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  • 1.
    Andersson, Joacim
    et al.
    Department of Education, University of Uppsala, Uppsala, Sweden.
    Maivorsdotter, Ninitha
    University of Skövde, School of Health and Education. University of Skövde, Health and Education.
    The 'body pedagogics' of an elite footballer's career path - analysing Zlatan Ibrahimovic's biography2017In: Physical Education and Sport Pedagogy, ISSN 1740-8989, E-ISSN 1742-5786, Vol. 22, no 5, p. 502-517Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: Pedagogical research on career is encouraged to not limit sport learning to athletic skills, coaching effectiveness and coach–athlete relationships, but to also focus on learning in a multidimensional sense in the context of an athlete’s individual and social biography. This article examines an elite athlete’s career path as a body pedagogic phenomenon involving processes of self-transformation in relation to practical, social and embodied environments.

    Purpose: The purpose is to analyse the career path of the elite footballer Zlatan Ibrahimovic by focusing on how different learning environments relate to different embodiments of techniques and skills and how values and norms shape professionalism.

    Theoretical frameworks: A combined framework of body pedagogics and John Dewey’s theory of aesthetic experience is used to understand an elite career path as a learning trajectory involving different self-transformation means. Hence, the elite athlete is viewed as a career climber who creates his own educational pathway and engages in processes of participating, acquiring and becoming.

    Data analysis: A practical epistemology analysis (PEA) with a focus on aesthetic judgements is used to analyse the narrative of Zlatan’s career path as it is portrayed in the biography I Am Zlatan: My Story on and Off the Field. One major theme is identified, namely that Zlatan develops from being a dribbler to a striker. Against this background, Zlatan Ibrahomovic’s self-transformation is scrutinised in relation to three different sub-themes (suburb, arena and team) in three different ways (auto-didactic, education and educator) to create distinct and heterogeneous forms of knowledge in support of professional artistry.

    Results: The analysis offers an elaborated empirical description of how the means and ends of self-transformation develop reciprocally throughout Zlatan’s elite career and how this relates to practical, social and embodied environments. Examples of body pedagogic outcomes are: (1) different commitments to training, team culture and the coach–athlete relationship (social), (2) that Zlatan uses his dribbling skills more purposefully for scoring goals and satisfying the coach (embodied) and (3) that he is able to win different leagues and titles with different teams (practical).

  • 2.
    Barker, Dean
    et al.
    University of Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Nielsen, Jacob
    University of Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Wahlström, Martin
    University of Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Barker-Ruchti, Natalie
    University of Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Carlén, Urban
    University of West, Sweden.
    Maivorsdotter, Ninitha
    University of Skövde, School of Health and Education. University of Skövde, Health and Education.
    Jacob and Martin: Developing digital technology competence in physical education teacher education2017In: Digital technologies and learning in physical education: Pedagogical cases / [ed] Ashley Casey, Victoria A. Goodyear, Kathleen M. Armour, London: Routledge, 2017, p. 231-246Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 3.
    Brolin, Magnus
    et al.
    School of Health and Medical Sciences, Örebro University.
    Quennerstedt, Mikael
    School of Health and Medical Sciences, Örebro University.
    Maivorsdotter, Ninitha
    University of Skövde, School of Health and Education. University of Skövde, Health and Education.
    Casey, Ashley
    School of Sport, Exercise and Health Sciences, Loughborough University, UK.
    A salutogenic strengths-based approach in practice: an illustration from a school in Sweden2018In: Curriculum Studies in Health and Physical Education, ISSN 2574-2981, Vol. 9, no 3, p. 237-252Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Despite an extensive debate and an openness of teachers to a strength-based approach to health and physical education, it is not always clear what a salutogenic strengths-based approach might look like in practice, at least not in the day-to-day work in schools. The purpose of this article is to present a salutogenic strengths-based school initiative in Sweden and to identify health discourses in the school’s practice. An insider perspective is used to explore health in the school through Brook field’s four lenses fo exploring one’s own teaching practice. Two health discourses are identified: (1) an individual health discourse rooted in the fostering of personal development, and (2) a value-based health discourse build up around social relations and the fostering of democratic values. The individual health discourse can be understood as based in a pathogenic norm, and in the investigated school practice the individual health discourse dominated the school health initiative despite the salutogenic intentions.

  • 4.
    Caldeborg, Annica
    et al.
    School of Health Science, Örebro University, Örebro, Sweden.
    Maivorsdotter, Ninitha
    University of Skövde, School of Health and Education. University of Skövde, Health and Education.
    Öhman, Marie
    School of Health Science, Örebro University, Örebro, Sweden.
    Touching the didactic contract: a student perspective on intergenerational touch in PE2019In: Sport, Education and Society, ISSN 1357-3322, E-ISSN 1470-1243, Vol. 24, no 3, p. 256-268Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    A growing anxiety around intergenerational touch in educational settings has both emerged and increased in recent years. Previous research reveals that Physical Education (PE) teachers have become more cautious in their approaches to students and they avoid physical contact or other behavior that could be regarded as suspicious [Fletcher, 2013. Touching practice and physical education: Deconstruction of a contemporary moral panic. Sport, Education and Society, 18(5), 694–709. doi:10.1080/ 13573322.2013.774272; Öhman, 2016. Losing touch—teachers’ selfregulation in physical education. European Physical Education Review, 1–14. doi:10.1177/1356336X15622159; Piper, Garratt, & Taylor, 2013. Child abuse, child protection and defensive ‘touch’ in PE teaching and sports coaching. Sport, Education and Society, 18(5), 583–598. doi:10.1080/13573322.2012.735653]. Some also feel anxious about how physical contact might be perceived by the students. The purpose of this article is to investigate physical contact between teachers and students in PE from a student perspective. This is understood through the didactic contract. For this purpose, focus group interviews using photo elicitation have been conducted with upper secondary school students in Sweden. One of the major findings is that intergenerational touch is purpose bound, that is, physical contact is considered relevant if the teacher has a good intention with using physical contact. The main agreements regarding physical contact as purpose bound are the practical learning and emotional aspects, such as learning new techniques, preventing injury, closeness and encouragement. The didactic contract is in these aspects stable and obvious. The main disagreements are when teachers interfere when the students want to feel capable or when teachers interfere when physical contact is not required in the activity. In these aspects the didactic contract is easily breached. It is also evident that personal preference has an impact on how physical contact is perceived. In conclusion, we can say that physical contact in PE is not a question of appropriate or inappropriate touch in general, but rather an agreement between the people involved about what is expected. Consequently, we should not ban intergenerational touch, but rather focus on teachers’ abilities to deal professionally with the didactic contract regarding physical contact.

  • 5.
    Carlén, Urban
    et al.
    Department of Social and Behavioural Studies, University West, Trollhättan, Sweden.
    Maivorsdotter, Ninitha
    University of Skövde, School of Health and Education. University of Skövde, Health and Education.
    Exploring the role of digital tools in running: The meaning-making of user-generated data in a social networking site2016In: Qualitative Research in Sport, Exercise and Health, ISSN 2159-676X, E-ISSN 2159-6778, Vol. 9, no 1, p. 18-32Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The aim of the study is to examine how runners make meaning of digital tools in the dialogues published on a social networking site (SNS) created by and for runners who choose to run alone. The study explores the digital data generated by the runners using global positioning systems, such as how many kilometres have been covered, the average pace, the geographical location, the total climb, health information related to pulse rate and the number of calories burned. Some runners share this kind of data when publishing postings on the SNS. The empirical data consists of published postings of visual graphs and photographs with comments in threads retrieved from the online archives. A transactional approach and practical epistemology analysis are employed to focus on and analyse the meaning-making processes that are located in the social practices that the runners create when participating online. The participants make meaning of digital tools (such as sport watches and associated apps) by: (1) sharing details about their running performances, (2) signalling their presence in the social network of lone runners and (3) planning running events. Digital information is primarily used to reinforce the runners’ identity formation. The meaning-making of digital tools thus becomes a way of highlighting an individual’s social affinity to a runners’ collective. Surprisingly, lone runners do not use the performance-related feedback and health information offered by the digital tools to enhance their running progress when participating in the SNS.

  • 6.
    Carlén, Urban
    et al.
    University West, Trollhättan, Sweden.
    Maivorsdotter, Ninitha
    University of Skövde, School of Health and Education. University of Skövde, Health and Education.
    Understanding athletes' online participation: A ticket to qualitative research on online arenas2018In: Digital qualitative research in sport and physical activity / [ed] Andrea Bundon, London: Routledge, 2018, p. 59-79Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 7.
    Hammerin, Zofia
    et al.
    University of Skövde, School of Health and Education.
    Andersson, Erik
    Örebro University, School of Humanities, Education and Social Sciences, Örebro, Sweden.
    Maivorsdotter, Ninitha
    University of Skövde, School of Health and Education. University of Skövde, Health and Education.
    Exploring student participation in teaching: An aspect of student health in school2018In: International Journal of Educational Research, ISSN 0883-0355, E-ISSN 1873-538X, Vol. 92, p. 63-74Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The aim of the article is to contribute knowledge about student participation in teaching as an aspect of student health in school. Teaching is approached as an everyday democratic process that affects individual health, the health of a democratic society and young people's experiences and attitudes towards democracy. Interviews conducted with high-achieving girls experiencing school-related stress in a Swedish upper secondary school are analysed using the Student Participation in Teaching Model as a methodological framework. The results indicate that the students mainly experience participation as being informed and suggest other dimensions of participation, such as reciprocal responsibility and communication. It is concluded that the teaching itself is a vital dimension of individual and societal democratic health and that this should be emphasised more in teaching practice. © 2018 Elsevier Ltd

  • 8.
    Hofverberg, Hanna
    et al.
    Department of Education, Uppsala University, Uppsala, Sweden.
    Maivorsdotter, Ninitha
    University of Skövde, School of Health and Education. University of Skövde, Health and Education.
    Recycling, crafting and learning - an empirical analysis of how students learn with garments and textile refuse in a school remake project2018In: Environmental Education Research, ISSN 1350-4622, E-ISSN 1469-5871, Vol. 24, no 6, p. 775-790Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 9.
    Maivorsdotter, Ninitha
    et al.
    University of Skövde, School of Health and Education. University of Skövde, Health and Education.
    Lundvall, Suzanne
    The Swedish School of Sport and Health Sciences, Sweden.
    Quennerstedt, Mikael
    University of Örebro, Sweden.
    Being a competent athlete or a competent teacher?: Aesthetic experiences in physical education teacher education2014In: European Physical Education Review, ISSN 1356-336X, E-ISSN 1741-2749, Vol. 20, no 3, p. 407-422Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The aim of this study was to explore physical education teacher education students' meaning-making of participating in lessons - in this case gymnastics and basketball - based on their aesthetic judgements, expressed in written stories. A transactional approach, drawing on the work of John Dewey, was used in the study and the empirical data was generated through observations and collection of students' written stories. A practical epistemology analysis was used in order to explore the students' meaning-making in-depth. The purposes that the students ascribed to participating in the lessons were to develop both as athletes and as teachers. When analysing the stories, the importance of being a competent athlete emerged as the main purpose of participating in the lessons, and the majority of the students never included the purpose of developing as a teacher in their stories at all. By making the competent athlete the centre of their participation, other positions of participation were excluded or marginalized. However, even if all the students' stories contribute to the collective appropriation of the type, the majority did not include the projected, ideal type in all respects. In their stories, it was clear that many of the students expressed a tension between doing gymnastics or basketball within the context of competitive sport and doing the same activities within the context of physical education teacher education. Even if the students did not fulfil this awareness of contrasting ideals by undoing the competent athlete' completely, many of them did highlight the conflict.

  • 10.
    Maivorsdotter, Ninitha
    et al.
    University of Skövde, School of Health and Education. University of Skövde, Health and Education.
    Quennerstedt, Mikael
    Örebro University.
    Exploring gender habits: A practical epistemology analysis of exergaming in school2019In: European Physical Education Review, ISSN 1356-336X, E-ISSN 1741-2749, Vol. 25, no 4, p. 1176-1192Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Digitisation is an ongoing process in society as well as in physical education (PE) and research has identified digital technologies as a trend that influences the PE curriculum. A number of studies have explored the topic from different angles, although very few have empirically looked at the critical aspects of digitised PE in educational practice. This is particularly striking when it comes to issues of gender. Against this background, the aim of the paper is to explore gender habits in a digitised PE practice. A transactional approach, drawing on the work of the pragmatist feminist Shannon Sullivan, is used in the study. The data consists of video- and audio recordings of ongoing video gaming organised by the PE teacher. A practical epistemology analysis (PEA) is employed to explore the teenagers’ gender habits in depth. In the analysis, it is clear that the use of exergames in school reinforces traditional gender habits, rather than weakens them. This is particularly evident when the teenagers play in single sex groups. This is also the case when playing in mixed gender groups, although here some changes in gender habits can be identified. However, gender habits are not easily transformed and the findings support the argument that deliberate teaching is important when issues of gender are raised in practice.

  • 11.
    Quennerstedt, Mikael
    et al.
    Örebro University, Sweden.
    Maivorsdotter, Ninitha
    Örebro University, Sweden.
    The role of learning theory in learning to teach2017In: Routledge handbook of physical education pedagogies / [ed] Catherine D. Ennis, New York: Routledge, 2017, p. 417-427Chapter in book (Other academic)
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