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  • 1.
    Herrera, Carlos
    et al.
    University of Skövde, School of Humanities and Informatics. University of Skövde, The Informatics Research Centre.
    Montebelli, Alberto
    University of Skövde, School of Humanities and Informatics. University of Skövde, The Informatics Research Centre.
    Ziemke, Tom
    University of Skövde, School of Humanities and Informatics. University of Skövde, The Informatics Research Centre.
    Behavioral Flexibility: An Emotion Based Approach2007In: 9th International Work-Conference on Artificial Neural Networks, IWANN 2007 / [ed] Sandoval, F; Prieto, A; Cabestany, J; Grana, M, Springer Berlin/Heidelberg, 2007, p. 798-805Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In this paper we suggest a biologically inspired approach to flexible behavior through emotion modeling. We consider emotion to emerge from relational interaction of body, nervous system and world, through sensory-motor attunement of internal parameters to concern-relevant relationships. We interpret such relationships with the notions of collective variable and control parameters. We introduce a simple robotic implementation of this model of appraisal, following the techniques of evolutionary neuro-robotics.

  • 2.
    Herrera, Carlos
    et al.
    University of Skövde, School of Humanities and Informatics. University of Skövde, The Informatics Research Centre.
    Montebelli, Alberto
    University of Skövde, School of Humanities and Informatics. University of Skövde, The Informatics Research Centre.
    Ziemke, Tom
    University of Skövde, School of Humanities and Informatics. University of Skövde, The Informatics Research Centre.
    The Role of Internal States in the Emergence of Motivation and Preference: A Robotics Approach2007In: AFFECTIVE COMPUTING AND INTELLIGENT INTERACTION, PROCEEDINGS, Springer Berlin/Heidelberg, 2007, p. 798-805Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In order to explain and model emotion we need to attend to the role internal states play in the generation of behavior. We argue that motivational and perceptual roles emerge from the dynamical interaction between physiological processes, sensory-motor processes and the environment. We investigate two aspects inherent to emotion appraisal and response which rely on physiological process: the ability to categorize relations with the environment and to modulate response generating different action tendencies.

  • 3.
    Kiryazov, Kiril
    et al.
    University of Skövde, School of Humanities and Informatics.
    Lowe, Robert
    University of Skövde, School of Humanities and Informatics.
    Becker-Asano, Christian
    Freiburg Institute for Advanced Studies, University of Freiburg, Albertstrase, 1979104, Freiburg, Germany.
    Montebelli, Alberto
    University of Skövde, School of Humanities and Informatics.
    Ziemke, Tom
    University of Skövde, School of Humanities and Informatics.
    From the virtual to the robotic: Bringing emoting and appraising agents into reality2011In: Proceedings of the 2nd European Future Technologies Conference and Exhibition 2011 (FET 11) / [ed] Elisabeth Giacobino and Rolf Pfeifer, Elsevier, 2011, Vol. - 7, p. 241-243Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    - A classical appraisal model of emotions extended with artificial metabolic mechanisms is presented. The new architecture is based on two existing models: WASABI and a model of Microbial Fuel Cell technology. WASABI is a top-down cognitive model which is implemented in several virtual world applications such as a museum guide. Microbial fuel cells provide energy for the robot through digesting food. The presented work is a first step towards imbuing a physical robot with emotions of human-like complexity. Classically, such integration has only been attempted in the virtual domain. The research aim is to study the embodied appraisal theory and to show the role of the body in the emotion mechanisms. Some initial tests of the architecture with humanoid NAO robot in a minimalistic scenario are presented. © Selection and peer-review under responsibility of FET11 conference organizers and published by Elsevier B.V.

  • 4.
    Lowe, Robert
    et al.
    University of Skövde, School of Humanities and Informatics. University of Skövde, The Informatics Research Centre.
    Montebelli, Alberto
    University of Skövde, School of Humanities and Informatics. University of Skövde, The Informatics Research Centre.
    Ieropoulos, Ioannis
    University of West England, Bristol Robotics Lab, UK.
    Greenman, John
    University of West England, Bristol Robotics Lab, UK.
    Melhuish, Chris
    University of West England, Bristol Robotics Lab, UK.
    Ziemke, Tom
    University of Skövde, School of Humanities and Informatics. University of Skövde, The Informatics Research Centre.
    Grounding Motivation in Energy Autonomy: A Study of Artificial Metabolism Constrained Robot Dynamics2010In: Artificial Life XII: Proceedings of the Twelfth International Conference on the Synthesis and Simulation of Living Systems / [ed] Harold Fellermann, Mark Dörr, Martin Hanczyc, Lone Ladegaard Laursen, Sarah Maurer, Daniel Merkle, Pierre-Alain Monnard, Kasper Støy, Steen Rasmussen, Cambridge, Massachusetts, London, England: MIT Press, 2010, p. 725-732Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    We present an evolutionary robotics investigation into the metabolism constrained homeostatic dynamics of a simulated robot. Unlike existing research that has focused on either energy or motivation autonomy the robot described here is considered in terms of energy-motivation autonomy. This stipulation is made according to a requirement of autonomous systems to spatiotemporally integrate environmental and physiological sensed information. In our experiment, the latter is generated by a simulated artificial metabolism (a microbial fuel cell batch) and its integration with the former is determined by an E-GasNet-active vision interface. The investigation centres on robot performance in a three-dimensional simulator on a stereotyped two-resource problem. Motivationlike states emerge according to periodic dynamics identifiable for two viable sensorimotor strategies. Robot adaptivity is found to be sensitive to experimenter-manipulated deviations from evolved metabolic constraints. Deviations detrimentally affect the viability of cognitive (anticipatory) capacities even where constraints are significantly lessened. These results support the hypothesis that grounding motivationally autonomous robots is critical to adaptivity and cognition.

  • 5.
    Lowe, Robert
    et al.
    University of Skövde, School of Humanities and Informatics.
    Philippe, Pierre
    University of Skövde, School of Humanities and Informatics.
    Montebelli, Alberto
    University of Skövde, School of Humanities and Informatics.
    Morse, Anthony
    University of Skövde, School of Humanities and Informatics.
    Ziemke, Tom
    University of Skövde, School of Humanities and Informatics.
    Affective Modulation of Embodied Dynamics2008In: The role of emotion in adaptive behaviour and cognitive robotics / [ed] Robert Lowe, Anthony Morse, Tom Ziemke, 2008, p. 48-64Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 6.
    Messina Dahlberg, Giulia
    et al.
    University of Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Lindblom, Jessica
    University of Skövde, School of Informatics. University of Skövde, The Informatics Research Centre.
    Montebelli, Alberto
    University of Skövde, School of Informatics. University of Skövde, The Informatics Research Centre.
    Billing, Erik
    University of Skövde, School of Informatics. University of Skövde, The Informatics Research Centre.
    Negotiating epistemic spaces for dialogue across disciplines in higher education: The case of the Pepper experiment2018In: EARLI, Joint SIG10-21 Conference, 2018 (forthcoming), Luxembourg, 2018Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 7.
    Montebelli, Alberto
    University of Skövde, School of Informatics. University of Skövde, The Informatics Research Centre.
    Ecological autonomy: the case of a robotic model of biological cognition2011Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 8.
    Montebelli, Alberto
    University of Skövde, School of Humanities and Informatics. University of Skövde, The Informatics Research Centre.
    Modeling the Role of Energy Management in Embodied Cognition2012Doctoral thesis, comprehensive summary (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    The quest for adaptive and autonomous robots, flexible enough to smoothly comply with unstructured environments and operate in close interaction with humans, seems to require a deep rethinking of classical engineering methods. The adaptivity of natural organisms, whose cognitive capacities are rooted in their biological organization, is an obvious source of inspiration. While approaches that highlight the role of embodiment in both cognitive science and cognitive robotics are gathering momentum, the crucial role of internal bodily processes as foundational components of the biological mind is still largely neglected.

    This thesis advocates a perspective on embodiment that emphasizes the role of non-neural bodily dynamics in the constitution of cognitive processes in both natural and artificial systems. In the first part, it critically examines the theoretical positions that have influenced current theories and the author's own position. The second part presents the author's experimental work, based on the computer simulation of simple robotic agents engaged in energy-related tasks. Proto-metabolic dynamics, modeled on the basis of actual microbial fuel cells for energy generation, constitute the foundations of a powerful motivational engine. Following a history of adaptation, proto-metabolic states bias the robot towards specific subsets of behaviors, viably attuned to the current context, and facilitate a swift re-adaptation to novel tasks. Proto-metabolic dynamics put the situated nature of the agent-environment sensorimotor interaction within a perspective that is functional to the maintenance of the robot's overall `survival'. Adaptive processes tend to convert metabolic constraints into opportunities, branching into a rich and energetically viable behavioral diversity.

  • 9.
    Montebelli, Alberto
    et al.
    University of Skövde, School of Informatics. University of Skövde, The Informatics Research Centre.
    Billing, Erik A.
    University of Skövde, School of Informatics. University of Skövde, The Informatics Research Centre.
    Lindblom, Jessica
    University of Skövde, School of Informatics. University of Skövde, The Informatics Research Centre.
    Messina Dahlberg, Giulia
    Department of Educational Research and Development, University of Borås.
    Reframing HRI Education: A Dialogic Reformulation of HRI Education to Promote Diverse Thinking and Scientific Progress2017In: Journal of Human-Robot Interaction, E-ISSN 2163-0364, Vol. 6, no 2, p. 3-26Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Over the last few years, technological developments in semi-autonomous machines have raised awareness about the strategic importance of human-robot interaction (HRI) and its technical and social implications. At the same time, HRI still lacks an established pedagogic tradition in the coordination of its intrinsically interdisciplinary nature. This scenario presents steep and urgent challenges for HRI education. Our contribution presents a normative interdisciplinary dialogic framework for HRI education, denoted InDia wheel, aimed toward seamless and coherent integration of the variety of disciplines that contribute to HRI. Our framework deemphasizes technical mastery, reducing it to a necessary yet not sufficient condition for HRI design, thus modifying the stereotypical narration of HRI-relevant disciplines and creating favorable conditions for a more diverse participation of students. Prospectively, we argue, the design of an educational 'space of interaction’ that focuses on a variety of voices, without giving supremacy to one over the other, will be key to successful HRI education and practice.

  • 10.
    Montebelli, Alberto
    et al.
    University of Skövde, The Informatics Research Centre. University of Skövde, School of Humanities and Informatics.
    Herrera, Carlos
    University of Skövde, The Informatics Research Centre. University of Skövde, School of Humanities and Informatics.
    Ziemke, Tom
    University of Skövde, School of Humanities and Informatics. University of Skövde, The Informatics Research Centre.
    An Analysis of Behavioral Attractor Dynamics2007In: 9th European Conference, ECAL 2007: Advances in Artificial Life, Springer Berlin/Heidelberg, 2007, p. 213-222Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The interaction of brain, body and environment can result in complex behavior with rich dynamics even for relatively simple agents. Such dynamics are, however, often notoriously difficult to analyze. In this paper we explore the case of a simple simulated robotic agent, equipped with a reactive neurocontroller and an energy level, that the agent has been evolved to re-charge. A dynamical systems analysis, shows that a non-neural internal state (energy level), despite its simplicity, dynamically modulates the agent-environment system’s behavioral attractors, such that the robot’s behavioral repertoire is continually adapted to its current situation and energy level.

  • 11.
    Montebelli, Alberto
    et al.
    University of Skövde, School of Humanities and Informatics. University of Skövde, The Informatics Research Centre.
    Herrera, Carlos
    University of Skövde, School of Humanities and Informatics. University of Skövde, The Informatics Research Centre.
    Ziemke, Tom
    University of Skövde, School of Humanities and Informatics. University of Skövde, The Informatics Research Centre.
    On Cognition as Dynamical Coupling: An Analysis of Behavioral Attractor Dynamics2008In: Adaptive Behavior, ISSN 1059-7123, E-ISSN 1741-2633, Vol. 16, no 2-3, p. 182-195Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The interaction of brain, body, and environment can result incomplex behavior with rich dynamics, even for relatively simpleagents. Such dynamics are, however, often difficult to analyze.In this article, we explore the case of a simple simulated roboticagent, equipped with a reactive neurocontroller and an energylevel, which the agent has been evolved to recharge. A dynamicalsystems analysis shows that a non-neural internal state (energylevel), despite its simplicity, dynamically modulates the behavioralattractors of the agent—environment system, such thatthe robot's behavioral repertoire is continually adapted toits current situation and energy level. What emerges is a dynamic,non-deterministic, and highly self-organized action selectionmechanism, originating from the dynamical coupling of four systems(non-neural internal states, neurocontroller, body, and environment)operating at very different timescales.

  • 12.
    Montebelli, Alberto
    et al.
    University of Skövde, The Informatics Research Centre. University of Skövde, School of Informatics. Department of Automation and Systems Technology, Aalto University, Finland.
    Kyrki, Ville
    Department of Automation and Systems Technology, Aalto University, Finland.
    Transferring Physical Skills From Humans to Robots: Multimodal Programming by Demonstration for In-Contact Tasks2013Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 13.
    Montebelli, Alberto
    et al.
    University of Skövde, School of Informatics. University of Skövde, The Informatics Research Centre.
    Lindblom, Jessica
    University of Skövde, School of Informatics. University of Skövde, The Informatics Research Centre.
    On Transferring Crafting Intentions from Humans to Robots: A Message to Manufacturers of the (Near) Future2018In: Advances in Manufacturing Technology XXXII: Proceedings of the 16th International Conference on Manufacturing Research, incorporating the 33rd National Conference on Manufacturing Research, September 11–13, 2018, University of Skövde, Sweden / [ed] Peter Thorvald, Keith Case, Amsterdam: IOS Press, 2018, p. 163-168Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Our present work aligns three results from previous robotics research in simultaneous kinesthetic teaching of spatial and force/torque requirements for “in-contact” tasks, to highlight the endeavor towards the creation of safe, flexible, cost effective, confidential, natural programming interfaces, a crucial tool for the manufacturing domain of the future. The tasks that we here consider overarch different dimensions of complexity, from writing with a marker on a white slate to using a wood plane. Eventually, incrementally assisted kinesthetic teaching (IAKT) allows human experts to refine their demonstrations under modulated robotic assistance, thus converging, by a limit process constituted of a sequence of sub-perfect individual demonstrations, towards the “ideal” crafting intention, i.e. the humanly unreachable, perfect execution of the task. In the closing discussion, we demonstrate how this approach can find space in contemporary industrial and SMSE manufacturing, in order to aim for improved production quality and performance.

  • 14.
    Montebelli, Alberto
    et al.
    University of Skövde, The Informatics Research Centre. University of Skövde, School of Informatics.
    Lowe, Robert
    University of Skövde, The Informatics Research Centre. University of Skövde, School of Informatics.
    (Em)powering Emergent Cognition: Realistic proto-allostasis as a foundational route to cognitive ability2016Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 15.
    Montebelli, Alberto
    et al.
    University of Skövde, School of Humanities and Informatics. University of Skövde, The Informatics Research Centre.
    Lowe, Robert
    University of Skövde, School of Humanities and Informatics. University of Skövde, The Informatics Research Centre.
    Ieropoulos, Ioannis
    Bristol Robotics Laboratory, University of Bristol and University of the West of England, UK.
    Melhuish, Chris
    Bristol Robotics Laboratory, University of Bristol and University of the West of England, UK.
    Greenman, John
    Microbiology Research Lab, University of the West of England, UK.
    Ziemke, Tom
    University of Skövde, School of Humanities and Informatics. University of Skövde, The Informatics Research Centre.
    Microbial fuel cell driven behavioural dynamics in robot simulations2010In: Artificial Life XII: Proceedings of the Twelfth International Conference on the Synthesis and Simulation of Living Systems / [ed] Harold Fellermann, Mark Dörr, Martin Hanczyc, Lone Ladegaard Laursen, Sarah Maurer, Daniel Merkle, Pierre-Alain Monnard, Kasper Støy, Steen Rasmussen, Cambridge, Massachusetts: MIT Press, 2010, p. 749-756Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    With the present study we report the first application of a recently proposed model for realistic microbial fuel cells (MFCs) energy generation dynamics, suitable for robotic simulations with minimal and extremely limited computational overhead. A simulated agent was adapted in order to engage in a viable interaction with its environment. It achieved energy autonomy by maintaining viable levels of the critical variables of MFCs, namely cathodic hydration and anodic substrate biochemical energy. After unsupervised adaptation by genetic algorithm, these crucial variables modulate the behavioral dynamics expressed by viable robots in their interaction with the environment. The analysis of this physically rooted and self-organized dynamic action selection mechanism constitutes a novel practical contribution of this work. We also compare two different viable strategies, a self-organized continuous and a pulsed behavior, in order to foresee the possible cognitive implications of such biologicalmechatronics hybrid symbionts in a novel scenario of ecologically grounded energy and motivational autonomy.

  • 16.
    Montebelli, Alberto
    et al.
    University of Skövde, School of Humanities and Informatics. University of Skövde, The Informatics Research Centre.
    Lowe, Robert
    University of Skövde, School of Humanities and Informatics. University of Skövde, The Informatics Research Centre.
    Ziemke, Tom
    University of Skövde, School of Humanities and Informatics.
    Embodied anticipation for swift re-adaptation in neurocomputational cognitive architectures for robotic agents2009In: Proceedings of the 31th Annual Conference of the Cognitive Science Society / [ed] Niels Taatgen & Hedderik van Rijn, Austin: Cognitive Science Society, Inc., 2009, p. 3082-3087Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The coupling between a body (in an extended sense that encompasses both neural and non-neural dynamics) and its environment is here conceived as a critical substrate for cognition. We propose and discuss the plan for a neurocomputational cognitive architecture for robotic agents, so far implemented in its minimalist form for supporting the behavior of a simple simulated agent. A non-neural internal bodily mechanism (crucially characterized by a time scale much slower than the normal sensory-motor interactions of the robot with its environment) extends the cognitive potential of a system composed of purely reactive parts with a dynamic action selection mechanism and the capacity to integrate information over time. The same non-neural mechanism is the foundation for a novel, minimalist anticipatory architecture, capable of swift re-adaptation to related yet novel tasks.

  • 17.
    Montebelli, Alberto
    et al.
    University of Skövde, School of Humanities and Informatics.
    Lowe, Robert
    University of Skövde, School of Humanities and Informatics.
    Ziemke, Tom
    University of Skövde, School of Humanities and Informatics.
    Embodied anticipation in neurocomputational cognitive architectures for robotic agents2009Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The coupling between a body (in an extended sense that encompasses both neural and non-neural dynamics) and its environment is here conceived as a critical substrate for cognition. We propose and discuss the plan for a neurocomputational cognitive architecture for robotic agents, so far implemented in its minimal form for supporting the behavior of a simple simulated robotic agent. A non-neural internal bodily mechanism (crucially characterized by a time scale much slower than the normal sensory-motor interactions of the robot with its environment) extends the cognitive potential of a system composed of purely reactive parts with a dynamic action selection mechanism and the capacity to integrate information over time. The same non-neural mechanism is the foundation for a novel, minimalist anticipatory architecture, implementing our bodily-anticipation hypothesis and capable of swift readaptation to related yet novel tasks.1

  • 18.
    Montebelli, Alberto
    et al.
    University of Skövde, School of Humanities and Informatics. University of Skövde, The Informatics Research Centre.
    Lowe, Robert
    University of Skövde, School of Humanities and Informatics. University of Skövde, The Informatics Research Centre.
    Ziemke, Tom
    University of Skövde, School of Humanities and Informatics. University of Skövde, The Informatics Research Centre.
    Energy Constraints and Behavioral Complexity: The Case of a Robot with a Living Core2011In: Complex Adaptive Systems: Energy, Information, and Intelligence: Papers from the AAAI Fall Symposium / [ed] Mirsad Hadžikadić, Ted Carmichael, Palo Alto, Calif.: AAAI Press, 2011, p. 109-116Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The new scenarios of contemporary adaptive robotics seem to suggest a transformation of the traditional methods. In the search for new approaches to the control of adaptive autonomous systems, the mind becomes a fundamental source of inspiration. In this paper we anticipate, through the use of simulation, the cognitive and behavioral properties that emerge from a recent prototype robotic platform, EcoBot, a family of bio-mechatronic symbionts provided with an 'artificial metabolism', that has been under physical development during recent years. Its energy reliance on a biological component and the consequent limitation of its supplied energy determine a special kind of dynamic coupling between the robot and its environment. Rather than just an obstacle, energetic constraints become the opportunity for the development of a rich set of behavioral and cognitive properties.

  • 19.
    Montebelli, Alberto
    et al.
    University of Skövde, School of Humanities and Informatics. University of Skövde, The Informatics Research Centre.
    Lowe, Robert
    University of Skövde, School of Humanities and Informatics. University of Skövde, The Informatics Research Centre.
    Ziemke, Tom
    University of Skövde, School of Humanities and Informatics. University of Skövde, The Informatics Research Centre.
    More from the Body: Embodied anticipation for swift re-adaptation in neurocomputational cognitive architectures for robotic agents2010In: Advances in Cognitive Systems / [ed] Nefti-Meziani, Samia, Stevenage: Institution of Engineering and Technology, 2010, p. 249-270Chapter in book (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The coupling between a body (in an extended sense that encompasses  both neural and non-neural dynamics) and its environment is here conceived as a critical substrate for cognition. We propose and discuss the plan for a neurocomputational cognitive architecture for robotic agents, so far implemented in its minimal form for supporting the behavior of a simple simulated robotic agent. A non-neural internal bodily mechanism (crucially characterized by a time scale much slower than the normal sensory-motor interactions of the robot with its environment) extends the cognitive potential of a system composed of purely reactive parts with a dynamic action selection mechanism and the capacity to integrate information over time. The same non-neural mechanism is the foundation for a novel, minimalist anticipatory architecture, implementing our bodily-anticipation hypothesis and capable of swift re-adaptation to related yet novel tasks.

  • 20.
    Montebelli, Alberto
    et al.
    University of Skövde, School of Humanities and Informatics. University of Skövde, The Informatics Research Centre.
    Lowe, Robert
    University of Skövde, School of Humanities and Informatics. University of Skövde, The Informatics Research Centre.
    Ziemke, Tom
    University of Skövde, School of Humanities and Informatics. University of Skövde, The Informatics Research Centre.
    The Cognitive Body: From Dynamic Modulation to Anticipation2009In: Anticipatory Behavior in Adaptive Learning Systems, ABiALS 2008: From Psychological Theories to Artificial Cognitive Systems / [ed] Giovanni Pezzulo, Martin V. Butz, Olivier Sigaud, Gianluca Baldassarre, Berlin, Heidelberg: Springer Berlin/Heidelberg, 2009, p. 132-151Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Starting from the situated and embodied perspective on the study of cognition as a source of inspiration, this paper programmatically outlines a path towards an experimental exploration of the role of the body in a minimal anticipatory cognitive architecture. Cognition is here conceived and synthetically analyzed as a broadly extended and distributed dynamic process emerging from the interplay between a body, a nervous system and their environment. Firstly, we show how a non-neural internal state, crucially characterized by slowly changing dynamics, can modulate the activity of a simple neurocontroller. The result, emergent from the use of a standard evolutionary robotic simulation, is a selforganized, dynamic action selection mechanism, effectively operating in a context dependent way. Secondly, we show how these characteristics can be exploited by a novel minimalist anticipatory cognitive architecture. Rather than a direct causal connection between the anticipationprocess and the selection of the appropriate behavior, it implements a model for dynamic anticipation that operates via bodily mediation (bodily-anticipation hypothesis). This allows the system to swiftly scale up to more complex tasks never experienced before, achieving flexible and robust behavior with minimal adaptive cost.

  • 21.
    Montebelli, Alberto
    et al.
    Department of Automation and Systems Technology, Aalto University, Finland.
    Lowe, Robert
    University of Skövde, School of Humanities and Informatics. University of Skövde, The Informatics Research Centre.
    Ziemke, Tom
    University of Skövde, School of Humanities and Informatics. University of Skövde, The Informatics Research Centre.
    Toward Metabolic Robotics: Insights from Modeling Embodied Cognition in a Biomechatronic Symbiont2013In: Artificial Life, ISSN 1064-5462, E-ISSN 1530-9185, Vol. 19, no 3-4, p. 299-315Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 22.
    Montebelli, Alberto
    et al.
    University of Skövde, School of Informatics. University of Skövde, The Informatics Research Centre.
    Ruaro, Elisabetta
    Torre, Vincent
    Towards the neurocomputer2001Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 23.
    Montebelli, Alberto
    et al.
    Department of Electrical Engineering and Automation, Aalto Univeristy, Finland.
    Steinmetz, Franz
    German Aerospace Center (DLR), Institute of Robotics and Mechatronics, Oberpfaffenhofen-Weßling, Germany.
    Kyrki, Ville
    Department of Electrical Engineering and Automation, Aalto Univeristy, Finland.
    On handing down our tools to robots: Single-phase kinesthetic teaching for dynamic in-contact tasks2015In: Proceedings of the 2015 IEEE International Conference on Robotics and Automation: ICRA 2015, IEEE conference proceedings, 2015, p. 5628-5634Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    We present a (generalizable) method aimed tosimultaneously transfer positional and force requirements en-coded in a physical human skill (wood planing) from a humaninstructor to a robotic arm through kinesthetic teaching. Weachieve our goal through a novel use of a common sensoryconfiguration, constituted by a force/torque sensor mountedbetween the tool and the flange of a robotic arm. The roboticarm is endowed with integrated torque sensors at each joint.The mathematical model used to capture the general dynamicof the interaction between the human user and the wood surfaceis based on Dynamic Movement Primitives. During reenactmentof the task, the system can imitate and generalize the demon-strated spatial requirements, as well as their associated forceprofiles. Therefore, the robotic arm acquires the capacity toreproduce the dynamic profile for in-contact tasks requiringan articulated coordination in the distribution of forces. Forexample, the capacity to effectively operate the plane on a woodplank over multiple strokes, according to the demonstration ofthe human instructor.

  • 24.
    Montebelli, Alberto
    et al.
    University of Skövde, School of Informatics. University of Skövde, The Informatics Research Centre.
    Tykal, Martin
    Aalto University, Finland.
    Intention Disambiguation: When does action reveal its underlying intention?2017Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 25.
    Morse, Anthony F.
    et al.
    University of Skövde, School of Humanities and Informatics. University of Skövde, The Informatics Research Centre.
    Herrera, Carlos
    University of Skövde, School of Humanities and Informatics. University of Skövde, The Informatics Research Centre.
    Clowes, Robert
    Center for Research in Cognitive Science, University of Sussex, Brighton, UK.
    Montebelli, Alberto
    University of Skövde, School of Humanities and Informatics. University of Skövde, The Informatics Research Centre.
    Ziemke, Tom
    University of Skövde, School of Humanities and Informatics. University of Skövde, The Informatics Research Centre.
    The role of robotic modelling in cognitive science2011In: New ideas in psychology, ISSN 0732-118X, E-ISSN 1873-3522, Vol. 29, no 3, p. 312-324Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    From the perspective of cognitive robotics, this paper presents a modern interpretation of Newell’s (1973) reasoning and suggestions for why and how cognitive psychologists should develop models of cognitive phenomena. We argue that the shortcomings of current cognitive modelling approaches are due in significant part to a lack of exactly the kind of integration required for the development of embodied autonomous robotics. Moreover we suggest that considerations of embodiment, situatedness, and autonomy, intrinsic to cognitive robotics, provide an appropriate basis for the integration and theoretic cumulation that Newell argued was necessary for psychology to mature. From this perspective we analyse the role of embodiment and modes of situatedness in terms of integration, cognition, emotion, and autonomy. Four complementary perspectives on embodied and situated cognitive science are considered in terms of their potential to contribute to cognitive robotics, cognitive science, and psychological theorizing: minimal cognition and organization, enactive perception and sensorimotor contingency, homeostasis and emotion, and social embedding. In combination these perspectives provide a framework for cognitive robotics, not only wholly compatible with the original aims of cognitive modelling, but as a more appropriate methodology than those currently in common use within psychology.

  • 26.
    Racca, Mattia
    et al.
    School of Electrical Engineering, Aalto University, Finland.
    Pajarinen, Joni
    Intelligent Autonomous Systems (IAS) and Computational Learning for Autonomous Systems (CLAS) labs at TU Darmstadt.
    Montebelli, Alberto
    University of Skövde, School of Informatics. University of Skövde, The Informatics Research Centre.
    Kyrki, Ville
    School of Electrical Engineering, Aalto University, Finland.
    Learning in-contact control strategies from demonstration2016In: IROS 2016: 2016 IEEE/RSJ International Conference on Intelligent Robots and Systems, IEEE, 2016, p. 688-695Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Learning to perform tasks like pulling a door handle or pushing a button, inherently easy for a human, can be surprisingly difficult for a robot. A crucial problem in these kinds of in-contact tasks is the context specificity of pose and force requirements. In this paper, a robot learns in-contact tasks from human kinesthetic demonstrations. To address the need to balance between the position and force constraints, we propose a model based on the hidden semi-Markov model (HSMM) and Cartesian impedance control. The model captures uncertainty over time and space and allows the robot to smoothly satisfy a task's position and force constraints by online modulation of impedance controller stiffness according to the HSMM state belief. In experiments, a KUKA LWR 4+ robotic arm equipped with a force/torque sensor at the wrist successfully learns from human demonstrations how to pull a door handle and push a button.

  • 27.
    Steinmetz, Franz
    et al.
    German Aerospace Center (DLR), Institute of Robotics and Mechatronics, Oberpfaffenhofen-Weßling, Germany.
    Montebelli, Alberto
    University of Skövde, School of Informatics. University of Skövde, The Informatics Research Centre.
    Kyrki, Ville
    Department of Electrical Engineering and Automation, Aalto Univeristy, Aalto, Finland.
    Simultaneous kinesthetic teaching of positional and force requirements for sequential in-contact tasks2015In: Proceedings of the 2015 IEEE-RAS International Conference on Humanoid Robots (Humanoids), IEEE Computer Society, 2015, p. 202-209Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This paper demonstrates a method for simulta-neous transfer of positional and force requirements for in-contact tasks from a human instructor to a robotic arm throughkinesthetic teaching. This is achieved by a specific use of thesensory configuration, where a force/torque sensor is mountedbetween the tool and the flange of a robotic arm endowedwith integrated torque sensors at each joint. The humandemonstration is modeled using Dynamic Movement Primitives.Following human demonstration, the robot arm is provided withthe capacity to perform sequential in-contact tasks, for examplewriting on a notepad a previously demonstrated sequence ofcharacters. During the reenactment of the task, the systemis not only able to imitate and generalize from demonstratedtrajectories, but also from their associated force profiles. In fact,the implemented framework is extended to successfully recoverfrom perturbations of the trajectory during reenactment andto cope with dynamic environments.

  • 28.
    Thabet, Mohammad
    et al.
    Department of Intelligent Hydraulics and Automation, Tampere University of Technology, Finland.
    Montebelli, Alberto
    University of Skövde, School of Informatics. University of Skövde, The Informatics Research Centre.
    Kyrki, Ville
    Department of Electrical Engineering and Automation, Aalto University, Finland.
    Learning Movement Synchronization in Multi-component Robotic Systems2016In: : ICRA 2016, Institute of Electrical and Electronics Engineers (IEEE), 2016, p. 249-256Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 29.
    Tykal, Martin
    et al.
    Aalto University, Finland.
    Montebelli, Alberto
    University of Skövde, School of Informatics. University of Skövde, The Informatics Research Centre.
    Kyrki, Ville
    Department of Electrical Engineering and Automation, Aalto University, Finland.
    Incrementally Assisted Kinesthetic Teaching for Programming by Demonstration2016In: Human-Robot Interaction (HRI), 2016 11th ACM/IEEE International Conference on: HRI 2016, IEEE Computer Society, 2016, p. 205-212Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 30.
    Wróbel, Borys
    et al.
    Systems Modeling Laboratory, IO PAN, Sopot, Poland / Evolutionary Systems Laboratory, Uniwersytet im. Adama Mickiewicza, Poznan, Poland / Institut für Neuroinformatik, Universität & ETH Zürich, Switzerland.
    Joachimczak, Michal
    Systems Modeling Laboratory, IO PAN, Sopot, Poland.
    Montebelli, Alberto
    University of Skövde, School of Humanities and Informatics. University of Skövde, The Informatics Research Centre.
    Lowe, Robert
    University of Skövde, School of Humanities and Informatics. University of Skövde, The Informatics Research Centre.
    The Search for Beauty: Evolution of Minimal Cognition in an Animat Controlled by a Gene Regulatory Network and Powered by a Metabolic System2012In: From Animals to Animats 12: 12th International Conference on Simulation of Adaptive Behavior, SAB 2012, Odense, Denmark, August 27-30, 2012 / [ed] Tom Ziemke, Christian Balkenius, John Hallam, Berlin, Heidelberg: Springer Berlin/Heidelberg, 2012, p. 198-208Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    We have created a model of a hybrid system in which a gene regulatory network (GRN) controls the search for resources (fuel / food and water) necessary to allow an artificial metabolic system (simulated microbial fuel cell) to produce energy. We explore the behaviour of simple animats in a two-dimensional simulated environment requiring minimal cognition. In our system control evolves in a biologically-realistic manner under tight energy constraints. We use a model of GRN in which there is no limit on the size of the network, and the concentration of regulatory substances (transcriptional factors, TFs) change in a continuous fashion. Externally driven concentrations  of selected TFs provid the sensory information to the animat, while the concentration of selected internally produced TFs is interpreted as the signal for actuators. We use a genetic algorithm to obtain diverse evolved strategies in ecologically grounded animats with motivational autonomy, even though they lack a dedicated motivational circuit. There are three motivations (or drives) in the system: thirst, hunger, and reproduction. The animats need to search for food and water, but also to perform work. Because the value of such work is arbitrary (in the eye of the beholder), but affects the chances of reproduction, we suggest that the term beauty is more appropriate, and we name the task the Search for Beauty. The results obtained provide a step towards realizing a biologically realistic system with respect to: the way the control is exercised, the way it evolves, and the way the metabolism provides energy.

1 - 30 of 30
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