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  • 1.
    Boers, Börje
    University of Skövde, School of Business. University of Skövde, Enterprises for the Future.
    100 years and older: responsible ownership in long-lived family firms2019Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The purpose of this paper is to explore the implications of responsible ownership in long-lived family firms. Theoretically, the paper draws on responsible ownership. Responsible ownership is suggested as an alternative conceptualization of social responsible behavior in family firms. Empirically, the study draws on in depth case studies from Germany and Sweden. The study focuses on responsible ownership behavior towards two key stakeholders, i.e. employees and the home community. Thereby the study contributes to further the understanding of responsible ownership of family firms.

  • 2.
    Boers, Börje
    University of Skövde, School of Business. University of Skövde, Enterprises for the Future.
    Go East! How family businesses choose markets and entry modes when internationalising2016In: International Journal of Globalisation and Small Business, ISSN 1479-3059, E-ISSN 1479-3067, Vol. 8, no 4, p. 333-354Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This paper investigates the choices of foreign markets, international market selection (IMS), and the respective entry modes, entry mode selection (EMS), for family firms internationalisation by using in-depth case studies of two family-owned newspaper companies. These decisions are studied from the Uppsala-stage model perspective. The purpose is to understand how and why family firms choose IMS and EMS when internationalising from a risk perspective. This study shows that IMS and EMS can at times be the consequence of one decision which may be the result of opportunistic behaviour. The decision reflects the risk preferences of owning families when selecting markets and entry modes. The explored family firms use contrasting approaches as they choose IMS and EMS according to different logics. Psychic distance leads to certain international market selection, but there is not a given preference for low distance. Instead, the entry mode selection reflects the dominant risk perception of the owning families. A preference for direct entry modes corresponds to the owning families risk perception and need for control. Accordingly, IMS and EMS are two steps, but the order of these is not given, i.e. after an entry mode is chosen this may be applied irrespective of the market to be entered. Business model and acquisition are highlighted as alternative entry modes, giving control to family firms. Thereby, this study expands those prior and increases the understanding of the peculiarities of family firm internationalisation.

  • 3.
    Boers, Börje
    University of Skövde, School of Business. University of Skövde, Enterprises for the Future.
    Heteronormativity and the family firm: Will we ever see a queer family business?2017In: Gender and Family Entrepreneurship / [ed] João J. Ferreira, Vanessa Ratten, Veland Ramadani, Robert D. Hisrich, Leo-Paul Dana, London and New York: Routledge, 2017, 1, p. 171-182Chapter in book (Refereed)
  • 4.
    Boers, Börje
    University of Skövde, School of Business. University of Skövde, Enterprises for the Future.
    Internationalization of regional newspaper companies: two examples2015Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Newspaper companies and other media companies are under pressure as their traditional business model is challenged. Some companies try to compensate by entering new markets, i.e. to internationalize. This strategy increases their presence in old and new media markets and segments. This paper problematizes how two family owned newspaper companies internationalize from two perspectives, i.e. an ownership perspective and an industry perspective. Empirically, the paper draws on two examples of family owned newspaper companies. Semi-structured interviews with owners, managers and editors have been conducted domestically and in the respective foreign market. Archival data has been used to complement the interviews. Both companies started as regional newspaper companies and have reached leading positions in their distribution area. Whereas one company entered the Eastern European market in the 1990s the other company focused on domestic expansion and small scale, international joint ventures in the later 2000s. From an ownership perspective it becomes visible that the family owners are initiating and supporting the internationalization process. In one company, an owner manager was in charge for the internationalization process which can be seen as a success factor. In the other company, the owners were not actively involved which is reflected in the relatively poorer results. From a newspaper industry perspective the study shows that synergies are possible by syndication of content across languages within the same industry as well as business models (printing).These perspectives contribute to the developing body of literature in the field of media management on internationalization and ownership.

  • 5.
    Boers, Börje
    University of Skövde, School of Business. University of Skövde, Enterprises for the Future.
    Learning to professionalize: handling tensions in a family owned newspaper business2015Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This paper aims at understanding the professionalization process of a Swedish family owned newspaper from a generational perspective. Professionalization is a much debated topic within the family business field. Family ownership is still common in the Nordic countries.  But the consequences and implications are not well understood and despite its presence the issue of family ownership is rarely discussed in the academic field. Media studies discuss professionalization but mostly focusing on the journalistic profession. Ownership and ownership transition have only recently been discussed.

     Empirically, the paper draws on an in depth case study of a family owned newspaper company. Semi-structured interviews with owners, managers, board members, and editors have been conducted. The interviews were complemented with secondary material, e.g. annual reports and biographies. Four generations are discussed with regards to professionalization processes.  The study shows that competence and learning are factors influencing the professionalization process across generations.  Competence is divided into cultural and formal competence. Learning is categorized as experiential learning which increases over generations. Formal competence and structures become important, increasing the risk for alienation between the owners and the business.  Professionalization of ownership structures and roles has consequences for family, ownership and business. The paper contributes to the limited research on family ownership in media management research.

  • 6.
    Boers, Börje
    University of Skövde, School of Technology and Society. Jönköping International Business School.
    The codetermined family business: a paradox?2013Conference paper (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    This work in progress paper introduces codetermination as phenomenon to the family business field. The study aims at exploring the role of employee-representatives in boards of non-listed family businesses and thereby contributes to understanding ownership and governance processes in family businesses.

  • 7.
    Boers, Börje
    University of Skövde, School of Business. University of Skövde, Enterprises for the Future.
    The codetermined family business: a paradox?: Comparing cases from Sweden and Germany2019Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The purpose of this comparative case study is to understand codetermination in two family firms. Empirically, this study draws on an interpretive case study of two family businesses. Its findings extends earlier research, by exploring and introducing the phenomenon of codetermination in the family business literature. Theoretically, the study draws on the control-collaboration paradox which helps understanding the phenomenon of codetermination. Findings highlight the need for professional governance structures in order to facilitate cooperation between family owners, the management, and employee representatives.

  • 8.
    Boers, Börje
    et al.
    University of Skövde, School of Business. University of Skövde, Enterprises for the Future.
    Brozovic, Danilo
    University of Skövde, School of Business. University of Skövde, Enterprises for the Future.
    Work-family interface: coping strategies in growing family SMEs2019Conference paper (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    SMEs may be more vulnerable because of their limited resources (Falkner & Hiebl, 2015). SMEs’ success is often dependent on their owner managers, e.g. their attitude towards growth may differ substantively (Achtenhagen, Naldi, & Melin, 2010; Jaouen & Lasch, 2015). For instance, Davidsson argued that not all small firm owners are willing to grow because they, e.g., fear that growth will endanger employee well-being and the owners will lose control (Davidsson, 1989, 1991). The ability of owner managers to follow a growth strategy may in part also be dependent on how the owner manager is able to handle its life outside the business (Jennings & McDougald, 2007), e.g. the family embeddedness (Aldrich & Cliff, 2003).

    More recent research has called for studies investigating, e.g. the work–family (WF) interactions in businesses run by male and female entrepreneurs (Adkins, Samaras, Gilfillan, & McWee, 2013; Ahl, 2006). Extant research has started looking at motives and constrains of female entrepreneurs in regards to the work family interface (Adkins, et al., 2013; Ahl, 2006).

    Research on work family interface is, in line with other areas, dominated by studies investigating the US-context, disregarding other contexts (Shaffer, Joplin, & Hsu, 2011). More and more researchers have called for further research on the interface between family and work life (Jaskiewicz, Combs, Shanine, & Kacmar, 2017; Nguyen & Sawang, 2016; Powell & Eddleston, 2017; Powell, Greenhaus, Allen, & Johnson, 2018). Therefore, we offer a new angle by investigating male entrepreneurs who can be considered successful in a Swedish context. Success in this context refers to a sustainable growth strategy in regards to growing the business considerably in both turnover and number of employees over a period of five years.

     Purpose/topic of research

    The purpose of this study is to understand the work-family interface in small, growing family firms by answering the following research questions:

    Which coping strategies are used to address conflicts in the work family interface?How do these strategies support work/life –balance and how to do they influence firm growth?

    Research method

    The authors of this study conducted a research project on SMEs which, after a period of stable performance in terms of turnover and number of employees, grew with 50% in bother turnover and number of employees over a consecutive period of five years. The study was conducted in the southwest of Sweden.

    For this paper and purpose we selected three companies where the respondents had expressed that work-life-conflicts played a role for being able to focus on and execute a growth strategy.

    The figures concerning turnover and number of employees were taken from the publicly available annual reports. The collection of this data was executed in 2017 and included annual reports from 2000 to 2016.

    As part of the general study, the selected companies were interviewed. Before the interviews were conducted, the interviewees were contacted by email and afterwards by telephone. In this first telephone conversation, the general purpose of the study was explained. In the following face-to-face interviews the respondents, usually owner-managers, were interviewed, using a structured interview guideline. The guideline entailed open questions and scaled questions concerning reasons for growth, performance, change in ownership and management, entrepreneurial orientation, employee concerns, justice and equality.

     Theories used Coping strategies

    The literature has come up with plenty of coping strategies that deal with how individual deal with issues that bothers them. In this study we draw on research with a connection to entrepreneurship and growth (Jennings & McDougald, 2007).

     Coping has been defined in psychological terms by Lazarus and Folkman (1984) as “constantly changing cognitive and behavioral efforts to manage specific external and/or internal demands that are appraised as taxing”. Coping is expending conscious effort to solve personal and interpersonal problems, and seeking to master and minimize stress (Weiten & Lloyd, 2008). Psychological coping mechanisms are usually termed coping strategies or coping skills. Unconscious strategies are commonly excluded. The term coping generally refers to adaptive or constructive coping strategies. However, some coping strategies can also be considered maladaptive. Maladaptive coping can be described as non-coping. Furthermore, the term coping commonly refers to reactive coping. This contrasts with proactive coping, in which a coping response aims to head off a future stressor. Coping responses are partly controlled by personality, but also by the social context, particularly the stressful environment (Carver & Connor-Smith, 2010).

    On growth

    “Most firms start small, live small and die small” (Davidsson 2010, p. 23[BB1] ). Growth is not the norm, and the main reason that most firms do not grow is that they operate in mature industries and serves local markets (Davidsson 2010). For those firms that do grow the entrepreneur often plays an important role. Factors such as motivation, education, management experience, number of founders have been proven to influence growth in a positive direction. However, there is a lack of research regarding how different factors related to work-life balance affects firm growth.

    Growth is usually defined as an increase in the amount of some measurable outcome, e.g. sales or employment (Cyron & Zoellick, 2018)(Cyron & Zoellick 2018, Davidsson 2010).

     Contribution of research

    The research contributes insights on which and how male entrepreneurs use coping strategies to address conflicts in the work family interface.

    Findings reveal the complex role of family which can both be an origin but also a solution to these conflicts.

    The study further contributes to the ongoing debate concerning growth intension and growth ambition in the entrepreneurship literature. Especially in small family firms, growth is not only hindered by limited resources. At the same time, resources and obstacles for growth are complex.

  • 9.
    Boers, Börje
    et al.
    University of Skövde, School of Business. University of Skövde, Enterprises for the Future.
    Ljungkvist, Torbjörn
    University of Skövde, School of Business. University of Skövde, Enterprises for the Future.
    A founder's heritage: the development of organizational identity2019In: Journal of Small Business and Entrepreneurship, ISSN 0827-6331, E-ISSN 2169-2610, Vol. 31, no 1, p. 73-95Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The purpose of this paper is to understand how a former family firm strategically makes use of the founder's legacy to preserve its organizational identity. Following a single case study approach, it draws on rich empirical material from semi-structured interviews and extensive archival data. We show how central organizational activities are affected by a founder's heritage long after the formal exit has taken place, illustrating the central, enduring, and distinctive elements of organizational identity a founder has. Regardless of ownership forms, the family company founder's legacy is used to legitimize new owners and maintain the organization's identity. However, centripetal moves complicate the preservation of the organizational identity, whereas a high focus on value leveraging in another ownership form opens up for centrifugal approaches which strengthen the entrepreneurial dimension of organizational identity.

  • 10.
    Boers, Börje
    et al.
    University of Skövde, School of Business. University of Skövde, Enterprises for the Future.
    Ljungkvist, Torbjörn
    University of Skövde, School of Business. University of Skövde, Enterprises for the Future.
    A founder’s heritage: the development of psychological ownership2017Conference paper (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    ObjectivesIs a founder “leaving” an organization by selling it, or are there aspects of the founder left even though, the founder does not have a formal occupation or ownership in the organization?Will there be a legacy of the founder and how will this affect the psychological ownership? What is the founder’s heritage from a psychological ownership perspective?The purpose is to understand the consequences of a business sale of the founder and from a psychological ownership perspective.

    Prior WorkDrawing on the work of psychological ownership and founder heritage, the work combines important literatures to shed light on an important empirical phenomenon, i.e. the exit of a founder/entrepreneur and its consequences for the organization.

    ApproachThis study follows a single case study approach and draws on rich empirical material from semi-structured interviews and extensive archival data.

    ResultsWe show how central activities are affected by a founder’s heritage over long time after the formal exit has taken place. We illustrate the development of a founder’s psychological ownership before and after he has formally sold the legal ownership.

    Implications and ValueThe paper aims at contributing to the entrepreneurial and founder exit-literature by adding a process perspective. Unlike it is sometimes assumed in the entrepreneurship literature is an exit not necessarily a clear-cut and once and for all decision. The paper contributes also psychological ownership literature by highlighting its continuity after the formal sale of the legal ownership and its consequences for the organization.

  • 11.
    Boers, Börje
    et al.
    University of Skövde, School of Business. University of Skövde, Enterprises for the Future. CeFEO@JIBS.
    Ljungkvist, Torbjörn
    University of Skövde, School of Business. University of Skövde, Enterprises for the Future.
    Family business, resilience and regional culture: Examples from Sweden2014Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The present study examines two regions in the south west of Sweden. A number of factors which are of significant importance in creating resilient family businesses as well as regions are identified. The study is based on a literature investigation and on 60 interviews of leaders in business and communities. Thereby, the study contributes to the scarce literature on resilience in family businesses and the interdependence with regional culture. Resilience in this paper refers to a particular type of economic and structural crisis which has not been considered before. We highlight similarities and differences of two regions in Sweden which have distinct regional cultures. These cultures support the development of resiliency. However, owning families as facilitators for organizational resilience play the central role. Their closeness and involvement in the business allows them to act fast and take decisions quickly which makes them more resilient.

  • 12.
    Boers, Börje
    et al.
    University of Skövde, School of Business. University of Skövde, Enterprises for the Future.
    Ljungkvist, Torbjörn
    University of Skövde, School of Business. University of Skövde, Enterprises for the Future.
    Family businesses as venture capitalists: the exception that proves the rules?2016Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 13.
    Boers, Börje
    et al.
    University of Skövde, School of Business. University of Skövde, Enterprises for the Future.
    Ljungkvist, Torbjörn
    University of Skövde, School of Business. University of Skövde, Enterprises for the Future.
    Remembering the Founder in Times of Ownership and Leadership Changes2016In: RENT Proceedings 2016, Antwerp, 2016Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Objectives

    Is a founder “leaving” an organization by selling it, or are there aspects of the founder left even though, the founder does not have a formal occupation or ownership in the organization?

    What are the motives of a founder to sell his organization? Will there be a legacy of the founder and how will this affect the organization’s identity? By questioning ‘who were we?’ or ‘who have we been?’ the relevance of organizational history becomes apparent. But how does this work in practice when a founder is not any longer part of the dominant coalition of the organization?

    The purpose is to understand the heritage of a founder, and the consequences for the organizational identity when the founder exits.

    Prior Work

    Drawing on the work of entrepreneurial exit and organizational identity, including imprinting, the work combines important literatures to shed light on an important empirical phenomenon, i.e. the exit of a founder/entrepreneur.

     

    Approach

    This study follows a single case study approach and draws on rich empirical material from semi-structured interviews and extensive archival data.

     

    Results

    We show how central activities are affected by a founder’s heritage over long time after the formal exit has taken place. We illustrate this by analyzing the consequences of changes in ownership and leadership after the founder’s exit. The founder becomes an artefact which allows to signal continuity and discontinuity depending on the different owners’ perspectives.

     

    Implications and Value

    The paper aims at contributing to the entrepreneurial and founder exit-literature by adding a process perspective. Unlike it is sometimes assumed in the entrepreneurship literature is an exit not necessarily a clear-cut and once and for all decision. The paper contributes also to the organizational identity literature by highlighting the central role a founder can have for an organization.

  • 14.
    Boers, Börje
    et al.
    University of Skövde, School of Business. University of Skövde, Enterprises for the Future.
    Ljungkvist, Torbjörn
    University of Skövde, School of Business. University of Skövde, Enterprises for the Future.
    Brunninge, Olof
    University of Jönköping.
    Giving Up The Family Name While Staying A Family Business: The Family Business As Acquirer2018Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 15.
    Boers, Börje
    et al.
    University of Skövde, School of Business. University of Skövde, Enterprises for the Future.
    Ljungkvist, Torbjörn
    University of Skövde, School of Business. University of Skövde, Enterprises for the Future.
    Brunninge, Olof
    Jönköping International Business School, Sweden.
    Nordqvist, Mattias
    Jönköping International Business School, Sweden.
    Going private: A socioemotional wealth perspective on why family controlled companies decide to leave the stock-exchange2017In: The Journal of Family Business Strategy, ISSN 1877-8585, E-ISSN 1877-8593, Vol. 8, no 2, p. 74-86Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Our purpose is to understand the process of ‘going private’ decisions in family firms by applying a socioemotional wealth (SEW) perspective, specified in the following research questions: how do socioemotional wealth considerations influence owning families’ decisions to delist their publicly-listed companies? How do socioemotional wealth considerations change after the delisting of a firm? Based on case studies of two family firms, we elaborate upon the balancing of socioemotional and financial wealth considerations by the family owners, the assessment of which changes over time. Ultimately, we propose that the experiences from being listed can lead to the reevaluation of financial, as well as socioemotional, wealth considerations. By delisting, the companies reclaim independence and control, and the identity as a private family-owned firm becomes once again pronounced. We develop the SEW-perspective by viewing the decision to delist as a mixed gamble, in that owning families have to weigh personal and financial losses against SEW gains, thereby indicating how SEW-considerations change over time. We find that owning families are willing to sacrifice current SEW, accepting current financial losses for prospective increased SEW. Additionally, in this study we extend the argument that decisions to leave the stock market are tradeoffs between competing factors.

  • 16.
    Boers, Börje
    et al.
    University of Skövde, School of Business. University of Skövde, Enterprises for the Future.
    Ljungkvist, Torbjörn
    University of Skövde, School of Business. University of Skövde, Enterprises for the Future.
    Brunninge, Olof
    Jönköping International Business School, Sweden.
    Nordqvist, Mattias
    Jönköping International Business School, Sweden.
    Going private: Why family controlled, publicly-listed companies decide to leave the stock-exchange2015Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 17.
    Boers, Börje
    et al.
    University of Skövde, School of Business. University of Skövde, Enterprises for the Future.
    Melin, Leif
    Jönköping International Business School.
    Family business: A duality perspective on organizational identity in family businesses2015In: Proceedings IFERA 2015, Hamburg: Hamburg Institute of Family Owned Business , 2015, p. 107-Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Organizational identity has become a popular topic in family business research. Yet, there is little research accounting for the peculiarities of family businesses. Organizational identity research is dominated by the view of Albert and Whetten (1985) and the question of what organizational identity is. Little attention has been devoted to understand how organizational identity is constructed in family businesses. We draw on case studies and use a dualities perspective. This perspective builds on three dualities which are common to family businesses, i.e. formality-informality, independence-dependence, and historical paths-new paths.

  • 18.
    Boers, Qiuhong
    et al.
    University of Skövde, School of Business.
    Boers, Börje
    University of Skövde, School of Business. University of Skövde, Enterprises for the Future.
    The Construction of a Professional Identity of a Female Entrepreneur2018In: Knowledge, Learning and Innovation: Research Insights on Cross-Sector Collaborations / [ed] Vanessa Ratten, Vitor Braga, Carla Susana Marques, Cham: Springer, 2018, p. 113-122Chapter in book (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    The construction of professional identity of an entrepreneur involves many factors. In this chapter, the case study of a Chinese female immigrant entrepreneur in Sweden illustrates the complexity of professional identity which intertwines with the gender identity and the cultural identity in all levels from personal, professional and socio-cultural. The methods of participant observation and discourse analysis are used. The results reflect the impacts of gender and culture factors in the construction and communication of professional identity, which can contribute to the integration process of Chinese immigrants in Sweden.

  • 19.
    Evansluong, Quang
    et al.
    Lund University School of Economics and Management.
    Boers, Börje
    University of Skövde, School of Business. University of Skövde, Enterprises for the Future.
    Ljungkvist, Torbjörn
    University of Skövde, School of Business. University of Skövde, Enterprises for the Future.
    Ujvari, Sandor
    University of Skövde, School of Business. University of Skövde, Enterprises for the Future.
    The family influences of EO development in immigrant family businesses2018In: Sustainable entrepreneurship: A win-win strategy for the future, Toledo, 2018Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This paper explores how family influences the entrepreneurial orientation (EO) process in immigrant family business. To fulfill the purpose, we employ inductive multiple case studies with in-depth interviews.  We rely on seven cases of immigrant entrepreneurs of Chinese, Icelandic, Turkish, Cameroonian, Mexican and Lebanese who established firms in Sweden. Our results suggest that EO development trajectories vary in regard to first and second immigrant entrepreneurs, low and high-tech sectors and host and home countries. Thus, family dynamics facilitates the development of entrepreneurial orientation over time through transforming, translating and transferring across generations and contexts. Our study indicates that, through family dynamics, EO is developed as a (1) transferring process of the founders’ proactiveness between the family in the home and host country; (2) translating process of risk-taking between the family companies in the home country to immigrant family company in the host country and (3) transforming process of innovativeness between the home and the host country.

  • 20.
    Henschel, Thomas
    et al.
    Hochschule für Technik und Wirtschaft Berlin, Berlin, Germany.
    Boers, Börje
    University of Skövde, School of Business. University of Skövde, Enterprises for the Future.
    A necessary evil or useful tool?: Crisis management in family firms2019Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The aim of this paper is to explore and understand how family firms manage a crisis by applying a processual perspective.  Our objective is to find out how crisis management is approached by family firms in Sweden, Scotland, and Germany. Further, we aim to examine the role of the owning family in creating and solving a crisis in family firms. Finally, we will provide recommendations on how family firms can improve their crisis management practices.

  • 21.
    Ljungkvist, Torbjörn
    et al.
    University of Skövde, School of Business. University of Skövde, Enterprises for the Future.
    Boers, Börje
    University of Skövde, School of Business. University of Skövde, Enterprises for the Future.
    A theory of venture capital family business (VCFB): professionalization trajectories2019Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Venture capital as well as family firms are very heterogeneous populations of firms. Extant literature has studied the interaction and connection between the groups of firms. However, only recently, researcher began to look at those firms which are part of both group at the same. Firms which are labeled venture capital family businesses (VCFB) (Ljungkvist & Boers, 2017). Recent research suggests that the interaction of family firms and VC firms can be distinguished into three separate phases (Schickinger, et al., 2018). Based on these phases, the paper develops propositions on how VCFB firms develop their professionalization trajectories in these phases. Thus, the presented propositions highlight how the family owners’ actions and behavior are related to professionalism and how it influences the three phases of investing.

  • 22.
    Ljungkvist, Torbjörn
    et al.
    University of Skövde, School of Business. University of Skövde, Enterprises for the Future.
    Boers, Börje
    University of Skövde, School of Business. University of Skövde, Enterprises for the Future. Witten Institute for Family Business, Universität Witten/Herdecke, Witten, Germany.
    Another hybrid?: Family businesses as venture capitalists2017In: Journal of Family Business Management, ISSN 2043-6238, E-ISSN 2043-6246, Vol. 7, no 3, p. 329-350Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Purpose – This paper addresses the phenomenon of venture capital firms which are also family businesses(VCFBs). The purpose of this paper is to explore and understand the phenomenon of VCFB by answering thefollowing questions: What are the features of professionalization in VCFBs? And, how do professionalizationand types of family businesses explain the strategies and governance of VCFBs?Design/methodology/approach – As an explorative case study, it maps the Swedish venture capital (VC)industry and compares two VCFBs and their business investments with regard to strategy and governance.Findings – By suggesting two major configurations, the study explains how family business developmentand levels of professionalization relate to differences in VCFBs’ strategies, which in turn, affect theirgovernance. The personal VCFB features active owners who personally take responsibility roles and stronglyfocus on customers and relationships. The administrative VCFB strongly focuses on predetermined financialmetrics, high ethical awareness among board members, and ongoing interplay between the active familyboard members and minority shareholders.Research limitations/implications – The study was conducted in Sweden and concerns Swedish VCFBs.The paper contributes to the literature by combining the two currently separate research streams, i.e. familybusiness and VC, highlighting the importance and consequences of family ownership in VC businesses.Practical implications – The present study provides stock market investors and stock analysts with adeeper understanding of VCFBs’ strategy incentives. By identifying the kind of VCFB and its relation tostrategy, more reasonable assessments and analyses of the VCFBs’ actions will be possible. Family firms willingto accept VC-finance should consider the type of VC and the potential consequences of family ownership.Originality/value – This study is the first to classify VC firms as family businesses. Moreover, it shows thefeatures of professionalization in VCFBs by suggesting a set of configurations.

  • 23.
    Ljungkvist, Torbjörn
    et al.
    University of Skövde, School of Business. University of Skövde, Enterprises for the Future.
    Boers, Börje
    University of Skövde, School of Business. University of Skövde, Enterprises for the Future.
    Resilience and family businesses and regional culture2014Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 24.
    Ljungkvist, Torbjörn
    et al.
    University of Skövde, School of Business. University of Skövde, Enterprises for the Future.
    Boers, Börje
    University of Skövde, School of Business. University of Skövde, Enterprises for the Future.
    Structural crisis? Regional culture and resilience in family business-dominated regions in Sweden2016In: Journal of Enterprising Communities: People and Places in the Global Economy, ISSN 1750-6204, E-ISSN 1750-6212, Vol. 10, no 4, p. 425-446Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    PurposeThe purpose of this study is to understand the interdependence between regional culture and resilience in family business-dominated regions.

    Design/methodology/approachThe study is based on a literature review and helps to fill the knowledge gap regarding regional culture and resilience in family business-dominated contexts.

    FindingsWe highlight similarities and differences between two regions of Sweden with distinct regional cultures that support resilience. A number of norms that are significant in generating resilient regions are identified. One key finding is that the regional culture developed during the proto-industrial era, in connection with home production, still affects and contributes to resilience in these family business-dominated regions.

    Research limitations/implicationsThe study is based on two case studies, so no generalizable conclusions can be drawn.

    Practical implicationsFor policy-makers, our study shows that structural crises can be overcome with a strong regional culture, as it can foster resilience. However, regional culture is hard to implement by political decisions. For owners and managers of organizations, our study suggests that it is essential to consider regional culture as an important factor for the organization.

    Originality/valueThis study draws on a comparison of two regions in Sweden with explicit regional cultures.

  • 25.
    Ljungkvist, Torbjörn
    et al.
    University of Skövde, School of Business. University of Skövde, Enterprises for the Future.
    Boers, Börje
    University of Skövde, School of Business. University of Skövde, Enterprises for the Future.
    Andersén, Jim
    University of Skövde, School of Business. University of Skövde, Enterprises for the Future.
    Nordqvist, Mattias
    Jönköping International Business School - JIBS .
    Rapid growth of founder-led companies: the role of resource orchestration2019Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Purpose – The purpose of this paper is to understand the role of resource orchestration in rapidly growing founder-led companies.  

    Design/methodology/approach – Based on a comparative case study of founder-led companies, the resource orchestration in a founder-led family firm is compared with a founder-led one. To comprehend the complexity of resource orchestration, a large amount of archival data and interviews are used. By using data derived from a period of ten years, the present study has a longitudinal approach.

    Findings – By uncovering the resource management process, the findings indicate a difference in focus between the founder-led family firm and the founder-led firm. The resource orchestration in the family firm focuses to a greater extent on the early stages of the resource management process, i.e. the recruitment of new staff, the incorporation and the control of “right” values and norms. On the other hand, the founder-led business puts a higher focus on performance metrics and the documented coordination of teams and customers. However, both companies rely largely on self-organizing teams. By revealing the management role in a dynamic industry, the present study criticizes and extends general findings of the resource orchestration literature. Moreover, it contributes to the organizational culture and firm growth entrepreneurship literature.      

    Practical implications – The study shows how founder-based companies can grow successfully in a dynamic environment. Furthermore, it reveals how software companies’ resources can be managed and bundled in a successful manner.

    Originality/value – the present study conveys fine-grained insights in complex management processes operating in a dynamic environment.

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