These three films are highly commercial products that seek large audiences, and increasingly international audiences, which would return the financial support invested in them. This differentiates them from classical postcolonial cinema and the echelons of high art, placing them within the realms of popular and mass culture. The paper will first draw on concepts of cinematic representation within a postcolonial framework, and, second, look at the representation of the city as a tool with which we can view these films as more than just commercial products unworthy of our attention. The city is what unites these three films on the one hand, but, on the other, it is also what makes them diverge from each other both cinematically and nationally. With regard to the postcolonial, I will argue that these films can be examined as expressions of a post-imperial condition. There is a desire to narrate the nation anew, as if liberated from a colonial oppression. However, the old structures of oppression have not disappeared, but rather merged into new ones.

  • 24.
    Kristensen, Lars
    University of Skövde, School of Informatics.
    When Marx Retruned to Russia: Marxist Film Activism in a Post-communist Condition2014Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 25.
    Kristensen, Lars
    University of Skövde, School of Humanities and Informatics.
    Work in Bicycle Cinema: From Race Rider to City Courier2013In: Work in Cinema: Labor and the Human Condition / [ed] Ewa Mazierska, New York: Palgrave Macmillan, 2013, p. 249-264Chapter in book (Refereed)
  • 26.
    Kristensen, Lars
    et al.
    University of Skövde, School of Informatics. University of Skövde, The Informatics Research Centre.
    Burman, Christo
    University of Skövde, School of Informatics. University of Skövde, The Informatics Research Centre.
    Soviet Estonian bicycle film: sport, nation and race narratives2017In: Studies in Eastern European Cinema, ISSN 2040-350X, Vol. 8, no 1, p. 62-77Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This article deals with Soviet Estonian bicycle films focusing on sport. Four films are selected for analysis: three documentaries by Hans Roosipuu and the fiction film Kuljetuul/Side Wind (1983) by Raul Tammet. The films show a chronological development of the bicycle race film, starting with Hans Roosipuu’s short film Ulekanne 56:13/Transmission 56:13 (1969) and ending with Raul Tammet’s Side Wind, screened on television a few years before Glasnost was introduced in the Soviet Union. The analysis focuses on the issue of national identity building on the notion that sport was one of the few venues where Estonians could express their nationality. The analysis finds that the closer we get to the Glasnost period the more the films tend to highlight the Estonianness or concerns for Estonian bicycle riders. Moreover, in comparison with Western bicycle film, the Estonian films have didactic qualities based in the traditions of socialist realism and a tendency to elevate the bicycle race mechanic due to Soviet bicycling culture being less advanced. Also earlier than their Western counterpart, the Estonian bicycle films are concerned with the greenvalue of the bicycle in a drive to criticize the Soviet authorities. In doing this the Soviet Estonian bicycle films adheres to the dynamic of the Glasnost film.

  • 27.
    Kristensen, Lars
    et al.
    University of Skövde, School of Informatics. University of Skövde, The Informatics Research Centre.
    Mazierska, Ewa
    Introduction2015In: Marxism and Film Activism: Sreening Alternative Worlds, New York and London: Berghahn Books, 2015, p. 1-25Chapter in book (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This book reflects the fact that Marxist film activism is a question of the production, textual characteristics and reception of film. Consequently, practically all the essays included in this collection deal with one if not all of these three aspects. It presents a wide spectrum of cases, using examples from different periods of cinema’s history and different locations. The volume aims to fill a gap in research as this form of activism is barely covered in existing publications and to connect the almost hegemonic position of the neoliberal version of capitalism with an increased accessibility of digital technologies and growth of channels of distribution of films. Filmmakers covered are Aleksandr Medvedkin Jean-Marie Straub and Danièle Huillet, Chris Marker and Jean-Luc Godard to films like 5 Broken Cameras (2010) by Emad Burnat and Guy David, A Screaming Man (2010) by Mahomet-Saleh Haroun and Fernando Solanas and Octavio Getino’s seminal Third Cinema film, The Hour of the Furnaces (1968).

  • 28.
    Kristensen, Lars
    et al.
    University of Skövde, School of Informatics.
    Mazierska, EwaUniversity of Central Lancashire .Näripea, EvaEstonian Academy of Arts .
    Postcolonial Approaches to Eastern European Cinema: Portraying Neighbours On-Screen2014Collection (editor) (Refereed)
  • 29.
    Kristensen, Lars
    et al.
    University of Skövde, School of Informatics. University of Skövde, The Informatics Research Centre.
    Mazierska, Ewa
    University of Central Lancashire, UK.
    Näripea, Eva
    Estonian Academy of Arts.
    The Deterritorialised Muslim Convert in Post-Communist Eastern European Cinema2014In: Baltic Screen Media Review, ISSN 2346-5492, Vol. 2, p. 54-75Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This article analyses the Muslim convert as portrayed in three post-communist Eastern European films: Vladimir Khotinenko’s A Moslem (Мусульманин, Russia, 1996), Jerzy Skolimowski’s Essential Killing (Poland/Norway/Ireland/Hungary/France, 2010), and Sulev Keedus’s Letters to Angel (Kirjad Inglile, Estonia, 2011). Although set in different periods, the films have their origins in Afghanistan and then move to European countries. The conversion to Islam happens in connection to, or as a consequence of, different military conflicts that the country has seen. The authors examine the consequences the characters have on their environment, using Gilles Deleuze and Félix Guattari’s concept of deterritorialisation, understood as an opportunity to produce political and cultural change. Resettling from one religion and place into another means breaking up structures that need to be reassembled differently. However, these three films seem to desire deterritorialisation and resettlement for different reasons. In A Moslem, national structures need to be reset since foreign Western values have corrupted the post-communist Russian rural society. In Essential Killing, it is the Western military system of oppression that cannot uphold the convert and his values. Lastly, in Letters to Angel, the convert exposes the hollowness of post-communist capitalism. The Muslim converts in these films are subtle reminders that we can all reinvent ourselves.

  • 30.
    Kristensen, Lars
    et al.
    University of Skövde, School of Informatics. University of Skövde, The Informatics Research Centre.
    Wilhelmsson, Ulf
    University of Skövde, School of Informatics. University of Skövde, The Informatics Research Centre.
    Roger Caillois and Marxism: A Game Studies Perspective2017In: Games and Culture: A Journal of Interactive Media, ISSN 1555-4120, E-ISSN 1555-4139, Vol. 12, no 4, p. 381-400Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The authors look at Caillois’ reflections on the dichotomy between work and leisure in relation to Marxism, whose dialectics are shown to influence the milieu under which Caillois developed his ideas. The contribution interrogates this labor/play dialectic while looking at recent literature on games being produced within the current capitalist and neoliberal system, focusing on phenomena like “playbour” and on key elements discussed in these theories, from the affordances and limitations of technology to the immaterial technological tools used by gamers and game makers. The article argues that looking at Caillois in relation to Marxism would provide an interesting critical perspective, one that has been underexplored by current approaches. The authors note that contemporary concerns on capitalism and games are far from being at odds with Caillois’ distinction between labur and play and suggest that the influence of Marxism on Caillois’ writings would provide an interesting terrain of further discussion.

  • 31.
    Mazierska, Ewa
    et al.
    School of Humanities and Social Sciences at the University of Central Lancashire, UK.
    Kristensen, LarsUniversity of Skövde, School of Informatics. University of Skövde, The Informatics Research Centre.
    Contemporary Cinema and Neoliberal Ideology2018Collection (editor) (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In this edited collection, an international ensemble of scholars examine what contemporary cinema tells us about neoliberal capitalism and cinema, exploring whether filmmakers are able to imagine progressive alternatives under capitalist conditions. Individual contributions discuss filmmaking practices, film distribution, textual characteristics and the reception of films made in different parts of the world. They engage with topics such as class struggle, debt, multiculturalism and the effect of neoliberalism on love and sexual behaviour. Written in accessible, jargon-free language, Contemporary Cinema and Neoliberal Ideology is an essential text for those interested in political filmmaking and the political meanings of films.

  • 32.
    Mazierska, Ewa
    et al.
    University of Central Lancashire, UK.
    Kristensen, LarsUniversity of Skövde, School of Informatics. University of Skövde, The Informatics Research Centre.
    Marx at the Movies: Revisiting Histroy, Theory and Practice2014Collection (editor) (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    This book revisits cinema from a Marxist perspective, which has been marginalised by mainstream film studies for over three decades. It argues that the supposed ‘end of history’, marked by the comprehensive triumph of capitalism and the ‘end of cinema’, calls for revisiting Marx’s writings in order to analyse film theories, histories and practices.  It pays particular attention to the phenomena, which were previously rarely tackled from a Marxist perspective, such as classical Hollywood cinema and amateur filmmaking.  The authors examine such aspects of film as the use of humour, the problem of adaptation and translation, the relationship between sound and image and the use of music and silence in film. Apart from Marx, they refer to the works of Benjamin, Bloch, Adorno, Brecht, Rancière, Hardt and Negri, Sviták and Kosík, to name just a few. In common with Marx, they also argue for combining theory with history and practice. 

  • 33.
    Peshkopia, Ridvan
    et al.
    University for Business and Technology, Kosovo.
    Imami, Arben
    Institute for Political Studies, Tirana, Albania.
    Kristensen, Lars
    University of Skövde, School of Informatics. University of Skövde, The Informatics Research Centre.
    Constructing and Dismantling the New Man Utopia: The Cinematic Reflection of Albanian Communist and Post-communist Ontology2016In: Kinokultura, ISSN 1478-6567, no Special Issue 16 AlbaniaArticle in journal (Refereed)
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